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date (1903-05-11) newspaper_issue R. T. GiV-soo 



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Associated Press 



THE 




HEKAID. 



The Weather: 



FAIR MONDAY: TUESDAY 

SHOWERS IN WEST PORTION. 



THIRTY-THIRD YEAR. 



LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY, MONDAY, MAY 11, 1903. 



NUMBER 131. 



SAFE 



BEHIND BARS 



Curtis Jett Arrest- 
ed by Posse. 

SIBIHITTED PEACEFULLY 



Arriving al 3 A. M. Officers 
Found Him in Bed. 



HE HAH DRIVEN HIS STEP- 
FATHER FROM HOME SAT- 
URDAY NIGHT. 



Visited In Jail By a Herald Reporter, 
He Declined To Discuss the Mar- 
cum Killing — Threats Made 
Against His Uncle. 



(From a Staff Corrcspouclcnt.) 

WTNCIIICSTKR. Kv., May 10.— (Spe- 
cial.) —Curtis Jett, charged with the 
murder of James B. Marcum, was cap- 
tured this morning shortly after three 
o’clock at his mother’s home in Mad- 
ison county, near the Kentucky river, 
by Slieriff Woodson McCord, Deputy 
Sheriff J. T. Stokely, of this county, 
and a posse of six men. and now oc- 
cunics a coll in the Clark county jail. 

Jett made no attempt to resist ar- 
rest, although ho bad a big gun un- 
der his pillow and inside the house 
luul every advantage of the offleers. 
Sheriff McCord and Deputy Sheriff 
Stokely approached the house, leaving 
the rest of the nnrty stationed In 
places of advantag- n the yard. After 
a Ilitlo delay they secured admission 
to the house and fpund Jett in bed. 
rie was In bed aiink^iicn informed of 
the mission of the ^^icers quietly sub- 
mitted. ^ 

No Show Arms. 

Sheriff McCord und Deputy Stokely 
went about the o.rcst very quietly 
and without any ^^m play. They are 
known as ^earlcs^. and able officers 
and have never failed to get the man 
thev went after. In all their career 
they have never used their guns in 
arresting a man. believing that the 
more quiet mclhods are the better. 

The Sheriff and his posse, with 
Jett, returned to Winchester about 
half past ftvo o'clock and Jett was 
placed in the county jail, where your 
coi respondent saw him this afternoon. 
Jett was fairly communicative when 
qiiestioneti In regard to all matters ex- 
cept the question most interesting — 
the assassination of J. B. Marcum. 
When the assassination was mention- 
cmI ho grew sullen and parried every 
question. 

One nucstlon that is agitating the 
minds of Winchester citizens is, now 
that Jett is in custody, what will be 
done with him. They believe that If 
he is taken to the Jackson jail ho 
w'ill escape and it is said that an cf- 
fuiT uiay be niade to keep him in 
Winchester for some time at least. 

The warrant for Jell's arrest was 
issued by Police Judge Pendleton up- 
on an allldavlt sworn to by Sam Jett, 
charging him with the murder of 
James B. Marcum. The warrant was 
issued when it was lamed that Tom 
(’ockrcll could not reach Winchester 
last night with the warrant sworn out 
al Lexington. The now warrant was 
placed in the hands of Sheriff McCord 
and ho immediately prepared to 
serve It. Jett had come down from 
Jackson to Winchester Saturday af- 
ternoon and had gone to his mother’s 
homo in the upper end of Madison 
county abotit six o’clock. To Sheriff 
McCord hg^ said that his mother had 

■■■■ 111 I 



been ill with rheumatism and had 
asked him to pay her a visit. 

The Trip to Jackson’s Ferry. 

Sheriff McCord, together with Dep- 
uty Stokely. 8o m secured a posse, a 
minjher of young men volunteering to 
go with them. In the party were 
.Messrs. W. A. Adams, C. D. Hoskins, 
Charles Derrickson, June Hunter, H. 
W. Scrivener and H. B. Scrivener. 
Mr. Adams was in his youth a neigh- 
bor of JcU and went as a pilot. 

Jett’s father. Hiram Jett, a well-to 
do citizen of Winchester, died in Sep- 
tember. 189J. and his mother after- 
wards married a man by the name ol 
Hagins. They live in Madison coun- 
ty. about two miles from .I^ackson's 
Ferrv and about twelve miles from 
Winchester. 

Sheriff McCord and his posse left 
Winclioslor In four buggies shortly 
after midnight and drove to Jackson’s 
Ferry, ten miles distant. All w'ere 
well supplied with pistols, for they 
did not know what kind of a reception 
they would receive. They arrived at 
Jackson’s Ferry about 2:30 a. m. and 
left ihoir horses and buggies, the road 
to Mrs. Hagins’ home being far out 
of the way and very inconveniently 
reached. They were rowed across the 
Kentucky river in boats and then 
took up their two-mile tramp to Mrs. 
Hagins’ home. The country in the 
upper end of Madison county along 
the Kentucky river cliffs is very 
rough. Great hills and cliffs shoot up 
to give wav soon tp deep ravines and 
low, damp valleys. Through this coun- 
try the posse was compelled to walk. 
They waded through the meadows 
knee deep with wet grass and climb- 
ed steep hills until they reached the 
road leading to the Hagins’ home. 

Arrival At the Home. 

It was three o’clock when the par- 
ty reached the house. Mr. Adams 
had proved a good pilot and had 
brought them to their destination in 
fast time. Sheriff McCord decided 
to lake Deputy Stokely and go to 
the house. The other members of 
the party were told to secure places 
of advantage around the yard, so that 
if Jett tried to escape they might in- 
tercept him. The Members of Ute 
p osse tell a numbe' of amusing sto- 
ries of what kappe m ■! while they 
wore taking their st i-J'ms. r^.-»ItiouK 
behind the trees werA secured, and 
from behind these the meml)ers ol 
the posse rested their guns on some 
limb. One member (^f the posse 
climbed an apple tree. Irom which he^ 
had a full view of what was taking 
place inside the house. 

Mrs. Hagins Answered Knock. 

When the posse had been placed. 
Sheriff McCord and Deputy Stokely 
approached the house and knocked at 
the front door. Mrs. Hagins answer- 
ed the knock and was asked by Dep 
iity Stokely if her husband was at 
home. She said that he was not. He 
then asked if Curt Jett was there. 
For a moment she hesitated and then 
admitted that he was. She was told 
that they wanted to see hitn and sh**" 
re-entered the house, and after a 
short delay returned. Then It was 
that the officers told her who they 
were. She directed them to go to the 
rear of the house, saying that she 
would let them in by, the roar door. 

When the officers first entered the 
yard they saw a light burning in a 
rear room. When they reached the 
rear of the house there was no light 
In the room. This made the officers 
somewhat suspicious and they hesi- 
tated on the door step. Finally the 
light reappeared and the door was 
opened. An unknown man was stand 
ing in the shadow and the officers 
eyed him closely. 

V/hon the officers entered the room 
they found Jolt in bed. He had only 
his night clothes on and was leaning 
on his elbow., Underneath his pillow 
the officers saw the handle of his big 
pistol. 

A Pleasant Greeting. 

"Hello Curt," said Sheriff McCord, 
walking to his bed and taking his 
hand. "I have a warrant for your 
arrest." 

Jett did not move and di.splayed 
no surprise or emotion. "All right 
Woods.” ho said; "I will submit to 




CLfRTIG JETT* 



you; you won’t have any trouble with 
tie. All I want is to bo treated right 
ind protected.” 

Sheriff McCord assured him that 
he would l)e perfectly safe in his 
hands, and then read the warrant to 
’lim, in which he is charged with the 
murder of James B. Marcum. Jetf 
lever said a word, but his mother 
•.aid : i don,^t believe C»;ri did it.” 
Gave Gun To Motbe. 

Curt then dres. ' d and prebarod i‘  
;o with The officers. Pie took liis 
;un from under his nlllow and gave 
t to his mother, requesting her to 
keep it safe for l(im. Deputy Stokely, 
)Ut of curiosity, asked to see the 
•;un that is alleged to have playeil so 
mportant a part in the late history 
)f Breathitt county. Jott shook his 
head and laughingly said: ‘'Oh, you 
don’t want to see it." 

All the time the officers w’ere In 
he room and while Jett was dressing 
'hey say they were expecting to be 
dred on at any moment. The unknown 
man who had opened the door for 
them had come into the room and 
jtood so as to flank them. The d»x)r 
0 a room opening into Jett’s room 
was slightly ajar and seemed to be 
□eld by some person who was peer- 
ing through the two-inch crack. This 
nade the officers feel very uncomfori- 
vble, but no effort to interfere with 
hem was made. 

Ran Step-Father From Home. 

It is charged that Jett was drinking 
when he was in Winchester Saturday 
ifternoon and when he reached his 
nother’s home he had imbib' d from 
!he jug which he carried. There he 
had some difficulty with his sfep- 
ather, Mr. Hagins, and. the laib r 
:Iaims, ran him away from home at 
ho point of his revolver. Mr. Hagins 
vent to Richmond, where ho swore 
)iit a warrant for Jett’.s arrest on the 
charge of assault with a pistol. 



I that thep were officers from Rioh- 
! mond to arrest him for driving his 
step-father from home. 

I Silent As Tc T."^qedy. 

I On the wap to Winchester. Sheriff 
j McCoid tried every mcanp in his 
J power to tret Jett to talk almut Mar- 
‘ corn’s aspass’nation, was hut was mi- 
Hucceasful. He w. .' jL^r|y commqnl- 
l -.A'Ivi about tilings tlrat. did not »  m- 
j cv the .t^sassinatUui of Marcum, 
t Imt wlieii . '.at t'^mc was mentioned 
ji: - became rcticon*. 
f Ho was very Utter in his talk 
j against riani .leit, his tinclo, and refer- 
! red to him sarcastically as "his own 
uncle in blood," putting emphasis on 
"blood." He said that when he got 
out of Jail he would give Sam Jett 
a sound beating; that he did not want 
to kill him. but would club him. Sher- 
iff McGoinI asked him about his ability 
as a marksman. 

"Oh. I can kill a squirrel," replied 
Jotl. 

"With a pistol?" 

"No." repHed Jett, with a grim 
smile, ‘‘with a shotgun." 

In appearance. Jolt is about five 
I feet eight inche;^ tall, weighs about 
\'}7i pounds and i.s siockily built. His 
j features arc sharp and seem to indi- 
j cate shrewdness. His head is cov- 
! cred with a heavy suit of brownish- 
' red hair. Hi:^ eyes arc small, al- 
' moiul shaped and piercing. 

I Vititeri l;-i Jail. 

, When seen al the jail yesterday by 
;a Herald correspondent, in company 
I with Sheriff McCord and Deputy 
J Stokely, he was lying on the cot in 
j his narrow cell and said that he had 
I just been sU-eping. Jett was dressed 
; in a dark coften sfti^t. v.ith rough cor- 
duroy trouscis. His shoes were 
lieavy. Jett savs that he Is twenty- 
oighi years old. but he does not look 
to be more than twenty-iwo. and in 
111!:' respect Ihe pici ire of liim with 



( 



Gemeiil Paving Bnaianienn 

F. T. JUSTICE & CO. Phones 252-638 




copyRtCnT 



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Safety Vault Co., in its Savings De 
partmont, offers you a way. Its finan- 
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officers are always happy to welcome 
new depositors. 

JI.OO Starts an Account. 

3 Per Cent Interest Paid. 

Over {1,150,000 Security, 



THE SECIRITY TRIST & SAFETY VAULT tO. 



SAVINGS DEPARTMENT. 



By the time the officers arrived Jett 
lad slep! off the effects of the whisky 
\nd desired nuire. His mother pro- 
ested, begging him not to lM*ron 
Irinking again. He’ insisted, however, 
tnd she secured a bottle, which lie 
Tiled froH‘ the lug he had. Fb'  lrank 
)f the whisky on his way to town. 

The officers believe that a nnml er 
»f things contrilmted to the easy 
ure of .leu. They think he was .sur- 
)rised. although ho did not .show it. 
They also think that their manner (.f 
ipproaching him had a great deal t(» 
lo with the capttne. If they had 
;oue in with their giitvs vlrawii they 
believe that Jett would have iminedi- 
\tcly shown fight, .left had everv ad- 
vantage. ami it is almost certain thai 
f a fight had Ineu precipitated 
)f the participants would hav*- be n, 
vllled or injured. The f)fflcen'. a!:" 
itelieve that at first Jolt -nspectid 



his gtin in liis hand does him an In- 
jusilci-. Xevcrfheh'ss, he seems to 
be protJd of the plctnw* and last night 
when the officers entered his room 
they foend a copy of it on the table. 
A.«iile from making J tf look older 
tlian he is. the piciures ptiblished are 
c\re!lent llklifesses. 

He complained of sickness at the 
stomach as a result of drink. He al- 
sej cfunplained of the slump of a fin- 
g'^r that had heei: hur; In a saw mill 
and hfd lu • n .irfiputhied. was paining 
him and a^kt'd for a physician to 
liress it. The finger was mashed In 
the saw mill i f the Kentucky Lum- 
b('r and V« neerlng I’mupany at Rldg- 
wood. and Jett said thni lie now has 
a .suit lor $d.d00 pending against the 
rom]*any. 

Wants To Be Tried l.i Jackson. 

I In n'sponsf to qiieBtions,  Jett said 
I that h«- would like ro b^* taken to Jack- 



son immediately, hut added tl/at ’ ho 
was in charge of Sheriff MeCt^d. At 
the mention of the name of hjis uncle, 
Sam Jett, he said that he wlould like 
to see him, adding sarcasti ^illy, "One 
ought to like his blood relat^^ious." He 
denied that he had run !'•« step- 
father away from his home, nd said 
that the report was altogeth false. 
In response to another quesii'Mi, he 
said that he had been at "outj / with 
County Judge Hargis for mortmy^; 
six mouths — since the time 
Hargis sent him to jail under Ja $5.- 
000 peace bond. Ho said: ”1/ Ivroke 
into jail and I broke out." .'/- tt was 
never rearrested after he had’ broken 
jail. 

He became Irritated when a inumb^ 
of persons crow'dod round his ('Til and 
said that he was no "side showk ’ He 
also complained that the acconimoda- 
tioiis at the Jail did not suit lijiV. 

"What Do You Care?" 

"Wliere w'cre you when Mntreum 
was killed?" was the first qiu.it ion 
asked him In regard to the assas’ctna- 
tion. 

Immediately his expression w’tts 
changed. He grew sullen, his oyAs 
flashed and he blurted out, "What dJ  
you care?" 

Other questions bearing on the a.- j 
sassination were asked, and to all tjff 
thorn he maintained a sullen silcnc^j^ 
He was asked If he had hoard IhitJ 
witnesses would sw'ear that they Si \y 
him enter the court house just bcfoiy 
Marcum was shot and Icavo just aftf/r 
he was shot. To this, as to all simihVr 
questions, he maintained the sam 
sullen silence. One visitor to his ce**'] 
earlier in the dav met with a sharp/ 
rebuff. He asked Jett whai he knew? 
in regard to the murder of MarcirnJ 
and Joti replied: "I don't know a( 

damn thing about it and don’t care 
damn thing about it." 

Visited By Brother. 

Lalcr in the afternoon Sheriff 
Chord took Dr. R. B. Ishmael to he 
cell and the latter dressed Jett's fin- 
ger. Sheriff McChord then askC'J Jett 
if he would like lo see his brother. 
William Jett, a merchant of Fteckner- 
ville, who was in Winchester. He re- 
plied that he would and his ktrother 
was brought in. They did nor shake 
hands. *'nrt Jett called hi- trother 
■ l^ncU' Tom,” a::d after u - y -vords, 
asked for a private converse’ . »n with 
him. This was granted and t'..ey w-ere 
closeted for some time. It alleged 
that Will Jett was driven fkoM Jack- 
son by the Hargis faction.' 

Winchester people give Cu' Jett a 
had reputation. They say h as been 
wild from youth, and at or / time ho 
shot ii negro youth after a ti i\ .al quar- 
rel with him. He is regarded hero as 
a dangerous man. He has never been 
arrested for the murder of any one 
before this lime. 

A Serious Boast. 

Sheriff McChord this afternoon said 
that some time last summer shortly 
after the assassination of James Cock- 
rell. he met Jett in Winchester. Jett 
addressed him as "The Sheriff of 
(’lark county." Sheriff McChord re- 
plied with "Hello, Deputy Sheriff of 
Breathitt county." 

"Ah. by God." responded Jett with 
an air of bravado. “Ed Callahan won’t 
have a deputy that is not a murderer." 

An effort is to be made to keep Jett 
in jail at Winchester or take him to 
Lexington. It is not known as yet 
whether this can be legally done, but 
U is said that the effort will be made. 
Citizens of Winchester say that if 
JcU is returned to Breathitt county 
he will escape. They are anxious for 
a Special Judge. Special Common- 
wealth’s Attorney and several com- 
panies of State Guards to conduct the 
trial. This it is believed lo be neces- 
sary if any one is to be convicted for 
any of the assassinations that have 
taken place in Breathitt county. 

Demand Justice. 

Your correspondent saw Mr. Sam 
Jett at his home here today. Quite 
a nuniher of ('oekrell sympathizers 
were at his home. Tom Cockrell 
came over from Lexington on the 12 
o’clock C. & O. train. His brother. 
McKinley Cockrell, Brack Cox, a 
brother of Dr. Cox. who was assassi- 
nated. and William Jett were pres- 
ent. Mr. Jett was asked what steps 
be would take to have Jett indicted 
and tried, and replied that everything 
was in the hands of the officers and 
that he only desired that justice be 
done. 



‘^hree of our friends," said ho, 
"have been shot down within the last 
two years and no one has ever been 
punished for it. What we want is jus- 
tice and a fair trial, and wo will ad- 
duce testimony that will convict Curt 
Jett. Witnesses arc ready to return 
at any moment to testify. I would not 
have any innocent person punished, 
but I do believe that the guilty should 
be punished." 

Mr. Jett said that he believed Curt 
Jett would escape If he was taken to 
Jackson, but would not indicate what 
steps could be taken to keej) Jett at 
Winchester. Tom Cockrell, who was 
present, said that Jett would never 
return lo Jackson. 

Will Be Arraigned Tuesday. 

Sheriff McChord’ said that ho was 
anxious to keep Jett at Winchester, 
but that he believed that the law re- 
quired him to deliver the prisoner to 
the authorities of Breathitt county. 
Ho is allowed three days before he 
brings out the prisoner before the 
Magistrate who issued the warrant. 
He said t^at he would probably bring 
Jett out before Police Judge Pendle- 
ton tomorrow afternoon or Tuesday 
morning. Judge Pendleton indicated 
that If the law required it he would 
order Jett taken to Jackson. Sheriff 
.McChord said that he would obey this 
order. 



FOUL 



DEED JETT’S 



Charge Made by 
Bach and Ewen. 



OTHER ACCUSERS NAMED 



Ewen Says He Saw the 
Assassin Plainly. 



FULL DETAILS OF THE ASSASSI- 
NATION GIVEN IN AN 
INTERVIEW. 



CAwHIER'S ACCOUNTS SHORT. 



MANILA. P. I., May 10.— (Associat- 
ed Press.) — Albert Roberts, cashier 
of the Government Ice Pla^t here has 
been arrested on the charg-)? of embez- 
2 leiT*^t. His accounts nave been 
foun *$4,000 short. 

C 

vHOLERA QUARANTINE. 



MANir.A, P. I., May 10.— (Associat- 
ed Pros*.) — The. quarantine of trans- 
ports bound for San Francisco has 
been resumed on account of cholera. 



TRIBESMEN DEFEATED. 



TANGIER. Morrocco, ^lay 10. — (As- 
sociated Pre^s^) — New's reached here 
from Tctuai* lhat tribesmen suffered 
defeat at the hands of the government 
troops. 



Judge Bach Says He Will Testify 
That Jett Fired the Shots — He 
Names Four Other Eye 
Witnesses. 



Judge J. J. C. Bach, one of the lead- 
ing attorneys of Jackson, left yester- 
day for Los Angeles, Cal., to lake 
some depositions in a land case 

He was the attorney for Judge Har- 
gis and the other Democratic con- 
testees in the Breathitt county elec- 
tion cases. His wife Is a cousin of J. 
B. Marcum, and Judge Bach is a per- 
sonal friend of both Hargis and Mar- 
cum. His office is Just opposite the 
court house, and he w’as in full view 
of Marcum and Ewen w'hen the fatal 
shots were fired. He saw the last 
shot strike the floor and was under 
the impression at the time that the 
shooting was done from Hargis Bros.’ 
store. 

He talked freely about the matter 



(C.ontinucd on SfrOLd Page.) 



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required Number of Clippings of the words CORDOVA COFFEE cut 
from the face of Dannemillers Cordova Coffee wrappers together 
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This special offer expires December 1, 1903. This slip will not 
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Advertising Depot, NEW YORK CITY. 



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THE 31 ()H.MN(; JIEHALD. 



MONDAY. MAY U. 
' 



THE MORNING HERALD 

l*u!)Iishcd every moruing In the year by the Lexington Publishing Company. 

(Incorporated.) 



Member Associated Press. Member American Newspaper Publishers' AssocU' 
.tlon. Only Morning Paper in Central Kentucky which is a member of cither. 



OfiSHA IJUFX'KINKIDOE.. Manager 



Entered at the Lexington Postuflice as second-class matter. 



Home OIIIcq: The Herald Luilding, 135 East Main Street, Lexington, Ky. 
NEW YOUK OEEICE— Nc 150 Nassau street. VilEELAND-BENJAMlN, Spe- 
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BUBSCKIPTIO.N HATES— Daily; By mail, 60c per single month, 16.00 per 
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the surrounding towns of Central Kentucky, 15c per week. Weekly, $1.00 
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DEMO CltAUO T ICKET, 

For Circuit Judge WATTS PARKER. 

For Circuit Clerk J. C. ROGERS. 

Tor Commonwealth’s Attorney JOHN R. ALO'IN. 

For .Stato Senator J. EMBRY ALLEN. 

For County Representative W. !. HUGHES. 

For City Representative WILLIAM F. KLAIR. , 

For Mayor THOMAS A. COMBS. 

For City Solicitor W’M. ROGERS CLAY. 

For City Treasurer PETER J. GARLAND. 

For City Clerk J. ERNEST CASSIDY. 

For City Attorney GEORGE C. MORGAN. 

For City Assessor JOHN F. DOYLE. 

For City Engineer P. P. O’NEILL. 

For City Jailer JOHN MASNER. 



=»ORT OF THE LAKELAND 

ASYLUM COMMISSIONERS. 



Th^ 
point I 



report of 
•d by the 



the committee ap- 
Commissioners of 



Lakfiland .Asylum to investigate and 
ropoift concerning the alleged brutal- 
ities^ charged to be frequently done 
by Attendants of that asylum is 
startin|ng in its recitals and of the ut- 
most importance in its recommenda- 
tions. ®’here are two reports — one 
signed b.y throe members of the com- 
mittee a»pd one by a minority of one. 
The bo-^rd has not adopted either. 
The n .norlty report is to be greatly 
regreUtod; it is not worthy of the gen- 
tlomyn whose name is signed to It. 
The ’testimony was conclusive that 
acts were frequently done on 
lijvl'aticnts by the attendants — so 
frequiontly, so openly, so shockingly, 
that m is simply incredible that the 
praotieW of this cruelty was not known 
to the ^persons in authority. This is 
the gir^t of the report, as it is of the 
indict.tnents found by the Jefferson 
graml jury. The minority rei ort is 
mainuy an eulogium upon the suporin- 
tcndc4nt and an approval of certain 
rcconftmendations submitted by Gover- 
nor f^eckham in a former message — 
recommendations which wo cordially 
endorse. But it is impossible to 
change the present system until the 
n jxt session of the Legislature — and 
ijA the meantime will not some radi- 
Jral change be made in the manage- 
Imont and control of that asylum? 



FOUL 



MONDAY, MAY 11, 1003. 



BUILDING FUND PLEDGE. 

Lexington, Ky 100.... 

Believing that ihe Young Men's Christian Association of Lexington is 
an institution that promotes the best interests of young men and the wel- 
fare of ot»r city, ami that the work of the Association needs a suitable 
building wilh modern equipment, I, the undersigned, promise to pay to 
the Association 

DOLLARS 

towards Ihe purchase of a site and the erection thereon of a building adapt- 
to the needs of the organization. ’I’his subscription payal)le as fol- 
lows: Twenty-five per cent when l)ona-fido subscriptions reach $40,000, and 
twenty-five per cent every six months thereafter. 

Name 

Address 

Cut this out. fill In the amount you desire to subscribe and mail It to 
Tho Herald Office DO IT TODAY. 



STATEMENTS WHICH CHANGE STATUS OF AFFAIRS IN BREATHITT. 



Tho public statements made m 

V 

Lexington an-Kuisliaps elsewhere by 



Mr. naeb, a iSadin*’: lawyer of Jack- 
\ 

son; the arre.d of Curtis Jett, in pur- 
suance to a warrant sworn out by 
Sam .lell, Tom Cockrell also having 
sworn out a warrant, and tho publica- 
tion in the Courier-Journal of a confi- 
dential statement made by Mr. Eweii 
to the eorrespondoiit of that imper — 
an interview’, wc foai'. improvidently 
and prematurely puhlishcd — chan?Tcs 
radically the staiis of affairs lii Jack- 
son. Of course, within three minutes 
after .Mr. .Marcum was shot it was 
an oi eii secret that he had been 
shot by Curtis Jett; an l within forty- 
eight hours this was known to every 
reporter v/lio went there ami to 
many persons between Jackson and 
Louisville and to quite a iiiiiiibcr hero 
and elsewhere, and vs'as communica- 
ted, as has been reported, to tlie Gov- 
ernor. But it wa.s believed tliat no 
one would have the eourage to admit 
that he knew this, ami it was feared 
that if it was known that any one 
who saw the ass.assinalioii woubl so 
state, ho would be killed; and so for 
days tlic condition there was of dread, 
of silence, of suspen.se. Mr. Bach is 
reported to liave said openly that 
there are five persons who saw 
cMiougU — whose names he gave — to 
convict Curtis ,leit; not in confidence, 
as we are informed, but publicly said 
the se persons were ready andwilllng 
to testify to what they knew. And 
it is presumed that on this puldic 
stati'ineut 'fom Cockrell swore out 



ic to open these papers and see what 

V 

notice is taken of this assassination. 
Tho columns of those papers are pit- 
iable but conclusive testimony to an 
intimidation that is incredible. In 
tho reports published concerning the 
events in that tow’n have been men- 
tioned the names of several persons 
v.ho were reported to have made 
slatenionts or done certain acts. Al- 
most immediately after those papers 
reach there allldavits are prepared 
and these affidavits are signed and 
sworn to by these persons denying 
the truth of ihe statements, and yet 
these affidavits are not believed by 
any one to be true. For instance, Mrs. 
Marcum is said to have made the 
statement that Henry Bach and Ed- 
ward Strong tried to communicate to 
Mr. Marctiln warning of a plot to as- 
sassinate him; this is denied under 
oath by these two men, and Mrs. 
Marcum at once replies that she can 
prove the contrary by a number of 
witnesses. Are tho persons named 
by Mr. Bach of firmer nature and 
stronger character and greater cour- 
age than those affiants? 

It lias l ren the desire Aid purpose 
of The Herald to arouse the senllmont 
of Kentucky, of Breathitt county and. 
if possible, of the country and rivet 
attention upon the (own of Jackson; 
ami also to convince every citizen of 
that town that this searching, eager, 
intense attention was rivited on him 
anil all his fellow’ citizens; and to 
cause every official there to realize 
tlial lie was on trial; that Jackson 
was not isolaUMi from th»* remainder 



Captain Byroade of the Slate Col- 
lege military department announces 
that all arrangements for the encamp- 
[ment at Ashland have been completed. 
Ja full agreement with the Chamber 
tof Commerce of that city has been 
thrived at and the encampment will 
held in Central Park, near the 
GRy. The park is an .ideal' place for 
the encampment. It is filled with 
larg^ forest trees, and has electric 
lights, with a large open place suita- 
ble for the camp and drill grounds. 
The c!#y will furnish water, lights 
and nallural gas for fuel, and will prac- 
tically defray railroad expenses. 

The^ncampment will be conducted 
along jthc lines of a regula* military 
outlngj There will be drill every 
moruiiVg and dress parade in the af- 
ternoon.'*,. Strict military discipline 
will bo Maintained. Tho cadets will 
leave th.'s city the 21st and will re- 
turn on the 30th. 



the warrant and put in operation the , of the Stale, and its olllcers could not 
uiacbiiicry of tlic law; an»l as this ^ violate tho law or prosliliiic the-forms 



made puldie the cliarg»3 against JcU, 
the coiTes! omient to whom Mr, Ewen 
is alleged to have made the publlsli- 
'od r-taleincnt decided that he liad the 
right to make public that statement. 

Under these revelations and chang- 
ed circumstances th * question is not. 
can the truth bo ascertained, but can 
there he held in Jackson a fair and 
just trial with safety to those wit- 
nesses and to other w’itncsses who 
may he calloil to testify? Is the Hf*' 
of these wilucs^ » s safe not only, from 
this day until that trial, but after- 
wards? Ami it is also askc;l — ^iiow 
that there is an arrest for the mur- 
der oi Mr. Marcum — can the assassin- 
ation of James Cockrell be investiga- 
ted with safety to the witnesses by 
whom that assaiedn can be convicted? 

What is the exact stato of affairs 
In that town is perhaps not fully un- 
d'.TPiood or euile realized liy any who 
has not rc idl'd there. There are 
some signs of a condiliou that must 
be iDcomprelicnsil)lo to any one who 
has never resided iheie. There are 
two new’spapers published in Jackson 
— they are excellent papers — w'oll-ed- 
ited and well-conducted. It is pathet- 



of law without public condemnation. 
This arrest and these public state- 
ments will intensify tho profound and 
determined public senlimoiit that jus- 
tice must be done and the courts must 
not 1)0 the partners of criminals, the* 
pr.dectors of crime and the shield 
of assassins. 

Wo have judged no one — wc have 
cari'fully refrained from expressing 
any judgment or or)iuion of our own; 
wo have at templed to give articulate 
form to the plea of those who had 
not l)oeii able to make themselves 
heard; solely to liave the truth as- 
certained and justice done. And It is 
the highest friendship to tho officers 
of the law of every rank and authori- 
ty in Breathitt that they be told wdth 
frankness that the Stale will not tol- 
erate intimidation or tampering with 
the witnesses or with the prostitution 
of the courts of justice or wilh false 
testimony to shield the guilty. On 
tho other baud, it is due to those offi- 
cers and to the Governor, whose name 
and comluct have become complicated 
with these lamentable events, that 
they, too, bo given a fair, calm, just 
hearing. 



PARK 



kWILL BE USED BY CADETS FOR 
I ENCAMPMENT— FINAL AR- 
\ RANGEMENTS MADE. 



(Continued From First Page.^ 

and said there had developed a de- 
termination among the citizens to put 
a stop to the reign of terror that has 
hung over Jackson for the last two 
years. He was in conversation with 
Tom Cockrell when told of the war- 
rant against Curtis JcU. Ho said: 

“He is tho man who killed Marcum, 
and I will be one of five witnesses 
who will so testify before the proper 
tribunal.” 

Marcum was talking to Ewen and 
was apparently in a deep study and 
was twirling a pencil in his hand. Ed 
Callahan walked across from Hargis’ 
store and passed by them and around 
tho corner of tho court house. He 
walked back to Ihe store a few min- 
utes later. Tom White walked out of 
tho court house and half turned to- 
ward Marcum just before the shoot- 
ing. B. J. Ewing told me that he 
saw Curtis Jett step toward Marcum 
wilh his pistol in both hands and 
shoot him in the head. William M. 
Combs. Dr. Kelly Kash, John E. Pat- 
rick and, I think. County Attorney W. 
H. Blanton saw Curtis Jett go Into the 
side door of the court house, heard 
the shots and saw Jett come to the 
same side door, look cautiously all 
around and then walk down the stops 
and around to the front Into the crowd 
that was gathering. 

Judge Bach added that this state- 
ment, coming from him. might result 
in his house being burned over his 
head, and would make him a marked 
man unless, in the meantime tho 
strong arm of the law intervened and 
put Jett and his accomplices and in- 
stigators of the murder where they 
could do no more harm. 

The witnesses named by Judge 
Bach are all prominent citizens of 
Jackson, and their statements will bo 
believed, 

Mr. Charles Scott, of the Ij. & E., 
telegraphed to the agent at Jackson 
yesterday morning and was told that 
the story of the shooting of Captain 
Ewen was a canard. 



S. Taulbec, County Clerk, saw him. 
These men arc witnesses of irre- 
proachable character, aiul are e:u iigli 
to convict him on. Y'ou may tise this 
interview when it is released, or when 
you honestly think that the danger to 
me is passed.” 

The developments yesterday— the 

swearing out of a warrant for Jett; 
Jett’s flight, and tho attempt to as- 
sassinate Ewen — show that Ewen’s 
danger can not now be increased by 
the publication of his statement. 

Floyd Hagins left htst Alonday aft- 
ernoon for the northeaslern part of 
Tennessee, and has not been seen 
since. It is reported that ho is will- 
ing to return \o prosecute Jett. The 
other men who were named as wit- 
nesses could not be seen on accouat 
of their being out of town, but Mr. 
Ewen vouched that they will testify 
in substance to what was related by 
him. S. S. Taulbee says that he was 
standing In such a position that it is 
reasonable to believe that they saw’ 
and recognized tho assassin, but it is 
believed tliat they will come forward 
w'hen the limd conics and toll ell they 
know. 

Ed Callahan, Sheriff of the (^ounty, 
says that he was looking into the 
corridor of tho c^iirt house when the 
shot was fired, and saw tho assassin, 
but on account of the dense smoko 
could not identify him. Dr. Kash and 
Capt. Ewen said that smokeless car- 
tridges were used, and pointed out 
that even if smokeless cartridges had 
not been used tho smoke from tw'o 
cartridges would not make smoke so 
dense that it would completely en- 
velop a man’s form in a well-lighted 
corridor. Judge Hargis saw the 
shooting, but says lhat he was stand- 
ing out of lino with the assassin and 
did not see him.” 






EWEN ACCUSES JETT. 



BECKHAM 









CASTORM 



A\tgctable PrcparalionforAs- 
simUalmg (hcFoodandRc^uIa- 
ling the Sloiaaclis and Bowels of 



iNFAfj IS /Children 



Fromolcs DigcslionOieerful- 
ness and Rest .Conlains neiilter 
Opium.Morpliine nor Iiucral. 

 ’OT IK^VRC OTIC • 



ofMdDrSAMUELPlTCHEIi 
P^unpktn Secd " 

dlx.Senna. * 

/tadidU 

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. 

lit CurbvttnieSSogA ^ 

- 

(imfird 

JtBiiiv y/ 0^ 1 rtarvK 

Aporfccl Remedy forConslipa- 
rion»Sour Stomach, Diarrhoea 
^Vo^ms , (Convulsions Icvcrish- 
ncss and Loss of Sleep. 

Facsimile Signature oC 

XEW VORK. 



GASTORIA 

For Infants and Childre n. 

The Kind You Have 
Always Bought 

Bears the 
Signature 
of 




hAAQT copy of wrapper. 






For Over 
Thirty Years 

GASTORIA 

THE OCNTAUfl •OMMNV. HCW VOUX CITY. 



SENDS TERSE REPLY TO QUES- 
TION OF NEW YORK PAPER 
REGARDING FEUDS. 



TJCKETS 



FOR McCARTY HANGING ISSUED. 
NO REPRIEVE EXPECTED 
BY OFFICIALS. 



As the fifteenth of May, the date of 
McCarty’s execution, approaches, the 
preparations are being quietly made. 
The tickets to the execution have al- 
ready bciMi printed and some of them 
have been issued. The arrangements 
are in tho hands of Sheriff Wilker- 
son. Ho has decided that the scaf- 
fold will be placed in the rear yard 
of the jail on or near the spot where 
Mud Dauber expiated his terrible 
crime. 

So far as preparations go, there is 
little to bo done. The scaffold upon 
which Mitd Dauber was hanged is pre- 
served in the jail and can be set up in 
a short time. It is understood that 
only a few tickets have been printed 
and the execution will be viewed by a 
comparatively few persons. 

While it is thought lhat McCarty 
still has hopes of a reprieve from the 
Governor, the police and county offi- 
cials believe that there is slight 
chance lhat such will be the case. 
It seems almost assured lhat the day 
sot will witness the execution of tho 
wife-murderer. 



••••••••••••••••• 

• • 

• FUNERALS • 

• • 

MRS. JOSEPHINE McCARTY. 



Tho funeral services of Mrs, Jose- 
phine McCarty will take place at the 
residence of her son, Mr. J. McCarty, 
on East Main street, No. 307 (2.39), 
this morning at 9:30 o’clock. Burial 
in Lexington Cemetery. Rev. U. G. 
Foote will officiate. 



EVEN WITH HIM. 



Mr. Flirty (tauntingly) — ‘I saw 

Mrs. Berryman on the street today. 
She looked charming in her mourning 
gown.” 

Mrs. Flirty (sarcastically)— "In- 

deed! It’s a pity we all can’t be wid- 
ows.”— Detroit Free Press. 



BARGAINS IN BUGGIES 



Can be had Monday at our Court 
Day Sale. You can also have your 
choice of an unusually fine lot of 
horses. Z. T. SMILEY & CO 
10-2t 527 W. Short St. (New No.) 



LOUISVILLE, Ky.. 10.— In connec- 
tion with tho report that B. J. Ewen 
had been killed the Courier-Journal 
published the following: 

To a staff correspondent of tho 
( ourier-Journal aC' Jackson, Ky., yes- 
terday ho gave all the details of the 
shooting of Marcti*^;, as told below. 
He had never to... iiic story- before 
to anyone, and was in fear of death 
because of i*is knowledge. 

"Capt. B. J. Ewen was Marcum’s 
sincere friend, and he wanted Mar- 
cum’s death avenged, lei for him to 
tell what he knew at the time, he 
thought meant death to him. There- 
fore he tacitly assented to an inter- 
view, which Judge Hargis practically 
gave out for him. saying he did not 
BOO tho murderer. In a secret and 
confidential interview ho gave out the 
following story, which bo pledged 
the correspondent to withhold from 
publication until it was safe to use. 
The secret interview was given after 
the Interview given by Judge Hargis, 
and he began it as follows: 

“ ‘I . lied to you in the first, inter- 
view, but it was for the best. I am 
willing to tell a Be about this matter, 
but I will never swear to a He. I 
was standing beside Marcum when 
he was killed. His right hand was 
resting heavily upon my shoulder. 
Tom White passed by us from out of 
tho court house and looked Marcum : 
full in the face, and turned around in 
front, attracting Marcum’s attention. 
Suddenly the shot was fired. The 
pressure of Marcum's arm on my 
shoulder half pulled me around to 
face the assassin, and I turned the 
rest of the way. I saw tho murderer 
and recognized him. It was Curtis 
Jett. He held his pistol in both hands 
and had advanced two steps. 1 tliought 
ho wa.s going to shoot me. Marcum 
had fallen to the flour, and I .'^topped 
out of the door to save ray life. I 
turned the corner of the court house 
and then drew my pistol, half expect- 
ing the next shot to be for me. I 
heard the second shot, and a couple 
of moments later saw Jett appear at 
the side door facing tho well, post- 
office and Day’s store. He placed a 
hand on either side of the casting 
and peered out each side of the door. 
He cautiously walked down the steps 
and turned into the crowd at the 
door, which by that time was sur- 
rounding Marcum. 

"I swear before God that I saw 
these things. 

"Judge Blanton, the County Attor- 
ney, also saw Jett fire the second 
shot. Jett was standing behind Uic 
loft side' partition when he fired tho 
first shot, but advanced to Marcum’s 
head and fired the second shot, ami 
it wa.s then that Blanton saw him. 

“ ‘William M. Combs, ex Sheriff, 
and a man who is worth $50,000, saw 
Jett emerge from tho side door in 
the same cautious manner. J. J. C. 
Back, a loading lawyer and attorney 
for the Hargises, saw Jett come out 
the side door. Floyd Hagins, a 
brother of Lee Hagins. Circuit Clerk, 
saw Jett come out. I believe that S. I 



I-OUISVILLE. Ky., May ]0.— Gover- 
nor Beckham sent a terse reply to the 
request of a Now York newspaper for 
an expression from him on the Breath- 
itt county trouble and for his plan 
of punishing murderers and stamping 
out feuds in Kentucky. The telegram 
received by Governor Beckham w;fs 
*as follows: 

"(Jov. J. C. W. Beckham, Louisville, 
Ky. : Will you please wire at our ex- 

pense 150 to 200 words regarding  v)iir 
plan for punishing feudist murderers 
and what, in year view, is the best 
method of destroying the feud prac- 
tices? 

"Tho New Y'ork World, by E. L. R. 

Noble.” 

The reply sent by the Governor 
was: 

"Now York Workl. Now York: Your 
telegram to me asking for a state- 
ment of my plan about stopping feud- 
al troubles in Kentucky was received. 
When you succeed in evolving a real 
good plan for successfully stamping 
out sin and crime in New York please 
let me know w'hat it is. and I will try 
it in Kentucky if it is necessary. 

“J. C. W. BECKHArd.” 



READ THIS 



It will be worth money to t 
mixed paint of my own which 
and better than mest paints fo 
only man in Lexington selling 
and guarantee. Price $1.50 pc 
qurnlitics. Atco geed p.^.int at $ 
I am at the same old stand, 
do the beet and most satiefacto 
My ctere is headquarters fo 
Brushes nt ‘ow prices. 



he public to know that 1 have a ready- 
1 quarantce to be equal to any other 
r sale In Lexington, and that 1 am the 
a mixed paint under my own name 
r gallon, cheaper whqn sold in larger 
1.00 per gallcn. 

No. 17 West Snort strict, prepared to 
ry werk in the matter cf Painting, 
r the best Paints, Oils. Varnishes and 



 L. F . YOUNip 



!T W. SHORT ©T. 



l_EXITS  3 TON, KV. 



PACIFIED 



NO FURTHER TROUBLE EXPECT- 
ED IN LAKE LANAO COUNTRY, 







IS. 



• 0 



FEED OF ALL KINDS. 



BYRNS & LEWIS 



OFFICE— No. 6 W. Short St. 



WAREHOUSE -Third & Georgetown 



PHONES. :T4 and 8 



MANILA, P. I., May 10. — (Associat- j 
od Press.) — Captain Pershing and his j 
column returned to Camp Vicars, 
Miudao, from an expedition through 
the country east of Lake Lanao. The 
column experienced no opposition af- 
ter fighting at Taraca. Prisoners cap- 
tured at Taraca took the oath of al- 
legiance to tho United Stales and 
were released. Among Moros killed 
in tho Taraca forts were nine Dattos 
and one Sultan. The moral effect of 
this fight will be far-reaching, and 
it is doubtful whether there will be 
any further hostilities in the I..akc 
Lanao country. Captain Pershing es- 
timates the poulation of Taraca at 
30.000. and in that district at 100,000. 
He says the population of the Lake 
I^nao district has been under-esti- 
mated. Four natives have been found , 



guilty of iiiunlor ami three .Americiu 
marines arrested at Olangapo, Subig 
Bny, last Sopienibcr, have been sent- 
enced to death.’ 

The Ladrones .situation seems to 
have materially improved, lu AHmy 
Province comlitlmis arc still tinsalis 



D.  not fail to attend Xinlley’s Court 
Day Sale Monday. Splendid consigu- 
meiit of liors(*s. Also clo.sing j ut naJo 
of a number of Buckeye and McFar- 
land buggie.s. 

Z. T. SMILEY & CO.. 
10-2t. 527 W. Short St. (New No.) 



.1 



factory, but other districts, which re - 1 (JU nn's ic^s arc delicious ami pure, 
cenlly have been disturbed, are qtiiet. ' fi^vons. 10-2t 




ers 



Hair Vigor 

Stops falling hair. Makes 
hair grow. Restores color. 
Cures dandruff. atwco.. 



LrfTwell. Hm«. 




NOT ONLY THE BEST— BUT THE MOST ECONOMICAL. 

c:fo 




AS it ever occured to you 
IJ to ask yourself how much 
bread your family could 
buy ( if you should be 
taken away) with your 

PRESENT GOOD INTENTIONS? 



EQUITABLE 

LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 



. wH/ never Pnnd 
wfcr^the water thac is past. 



tfENFY B.NyVeFouNoeff 
J.W.ALEXANDER/w;y J.H.HYDEk/«*/»55 



HEINRY J. F*0\A/I£LI^, yv\anage-r, Louis\/!lle, I .y. 

e xington Offices Cor. Short and Cheapside. AGENTS WANTED 





MONDAY, MAY 11. 1903. 



THE MimyrsG iiehaux 



o 

O 



FIRE CHIEF HAD A 

FRIGHT WHEN RIG WAS 

USED BY MISTAKE. 

Chief George W. Muir of the fire 
(lopartmeut tlioiight fhat a horse 
thief had driven off with his hig. fine 
bay and buggy Baturdny night about 
eight o’clock. lie had driven to the 
hospital ami left ,lho rig .standing in 
front, when a gentleman who had 
been sent out of the hos) ital by a 
doctor and told to use his buggy, 
whicli was al.so standing in front of 
the hospital, stopped into the Chief's 
rig and drove off with it. not knowing 
but what he was using the doctor’s. 
A telephone message to the ! olico de- 
partment set every patrolman on 
the lookout for the ri.g. 

Later the gentleman returned the 
rig to the ho.spital. all unconscious 
of the men who were looking for. him 
all over the city. 



firm, No. 2 red. 75V{st^7Gc; corn firm. 
No. 2 mixed. 4CVl*'?i47c; oats sii'ady. 
*\o. 2 mixed. 3:1’,^'?/ ; -ic; rye (luiet. No. 
2. u7e; lar l sU'ady. $S,75; hulkmeats 
quiet, $0.:!7!4: bacon steady, $10.75; 
whisky distillers’ finished goods (pilot 
on basis of 130; sugar steady. 

CINCINNATI LIVESTOCK. 



CINCINNATI, ().. May 9.— f Asso- 
ciated Press.) — Hogs steady. $4.7"j^( 
fi.80; cattle easy, $2.75@r).00; sheep 
steady, $2.00fi' L75; lambs steady, 
4.25^t G.33. 



KENTUCKY OIL STOCKS. 

(Ueportod by A. G. Morgan, Rroker.) 

Did 

Licking Valley $ -5.00 

Central 3.50 

: Ky. Ragland 2.00 

Instill (!ounty 2.00 

Cumberland 10.00 

, Chonoe 140.00 



Asked. 
$ 0.30 

7.00 

3 .00 
3.00 

1 .3.00 
130.00 



SMILEY’S COURT DAY SALE 



LOCAL MARKETS. 



On Monday will offer the opportun- 
ity of remarkable bargains in buggies. 
Also a splendid consignment of 
horses. Z. T. SMILKY & ('O.. 
l ‘-2t .327 W. Short St. (New No.) 



MARKETS 



CHICAGO GRAIN. 



CHICAGO, 111., May 0. — (Associated 
Press.) — The usual Saturday dullness 
pervaded the grain and provision pits 
today and prices in general were firm. 
July wheat closing V4c higher. July 
corn 1-9c higher and oats up M$c. July 
provisions closed from a shade lower 
to 7 V 2 C hij^hor. 

Trading in wheat was ‘small, but 
there was a continuation of yester- 
day’s bullish sentiment. Opening 
prices were firm on small receipts, 
unfavorable crop reports, firm cables 
and on talk of possible war in the 
Orient. July was unchanged to %c 
higher, at 72V^c to 72%c. and during 
the first half of the session the fluctu- 
ations in price w'cre confined within 
a narrow range. There wa.s a lack 
of outside orders, and about the only 
trading was that of an “evening up ’ 
character over Sunday between local 
traders. Estimates of large w'orld’s 
shipments for Monday caused some 
selling inter in the day and the mar- 
ket cased off, July declining to 72%c, 
i)ut a fair cash demand and biilish 
crop advices soon brought prices- back 
to the opening figures. July closed at 
the high p^nt. at 72%c. a gain of Me- 
riearanct f»f wheat and flour were 
equal to .non bushels. Primary re- 
ceipts wei' 237.00U bushels, against 
292,300 bushels a year ago. Mlnneajt- 
olis and l.uilmh reported receipts of 
124 cars. '.h‘ch with local receipts of 
fifly-foiir Cars — none of contract grade 
— made total receipts for the three 
]X)ints of 178 cars, against 181 cars 
last w’oek and 174 cars a' year ago. 

Gorn was dull, but the market was 
firm the greater part of the day. Fav- 
orable weather brought out consider- 
able soiling by local traders, but the 
offerings were readily taken by two 
of the principal longs. Receipts were 
larger and the cash demand good. 
July closed VsC higher, at 43c, after 
soiling betwcf*n 43%^43*')lc and 45c. 
lyocal recoims wore 2G4 cars, with 
eighteen of contract grade. 

Oats shared in the general dullness, 
and aside from the early buying of 
May by a prominent commission 
house ami shorts the market lacked 
any feature. The local sonliment 
was still bullish on crop advices, but 
cxymplaiuts from the country were 
fewer In that respect. The close was 
sieidy. July closing %c higher, at 
32H 52 -')xC*. after ranging between 

:*.2Vse and 32%c. Local receipts were 
110 cars. 

The fcaturd in provisions was soil- 
ing by outsiders, together with small 
offetirgs by local bears. There was 
pome covering by shorts late in the 
day. which caused a better tone in 
the situation. Soplombor pork closed 
7MiC higher, at $IG.72V^; September 
lard was up 5c, at $9.07^. while ribs 
were down a shade at $9.27^4^9.30. 

Kstimatoil receipts for Monday — 
Wheat, 30 cars; corn. 240 cars; oats, 
145 cars; hogs, 31.000 head. 



Buyers pay the fo:iowing prices for 
Butter — 15(fi:20c per pound. 

Roosters — fAve, 4c per pound, 
lien Tttrkeys — Live. 13c per pound. 
Tom Turkeys — Live, 10@llc per 
pound. 

Ducks — TAve, per dozen, $3.00^^3.0ii. 
Oee.se — lAvo, per dozen, $4.80'?/)7.00 
Guineas — Live, per dozen, $2.50(0) 
.3.00. 

Chickens — liens, live, 8%c per 
pound. 

Kggs — 11 per dozen. 

Corrected daily by The Keystone 
Commercial Company. 

LEXINGTON (KY.) STOCKS. 

(Reported by J. H. Shropshire.) 

Bid. Asked. 

FavetteNational Bank 

Stock $230 00 $233 Ut 

First National Bank 

Stock 136 00 137 Ot 

Froenix National Bank 

Stock 148 00 150 00 

City National Bank 

Stock 175 00 180 00 

National Exchange 

Rank Stock 138 00 140 00 

Second National Bank 

Stoc!: 125 00 127 00 

Stock 88 00 9C 00 

Third 'national Bank 
Central Bank Stock... 102 00 105 00 

Security Trust and 
Safety Vault Ck)m- * 

pany 162 00 154 00 

Would be able to fill orders at above 
prices. Not many stocks offering for 
te. 



Lots Lois 
Lots 



I represent a party wiio wants 
sell fourtc ‘n beaut ii'nl building lots 
on IRj.se street. He wants the money 
and has pm the price “way dtjwu 
low.” They are actually tlie best lots 
on the market at the price. I am in- 
structed to soil ihoni on a payment 
ot $2.3. (M) cash and $2. wi ner week un- 
til i aid for. The si reef in front of 
these lots is inaradamizfMl, curbed 
and guttered, and cost nearly as 
much to construct as we are asking 
for the lots. They are only throe 
squares from the (1. & O. and new L. 
& L. Depots, two squares trom new 
public school and one square from 
State Collogo. You can’t duplicate 
them in L(*xington for the money. If 
yoti want a lot, don’t let ibis oppor- 
umily pass. 



Bishop Clay 

Real Estate Broker 

OPPOSITE PHOENIX HOTEL. 



COMMISSIONER'S SAIL 



FAYETTE CIRCUIT COURT. 



Jennie F. Townsend, Guardian, &c. 
to 

Court. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

FAYETTE CIRCUIT COURT. 

Mat Walton. Administrator of 

C. E. Heer, deceased. Plaintiff, 
vs. — Notice to Ureilitor.s. 

Robt. S. Herr, etc., etc., Defendants. 

All persons having claims agiinst 
the (‘State of the late C. E. Herr are 
hereby notiii.’d to present same prc»p- 
orly proven' n the uudersign('d .Master i 
rornniins) »: ** of tin* Fayette (3rcuil 
(krnrt at b.s olficc In The Southern 
Mutual Iuv« ^tment ('ompany’s Build- 
ing in Lexiir^lon.* Kciilttcky. on or be- 
fore the lirT day of .)»»ne, 19U3. I’n- 
der the order of the Court in this 
action (jf all claims not presented to 
me witlnii the period above stated 
will be barred. 

GEO. C. WEBB. M. ('. F. C. C. 
AValton Rives. AUonieys. 



Bank Stock 



-AT- 



PUBLIC AUCTION 

By order of the Fayette Circuit 
Court the imdorsigned will sell at 
public jiiictlon to the higliesL bidder 
h r cash, on 

RflONDAY.iVlAYIl 

At about 1 2 o’clock, at the front door 
of the Court House. 

30 Shares of National Ex= 



change Bank Stock 



CHICAGO LIVESTOCK. 



CHICAGO. III., May 9. — (Associated 
fh*e3.s.) — Catile.--Koceipts. 100; West- 
Drn nominal. Good to prime steers. 
$3.25(?7'5.50; poor to medium. $4.25'?t 
r).lu; slockerfe and feeders. $3.00(g. 
4.7.5; cows. $1.50(g'4.G0; heifers, $2.50 
f(5.70; oanner.5. $1.50Ct'2 73; bulls. 
$2.50(ff'4.50; calves. $2.50@G.00; Texas 
fed steers, $4.00@'4.75. 

Hogs. — Receipts today. 8.000; Mon- 
day. 33,000; left over, 2.500; weak to 
5c lower Mixed and butchers, $G.75(f/ 
G.OO; good to choice heavy, $C.85^f7 
7.!i7US; rough heavy. $G.G5#G.80; 
light, $G.45^fC.70; bulk of sales. $0.70 
(f-G-SO. 

Sheep. — Receipts. 570; nominal. 
Good to choice w(ythers, $." .70'(t G.OO; 
fair to choice mixed. $3.75^5.20; 
Western sheep, $4.73(Tt5 75; native 
lambs. $4.50^17.25: Western lambs. 

$1.75 i:f 7.25. 



CINCINNATI GRAIN. 



CliNClNNATI, O.. May 0.- 
ciated Press.) — Flour dtill; 



The Security Trust & Safely Vault Co. 

ExV of Mrs. S. B. Crcniy. 

fORSALf” 
AND R[N1 

Business and other desirable Main 
street property. 

Fine Blue Grass Farms, Elegant res- 
idences, very desirable cottages. 

, The most desirable and central lots 
.in the city. 

Insurance In the best companies. 
Two litindred and thirty-seven acr«»s 
of Blue Grass with abundance of 
water, itr rent. 

lOS. S.WOOLFOLK 

r.eai Estate and Insurance Broker. 

99 F-^ST MAIN STREET. 

MENANDWOMEN, 

Uno Big  i for unoatur»l 
OiKclikrgea.iDflauituatiunp, 
irritatioos or ulcnration* 
of mucous niombran^n. 
Pr «rnu p«iuUBS. sod DOt astl'io- 

ItKEEvAHSCKEMICUCO. geut or uoiKUDouf. 

?? Sold by 

or sent In plain wrapper, 
hr expreaa. prepaid, ful 
ei .00. or 3 Pnttlot $2.75. 
ftircolar s«ut on • ■’oat 

STOPPED FREE 

Permanently Cured by 

DR. KLINE’S GREAT 

NERVE RESTORER 

No Flu afUr Ar«(«Uj'tua. 
CONSCUATION, ptnoofti or bT mUL tr.oilM m4 

•2 TRIAL HOTTI.K PKKC 
'ermanent Cure, not mI; r«lur, for ail 

BiapiikiinHw.Bpllcpsj.SpaBmo, St.Vitus* 
ico. Debility , Exhaustion. 




FouttU^i im. 



[(1. 931 Arch St.. Philadelphia. 



By virtue of a judgment entered in 
the above styled action on April 27ih, 
1903, the undersigned Master Com- 
missioner will on 

JIONDAY, MAY 11, 1903. 

at about 12 o’clock noon, at the front 
door of the Court House in Lexington, 
Ky., sell at public auction, to the high- 
est and best bitfder, the following de- 
scribed parcel of land located in Lex- 
ington. Ky., or so niany of them as 
may be necessary to bring the sum of 
$1,833.10: 

(1.) Beginning at a point on the 
cast side of PaUerson street b'jtwocn 
High and Maxwell stroet.s at the 
southwest corner of the properly con- 
veyed to Jennie F. Townsend by Mat- 
thew McNamara and wife by deed 
rocerded in Deed Book 70 paic 324. 
in the Fayette County Clerk’.-? ofilci'. 
and running thence in an easterly di- 
rection along said lino of Jennie F. 
Townsend ninety reven (97) feet; 
ihcnco in a southerly direrilou and 
parallel with l*aUerson street forty- 
two and one-Tmlf (42*^) feet; thence 
in a westerly direction in a t.lraighl 
line to Patterson sliTel; thence in a 
northerly direction along Patterson 
street lorty-uuc (41) feet to the be- 
ginning. 

(2.) That lot and parcel of ground, 
beginning at a point on east side of 
Patterson street forty-one (I’t) feet 
sonlh of Mho lot convoyed to Jennie 
F. Townsend hy Matthew McNamara 
and wife; and running thence in a 
southerly direction along PaUerson 
street thirty-seven and one-l^ilf (37%) 
feet to the alloy, and* extending back 
in an ca.stcrly direction between the 
south line of lot No. '1. above dc- 
fjcribed and said alley ninety-eight 
(98) feet, and being thirty-seven (37) 
-'Ot wide in the rear. 

(3.) That lot and parcel of land, 
beginning at a point ninety-eight (98) 
feet east of l^allcrson street upon an 
alley which runs along the south line 
of the lot convoyed to Laura A. Wil- 
son by Bridget McNamara, by deed 
reconled in Deed Book S3 pa.go 279, 
which lot is a part of the land so con- 
veyed and is to remain a pass- way: 
and running thenco with said alley 
in au easterly direciiou twenty-five 
(25) feet; thence at right, angles 
with said alley and in a northerly 
direction towards High street of equal 
width seventy-six and six-tenths 
(70 G-10) feet to the line of Jennie F. 
Townsend. 

(4.) That tract  and parcel of land 
beginning at a point on the alloy 
meniioncd in the description of tract 
No. 3 herein, one hundred and twenty- 
three (123) feet east of PaUerson 
street; and running thence wi;h said 
alley in an easterly direcJtion sixty- 
seven (77) feet and extending back 
of equal width towards High street 
seventy-five and four-tenths (75 4-10) 
feet to the line of Jennie F. Townsend. 

Said sale of said lots will bo made 
upon credits of six and twelve 
months, for two equal installments of 
the purchase price, and lh6 put chaser 
or purchasers will be required to exe- 
cute bonds for two equal installments 
of the purchase money for each tract, 
payable in six and twelve tnonihs, re- 
spectively. from the date of sale and 
bearing interest at the rate of six per 
cent per annum from the dat(j of sale 
until paid. Said bonds are to be 
made by the purchasers with sureties 
to be approved by the Commissioner, 
and are to have the force and effect 
of judgments, and to remain a Mow 
upon the ' properly sold until fully 
paid. But the imrchasors if they de- 
sire, may pay the purchase price in 
cash. 

GEO. C. WEBB. M. C. F. C. C. 

BUTLER T. SOUTHGATE, 

Attorney. 



NOTICE 

On SVIonday, iVlay 25, 1903 

At 10 o’clock, a. m , unless paid before that time, M. Kaufman, City Treas- 
urer, will sell at public auction, at the door of the City Building, the fol- 
lo^ving special tax bills due the City of Lexington, Ky., for street recon- 
struction. The amount of each bill, as specified below, includes the 
penalty of 10 per cent, and each of said bills bears interest at 6 per cent 
per annum from the date said bill was due and payable until paid. 



Name.^. 

Bronston. U. J 

Roche, Mrs. Alice M. and Juo. G 

Roche. Johanna 

Ross. Mr.?. Elizubelh D 

Kinkead. ICleanora Tulbtu’t am 

Klij-ahetb Sholby 

Slahel, .Mrs. U 

Bruce, E.st. of W. W 

Scully. Jno 



Ward. 

2 

2 

2 



Block. 

42 

42 

42 

42 



3G 

42 

42 



SECOND STREET, PAYABLE OCTOBER 1st— BRICK. 
1 89 1 



Ix t. 

13 

14 
t; 

1 

29 

19 

11 

2-3-4 



1X92 
$34 24 
2:4 21 
23 G3 



1 893 


1891 


1895 


1S9G 


1X97 


$31 24 


$34 24 


$34 24 


$ 


$ 


21 21 


24 21 


21 21 


24 21 


24 21 


2‘i 65 


23 t;r  


23 65 


23 6,5 


23 »;5 


21 10 


21 10 


21 10 


21 10 


21 10 


20 10 


20 10 


20 10 


20 10 


20 10 


31 46 


31 4G 


31 46 


31 4G 


31 46 



f 



NORTH BROADWAY PAYABLE. SEPTEMBER 1st— BRICK. 



Sallie S.. 



Ward. 
Ned and 

2 

2 



Karnes. 

Grooiie, .Mrs. 

Emma 

.Morgan, Mrs. C. B. . . 

Morgan. Mrs. Ellen H 3 

Limlscy. Katherine Nugent 2 

limes. Mrs. J 2 

Mulligan. Mrs. EIlcu and J. H 2 

llowman. A. Smith 

Hiibbs. W. C. G ! . 

Lex. l,odge. No. 89. B. B. O. E 

Stoll, Est. of K. P 

Stoll, Est. (jf U. P 



2 



Hughes, Mrs. .Mary A 3 



Block. 

35 

37 

G5 

37 

40 

40 

40 

G8 

3.5 

37 

35 

G8 



Lot. 

15 

30 

7 

33 

45 

3G 

50 

3.3 

4 

40 

 ; 

30 



1891 



1892 

31 39 
39 71 
98 C2 
33 39 



1893 

31 39 
39 71 
9 8 C2 



1894 

31 .39 

39 71 
98 C2 



1895 

31 39 
39 71 
98 G2 



1890 

31 39 
39 71 
98 C2 



1897 



1898 

$ 

24 21 
23 G3 
21 10 

20 10 
31 4G 
50 17 



1898 



1899 


1900 


1901 






$ 


$34 24 


24 


21 


24 21 


24 21 


23 


65 


23 ti5 


23 65 


21 


10 


21 10 


21 10 


20 


10 


20 10 


20-10 


31 


4G 


31 46 


31 4G 


50 


17 


50 17 


50 17 
58 22 



1902 



1899 



1900 



1901 



1902 



19 77 19 77 19 77 19 77 



31 


39 


31 


39 


*31 


39 


31 


39 


31 


.39 


39 


71 


39 


71 


39 


71 


39 


71 


39 


71 


98 


62 


98 


62 


98 


62 


98 


62 


98 


G2 






33 


,39 


33 


39 


33 


39 


33 


39 


43 


78 


43 


78 


43 


78 


43 


78 


43 


78 






19 


77 


19 


77 


19 


77 


19 


77 


131 


83 


131 


83 


131 


83 


131 


83 


131 


83 


27 


55 


27 


55 


27 


55 


27 


55 


27 


.55 


,32 


f)7 


32 


07 


32 


07 


32 


07 


32 


07 


94 


2o 


94 


25 


94 


25 


94 


25 


94 


25 








26 


.32 


26 


32 


26 


32 


20 










29 


29 


29 


29 


29 


29 



Names. 

Slade. J. T 

(j’.Maboncy, R. J. 
Barnes, \V. S..., 



Ward. 



NORTH BROADWAY PAYABLE OCTOBER 1st— ERICK. 

Block. Ixjt. 1891 1892 1893 1894 1855 1S9G 



Names. W 

.Mulligan, J. II 

Tandy. Est. ol .lolin 

.Mulligan, .Mrs. Ellen and J. II 

Young, Dr. F. O 

('aiveri, R 

Uaivi'ft. .Mr.s. R 

Mciaiughlin. Er i. of Martin 
.Mcl-aughliJi, IQsf. of Martin 
Overstreet. J. H. and Annie. I 
3'htirg(5od, Mrs. Nettie. . . . 

Irvine, W. M.. J. B. and Fred. 

Yomiq, Mr.s. Dr. F. O 

Price, Juo. 1' 

A. ^ .M. College of Ky. . . . 

East era L uiatic Asylum of K) 

McNamara. .Mrs. B 

Martin. E. T 

King, 'Mr.- Gilbert 



ard. 

G 

G 

G 

G 

5 

G 

5 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 

G 



G9 

G9 

G9 



Block. 

23 



24 

3 

2G 

2G 

2G 

2G 

2G 

2.5 

24 

•} 

.21 

1 

1 

24 



29 

37 

1 



48 32 48 32 48 32 



48 



48 32 



SOUTH LIMESTONE STREET PAYABLE JULY 1st. 
1891 1892 



Lot. 1891 1892 1893 

13 : 8 12 

12 18 41 

lo-ii 111 It; 

9 -22 37 

30 54 45 

4 3 3 G1 

29 79 9S 

12 38 74 

11 2 ! 03 

7 2C 18 

G 2G 18 

30 2G 18 

G 

•»*  

I 

29 

24 

4 



SHORT STREET, PAYABLE JULY 1st— BRICK. 



1894 
28 12 
18 41 
1 1 1 IG 

22 37 
54 45 
13 G1 
79 98 
38 74 

23 03 
2i; 18 

•2G 18 
2G 18 
43 Ut, 



1895 
28 12 
18 41 
in IG 

22 37 
54 43 
13 G1 
79 98 
38 74 

23 o;{ 
2G 18 
2G 18 
2G IX 
43 05 



I89G 
28 12 
18 4J 
111 IG 

22 37 
54 45 
13 G1 
79 9S, 
38 74 

23 03 
2G 18 
2G 18 
25 18 
43 95 



108 90 108 90 108 90 108 90 



1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


48 


32 


48 


32 


48 


32 


48 


32 


48 


32 


34 


00 


34 


50 


34 


50 


34 


50 


34 


50 


113 


■11 


113 


41 


113 


41 


113 


41 


113 


41 


1897 


1898 


isii 


19 


1 900 


1901 


28 


12 


28 


12 


28 


12 


28 


12 


28 


12 


18 


41 


18 


11 


18 


41 


18 


41 


18 


41 


111 


16 


111 


16 


111 


16 


111 


16 


in 


10 


22 


37 


22 


37 


22 


37 


22 


37 


22 


37 






50 


35 


54 


45 


54 


45 


54 


45 








42 


13 


61 


13 


61 


13 


Gl 


79 


98 


79 


98 


79 


9S 


79 


98 


79 


98 


38 


74 


38 


71 


38 


71 


38 


74 


38 


74 


23 


03 


23 


03 


23 


o;i 


23 


03 


23 


03 


26 


18 


2G 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


26 


18 


2G 


18 


26 


IS 


26 


IS 


26 


18 


2G 


18 






43 


05 


43 


05 


43 


05 


43 


05 


108 


90 


108 


90 


108 


90 


108 


90 


108 


90 






25 


02 


25 


02 


25 


02 


25 


02 



19 43 
15 51 



1902 



1902 
28 12 

18 41 
111 IG 

22 37 
54 15 
13 G1 
79 98 
38 74 

23 03 
2C 18 
2G 18 
2G 18 
43 05 

108 90 
25 02 

19 43 
15 51 
48 G5 



Ka me. 


Ward. 


Block. 


Lot. 


1891 1X92 


1 893 


1894 


1895 


189G 


1897 


1808 


1890 


1900 


1901 


1902 


Lougliridgc. W. .) 


3 


72 


2 


47 74 


4 7 74 


47 74 


47 74 


47 74 


47 74 


47 74 


47 7i 


47 74 


47 74 




Mulligan, Mns. Ellen and Jas. H. 


• • • 


87 


0 


16 11 


16 11 


IG II 


16 11 


IG 11 


IG 11 


16 11 


IG 11 


IG 11 


IG 11 




Barnes. Mr.?. Wm 


... 3 


8t; 


7 














64 37 


G4 37 


G4 37 


64 37 




Merrick laidge, 1. 0.0. F 




87 


7 














63 U5 


63 05 


G3 05 


63 05 










EAST 


SHORT STREET, PAYABLE JULY 1st. 
















Nani(\ 


Ward. 


Blook. 


Ixu. 


1891 1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


19lt2 


Williams, I. N 


. . . 4 


96 


o 






















15 71 








CHEAPSIDE. PAYABLE JUNE 1st— BRICK. 
















N'4»r.e. 


Ward. 


Block. 


Lot. 


1891 1892 


1 893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


Lexington ('i:y National Bank... 


. . . 3 


72 


J) 


94 54 


91 51 


94 54 


94 54 


94 51 


94 54 


94 54 


94 54 


94 54 


94 54 




f^oughiidge, W. J 


. .. 3 


72 


2 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 


29 10 










MILL STREET PAYABLE JULY 1st 


-BRICK. 














Name. 


Ward. 


Block. 




1891 1892 


1 893 


1894 


1895 


1S9C 


1897 


1898 


1S99 


1900 


1901 


1902 


S. T. A' S. Co., formerly 


Z. 




























Gibbons 


•  


73 


6 




25 01 


25 6! 


25 Gl 


25 Gl 


25 61 


2.5 61 


25 61 


25 61 


25 61 


25 61 


Wilson, Mrs. Alice* P 


«  


6:i 


17 




26 87 


2G 87 


26 87 


26 87 


26 87 


26 87 


26 87 


26 87 


2G 87 


26 87 


Wilson. Mis. Alice P 


•  

• • • o 


63 


15 




45 13 


45 13 


45 13 


45 13 


43 i:i 


45 13 


45 13 


45 13 


45 13 


45 13 


May, Mrs. Beitic 


, 3 


73 


5 




















25 31 


25 31 








WEST 


HIGH STREET, 


PAYABLE JULY 


1st- BRICK. 














Name. 


Ward. 


Block. 


Lot. 


1891 1892 


1893 


1894 


1805 


189G 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 



0'U(nmell. Mrs. M 

Gilman, (’lias. P. 

.McC’urniick, Ksl. of Jas. . . 
Me('ormie!v. Est. of Jas. . . 

Murray, Pat 

j Uarpcnlor. Mary F 

j Uarpouler. Ben P 

: ^YilIiamson. J. R.. ami Est. ot 

i Williamson. J. R 

; Woulfolk, W. T 

j Herjihy Heirs 

I .Moore, Maggie and Blanch 

j Apitleton. Grace G 

I Bruce, Est. of W. W 

Egan. Jas 

Richardson. J. W 

Satmier. Steve 

Ston^. Est. of Robt 

Bell. B. D 

natighcrty, Mary K 

S. T. ^ S. V. Co.. Trust 

of J. Bruen 

Byrnes. Mrs. Mollie. . . . 

Beil. .Mrs. B. D 

Smiley, Z. T 

Trimmcll, T. E 



Win 



0€ E 



st 



40 

•U 

11 

11 

11 

23 

24 
24 
24 
24 
23 
12 
18 



•to 

23 
1 1 
18 

24 

n 
1 1 
12 
24 
24 



32 4G 
.5G C5 
15 42 

34 88 
38 00 
24 78 
34 43 
34 43 
71 2G 
22G 19 



35 50 
14 83 

33 3G 
3C G8 
23 85 
33 2G 
3:; 2G 
GS 8G 
218 G4 
2G 41 



Name. 

Mulligan. J. I! 

Mnlli.gan, Mrs. Ellen and J. II 

Groom, Mrs. Maggie A 

Daugherty. Heirs of M. . 

Allen. Susan F . 

.Allen. Susan F.' 

Asbury A. M. E. ('hurch. Trust 

Slone, Estate of Robt 

Combs, T. A 

Coryell. Nannie 

(’anipludl, Jas 

Boswell ,W. U 

Sliari)o, J. li.. Excr 



Name. 

Barnes, Mrs. A. B 

Uomb.s. Mrs. Mary 

Kinkead. l.aitra Stone 

Cassell. n\ L 

Taggart. Est. of Mrs. Rosa. 

Taylor. Mrs. A. P 

Snyder. W. R 



W 



ard. 

G 

G 



G 



of G 



Block. 



30 

.5 

1 

30 

G 

5 

30 

5 

G 

2 



15 
38 

13 
15 

14 

I I 
9 

51 

52 
28 

1 to 10 
i: 

42 
5 
i:; 

7 

17 

8 
40 
12 

II 
12 

8 
li 
13 

EAST 
J..nt. 

1 1 
17 
13 
30 
U 
1 !) 

17 

20 

h: 

21 

I 

15 

MAIN STREET, UPPPER TO WALNUT— PAYABLE. 



30 2ti 

34 28 

3 86 
32 50 

35 42 
23 03 
32 12 
32 12 
GO 48 

211 11 
25 50 
45 25 



29 18 

33 ttG 
13 81 

23 GG 
31 33 

34 lo 
22 20 

30 J)7 
30 9T 
C4 10 

203 57 

24 59 
43 G4 
2G 09 
47 21 



28 10 

31 83 
13 31 

22 78 
30 18 

32 89 
21 38 
29 83 
29 S3 
61 69 

19G 03 

23 68 
42 03 
25 U 
45 49 
34 38 



27 


02 


25 


94 


24 


87 


30 


GO 


29 


38 


28 


IG 


12 


79 


12 


28 


n 


77 


21 


90 


21 


03 


20 


19 


29 


01 


27 


86 


26 


69 


31 


62 


30 


3G 


29 


09 


20 


5.5 


19 


74 


18 


92 


28 


67 


27 


63 


2G 


38 


28 


G7 


27 


53 


26 


38 


59 


33 


56 


9G 


54 


00 


188 


49 


180 


95 


173 


11 


22 


77 


21 


8G 


20 


95 


40 


41 


38 


79 


37 


18 


24 


09 


23 


18 


22 


20 


43 


74 


41 


99 


40 


24 




08 


31 


79 


30 


50 


15 


27 


33 


IG 


31 


77 






12 


56 


12 


03 






27 


45 


2G 


31 






22 


G7 


21 


72 



34 28 
11 77 
23 03 
19 92 
Cl 77 



HIGH STREET, PAYABLE JULY 1st— BRICK 
1891 1892 1393 1894 



1895 


1896 


1897 


1808 


1899 


1900 


1901 


•1902 


35 


70 


34 


45 


33 


26 


32 


07 


30 


88 


29 


70 


28 


51 


27 


32 


35 


70 


34 


45 


33 


26 


32 


07 


30 


88 


29 


70 


28 


51 


27 


32 


GO 


51 


5S 


45 






54 


40 


52 


39 


51) 


38 


48 


3G 


4C 


35 


22 


02 


21 


21 


20 


48 


19 


75 


19 


03 


18 


30 


17 


5G 


IG 


83 










24 


04 


23 


17 


22 


33 


21 


48 


20 


G3 


19 


75 










42 


58 


41 


05 


39 


,53 


38 


01 


30 


49 


34 


76 










29 


Gl 


28 


57 


27 


52 


2G 


45 


25 


39 


24 


34 



235 32 225 52 
22 53 21 GO 



14 52 



13 91 
21 83 
1.3 43 
4G 8G 



Ward. 



Name. 

iV«i!nan, 11 

Weiman. H 

Welman, .Minnie 



Ward. 



Block. 


Lot. 


1891 


1S:»2 1893 1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


S(j 


13 












25 76 


25 70 


25 76 


25 76 




5 


1 












27 89 


27 89 


27 89 


27 89 




1 


8 












45 83 


15 83 


45 83 


45 83 




86 


1 i 
















25 05 


25 05 




!h; 


21 


















29 34 




1 


6 


















31 38 




1 


7 


















CG 77 






WEST 


MAIN 


STREET, PAYABLE JULY 


1st— BRICK. 














Block. 


Lnl. 


1891 


1892 1 693 1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


34 


22 






•26 80 


25 91 


25 02 


24 12 


2J 23 


22 34 


21 45 


20 54 


46 


18 






25 


52 i2 


50 Gl 


48 80 


47 00 


45 18 


43 38 


41 58 


■n 


21 






20 77 


2tl 05 


19 39 


18 GG 


17 98 


17 29 


IG 59 


15 90 



(Uonliiiued on Scvtuith I*agc.) 



MONDAY. MAY 11. 1903. 



THE MOUXTNG HERaLD 



SUNDAY. MAY 10. 1903. 




GIVES INDIRECT ANSWER 



SAYS HE IS NOT DESIROUS OF 
CARRYING THE DEMO- 
CRATIC BANNER. 



!n reply to a letter from 13. U. Hold- 
er, Jr., editor of the Athens Banner, 
in which were given the result of a 
poll of the business men of Athens, 
showing a strong sentiment for the 
nomination of .Mr. Cleveland, and 
which contained this quotation: 

“Are you now considering or would 
you consider making the race for the 
Presidency next year on the Demo- 
cratic ticket?” former President 
Cleveland writes as follows: 

Princeton. N. J.. May d, 1003. 

B. F. Holder. Jr. 

Dear Sir: — I thank you for your let- 
ter of the 4lh iiist. and for the edi- 



TEMPER 

TESTER 



NO WONDER SOME LEXINGTON 
PEOPLE ARE ANNOYED. 



Very little rest night after night. 

Very little comfort day after day. 

The comstant itching of Piles or 
Eczema. 

Any Itchiness of the skin Is a tem- 
per tester. 

Doan’s Ointment is a never-falling 
cure. 

Is endorsed by Lexington citizens 
for all Itching skin diseases. 

Mr. S. Bales, 353 North Upper 
street, says: ’’Doan’s Ointment sold 

at McAdams & Morford’s drug store 
disposed of some blotches on my skin. 
I think akin to eczema. The rash or 
whatever it was appeared every now 
and then on my face and hands, and 
although I tried several remedies to 
stop it. I met with little success until 
a friend advised me to use Doan’s 
Ointment. It removed the itching, 
dried up the sore and healed it.” 

For sale by all dealers. Price 50 
cents. Foster-.Milburn Co., Buffalo. N. 
Y., sole agents for the United States. 
Remember the Name 

DOAN’S 

And Take No Other. 



TO CURE DANDRUFF. 

It Is Necessary That the Dandruff 
Germ Be Eradicated. 

"Destroy the cause, you remove the 
effect.” Kill the germ that causes 
dandruff, falling hair and baldness, 
you will have no more dandruff and 
your hair must grow luxuriantly. Her- 
piclde not only contains the dandruff 
germ destroyer, but it is also a most 
delightful hair dressing for regular 
toilet use. No other hair preparation 
Is on this scientific basis of destroy- 
ing the dandruff germ, and none oth- 
er claims to be. for the simple reason 
that it is only recently that a de- 
stroyer of the germ has been discov- 
ered — Newbro's Herpicide, the only 
hair preparation that actually kills 
dandruff. Send In stamps for sample. 
The Herpicide Company. Detroit, 
Michigan. For sale by McAdams & 
Morford. 



Nothino Too 
Good for Me 

Finest carriages, gentlest horses 
and nicest turnouts in Lexing- 
ton. Co see 

DOWNING 

If you want to marry or com- 
pelled to die get one of Down- 
ing's fine carriages and go in 
style. 

If you want to put on style, 
look rich and feel rich (you 
may be poor) go to Downing’s. 
(Phones 100.) and make your 
neighbor look poor who rides in 
• the other fellows’ rig with a 
IK)or horse and cheap, old rig. 
Do you hear me? 

Vine Street, Opposite 
Police Headquarters. 



torial clipping from your paper which 
accompanied it. I can not fail to be 
gratified by the kindly expressions 
which frequently come to me in those 
days from all parts of our country, 
and I desire to thank you for your 
loyal support in the past and for your 
exceedingly friendly expressions at 
this time. In answer to the question 
with which you conclude your letter, 
I can say no more than to assure you 
that at no time since the close of my 
last administration have I been  lesir- 
ous of carrying the Democratic ban- 
ner lor the fourth lime in a Presiden- 
tial contest. Yours truly, 

GROVER CI.EVELAND. 

Bryan Interviewed. 

In an interview at Lincoln. Neb., in 
which both (piesticms and flnswers 
were written. W. .1. Bryan expressed 
himself as follows: 

“Have you mot Grover Uloveland in 
recent years, Mr. Bryan?” 

"Not since I was a member of Con- 
gress.” 

"Is ii possible for Grover Devoland 
to receive the Democratic nomination 
next year, Mr. Bryan?” 

’ There is not the remotest possil)ll- 
Ity of Mr. Cleveland’s ijocoming the 
noniiiiec. Even his staunchest 
friends would not risk him as a can- 
didate.” 

”I am not in Mr. Cleveland’s confi- 
dence. and therefore can not give an 
inside explanation, but as an outsider 
I venture to say that his pur|X)se Is 
positively to refuse to be a candidate 
after a while and then allow his 
friends to say that he would have 
been nominated and elected had he 
not refused to run. This might afford 
Mr. Cleveland some saiisfactiou as a 
salve for the bruises which he ha.s 
nursed since 189G.” 

"Who is to be savior of the Democ- 
racy in 1901. and from what section 
of the country must he come?” Mr. 
Bryan was asked. 

“I can not discuss any available in- 
dividual for the nomination. The geo- 
graphical position of the candidate 
will not figure in the advantages. It 
matters not what Slate he is from. 
He must have the qualities if we arc 
to win. He must be in sympathy with 
the masses of the people and possess 
the moral courage to defend their 
rights and the integrity to resist temp- 
tation.” 

“On what issues will the Demo- 
cratic party base its hopes for success 
next year?" 

“A party platform can not be out- 
lined so far ahead. Conditions are 
constantly changing, and something is 
likely to rise to place an entirely new 
phase on the situation from what it 
appears today.” 



VISITORS 



CLAIMED YESTERDAY’S GAME 
BY A SCORE OF 18 TO 9. 



The Hamilton, O., team defeated 
the Lexington team yesterday by a 
score of 18 to 9, in one of the most 
loosely played games ever seen in 
this city. The pitching of Hammond 
was the redeeming feature of the 
play of the local team. The greater 
part of the nine hits secured off his 
delivery were due to the ooor sup- 
port given him by the individual 
members of ihe team. An error in 
the tirst inning cost the local team 
four scor*'S. The work of the visiting 
’earn was good ihioiighont. McThye 
flid gooil work, but received heller 
support than  lid Ids opTH)mmt. Fol- 
hiwiiig is the tabulated score: 
Lexington. 



Long. 3b 
Black, lb 



KENTUCKY FAIRS. 



Howe, If 



Totals 



Gaoho. 



Fidler, ss 





AB. 


R. 


H. 


VO. 


A. 


E. 


1 . . . . 


. . . 5 


1 


0 


0 


1 


1 


) . . . , 




0 


0 


G 


0 


0 


s. . . . 


. . 5 


1 


2 


5 


1 


1 


cf 


, . 3 


3 


1 


2 


0 


0 


d. p, 


, . 5 


2 


0 


0 


0 


0 






0 


0 


0 


0 


0 


, 2b. 


•  


0 


0 


0 


2 


2 


c. . . 


. 4 


0 


0 


G 


1 


0 


f.... 


0 


0 


1 


5 


0 


0 




.3G 9 

Hamilton. 


4 


27 


5 


G 




AB. 


R. 


H. 


PO. 


A. 


E. 


cf.., 


. . 5 


4 


0 


1 


0 


1 


f 


. 4 


5 


2 


0 


0 


0 




. 4 


3 


1 


1 


0 


1 


b. .. . 


. 4 


t 


1 


8 


0 


0 


3b... 


. G 


0 


1 


4 


1 


0 


1 ).... 


. 5 


2 


1 


G 


2 


I 


c. . . . 


. G 


0 


1 


7 


0 


0 


5 


. C 


1 


1 


0 


0 


2 


p. . . 


. 5 


0 


1 


0 


0 


0 






18 


9 


27 


8 


5 



BASE BALL 



NATIONAL LLAta i: 



CLUB STANDING. 



Clubs. W. 

New York 13 

Pittsburg 14 

Chicago e 14 

Brooklyn 10 

Boston 9 

Cincinnati 9 

St. Louis fi 

Philadelphia 5 



L. 

4 

8 

8 

!) 

9 

11 

15 

15 



P. C. 

. 705 
-03G 

.g:ig 

.520 ! 

.500 

.450 

.280 

.250 



Sole Agents 

Dunlap Hals 



LEXINGTON'S 

BIGGEST 

STORE 






1 he strain ot life be- 
gins in youth. Alw ays 
cqihil to the strain— 

Samson 

Suspender ’ 
Waist. 



YESTERDAY’S HERALD.* 



Pittsburg. 1: Cincinnati, o. 
Chicago, G; St. U)n!s, 

Second Oani ?— Chicago, 13; 
Louis, 8. 



St. 



PITTSBURG, 1; CINCINNATI, 0. 



Score by innings: 

Hamilton 4033014 2—18 

Lexington 0 2 0 0 4 0 4 1 — 9 

Two-base hit — Benke. 

Three-base hits — Denton. Gaoho. 
Stolen bases — Myres, Hammond. 
Porter 2, Strader. 

Bases on balls — By McThye 5, by 
Hammond 3. 

Hit by pitched ball — Myres 2, Tla- 
cey, Logan. 

Passed balls — Schibley 5, Drink- 
er 2. 

Wild pilches — Hammond. 

Struck out — Dy McThye 7, Ham- 
mond C. 

Umpire — McGinnis. 



Kirksville, July 17th and 18th. 
Georgetown, July 21 to 2G. 

Crab Orchard, July 22, 4 days. 
Cynthiana. JJuly 29, 4 days. 

Guthrie. July 29. 4 days. 

Danville. August 4, 4 days. 
Madisonvillc, August 4, 5 days. 
LEXINGTON, AUG. 10, 6 DAYS. 
Union County Association, Union, 
town, August 11 to 15, inclusive. 

Fern Creek. August 18, 4 days. 
Lawrenceburg. August 18, 4 days. 
Shei herdsvillt. August IS. 4 days. 
Maysville. August 19, 4 days. 
Shelhyville, August 25 4 days. 
London, At gust 2G, 3 days. 
Springfield, August 2G, 4 days. 
Bardstowii. September I, 5 days. 
Nicholasville. September 8. 4 days. 
Bowling Green, Sept. IG. 4 days. 
Kentucky Slate Fair, Owensboro, 
September 21, G days. 

Henderson. September 29. 5 days. 



EASTERN RUNNING 

RACE MEETINGS. 

Westchester Racing Association — 
Thursday, May 7, to Wednesday, May 
27. 

Brooklyn .Tockoy Club — Thursday, 
May 28, to Wednesday. June 17. 

Coney Island Jockey Club — Thurs- 
day, June 18. to Tuesday, July 7. 

Brighton Beach Racing Association 
— Wednesday, July 8, to Saturday, 
July 25. 

Metropolitan .Jockey Club — Monday 
July 27, Saturday, August 1. 

Saratoga Association — Monday, Au 
gust 3. to Friday, August 28. 

(’oney Island Jockey Cbib — Satur 
day, Augttsl 29, to Saturday, Septem 
her 12. 

Brooklyn Jockey Club — Monday 
September 14, to Saturday, Septem 
her 2G. . 

Westchester Racing Association — 
Moilay, Seidenibor 28, to Saturday, 
October 24. 

Queens (’ounty Jockey Club — Mon- 
day. October 2G, to Friday, November C. 

Metmpolltan .Jockey Club — Satur- 
day. November 7, to Saturday, No- 
vember 14. 



A fMWmiTE 



CINCINNATI, O., April 10.— (Asso- 
ciated Press.) — Pittsburg won a close 
and exciting ganue. It was a pitcher’s 
battle after the first inning. Ti»e visi- 
tors scored the only rim. Atioml- 
ance, 20,000. Score: 

Innings 1 2 3 45G78 9— T. 

Cincinnati 0 0 0 o 0 o 0 0 0 — u 

Pittsburg 1 0 0 0 0 0 (I 0 0— I 

Hits — Cincinnati, 5; Pittsburg. 4. 
Errors — CMncinnali, 2; Pittsburg, I. 
Batteries — Hahn and Bergen; Phil- 
lippi and Smith. 

Two-Base Hit — Kelley. 

CHICAGO, 6; ST. LOUIS, 3. 

CHICAGO, 13; ST. LOUIS. 8. 



ST. LOUIS, Mo., May 10.— (Asso- 
ciated Press.) — St. I..OUIS lost a dou- 
ble-header to Chicago today before , 
12,000 people. St. Louis players 
played loosely in both games, while j 
the visitors put up a first-class article 
111 base ball. Score: 

Innings 1 2 3 4 5 G 7 8 9— T. 

St. Louis 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1—3 

Chicago 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 1 1— G 

Hits — St. Louis, 10; Chicago, 11. 
Errors — St. Louis. 2; Chicago, 1. 
Batteries — O’Neill and O’Neill; Tay- 
lor and Kling. 

Second Game — Score: 

Innings 12345G78 9 — T. 

St. l^uis 40102000 1—8 

Chicago 401C 0 200 0 — 13 

Hits— St. Ixniis, 11; Chicago, 14. 
Errors — St. Louis, G; Chicago, 2. 
Batteries— Hay. Hackeit, Currie. 

Sanders and Ryan; Weimer, Lund- 
gren and Kling. 




If you will look at the collars, 
shoulders and front of th ‘ coats 
in our suits you'll umlerstand 
what we mean by 




and if yon look on the label 
and see 

HART.SCHUFFNER 
& MARX 

name .and lhat of other cele- 
brated makers, wliorie sole 
agents we are, you'll under- 
stand also why it is our 
clothes lit righl, hang right and 
look riglif. 

You'll not find such Summer 
Suits as wo are showing any- 
where else. Afore than fifty 
patfcTiis to .select from. Every 
suit a piece of Ihe tailors’ an. 



Copyrttfht 2^ by Hart ^ Marx 





BOYS' WASH SUITS 



Russian Blouse, 
Regatta, Sailor. 




White Duckj 
Crash, Fancy 



15c, 25c, 48c 




I 



To play in--saves clothes 




Boys’ Caps 

White Duck 1 Qp 
Fancy Linen I Uu 

Think of anything that boys wear — 
you'll find it in our Big Store. 



AMERICAN LEA(a E 



8& 10 WMAINAEXINGTON KY. 






YESTERDAY’S RESULTS. 



I—  v .- xa-xoi 



St. Louis. 6; Chicago, 4. 
Cleveland, 6; Detroit, 2. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



YESTERDAY’S RESULTS. 



Toledo, 10; Ixxuisville. 2. 
Milwaukee. 4; Kansas City, 1. 
Columbus, 22: Indianapolfa, 8. 



1 for $10,000 to Capt. S. S. Brown; His 
Excellency, for which Charles Head 
. Smith gave $G,000; Maid Marian, with 
which he parted for $7,500; Alan-a- 
Dale, for which he refused $25,000; 

Star Bright, which John Madden 
I thought enough of to buy for $G,000; 

; David Garrick, which sold as a wean- 

! ling for $4,000; Rush, which William [any other trainer he would have been 



broke him to harness. With the 
reins in his own hdnds he drove the 
colt ill a light road wagon, and only a 
few days before the race put a boy up 



Glenn’s ices are delicious and pure, 
all flavors. 10 ’It 



CLAY 



j C. Whitney took off his hands for 
i $10, 000; Spirituelle, which brought 
; $G,000 for service as a brood mare af- 
ter he.r racing days were over, ami 
many others. Ho has trained winners 
the Ke 



of 



eiitiicky D(‘ri)y, the Kentucky 



WILL MEET RICE. OF LOUISVILLE, 
IN BOUT HERE TONIGHT. 






Oaks and many of the other great 
stakes of the eountry. 

Mr. McDowell lives at Ashland, the 
homo of his great grand-father, Henry 
Clay. He is a son (»f Major H. (*. Mc- 

• , Dowell, who. at one time. wa.s the law 

The fifteen-round go to a decision i partner of Judge Bland Ballard. Ilia 
to be pulled off tonight in Ladies’ *nother is the daughter of Henry Clay, 
Hall, on Church stret. promises to ' Jr., who fell at the battle of Buena 
be largely attended. The principals | Vista. He was educated at the Uni- 
are Henry Rice, of Looiiisville, and versity of Virginia, ami during Presi- 
Bnitus Clay, of this city, both colored, ‘lent Benjamin Harrison’s Adminlstra- 



There will be two preliminary bouts 
between local "pugs." the main fight 
being called about nine o’clock. 

It will be remembered that Rice 
put Alonzo Jackson, of tliis city, out 
of the business in a fight on Water 



tion was made f.'olleclor of Internal 
Revenue at Nashville. Tenn. 

Raised in the Blue Grass, young 
M(*Dowell canine, naturally by his love 
of iho thoroughbred. Mis father 
owned a fine mare named Anark. and 



retire l long before, a hopeless cripple. 



^NDERBILT’S REINETTE II. / 

SECOND. 



Bara Rosa iOO, Comoro lO^i. 

Second race, selling; seven-eighths 
of a milL^Anglosea 107. The Golden 
Prince li:i. Afghan 113. Tom Kings- 
b^y 113. Prof. Neville HI. ihirklcy' HI 
to ride him. The result was that 1 Lou Wmals 111. Wedding March I09! 
Alan-a-Dale won. He broke down Duchess lOG, Choice 10.7. 'In.^o- 

tore the ^vire tvas reached and l as 

never started since, but with almost! Third race, handicap; one mib-^ 

Woodlake 92, Esherin 93; Henr\’ Bert 
119 and Love’s Labour 109. Rowe en- 
try; Wain-a-Molnen 115, Harry Now 
113: Silk f’ord 111 and Uledi 108, 
Pugh entry; .rinilncz loi and John 
McGiirk 100, Dunne entry; Florizar 
103. 

Fourth race, for two-year-olds; 
nine-sixteenths of a miU-- Rainland 
no. Leech KPJ. Reipiisite 100. Mon- 
don H o. Prince Rupert 99, lly Luhr- 
man Jr. 99. 

Fitih race. (Owners’ Handicap: five- 
eiglitlis of a milo--Travers 102. Har- 
lem Lane lOo. Talna 97, Jake Green 
berg 90. Twf) l,ick 90. Bonsonbiirsl 98. 
P(ior jvijr 87. Gram] Mary 95. 

Sixth race, selling: one and one- 
RixtAienth iniler. CogswidI 1 U, Ade- 
lante imt. Luie.s Fonso 109, Aimless 
lu4, Mint Bed 10.3, Capt. Hugh Brad- 
ley U»l. !,arkspur loi. Caxton loi, 
Senor 101, Jena UU. Altona lOO. Lmly 
of t!ie West 98. Fair Lass 92, Capt. 
Diickadoo 87, Emir 79. 



PARIS, May ]0. — (Associated 
I'r ‘ss.)— W. K. Vanderbilt’s Reinette 
II.. Hansch ni . ran second for Prix de 
Conrbeveres L uig Champs tuilay. 



BARGAINS IN BUGGIES 

('an be had .Monday .at our Ckmrt 
Day Sale. Von can also have your 
clioice of an unusually fine lot of 
horses. Z. T. SMILEY & CO.. 
lu-2t 527 W. Short St. (New No.) 



• • 

* TODAY S ENTRIES • 












STARS 



[ 



YOU CAN GET THE 

BEST OF EVERYTHING 
TO EIT iND DRINK 



Mild and Mellow — 

Geo. W. 



HAVE COME FROM STABLES AT 
ASHLAND— SKETCH OF 
MR. McDOWELL. 



Courier-Journal of Sunday 




NO. 117 N. LIMESTONE 8T, 

JAS. KE\RNS & CO. 



CHILDS 

Sc. Cigar 

Genemusiy Good^ 

d RRV. TCNIS cS. NO RWOOD 



GENERAL DISTRIBUTukS. 



street not long ago. Clay then dial- McDowell rod(Y her frequently in gen- 
lenged the winner for a fifteen-round 1 Memen’s steeplechase races of the Iro- 
hout. The contest will lie hehl un- ^ quolso Hunt Club. He l red the mare 
der (he auspices of the Hanover Club. ■ and raised Dr. Johnson. Spirituelle 

— ■ • ! and Monarca. While at Nashville he 

Delicious strawberry cream at I attended Gen. W. IL Jaeksou’s sale 
I , ■ IfiSt I Belle Meade Stud, and bid on 

two mares. 

\J One of these he purchased. She 
was Sudie McNairy, ami by her side 
was running Maid Marian, one of the 
great mares of the turf. The other 
was Duchess, following which was 
Clifford. McDowell’s last bid was $50 
under the price for which she was 
knocked down. SiuUe McNairy has 
since produ6ed among others Batten 
and Alan-a-Dale. Peg Woffington was 
bought by Mr. McDowell at the sale 
also. Her first four foals were Kitty 
winner of yes- ; Clive, Bracegirdle. Madrilene and 
David Garrick. Heine d’Or was sold 
to him at this sale, and she has pro- 
duced Argentina II. and Rush, which 
beat May Hempstead in the Kentucky 
Oaks. 

Mr. McDowell is an Ideal trainer, 
and seems to understand the horses 
under his care as well as if they could 
talk and tell him their condition. His 
most magnuificent achievement was 
in preparing Alan-a-Dale for the Ken- 
tucky Derby. Possessed of marvelous 
speed the handsome son of Halma 
was troubled with Ixad legs. Mr. Mc- 
was unwilling to trust him 
stable boy on liis back and 



The 
says: 

Thomas C. McDowell, college man 
, and descendant of Henry Clay, the 
I owner of Advantage 
I terday’s Nursery Stakes; Bourbon 
I and Woodlake. is a- gentleman in all 
I the word implies, and at the same 
time a horseman whose rare judgment 
has made him one of the most prom- 
inent figures on the turf today. Be- 
ginning in a small way he has dealt 
only in high-class thoroughbreds, and 
preferring to own a few stake horses 
! to a large number of inferior animals. 

I has given to the turf some of the 
greatest horses of history. 

Mr. McDowell has been actively en- 
! gaged as a turfman fur the past elev- 
en years. In that time he has ownofV 
such horses as Batten, which he sold 



j^Twell 
wWh a 



MORRIS PARK ENTRIES. 

First race, for llircc-year olds and 
upward: thirteen-sixtoemlis of a mile 
--New York 123, Orloff 105, Ink 98, 
Glennevis 103.- 

Second race, for two-year-olds: 
nine-sixteenths of a mile over the 
Eclipse Course- Leonidas 112. Trogon 
112, Gold Breaker 112, Aristocracy 
112, Yellow Haininor 112, Toledo 119, 
Sir Walt 109. I atheron 112, Montpel- 
ier 112. 

Third race, for maidens: Eclipse 
Course— Nine S|K)t 9:i. Sir Roche 98. 
Nick Longworth 98. Knockabout 113. 
Damon i)8. Reliable 98. Bassanlo 95. 
Hackett 95. Nun 93. Mesmer 98. Cater- 
pillar 110. The Guide 98. St. Jude 95. 
Taps 113. Sontag 93, Ansonella 93. 
Tim D. Jr. li:i. Reckless 98, Akela 95. 
Pipe 95. Burning Glass 98, Harlem 
Queen 100, Love Note 03. , 

First race; three-quarters of the 
Withers Mile— Royal 118, Lux Casta 
112. New York 113. Waswift lOG. De- 
murrer 105, Himself 103, Lady Uncas 
98. ICxiingnishor 97. Royal Summons 
97. Duelist 9t . Knight of Harlem 87. 

Fifth race, for mares, three-year- 
olds and iipwanl; seven-eighths of a 
mile — Rene 98, Anticipation 93. Torch- 
light lie. Semper Vivum 98. Nun 04, 
Wild Thyme 114. Fulurifa 101, Leon- 
ora Loring IIG, Lady Sarah 93. Ath- 
laiia 101. Lux Casta IIG. Rose Tint 
lOL 

Sixth race, handicap; Withers Milo 
-Col. Bill 12G. Blackstock 124. Royal 
117, Bonnibarl IIG. Mexican 110. River 
Pirate 105. Carbuncle lOG. Zoroaster 
105. Hunter Raino 98, Dauphin !•?. Fly- 
ing Buttress 95, Phaon 90. Knight of 
Harlem 88. 



LOUISVILLE ENTRIES. 



First race, for two-year-olds; one- 
half of a mile -Morning Star ii5. Gold 
Piece 95, N(*ltie E. luo, Natalya BtO, 



WORTH ENTRIES. 

First race; ilirco-quarthrs of a mile 
— All Uevtiir 115. Dan McKenna 11.5. 
Uranium 115, Tlie Don 103, Angelo 
Laurallghter 98. 

Second race, selling: for two-year- 
olds: nine-.sixteenths of a mile — Clare- 
mont 110, Jerry Flanigan 107. St. 
Tuckelt 103. Tom Rees 102, J. Reif 
lt»2,- Hicoful 101. Shaitan 95, Eli 93, 
Tressiliaii 91. Dick Ripley 88. 

Tlilrd race, selling; one and one- 
sixteenth mih's -Alfrpd C. 113. Bon- 
nie Lissak 107. Jack Doyle lOG, I o- 
madge 105. I’yrrho 105. Mary Moore 
105. Frank M. 104. Filiform 102. Ur- 
chin 102. Gin Spray 97, Dtidio S. 98. 
John J. Regan 88, Irene Mac 8G, Mi 
Neina SG. Memphtan 85. 

Fourth race. handicap: seven- 

eightns of a mile — Golden Rule 118 
and Fading Light 85. Durnell entry; 
Beau Ormond * IIG, Abe Frank IIG, 
Emshee lOG. (^. B. Campbell 105, 
Gregor K. 100. Charles Thompson  »S. 
Ahola 98. r*rince of Endurance 95, 
Mimo 94, Rankin 93. 

Fifth race, selling; thirteen-six- 
teenths of a mile — Tayoii 112, Silver 
Fizz 102, Fox Flyer lot. Chicago Girl 
mo. Optional 97. Blue .Mint 9G. Nauf- 
rago 9G. .Miss Planners 92. Harvester 
89. Full Back 87, Oronte 87. Dr. 
Moody 84. 

Sixth race; one mile and seventy’ 
yards- -Emshee I08. Little Scout 105. 
Potheen 105, Scotch Plaid 104, Cali- 
ban 97. Alma Girl 100, Flying Torpedo 
99. Felix Bard 99. 



Try HENRY CLAY PURE RVJC 
Bottled only at the Distillery, I.exing- 
ton, Ky., in Its ORIGINAL PURITY. 

SMILEY’S COURT DAY SALE 



On Monday will offer the opjwrtun- 
Ity of remarkable bargains in buggies. 
Ab^) a splendid consignment of 
horse.s. Z. T. SMILEY & CO., 

10. 2t 527 W. Short St. (N *w No.) 





MONDAY, MAY 11, 1903, 



THE :srOIEVTX(i HERaLH 



5 



FORTY 



COMPANIES IN WAYNE 



ALMOST EVERY INDUSTRY CEN- 
TERS IN OIL— REVIEW OF 
THE WEEK. 



work is boin^ pushed with greater 
energy than ever. The development 
for the next few months will be some- 
thing remarkable, and will be produc- 
tive of mtich good to the operators, 
as well as this section of the State 
in genera*!. 



Delicious strawberry cream at 
Glenn’s. 10-2t 



HILL HOUSE 



SOMERSET, Ky., May 10.— (Spe- 
cial.)— Any one who has never been 
in an oil field that is fast undergoing 
development would in all probability 
8t«and ill wonder if they should pay 
a visit to some portions of the Ken- 
tiicky-Tonnessee fields at the present 
time and witness the rush of work 
that has been and is now going on in 
this territory. 

Take Wayne county, for instance. 
In this county alone there are now 
more Ilian fflrty companies operating, 
ami almost every man, wagon and 
hf i.se available is emiiloyed by some 
of ibo various companies in their 
great rush of development in that 
section. The mills are kept busy cut- 
ting lumber for the erection of der- 
ricks, and the carpenters are busy as 
bees, while every wagon and team 
that can bo secured Is lieing used for 
hauling lumber t f the derricks, and 
new machinery from the railroad sta- 
tion at IJuniside. The hotels are I 
crowded to their utmost capacity 
and there are new prospectors arriv- 
ing in the fields from various parts of 
the country almost every day. 

The long pipe line iietween Somer- 
set and Parkersburg, W. Va.. is now 
compleiG with ilio exception of some 
.'ir  mUes. and the telegraph construc- 
tion Is comnleted clear through. The 
runs from the fields for the past week 
amounted to 5,800 barrels, of which 
the Cooper division produced 2,500. 
The total runs from these fields for 
the month of April was 19,285 barrels. 
For March the runs weye 21,500 bar- 
rels. The Wayne fields produced 14,- 
000 (luring the month of April, an 
increase over the previous month of 
2,500 barrels, while the decrease of 
runs in the BarbourvlUe fields for the 
sa^nc length of lime were in excess 
of the gains made in the Wayne fields. 
The Cooper and Slickford fields show 
satisfactory gains over the previous 
months. Three new wells came in 
at the Cooper division, one of which 
was dry. Coop- Blakeman & Co.. 
No. 2. was dry; Riverton Co.’s, Miller 
Bros.’ farm. Is :.'Xk 1 for leu barrels, 
as Is the J. I. .'ocUson No. 1, Coffey. 

The Barbourville division produced 
fouV wells, three^of which were dust- 
ers and the other a single barrel pw-' 
ductlon. Seven new wells were 
brought in on the Wayne fields dur- 
ing the past week, ranging all the 
way from three to one hundred and 
forty barrels pci day, the best pro- 
ducer being the Young No. 2, which 
in eleven feet of strong sand at a 
little more than 200 feet, is making 
140 barrels per day. This field will 
be subjected to a severe test within 
the next few months, and those who 
are familiar with the field have no 
f(?ars of the results being anything 
but BQiiRfactory. The Standard Oil 
f^ompauy has found a market for the 
heavy oil of Knox county wilh the 
railroad pooiilc for lubricating pur- 
poso.s, and are shipping large quanti- 
ties of It dally. They pay the pro- 
ducer 57 cents per barrel for this oil, 
but it Is not known what price they 
realise from the railroad people for 
same. 

The National Oil Reporter says it 
is tn receipt of information to the 
effect that it is planned to force the 
price of petroleum up, and that the 
Standard Oil Company will likely 
keep the price advancing with such 
rapidity that U will reach the figure 
of $2.50 within the next 18 moutlis. 
The consumer of course, bear 

the burden of this incn*ase, but the 
producer will reap the benefits of the 
proposed advance. The general out- 
look In the oil fields continues to ] 
pre.sont a more roseate appearance 



0[LEGAT[S 



GROSS 



ARRIVE FOR CONVENTION FRAUDS IN LOUISVILLE 



FIRST SESSION WILL BE HELD 
THIS MORNING— PROGRAM 
OF MEETING. 



AN EXTENSION OF MISS AD- 
DAMS’ PERSONALITY— FIRST 
SOCIAL SETTLEMENT IN 
AMERICA. 



Miss Addams did not formulate her 
plans clearly until she left Rockford 
College after her graduation in 1881. 
Then she determined to become a 
physician, so that she might find a 
natural place among the poor without 
any of the ariificlaliiy which charac- 
terizes most charitable work. She 
took a full year’s medical course in 
Philadelphia, although she was at the 
lime under the doctor’s care for a 
spinal trouble, with which she has 
always been afillcted. At the end of 
the year she was compelled to rest, 
and went to Europe, where she al- 
ternated travel and study. New f)OS- ' 
sibilities opened up to her in London I 
when she saw' the w'ork of Toynbee • 
Hall among the poor of that city. Why 
not make the same practical effort in 
the Ignited States? 

Up to that time her life was a 
preparation for the position which she 
holds today as the head of the first 
social settlement of America. The 
visitor who comes to Hull House in 
Chicago must bo impressed, as Hall 
Caine was on his visit, when he pro- 
nounced it the most complete social 
settlement in the world; yet it is 
really but an extension of the person- 
ality of this woman, w'hose gray eyes 
look over the lives of the many people 
coming each day to the door of the 
home she has made among the poor.— 
Bvery! ody’a Magazine. 



HISS LYDIA MARTIN DEAD 



The funeral services of Miss Lydia 
P. Martin, agcsl tw’enty-seven. who 
died at the Good Samaritan Hospital 
Sunday morning, will take place at 
the home of her mother. Mr.s. Nannte 
iMartin, No. 138 Harr street, tb»s ar- 
ternoon at 3 o’clfck, Rev. I. J. Spen- 
cer and Rev. Mark CoIIis officiating. 
The burial will take place in the Lex- 
ington- Cemetery. 

Miss Lydia Payue Martin was born 
in Scott county. ,*ar Payne’s Depot. 
August 22, 1875. She came to Lex- 
ington in 1899 and entered the Pro- 
testant Infirmary, now known as the 
Good Samaritan Hospital to study to 
be a trained nurse, and filled her posi- 
tion at the above infirmary until June 
of last year, when her health failed. 
She gave up the work and made a 
trip to the mountains. She- soon im- 
proved and returned to her home in 
Lexington, expecting to resume her 
duties as nurse, but never regain id 
health sufficient to warrajit her re- 
turning to her work, so remained at 
home under the care of her family. 
About twelve weeks ago she was tak- 
en to the Good Samaritan Hospital for 
treatment, where she died of con- 
sumption on Sunday morning. 

Her mother, Mr.s. Nannie Martin; 
four sister and two brothers survive. 
Her father. George K. Martin, died six- 
teen years ago. 



NEW CORPORATIONS. 

FRANKFORT. Ky.. May 10.— Incor- 
poration articles were filed in the of- 
fice of the Secretary of Stale as fol- 
lows: 

Green River Coal Company, of Hen- 
derson county, with $100,000 capital 
stock. O. W. McGinnis, of Evansville, 
Ind.: A. A. Arnold, of X'nion. Mich., 
I and R C. Arnold, of Spottsville, are 
day l)y day. and cv^ry week sees an i 

Increase in the activity of operators I Grauman, Henchley, 
all over the fields, while ney pros- I 



The Kentucky Laundry men’s As- 
sociation will meet here in Its ninth 
annual session today and tomorrow. 
The cortvcnliou will open at 10 a. m. 
and all session will be held in the 
Phoenix Hotel. Hon. Preston Kim- 
ball will deliver the address of wel- 
come. 

Dedegates began to arrive last night 
and about sixty arc expected to at- 
tend the convention. President 
Frank Kattorjohn. of Owensboro, and 
Secretary Ernest. VanOrsdall, of 
Shelbyville, headed a delegation 
which arrived by the C. & O. Others 
with them were Messrs. Thomas 
Sayres, Owen Sullivan. Treasurer W. 
A. Haas, V’ice President George Merke 
and F. \V. Schopponhorsl, of I.»oiiis- 
ville: W. \V. Godfrey, of Now Albany; 
C. E. McKoen, of Terre Haute; N. R. 
Howard. President of the Indiana As- 
sociation; P. C. Hlowalv, of Chicago; 
George C. Read, of the National Laun- 
dry Journal, Chicago; C. J. Cassidy. 
Pittsburg, President of the National. 
Laundrymen’s Association, and Sara 
Lyons, of Danville, Ky. 

A banquet will be given this even- 
ing. Laundries and stock farms will 
be visited Tuesday afterimon. 

THE PROGRAM. 

Monday, May 11 — Morning Session. 
Meeting oi oncd with prayer at ton 
o'clock. 

Address of Welcome. 

Reading of Minutes of Last Meeting. 
Reception of and Balloting on Appli- 
cations for Membership. 
Announcement of Committees. 

Report of President. 

Consideration of Communications. 
Report of Special Committees. 

New Business. 

Afternoon Session. 

Report of Secretary. 

Report of Treasurer. 

Address by President Cassidy of the 
Laundrymeii’s National Association. 
Short Talks by ex-Presidents. 

Essay — “Commission to Agents” — S. 

E. Mosel, Rowling Green. 

Tuesday, May 12 — Morning Session. 
Essay — “Points for Argument” — T. L. 

Metcalfe, Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Essay — “Wrinkles in the Business; 
Do They Pay?” — Owen Sullivan. 
Louisville. 

Remarks for the Good of the Associa- 
tion. 

Selection of Next Place of Meeting. 
Election of Officers. 

Installation of Officers. 

Officers. 

The officers of the association arc 
as follows: 

President — Frank KalteriKdin, Ow- 
ensboro. 

First Vice President — George 
Mercke, Louisville. 

Second Vice President — S. E. Mos(^ 
ly. Bowling Green. 

Secretary— Ernest VanArsdel, Shol- 
byvUle. 

Treasurer — W. A. Haas, Louisville. 
The members of the Executive Com- 
mittee are; I. N. Williams. Lexing- 
ton; Sam Lyons, Danville; George 
Denser. Louisville; Owen Sullivan. 
Louisville; T. S. Botlomley, lx)uis- 
ville; W. H. Pritchett, Madisonville. 



p(‘clors are being attracted to the 
territory by the scores. 

The rapid improvement in the con- 
dition of the roads leading into these 
field within (he last ten days has 
gn*aily facilitated matters for the 
companies that are rushing new ma- 



Cross Com- 
pany, of Louisville, with $300,000 capi- 
tal stock. The company will do a 
wholesale dry goods business. J. H. 
Grauman. P. E. Henchley and W. T. 
C. Cross are the Incorporators. 

Glasgow Lumber and Furniture 
Manufacturing Company, of Barren 
county, with $25,000 capital slock. 



chinery into this territory, and the ' Lewis. John Vaughan and W. T. 

Hicks are the incorporators. 



FtNLANDS FAMINE. 
Starvation Now Added to Oppression | 
and Persecution. | 

From far away Finland comes the : 



Lee County Oil aqd Gas Company, 
of Bcattyville, with $15,000 capital 
stock. L. C. Norman. Fayette Hewitt 
and R. Beatty, of Beattyville, are the 



wall of the hungry and that cry for ! incorporator,^, 
bread strikes the sympathetic chord | Manhattan Restaurant Company, of 
in every human heart. The sweetest l Louisville, with $2,000 capital stock, 
pleasure known is that wliich comes o. E. Yont and H. W. and Bertie 
from aiding our suffering fellow-men. Hackman are the incorporators. 

One of the world’s greatest philan- [ l^oulsville JVtale High School Ath- 



LEAVE FOR EUROPE. 



CHARGED BY THE ANTI-MACHINE 
CANDIDATES— CONVENTION 
TALKED OF. 



Chenault May Contest — Few Returns 
Received Sunday Make No 
Change — Tom Bradley May 
Run For County Clerk. 



of the ticket nominated, but nothing 
definite has been given out by the 
parly authorities. 



CLEVELAND ON FISHING JAUNT. 



TOLEDO, O., May 10. — lASsociatid 
Press.) — Former President Grover 
Cleveland arrived today at Middle 
Bass Island for a week’s fishing. 



LOUISVILLE, Ky.. May 10.— (Spe- 
cial.) — Scattering returns from half a 
dozen counties received today do not 
change (ho ro.snlt of Saturday’s pri- 
mary indicated in Sunday ‘.s H(uald. 
In the three close rac ‘ Uie several 
candidates all claim noininatiijn. It 
will likely require the official count to 
settle the claims. 

Chenault, Green. Hayes, Chinn. 
Mitchell and Julian went to Frank- 
fort today. John R. Pflanz. Clienauli’s j 
Ivouisville campaign manager, says ! 
gross frauds wen* nracUcod in favor | 
of Uagar. He .said Thomas 1). Brad- i 
ley, of Lexington, told him (hat. Chen- j 
mil would contest. The official lahu- I 
lailon in Louisville will Ivegin Tm s- 
lay and candidate.s will be represent- 
ed. C!omily C'lerk Simmons says the 
election was honest hero. Bos worth 
loft for L('xington, well satisfl(*d ai 
his snlendld victory. 

Thomas D. Bradley, of Lexington, 
.old friends hero today that lie would 
JO a candidate for County Clerk (if 
Fayette at the next primary there. 



GRANTED WAGE INCREASE. 

WILKESBARRE. Pa.. May 10 — 
(Associated Pre.ss.)- -As a result of 
the recent agitation, rock miiun.; in 
the Wyoming roc.don will rjrcivo a 
10 per cent avlvancc in wages, the 
same as decreed cmu! minor.-., dating 
from April 1st. Some of th** men re- 
c(nv(.'d their advance Saturday and 



the last of the others has been prom- 
ised this week. The diflicuUy is not 
settled, however, as the rock men de- 
mand 10 per cent back pay of all 
wag(*.s .since November 1st, and there 
is still the question whether they will 
receive this. 



Electrically heated gtoves and 
shoes arc proposed for motormen. 



TROTTING DATES. 



Detroit— July 20 to 25. 

Clevclaiid — July 27 to 31. 

Buffalo — August 3 to 8. 

Empire City— August JO to 15. 
Brighton Roach — .\ugti.st 17 to 22. 
Boston — August 24 to 28. 
Providence August 31 to Sept. 5. 
Hartford — September 7 to 12. 
Syracuse — September 7 to 12. 
Columbus- Sopl ember 21 to 25. 
Cincinnati SepB’mher 28 to Oct. ’1. 
Loxingt(jn — October 5 to 17. 



WIMB’S 

Nature 



FRAUDS ALLEGED. 



FRANKFORT. Ky.. May 10.— (Asso- 
ciated Press.) — So far the races for 
.\mHtor and Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture are the only ones in which then^ 
is a contest, in which there is still 
doubt as to the result of Saturday’s 
primary. Iii the race for Clerk of (he 
Court of Appeals, J. Morgan Chinn, 
the administration candidate is claim- 
ing clecdon. while his opponent. R. L. 
Greene, claims a majority for himself 
of at least 2,fi00. Three or four can- 
didates for Attorney General arc 
claiming the nomination. Judge Ira 
Julian being the only candidate who 
concedes defeat. 

The nomination for Superintendent 
of Public Instruction has two claim- 
ants. J. H. FiKjua and Ben Watt, each 
claiming a small majority. Fuqua ap- 
pears to be in the lead in the vote thus 
Car reported. 

Not one of the anti-slate candidates 
will talk for publication, though it is 
not known that they charge gros.^ 
frauds in Louisville and olscwliere In 
ihe State. 

There is talk that a Slate Conven- 
tion may now be ordered to ratify the 
work of the primary, and thereby re- 
move all doubt as to the regularity 



Is to love children, and no 
home can be completely 
happy without them, }^et the 
oi'dcal through which the ex- 
pectant mother must pass usually is 
so full of suffering, danger aud fear 
that she looks forward to the^ critical 
hour with apprehension and dread. 
Mother’s Friendy its penetrating and soothing properties, 
allays nausea, nervousness, and all unpleasant feelings, and 
so prepares the system for the 
ordeal that she passes through 
the event safel}^ and with but 
little suffering, as numbers 
have testified and said, “it is 
worth its weight in gold.” $i.oo per 
bottle of druggists. Book containing 
valuable information mailed free. 

THE ainDriELO REGULAIOR CO., Atlanta, Ga. 



We Are 
Now Opeti 
for Business 

With a full line of 

Builders’ Hardware, Cut- 
lery, Guns, Wagon 
Material, Etc. 

PAUL BAILER, lately with J. n. 
Howard, is in charge of our Awning 
Department and Repair Shop, and will 
be pleased to make you estimates on 
any work. 

We handle the Simmons Hardware 
('o.’s lino of True Blue and Keen Kut- 
lor Tools. 

Our Slock is Clean and Fresh. Wo 
Invito your Inspection. Our Prices ire 
as reasonable as consistent with fitst- 
class goods. r 

Hudson Pohiman 
Hardware Co. 

3 E. Main St. Both Phones 681. 



Wiicr’s 
Friend 



Base Bill aiiB Sponieg Boons 

BICYCLES 
TYPEWR TERS 

Sold and R mted on Easy Terms. 
INVESTIGATE THE 



I c 



OLIVER 



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC ! 

This is to warn Ihe public that cc^riain persons arc rraudnlontly using a 
preparation which (hey claim is Mincrallto Stone and Brick Finish. Tluv ex- 
clusive* rights to luaiiijfat'Uire and use Miin-ralito Stone and Brick Finish 
were Durcthasnd by me from Dr. N. B. Winter. Die orl,i.’inal maiiuracturor, and 
can bo used by me and no one else. I am pre;uircd to clean your sl mo 
frotits, wliul »w caps, sill and Voundaiions with MinoralUe Slone and Brick 
Finisli, and gnarvitee s.'itlsfVCvioa. 



G. E. PRATHER 




OI(f Phone 807-B. 



Lexington, Ky. 



C. Ora Updike 








COPYfiic,frr 



Would You 
Knowingly 

use a poor article that wouldn’t last 
half as long as good paint costing a 
few cents more per gallon? Well, 
hardly. 'nu*n try ours, it wifi give 
)ou the best rosults--. satisfaction 
sure. It’s bolli economical and dur- 
able. Beautifies, as well as nroserves, 
and imperviou.s to the weather. The 
sun can’t bli.ster Masiiry’s paint. 
U(':idy prepared, $1.50 per gallon. 



I 145 E. Mam St. 



Nca ' Postoffice. 



J. S. POER & CO. 



Contracting House Painters. 



Cor. Limestone atxl Short Sts. 



BACTERIOLOGY AND URINALYSIS 

I will devote my time in the future to this class of work. Special 
attention paid to TUBERCULOSIS AND KIDNEY DISEASES. Tw(mty-five 
years' experieuce should .s«*cirre accuracy. lieferencc^: All practising 

physicians in lids city. Telephone 1706. 

A. T. PARKER. 



Grand Gannon 

OF ARIZONA. 

Earth’s greatest wondci* — t 
the titan of chasms, a mile 
deep, many miles wide 
PICTURES OF IT: For 25 

cents will send the season’s 
nov(*lty-‘?a’Gfh7hf t'anjWi’ 
loohrome * view, uniquely 
nmnntod to reproduce the 
Canyon tints. Or, for same 
price, a set of fotir Idack-and- 
whilo prints, ready for frani- 
ing. 

BOOKS ABOUT IT: For 50 

cents will send a Grand Can- 
yon book, 128 pages. 93 illus- 
trations, cover in colors; con- 
tains articles by noted 
authors, and scientists. 
Worthy a place in any library. 
Or will mail free pamphlet, 

’ Titan of Chasms.” 

A. ANDREWS. Gen. Agt., 
108 North X'ourih Stn*ct, 

St. I./mlK, Mo. 

Sante Fe 






HAYMAKERS WILLING TO 

PLAY LEXINGTON TEAM. 

The Haymakers, of Sandersville. de- 
feated a picked nine from Forest Hill. 
Yellmantown and Irishtown yesterday 
afternoon at Sandersville in a well 
played game by the score of 5 to 0. 
The battery for the Haymakers was 
Stewart and Fitzer. and for the picked 
team, Bevin and Armstrong. For the 
Haymakers Stewart i)ltchcd splendid 
ball. Bevin did g(x d slab work, too. 
but bis support was very poor. The 
Haymakers made a number of long 
hits. They say that no team Is too 
good for them, and are willing to 
tackle the I^cxlngton Sunday League 
team. 



Mr. and Mrs. Hector Hlllenmeyor. 
Mrs. Carrie Hillcnmeyor and Mrs. 
Harting left last night for a visit to 
Germany. They expect to be gone 
some time. 



trophists says: When 1 first engaged 

in the task of relieving suffering hu- 
manity my heart was filled with hope, 
hut that my life’s dream should be ful- 
filled to the extent It has Is beyond 
my greatest expectation. Of 8.756,000 



letic Association, with $2,000 capital. 

Amended articles were filed by: 
Foreman Bros.’ Novelty Company, of 
McCracken county, increasing its cap- 
ital stock from $2.4u0 to $20,000; the 
Berry Surgical Instrument Company, 



REWARD FOR MISS 

REICHLIN’S MURDERER. 

i LOUAINR. O.. May 10.— ( Associal- 
' od Press.) — A man whoso name is 
withheld today sent $ 4,000 to J. J 
Mahoney, of the Knights of ('olumbus. 
of this city, to be oiTerod as a reward 
I for the detection of the murderer of 
I Agatha Rcichlin. 



persons who have taken Dr. Burk - 1 of Loutsviye. increasing from $7,500 



Idirt’s Vegetable Compound last year. 

p *r cent were cured. The grati- 
tude of th(» afflict(id is noured In upon 
mo from every civlllze^l nation and 
clime. 25 cents. All druggists. 



to $20;000, and the A. F. Voss Mantel 
Company, of Louisville, increasing 
from $14,000 to $40,000, and changing 
its name to Voss-Cochran Mantel 
Company. 



ROYAL BETROTHAL. 

LONDON. Eng.. May 10.— (Associa- 
ted Press.) — The betrothal of Prince 
Andreas, fourth son of King George 
of Greece, and Princess Alice, oldest 
daughter of Prince l^o^is of Batten- 
burg. is officially confirmed. 





THAT SATISFIED LOOK 

!s found on the face of every user of our Carria^^es 

They arc properly constructed. 

They are made of the best material. 

They are up-to-date in style. 

They are comfortable. 

They are light draft. 

Tliey don’t cost any more than cheap ones. 



We have 


a very large 


assortment from whicli to 


dioosc. 


We ask ycu to 


visit our 


repoHtorv and 


I lok tliem 


over. 



SMITH, WATKINS & CO. 






G 



THE M(M{MXG IIEEAEl) 



MONDAY, MAY 11. 1903. 




FOUND IN lAWRtNCEBURO 



HE HAD CUT OFF HIS MUSTACHE. 
BURK’S CONDITION IS 
SERIOUS. 



CREATION 



WILL BE PRESENTED AT CHRIST 
CHURCH CATHEDRAL ON 
MAY 22. 



PAPERS NOTICE 



TO BE READ BY KENTUCKIANS 
AT NEWSPAPER MEN'S CON- 
VENTION. 



OF APPOINTMENT AS MEMBER 
OF COMMITTEE ON COAL RE- 
CEIVED BY MR. NORWOOD. 



Henry Crowder, who stabbed James 
Burk Saturday ni^hl, was arrested in 
Lawrenceburg by J. K. I’axton, Sher- 
iff of Anderson county, and Chief of 
Police McCartv, of Lawrenceburg. 
yesterday morning and brought back 
to this city- and lodge I in the county 



The sublime oratorio “The Crea- 
tion.” will be given at ('hrist Oiurch 
Cathedral on Friday, the 22nd of May. 
at 8 o’clock. Lexington is not a mu- 
sical center, or perhaus it would be 
more eryhcinlslic to say that the 
musical talent of our city generally 
speaking is P^ing dormant. Realizing 
this, the Choral Club is making an 
earnest effort to stir un Interest along 
this line, and to lead our people, by 
the matchless power of music, to ap- 



jail. His examining trial i8\set for, , . ... , 

. . 1 i  1 predate the privileges that belong 

th s morning at 11 o cloclc before * 



Squire John D. Payne. 

Crowder left Lexington yesterday 
morning oif the Louisville Southern 
train. A message was received from 
Latvrenceburg shortly after his ar- 
rival. saving that he was in that city 
and asking if ho was wanted here. 
Lieut. Overly immediately swore out 
a warrant before Squire Payne and 
read the warrant to the Sheriff of 
Anderson county over the wire. 

Crowder was soon located and 



to ns. 

The chorus will number one hun- 
dred voices of local talent, with the 
exception of a trained quartette from 
Cincinnati, all under the able man- 
agement of Prof. Ehrgott. This beau- 
tiful praise service will be one of the 
most delighUul musical feasts Ta»x- 
ington has ever enjoyed, and will be 
held under the auspices of Christ 
Church Cathedral. 

The service will begin promptly at 
8 o’clock with a shortened form of 



placed under arrest. He was brought 
here hr- Sheriff Paxton and taken be- - 



The Fifth Annual Convontlon of i 
the National As.sociation of .Miniigers 
og Newspaper Circulation will mec-l 
In Boston on June 8, and in. Among 
tho.so who will read papers are two 
Kentuckians. I). B. G. Rose, of The 
Louisville Post, having for his subject 
"The HclatioiK^bip That Should Exist 
Between ICdftorial, Advertising and 
Circulat ion Depart ments." 

Desha Breckinridge, of The Morn- 
ing Herald, will read a paper on "How 
Best to Secure Subscribers for a 
Morning Paper in a Town of .’’O.OOU 
and so Manage the Circulation that 
the Business Office ('an Keep Tract 
of Each Subscriber, and Wht^i and 
Why He Discontinued, Without too 
Great Expense.” 

Among Others who will read paers 
are A. G. Lincoln, of Tho Post DIa- 
I patch. Si. I./Oiiis: G. R. Mundy, The 
1 Inquirer. !*hiladelphia: W. H. Jones. 
(The Bee, Sacramento, California: W. 

' H. Gille.spie, The Free Press, Detroit. 
■Mich.: W. H. W x)ds, The Herald Bos- 
1 ton. .Miss. 







Mr. C. J. Norwood, of this city, has 
received notification of his appoint- 
ment to he a member of the advisory 
committee on coal hy the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition Company. 

Tho aynointr.K'nt is regarded as a 
high con.;lImont to .Mr. Norwood in 
recognition of liis raitliful work in con- 
nection with the Kentucky Exhibit : 
Association, and his accurate knowl- ! 
edge of the subjects with which he 
will have to deal. He has been an 
active worker for tho association since 
it.-i organization, and deeply Interested 
in the mineral exhibit which Ken- 
tucky will have at the Exposition. 

The members of the committee are 
Capt. W. N. Palo. West Virginia; C. 
J. Norwood. Kentucky; John P. Keb- 
ler. Colorado; B. F. Bush. Missouri: 
R. C. Luther, Pennsylvania: E. W. 
Parker, of the I'nited Stales Geolog- 
ical Survey. All of them are experts 
on minerals, and coal in particular, 
and were selected by Mr. Parker. 



This annual sale brings just now an opportunity that the women of this community have been waiting 
for. iluiulreds of pieces of th • most desirable ribbon will be offered at a 

hi:i)l ( TION OF ONF HALF 

Every yard is fashionable in color, design, weave or jiatteru in whatever way fashion is expressed. 
cunT send samples of these sjiecial lots, bm all mail orders will be satisfactorily attended to. 

The story of the ribbons follows in derail: 



fore Squire Payne, who placed his 
bond at $500. He was unable to fur- 
nish bond and w'as committed to jail. 
When found by the officers, Crowder 
had cut off his mustache. He told 
the officers that his name was John- 
son. i 

Crowder v/o Jd have been arrested 
immediately after the cutting had . 



the Dean. 

Realizing that the capacity of the 
Cathedral will be taxed to the limit, 
the warens of the church have pur- 
 sued the method used at weddings, 
when cards of admission must he 
used. The vestr'men will, as usual, 
act as ushers and receive these cards 
at the door of the church. All per- 
sons desiring these cards — which arc 



not the Iniured man refused to swear , 

. * , , , merely issued to nrevent overcrowd- 

out a warrant, and declared that he v^/ . v 

, , . . . , M » ing — will nlease apply to Mrs. T. I), 

would not have his assailant prose- ‘ 

... »i 1 1 Ballard, chairman, or anv member of 

cuieil. As soon as the police learned . 

, t * g rt t * z t the Choral Club. These applications 

of the serious nature of Burk s inju- | * , 

1 -.u snould be made at once, as only a 

rles they instituted a search, with 



GEARY 



ELECTED CAPTAIN OF THE 1903 
CHAMPIONS— THE TEAM'S 
SPLENDID RECORD. 



GO SEE IT— THE 

TOWNSEND PROPERTY. 

Nos. 102 and loG Patterson street. 
Two frame houses, well built, under- 
pinned with good cellars, four rooms, 
hall, pantry, etc., good cisterns; cost 
$1,400 to build, lots cost $2,000; good 
paying tenants. To be sold by Master 
Commissioner Monday, noon. Court 
Day. Parries wishing good paying 
proijerly had belter go and examine 
it before too late. 

C. K. OLDHAM. 

9*2t. Real Estate Auctioneer. 



the result that he was apprehended 
in I.,awrenceburg. 

Account of Eye Witness. 

Tom Williams, who. so far as is 
known, was the only disinterested 



thousand tickets will be issued. This 
will be a rare treat for the music 
lovers of Lexington, and, given under 
the auspices of the church, places it 
upon its proper plane as a praise ser- 
vice to the glory of God. and wc hope 



wltncsa to the stabbing, says he was g^eat ora 



Standing outside of the door when 
Crowder was ejected from the sa- 
loon. When Burk went back into 
the saloon. Crowder said: “If he 

comes out here again PU cut his head 
off. Williams saw no knife at that 
time, but recollected seeing Crowder 
take something from his inside coat 
pocket. Crowder continued totnlkloud- 
ly and abuse Burk, who came out of 
the door and ordered him to leave. 
Instead of doing so, he began hitting 
Burk rapidly In the side. Burk slap- 
ped him in the face and walked back 
into the saloon. Williams did not 
realize that Burk had been cut until 
he saw Crowder step to tho curb, 
fling the yiood from his knife, wipe 
it on his pants leg and put it in his 

IKjckot. 

After the cutting Crowder walked 
away. Williams went into the salooon 
and as he did so Burk looked down 
and saw the blood and for the first 
time learned that he had been cut. 
He immediately called a night hawk 
and was driven to the St. Joseph’s 
Hospital. 

Burk Dangerously Hurt. 

At the first examination it was not 
thought that Burk was dangerously 
wounded. A further examination, 
however, revealed the true nature of 
the cuts, and an operation became 
necessary. It was found that the 
knife had penetrated the pit oj the 
abdomen and entered the intestines. 
The operation lasted for more than an 
hour, during which time the injured 
man bled profusely. During yester- 
day reports from the Hospital stated 
that Burk was doing as well as could 
be expected. His condition is regard- 
ed serious, and no one is allowed to 
see him. His physicians hope that If 
no complications arise he may re- 
cover. 



tions will he given so that Lexington 
may enjoy tho privilege of other 
cities. 

Of course, this service, given in 
the church, will not be marred by 
any audible demonstration of appre- 
ciation by the congregation. 

BAKER P. LEE, Dean. 



CHIEF REAGAN GOES 

TO NEW ORLEANS. 



Chief of Police Jerry J. Reagan 
left yesterday afternoon for New Or- 
leans. via Louisville and the Illinois 
Central. He goes to attend the In- 
ternational Association of Police 
Chiefs, which will meet In the Cres- 
cent City May 12. continuing through 
the 15th. Chief Reagan received a 
letter from the Chief of Police of 
New Orleans, Mr. Journeo, which 



Makes the children robust — bread 
made of 

Cream Flour 

Made by the Lexington Holler Mills 
Company. Ask the grocer for it, and 
insist on getting it. 



Glenn’s ices always please. 



stales that the visiting chiefs and de- 
tective are to be well taken care of 
and to have a royal good time. Chief 
Reagan expects to profit by the many 
suggestions he will receive at the con- 
ventkm, an excellent program having 
been arranged. The Association met 
in Ixiuisvllle last year. 

Captain William Jenkins will be 
acting Chief during Mr. Reagan’s ab- 
sence. 



The game Saturday is the last one 
that will be played by t!ie State Col- ' 
i lege team this year. Further games ' 
I will he prevented by the encampment, ' 
j which will begin May 21. Liimedlale- , 
j ly following the game the team re- 
I tired to Us quarters in the gymnasium 
’ and unanimously elected Mr. Robert 
I Geary, who h.as made an enviable 
[ record as pitcher this year, captain 
for next year. The members of the 
team recognizing Mr. Geary's fitness . 
for tlio place, elected him unanimous- 
ly, and there was no opposing candi- 
date. 1 

The retiring captain. W. H. Grady, 
received many compliinonts for the ; 
able way in which he had led the 
team to victory, and tho members are 
more than please l with their year’s ' 
work. The students arc already pre- ' 
dieting a successful campaign for next 
year. They say that a good captain ; 
is hall the ban ic. and they think they 
have the best in the State. Beside 
the captain the personnel of tho com- 
ing team will ho pracileally the same 
as that of this year, as six of the 
present team and three “subs.” will 
return to college next year. 

Of tho seven games played with the 
college learns of Kentucky, tho team | 
has won without exception, giving to 
it the uncontested championship. 
Central University, Kentucky Uni- 
vorsUy, Georgetown (College and 
Berea College have all been defeated 
in one game each. South Kentucky 
College was defeated in three con- 
' seciitive games. Of the five games 
I playetl, while on the southern trip. 
State College was victorious, giving 
the team a record of ten games won 
and two lost. 

Mr. ?I. M. Box, captain of the last 
year’s foot ball team at the Univer- 
sity of ('incinnati, visited friends in 
this city Saturday. 

Mr. H. A. Bayless, of the Cincin- 
nati Post, accompanied the Cincin- 
nati team to Lexington Saturday, and 
remained over with friends. 



2c 
5c 
5c 
10c 
10c 
ide 
15c 
20c 



a Yard tor narrow black Taffeta rib- 
bon: all silk, worth ijc. 

a Yard for plain black Taffeta rib- 
bon: all silk, worth loc. 

a Yard for plain black Satin ribbon: 
worth 12 I-2C. 



Do not fail to attend Smiley’s Court 
l ay Sale Monday. Splendid consign- 
ment of horses. Also closing out sale 
of a number of Buckeye and McFar- 
land buggies. 

Z. T. SMILEY & CO.. 
10-2t 10-2t. 527 W. Short St. (New No ) 



GERANIUMS 



A Farmer Straightened Out. 

“A man living on a farm near hero 
came in a short time ago completely 
doubled up with rheumatism. 1 
handed him a bottle of Chamberlain’s 
Pain Balm and told him to use it 
freely and if not satisfie l after using 
It he need not pay a cent for it,” says 
C. P. Raydcr, of Pattens, Mills, N. Y. 
”A few days later he walked into the 
store as straight as a siring and 
handed me a dollar saying, ‘give me 
another bottle of Chamberlain’s Pain 
Balm. I want it in the house all ^the 
time for it cured me.” For sale by 
McADAMS & MORFORD. 



® MOTION DOCKET • 

• FOR TODAY. • 

• • 

AV. M. Kenny, Jr., vs.'J. II. Fostoi*, 
etc.; to hear proof and dispose of 
motion in reference to assignment 
and to Foster's exempi ions land to 
have final order made as to attached 
fund. 

J. C. Henderson vs. M. T. Mar- 
lin; demurrer to reply. 

Louis Pilcher vs. James E. Hughes; 
general demurrer to petition. J 

Union Benevolent Society No. 8. 
etc., vs. Marlin, etc.; too have tho 
evidence signed and allowed. ' 

Darnall vs. Jones’ executor, etc.; 
to file mandate of tho Court of Ap- 
poals. 

Duncan vs. Doyle; general demur- 
rer to reply. , 

James E. Neely vs. the Industrial 
•Mutual Dejmsit; to dispose of motion 
filed by (’. D. Evans May 1st. | 

Manchasttu* (’oal Co. vs. Buford 
Graves; to  Usposc of demurrer to 
reply and to strike out. 

C. C. Fain vs. Lexington Railway 
Company; to dispose of motion for a 
new trial. 

John H. Powell vs. City of Lexing- 
ton; to dispose of motion for new 
trial. i 

Woodson Jones vs. Adams Express 
Company: motion of L. C. Weir to be 
substituted as party defendant. 

Manchester Coal Company vs. Bu- 
ford Graves; demurrer to reply; mo- 
tion to strike from reply; motion to 
require plaintiff to paragraph reply. 

Young’s trustee vs. Young, etc.; 
for permission to file petition of Belle 
Young an l Percy Young and for sub- 
mission thereon. . ' j 

Same vs. Same; permission to file 
response of C. E. Norman to petition 
of Bello A. and Percy Young. 

Woolley’s heirs, etc.. Vs. Woolley’s 
executor, etc.; plaintiffs suggest ■ 
death of C. W. Woolley and ask for ' 
revivor in names of heirs and widow. ! 

Same vs. same; for permission to | 
file intervening petition of Mary S. 
Woolley. 

J. n. Clarke, etc., vs. M. E. Clark, 
etc.; to confirm sale made herein. 

Dora Carter vs. John Carter; mo- 
tion to make rule absolule issued by 
said court April 13. 1903. 

Buckeye Buggy Company vs. M. T. 
Lyle & Co., etc.; for judgment. 

Woolley’s heirs vs. Woolley’s exec- 
utor; to revive cause as to Charles 



w 
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(0 
fi) 

'f' 

T 

ft) 
ft) 
fl) 

ft) 

^t) 

ft) 
ft) 

^t) 

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ft) 
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12 and I I West Main 

’ ■ S'. «-• S'. S', S'. S': S'. S'. S'. S; S^ S'. S': S'. S' 





\v 



a Yard for black Satin ribbon, 2 
inches wide, worth 2cc. 

a Yard for black Taffeta ribbon, 
3 1-2 inches wide, worth 15c. 

a Yard for black Gros-grain rib- 
bon, 2 in. wide, worth 20c. 

a Yard for black Satin ribbon, 
2 1-4 inches wide, worth 25c. 

a Yard for black Gros-grain rib- 
bon, 4 1-4 in. A'ide, worth 30c 

10 Ip a Yard for Satin Taffeta ribbon, 
IC.2^ all silk, beautiful in texture and 
colors: lor shower sashes and Com- 



.. 

mencement gowns. Ail shades and \l/ 
plenty cf white and black: worth 20c. il) 

OCp a Yard for Satin Taffeta ribbon, 6 
£m% 3 lf inches wide; fashionable colors 

Ui 

IQp a Yard for Satin Liberty ribbon; ik 
Iv/l/ all silk, all colors: a inches wide: \k 

vk 

ICp a Yard for fancy ribbons, striped 
lUL with white or seif color. A va- 

\k 
ik 



a Yard for Satin Taffeta ribbon, 6 
inches wide: fashionable colors 
and black and whiue a plenty: worth 40c. 

a Yard for Satin Liberty ribbon; 
all silk, all colors: 4 inches wide; 
worth 25c. 

a Yard for fancy ribbons, striped 
with white or seif color. A va- 
riety of very pretty shades, worth 25c 

17 'p 3 Y^rd for striped ribbon: all 
I I 2w light summery colors: 3 1-2 in. 
wide; some with Persian effects: worth 
30c. 

a Yard for plaid ribbons, G inches 
wide: beautiful shades, worth 

a Yard for fancy plaid ribbons, j 
inches wide, worth 60c. 



29c 

40 c. 

39c 




k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

k 

«k 

ik 

 0 



Street, Lexington, Ky. 

5F- 5^- Cr- ^ ST’- ^ ^ 3?'. ^ 



\V. Woolley in names of his widow 
and liis heirs. 

Same vs. same; to file iielilion and 
to be made parly plaintiff to this 
suit. 

B. G. Thomas, Inistee, etc., vs. 
Bello A. Young, etc.; to file interven- 
ing pcUtlon and to have it made a 
part of the record in this action, and 
to submit cause. 

B. Ross vs. T. A. Hornsey; to 
dispose of demurrer to answer. 

Trial DockeL 

Skain, etc., vs. Amanda Thomas, 
etc. 

Tlionias Jones’ executors vs. Emily 
Joues, etc. 

Buckeye Buggy Company vs, M. T. 
Lyle & Co. 

Perry Crosthwalt vs. unknown 
heirs of Julia Taylor. 

Amanda White vs. Sun Life Insur- 
ance (.'oinpany. 



Too Great a Risk. 

In almost every neighborhood some 
one has died from an attack of colic 
or cliolera morbus, often before metli- 
cino could be procured or a physician 
suninumod. A reliable remedy for 
those diseases should be kept at hand. 
Tho risk is too great for any one to 
lake. Uhamborlain’s Colic, Cholera 
and Diarrhoea Remedy has undoubod- 
ly saved the lives of more people than 
any other medicine in use. It can al- 
ways he dep(*nded upon. For sale hy 
McADAMS & MORFORD. 



MOUNTING FOP WAR 

TROPHY IS COMPLETED. 



The stone iiedestal upon which is 
to he mounted tho Spanish canon pro- 
sonlod ta the city of Lexington by 
the War Department, is completed. 
The gun will be placed immediately 
in front of the main building at State 
College, and will point out toward 
Broadway. 

All is now in readiness for the elab- 
orate ceremonies which are to ac- 
company the mounting, Tuesday, May 
19. The program of the occasion has 
not been announced, but it is expect- 
ed that a number of Important offi- 
cials will be jiresent and participate. 



D(‘lIcIous 

Uleim’s. 



strawberry 



cream at 
lb-21 



ED CORRlGAiN HERE. 

Ed Corrigan, the well known Chi- 
cago turfman, arrived in this city 
Saturday and registered at the Phoe- 
nix Hotel. Mr; ('orrigan is in tTic 
Blue Grass for a few days to insiioct 
his horses here. 



A Good 
Smoke 



From Good Tobacco is a iMeasuro. 
Our Brand of Smoking Tobacco and 
our Special Brailds of (’hoice (’igurs 
are a genuine pleasure to the smoker. 



A LARGE VARIETY OF 

Pipes, Holders 



ETC. 



•"'Ctjmc “*lrT' Mere For AH 
Your Needs in Tobacco. 




McClelland Building. 

Cor. Short and Upper Streets. 
LEXINGTON. KY. 



THE GOVERNMENT 



THERMOMETER. • 



The following temperature and rain- 
fall data were recorded at the United 
Stales Weather Bureau. State College, 
yesterday. May 10, 1903: 

C a. m. ... 58 12 m C8 

8 a. ni .... CO 2 p. ni . . . . 72 
10 a. m. ... 05 4 p. m. ... 75 

Maximum temperature. 7G degrees. 
Minimum temperature. 58 degrees. 
Mean temperature, G7 degrees. 
Above normal, 7 degrees. 
ITecipilation. none. 

Deficiency. 1.73 Inches, 

R. H. DEAN. Observer. 



Artistic Designs and 
Colorings in 

W dll Paper 
Frescoing 



Boa 



Painting 



Colored Sketches of Interiors. 



CANNAS 

COLEAS 



and other Flowering Plants 
should be bedded now. We 
are selling healthy, vigorous 
plants. 



Honaker 

FLORIST 



Whn you want a pleasant physic | 
try (/haniberlain's Stomach and Liver • 
Tablets. They are easy to take and 
pleasant in effect. For sale hy 
McADAMS & MORFORD. 



^unninghogi 



Paint Dept. 21 W. Short St. 



Paper Dept. 141 N. Broadway. 




Is unsurpassed in Quality, Flavor 
and Nulrlment. All Grocers sell 
It. Our Bakery is new and up-to- 
date. 

VISITORS WELCOME TO SEE 
H^W WE MAKE IT. 

Tim Deiicaiesseii Baneni 

Seventh and Upper Streets. 



Bath Mats 



A NICE ACCESSORY TO THE BATH ROOM FLOOR. EXTRA 
HEAVY TERRY CLOTH. COLORS— LIGHT BLUE, PINK, 
GREENS AND PERSIAN EFFECTS. 50c TO $1.00 EACH. 

White Spreads 

A LARGE ASSORTMENT TO CHOOSE FROM. CRIB SIZE 
TO LARGEST BED SIZE. WHITE AND COLORS. PLAIN 
AND FRINGED. 75c, $1.00, $150 TO $5,00. 

Summer Blankets 

YOU WILL FIND A PAIR OF THOSE SUMMER-WEIGHT 
BLANKETS JUST THE THING YOU WILL NEED THIS 
WEEK. 11-4 SIZE $3.50, $4.50 PAIR. 



PHONES 70 and 142. 



We Have a Few 

PIANOS 

Left that will be put aside till 
after our building has been re- 
modeled. If you want to see 
them come 

MONDAY MORNING 



Mitchell, Cassell Baker 



Montenegro-Riehm Music Company 



161 E. MAIN. 



J. S. REED, M’gV. 






1 



MONDAY. MAY 11, 1903. 



THE IlEHAl.D. 



Name. 


W’ard. 


Block. 


Lot. 


Luxon, .VI rs. Sarah B.. and children 
of Thos. B. laixon. Laura B. 
Coleman and Elizabeth Jane 
Armcl 


2 


41 


rt 


Williamson, J. R., and Est. of Wm 




2 


41 


27 


Williamson. J. K.. and Est. of Wm 




1 


15 


11 


Willinmson. J. U., and Est. of Wm. 




1 


15 


;i 


fkiwlmg. B 




2 


41 


29 


Dowling, H. and Elizabeth 




1 


22 


18 


Daly. Peter 




2 


41 


30 


Bonny man. Goo 




2 


46 


21-22 






0 


54 


23 


Ools, Mrs. Mary E 




2 


54 


20 


Thomas. B. G 




1 


22 


14 


('larkc. Julia 




1 


15 


j  


Foeney, Mrs. Marv 




2 


34 


19 


Sheets. Est. of U. W 




1 


22 


13 


Shannon. Mrs. Jno 




1 


22 


16 


McCormick, Est. of Jas 




1 


1 


4 


Washington, Susan 




2 


46 


12 


(’olorod Baptist Church, Trustees of. 


1 


22 


19 


McNamara. Mrs. B 




1 


1 


3 


Carroll. Ksl. of P 




2 


41 


23-24 


S. T. & S. V. Co., Trustee of Goo. 
Grimes 


2 


46 


14 


Beard, Mrs. E. J 




2 


54 


35 



1991 



1892 



1893 



1894 



N.^nic. Ward. 

Stalifl, Mrs. C’harlotte. . 4 

Sayre Institulo, Trustees of 4 

Sayro InstUule, Trustees of 4 

Merrick I^odgo, I. 0..0. F 8 

McMillan, J. U 3 

Hagerman. B. C 3 

Shannon. Pat, “Trustee” 3 

DoiiRhcrty. Mrs. Maggie 4 

O’NoiU, Jas 3 

Norton. F. H 3 

AVililanis. B. N 3 

Name. Ward. 

Spencer, Kev., I. J 4 

Conlral Christian Church, Trus- 
tees of 4 

Davenport^ Mrs. M. J 4 



Name. Ward. 

Morgan. Mrs. (X B 2 

Cahill. I)., “(idn.** Jennie Vertue 2 

Skain, Mrs. Jennie. Nellie and Wm. . 2 

Scriigham, Johanna, and Lexington 

City National Bank 2 

Orjdmn Asylum 2 

Mc.Veekin. J. \V 2 

Walton. Matt 2 

Stoll, J. W., formerly Est. of Geo. 

Stoll, Sr 2 

Stoll. C. H.. formerly Est. of Geo. 

Stoll. Sr 2 

Wright, Thos 2 

Moglone. Mrs. S. M 2 

Scoll, Walter 2 

Huffman. Catherine B 2 

Dodge. Asa 2 

McConi^cIl, Thos 2 

1 

« 

Namc\ Ward. 

Bruce, E.st. of W. W t  

Bruce, Est, of W. W 6 

Bruce, Est. of W. W 6 



Name. Ward. 

O’Gara. Hugh, and Jas. McAllister, 
Salllo, Mary and Bessie ('urry. . 6 

C'larUo  Julia and Augustus.. 5 

Hardesty, Nannie C 4 

McFarland. Jas 5 

Nelson, W. B 5 

Nelson. II. B 4 

Boll. Mrs. Mary E 4 

Bateman, Florence N 4 

Combs Lumber Co 5 

Fuller. Mrs. Lucy 6 

Nelson. W. Bush 4 

Clohesy, Tim 4 

McAllister. Jas 4 

McAllister. Jas 5 

Lane. Sallie T 5 

Shaeffor. Henry 5 

Brock & Connell B 

Hutchinson. Mrs. M. G 4 

Coml)s. Mrs. Mary B 

Jones, J 5 

Berkley, J. W., Est. of 5 

Elkin. Mrs. Sardonia S 

Bullock. Mrs. F. H 5 

Pulliam, Mrs. Addic W 4 

Parker. Mrs. Virginia 4 

Richmond. W 8 

Rotunson. Est. of J. F 4 

Huntington. Est. of C. P B 

l^exingion Lumber Co 5 

L *xington Lumber Co *..... 4 

Bronslon, C. T B 

Bronston. C. J B 

Farrell. Mrs. H B 

Keller, Dr D B 

Stone, Est. of Robt 6 

Iterry. W. G 5 

Hotilihan, W. J 4 

Miller, S. H 4 

Eillngcr. Chas 4 

Hayes, Miss Ellon 4 

Woolley, Lucy W B 

Cassidy, Malinda 1 5 



Name. Ward. 

Murray, Pat 1 

Carrier. Mary B. and her children, 
formerly Est. of W. W. Bruce. . . 6 

Riley, Est. of Mrs. Ellen 

lx winan, Thos. 6 

Walby, Mildred, and Est. of Wm. 

Shiddell, Est. of Mrs. Mary 1 

Stoll. Est. of K. P 1 

Lexington Roller Mills Co 1 

Downing. Lucy A., Mrs. Lula Spar- 
row, Mrs. Addle Bose and Mrs J. 

Downing 

Calvert. Mrs. Rebecca..* 6 

Ambrose. Mrs. Julia 1 

Haymaii, J. Q. A., and E. B., and 

Mrs. Lizette B. Morgan 1 

Jdoyd, Wm.. Patty and Margaret. ... « 

Idn)*d, Wm.. Patty and Margaret. ... 6 

Royster. Samuel B., and Bettio R. 

Thom]»son .• 6 

Piatt, D. A., formerly Est. of Thos. 

Foreman 

Hllcy, Jno. J.. and Geo. Ott, formerly 



1 



1 



1 



Block. 

97 

98 
98 

87 

89 

90 
90 
98 
90 

88 
90 



Block. 

106 

lOG 

lOG 



Block. 

37 

52 

Bi 



37 

37 

51 

36 

37 

37 

52 
52 
•36 
37 

51 

52 



Block. 

'21 

21 



Block. 

5 

5 

9 

105 

15 

18 

127 

127 

127 

5 

9 

131 

in 

lOB 

5 

15 

15 

18 

131 

5 

14 

14 

14 

18 

127 

105 

20 

127 

5 

13 
127 

18 

18 

9 

14 
9 
9 

111 

in 

105 

105 

14 

18 



Block. 

1 

40 

40 

40 

3 

3 

3 

2 



4 

44 



.1 

46 

4G 

46 






NORTH LIMESTONE STREET, PAYABLE OCTOBER 1st. 



1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


67 


30 


65 


06 


62 


82 


60 


57 


58 


«)«  


56 


08 


53 


84 


51 


60 


96 


2.5 


93 


03 


89 


78 


86 


57 


83 


36 


80 


15 


76 


95 


73 


74 


34 


43 


33 


20 


32 


06 


30 


91 


29 


76 


28 


62 


27 


47 


26 


33 


4(t 


42 


38 


42 


37 


63 


36 


28 


:m 


94 


33 


63 


32 


25 


30 


91 


25 


63 


24 


72 


23 


88 


23 


03 


22 


17 


21 


31 


20 


47 


19 


61 


17 


08 


16 


43 


15 


87 


15 


30 


14 


74 


14 


16 


13 


(;o 


13 


o:{ 


26 


24 


25 


32 


24 


45 


23 


.58. 


22 


71 


21 


83 


20 


96 


20 


08 


63 


.34 


61 


2.J 


59 


12 


57 


01 


54 


90 


52 


78 


50 


67 


48 


56 


:i6 


39 






18 


59 


32 


69 


:ii 


48 


30 


27 


29 


06 


27 


85 


39 


56 


38 


18 


36 


86 


35 


55 


34 


23 


32 


92 


31 


60 


.30 


28 






























23 


41 


74 


91 


72 


32 


69 


86 


67 


33 


64 


83 


62 


34 


59 


8.5 


57 


35 






36 


01 


35 


65 


34 


37 


33 


11 


31 


84 


30 


56 


29 


29 






30 


61 


29 


55 


28 


50 


27 


44 


26 


38 


25 


33 


24 


21 










40 


77 


39 


31 


.37 


86 


36 


41 


34 


94 


33 


4!t 














47 


81 


46 


15 


44 


38 


42 


61 


40 


84 














6 


72 


21 


94 


21 


10 


20 


26 


19 


41 




























60 


29 


73 


























t 




41 


65 


'.7 


■/ 


' . 
























61 


85 






























20 


51 






























26 


. 03 






























40 


’90 



HFRAin WANT 


“Af 




"■“nLOnLlJ iVnIil 


nl 


iOl 



Lot. 

30 

13^28 

13 

7 

1M3 

37 

2:1 

9 



Lot. 



1891 



1592 



1893 
21 32 
95 19 



1894 
21 32 
95 19 



1891 



1892 



1893 



1894 



IH 

1 
3 

WEST THIRD STREET. PAYABLE SEPTEMBER 1st— BRICK. 



1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


21 32 


21 32 


21 32 


21 32 


21 32 


21 32 


9$ 19 


95 19 


95 19 


95 19 


95 19 


95 19 


83 45 


28 45 


83 45 


83 45 


83 45 


8,3 45 








78 99 


78 09 


78 99 










27 43 


40 54 










39 1.3 


39 13 










15 37 


15 37 


1st.- 












189.5' 


1896 


1897 


189.8 


1899 


1900 


24 33 


33 51 


22 70 


21 89 


21 07 


20 26 


59 02 


57 05 


55 09 


53 13 


51 17 


49 20 



1901 
21 32 
95 19 
83 45 
78 99 
40 54 
:19 13 
15 37 
3:i 07 
15 51 



1902 
21 32 
05 19 
8:i 45 
78 99 
40 54 
39 13 
15 37 
33 07 
G9 10 
15 14 
23 2G 



1901 1002 

19 44 18 63 

47 24 45 27 

18 62 17 95 



Lo^. 


1891 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1806 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


30 


95 


83 


95 


83 


95 


83 


95 


83 


95 


83 


95 


83 


95 


83 


96 


83 


95 


83 


95 


83 


23 


34 


73 


34 


7.3 


34 


73 


34 


73 


34 


73 


34 


73 


34 


73 


34 


73 


34 


73 


34 


73 


5 






25 


83 


25 


83 


25 


S3 


25 


83 


25 


83 


25 


s:; 


25 


8;! 


25 


83 


25 


83 


25 






42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


42 


76 


20 














124 


70 


124 


70 


124 


70 


12^ 


70 


124 


70 


12 4 


70 


124 


70 


21 


























28 


71 


28 


71 


28 


71 


28 


71* 


49 


























28 


71 


28 


71 


28 


71 


28 


71 


21 


























31 


58 


31 


58 


31 


58 


31 


58 


20% 


























48 


68 


48 


68 


48 


68 


48 


68 


47 


























28 


71 


28 


71 


28 


71 


28 


71 


45 


























25 


S3 


23 


83 


25 


83 


25 


83 


54 






























39 


03 


39 


03 


;J9 


0 :; 


27 






























21 


24 


21 


24 


21 


24 


24-25 


































51 


54 


54 


54 


24 


































28 


71 


28 


7k 


UPPER STREET, 


PAYABLE 


JULY 1st— BRICK. 




















Lot. 


1891 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


alley 












70 




70 




69 




69 




69 




69 




69 




69 


21 










28 


09 


28 


03 


28 


09 


2$ 


09 


28 


09 


28 


09 


28 


09 


28 


09 


23 






























21 


81 


21 


84 


21 


84 


EAST 


MAIN STREET 


, PAYABLE 


JULY 1st. 




















Lot. 


1891 


1892 


189.3 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


4 


















45 


91 


44 


33 


42 


80 


41 


27 


.39 


74 


,38 


21 


10 


















33 


66 


32 


53 


31 


41 


30 


29 


29 


17 


28 


05 


24 


















42 


07 


40 


6b 


39 


27 


37 


80 


36 


46 


35 


05 


18 


















34 


49 


32 


35 


32 


18 


31 


04 


29 


89 


28 


74 


' 9 


















45 


29 


43 


72 


42 


21 


40 


71 


39 


20 


37 


69 


7 




















48 


37 


19 


3f) 


90 


:i4 


61 


:L3 


:m 


:i2 


05 


3 


















67 


49 


65 


24 


02 


99 


60 


74 


58 


49 


56 


24 


1 


















35 


11 


33 


94 


32 


76 


31 


60 


30 


42 


29 


26 


1 


















53 


98 


52 


07 


50 


39 


48 


58 


40 


T9 


44 


99 


9 


















180 


16 










121 


17 


116 


68 


112 


20 


22 


















23 


59 






22 


78 


21 


96 


21 


15 


20 


33 


1 






















93 


54 


90 


32 


87 


07 


83 


82 


70 


64 


40 






















42 


29 


40 


83 


39 


:i6 


37 


91 


36 


45 


33 






















26 


84 


25 


91 


25 


10 


0,| 


06 


23 


13 


3 






























:t3 


31 


32 


08 


30 


85 


65 






















47 


.38 


45 


74 


44 


11 


42 


48 


40 


84 


7 






















40 


09 


38 


72 


37 


33 


35 


94 


:i4 


57 


20 






















72 


89 


70 


38 


67 


88 


65 


:i6 


62 


84 


3 






















34 


61 


33 


42 


32 


23 


31 


04 


29 


83 


1 


























1.3 


72 


13 


23 


12 


71 


12 


25 


25 


























.35 


IS 


33 


92 


32 


67 


31 


41 


26 


























86 


67 


83 


47 


80 


38 


77 


29 


29 


























35 


18 


33 


92 


32 


67 


.31 


41 


22-23 


























112 


61 


108 


58 


104 


56 


100 


54 


9 


























70 


38 


67 


88 


65 


36 


62 


84 


19 






























28 


77 


27 


70 


26 


65 


5 






























33 


9f 


32 


67 


31 


41 


5 






























51 


99 


49 


01 


47 


12 


n 






























84 


06 


80 


94 


77 


8:1 


25 


































28 


09 


27 


01 


39 


























80 


94 






75 


16 


72 


27 


21 






































37 


09 


6 


































15 


13 


113 


U 



1901 



1902 



1901 
G9 
28 09 
21 84 



1902 
G9 
2S 09 
21 81 



19 

27 

3 

26 

11 

48 

26 

30 

27 

33 

SOOTH BROADWAY, PAYABLE JULY 1st— BRICK. 
1891 1892 



14 89 
22 61 



1901 

3G G8 

26 92 
33 GG 

27 59 
3G 19 
,30 7C 
53 99 

28 09 
43 18 

107 71 
19 52 
77 41 

35 00 
22 20 

29 01 
39 21 
33 18 
GO 33 
28 C5 
11 75 

30 IG 
74 21 
:io 16 
96 52 
GO 33 
25 58 
30 16 
45 ?4 
74 72 
25 93 
GO U 

36 10 

108 50 
28 74 
21 71 
84 48 



Lot. 

9 

1 

2 

3 

4 

2 

1 

1 



5 

3 

25 



1S93 
25 93 



1894 
25 93 



.1895 
25 93 



1896 
25 93 



27 08 2T 08 27 08 27 08 



1897 
25 93 

27 08 
54 58 

28 G4 
45 87 
85 92 



1898 

25 93 

27 08 
54 58 

28 64 
45 87 
85 92 



1899 
25 93 

27 08 
54 58 

28 i'A 
45 87 
85 92 



1900 
25 93 

27 08 
54 .58 

28 64 
45 87 
85 92 



1902 

35 15 

20 8o 

32 25 
26 It 
34 08 

29 49 
51 71 

26 91 
41 :19 

103 22 
18 71 
74 18 

33 53 

21 28 
28 38 
37 58 
31 80 
57 81 

27 45 
11 27 

28 89 
71 11 
28 89 
92 49 
57 81 
24 51 

28 89 
43 35 
71 61 
2-4 84 
66 49 

34 68 

104 07 
27 54 
20 80 
80 or. 
17 42 

30 96 

29 04 
23.54 
15.64 
23.12 
34.68 



1901 1902 

25 93 25 93 



27 08 
54 58 

28 61 
45 87 
85 92 



27 08 
54 58 

28 64 
45 87 
85 92 



44 to 55 
15 
17 



46 



93 


39 


93 


39 


93 


39 


93 


39 


9:{ 


30 


93 


39 


9.3 


:i9 


9.3 


39 


93 


39 


93 


39 






• 












&5 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 

/ 


55 


-40 


110 


.20 


no 


20 


110 


20 


110 


' l 

20 


110 


20 


110 


20 


no 


20 


no 


20 


no 


20 


no 


20 


21 


13 


21 


13 


21 


13 


21 


13 






13 


71 


21 


13 


21 


13 


21 


13 


21 


13 


















84 


30 


84 


30 


84 


30 


■84 


30 


84 


30 


84 


30 


296 


04 


300 


44 


ZQO 


44 


300 


44 


300 


44 


300 


44 


300 


44 


300 


44 


300 


44 


300 


44 


31 


28 


31 


28 


31 


28 


31 


28 


31 


28 


31 


28 


:n 


28 


31 


28 


31 


28 


31 


28 


31 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


34 


80 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 


24 



74 30 74 30 74 30 74 30 74 30 74 30 



Cavanaugh. Mary 


.. 6 


44 


5 














12 


92 


18 


97 


18 


97 


Stoll, Est. of R. P 


.. 6 


38 


3 


186 


73 


186 


73 


186 


73 


186 


73 


186 


73 


186 


73 


Brent, C. S 


.. 6 


39 


1 


65 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


Crosthwait, Perry 


.. 6 


40 


4-5 


80 


32 


80 


32 


80 


32 


80 


32 


SO 


32 


80 


32 


Meyers. Adolph 


. . 6 


42 


17 


43 


12 


43 


12 


43 


12 


43 


12 


43 


12 


43 


12 


Bruce. Est. of W. W 




40 


5 






40 


77 


40 


77 


40 


77 


40 


77 


40 


77 


Cox, Est. of Mary J 


. . 6 


45 


3 






35 


78 


35 


78 


35 


78 


35 


78 


35 


78 


Cox. Est. of Mary J 


.. 6 


45 


5 






18 


08 


18 


08 


18 


08 


18 


08 


18 


08 


Richardson. J. W 


.. 6 


40 


7 










55 


40 


55 


40 


55 


40 


5.5 


40 


Kelly. Dr. T. D 


. . 6 


41 


8 










16 


32 


63 


16 


6:1 


16 


63 


16 


Allen. E. J 




' 4 


7 










15 


48 




28 


36 


28 


35 


28 


McMoekIn, J. W 


. . 6 


43 


5 










23 


06 


23 


06 


23 


06 


23 


06 


McNamara. Mrs. B 




1 


13-14 


















56 


71 


56 


71 


Tavlor, Est. of Thos 


. . 1 


4 


n 






















21 


78 


Foreman. Est. of Thos 


. . 1 


8 


46 


23 


84 


O;* 


84 


23 


84 


23 


84 


22 


84 


23 


84 


McCormick, Mrs. Ellen 


.. 6 


42 


16 


20 33 20 


33 


20 


33 


20 


33 


20 


:13 


20 


33 


20 


33 


McLaughlin. Mrs. Katherine 


. . 6 


42 


16 


25 36 25 


3G 


25 


36 


25 


36 


25 


36 


25 


36 


25 


36 


Oldham, W. E.. and Mary Kate. . . . 


.. 1 


8 


1 










35 


20 


35 


20 


35 


20 


35 


20 



THEY PAY 
RATES 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS INSERTED AT FOL- 
LOWING PRICES FOR FIFTEEN WORDS OR LESS: 

1 Insertion one cent a word. 

3 Consecutive Insertions two cents a word. 

6 Consecutive Insertions three cents a word. 

10 Consecutive Insertions four cents a word. 

12 Consecutive insertions five cents a word. 

30 Consecutive Insertions ten cents a word. 



_WANTPD _ 

WANTED— A |H)sition as a sicnog- 
rapher and typcwrilcr by a g(Kxl 
stenographer and typewriter. Ad- 
dress Miss G. W. Graves, No. 3051 
East High street. 10-tf 

WANTED — At once a few more 
teachers for fall schools. Salaries 
range from $360 to $3,000. Address 
with stamp. American Teaclicrs’ As- 
sociation, Mcmplii, Tenn. 10-301 



WANTED — Men to learn barber 

trade. Years saved. Thoroughly 
systomized course. Established in 
1893. Branches New York, Chica- 
go. St. Louis, San Francisco. New 
Orleans and Omalua. Inducements 
to distant applicants. Busy season 
now. Positions guaranteed. Wages 
Saturdays. Particulars mailed. 
Write. Molcr Barber College, St. 
Louis, Mo. 9-Ct 



WANTEi — Good cook for small fam- 
ily; must have references. Apply 
89 West High, (old number.) 8-:U 

W ANTED — A cook. Apply Mrs. Wel- 
lington Payne, 210 West Secoml 
street. • 8-3t 



WANTED — A nurse, references re- 
quired. Apply to Mrs. Phil Straus, 
corner Spring and High streets. 5-tf 



WANTEI — A good cook for small 
family; must have good references. 
Apply The Herald Office. 



STRAYEI^ — To our place May 3, a 
hay marc. Owner call and pay c »sts. 
T. \V. Spatililing, one mile on Ver- 
sailles pike. 9-3t 



COMMI SSiDNEH o SkLZ. 

FAYETTE CIRCUIT COURT. 



WANTED — Stenographer, male, de- 
sires position for summer vacation. 
Address “Stenographer,” Kentucky 
University. 



WANTED — Kentucky timber lanfls. 
Address at once, giving terms and 
description, X., Box 16, Lexington, 
Ky. C-tf 

WANTED — Leases on desirable coal 
land, preferably in Kentucky. Ad- 
dress, stating definite proposition, 
“Leases,” Box 255, l..cxingion. Ky. 



_ FOR RBiT 

FOR RENT — Stable with loft and 
aniall office; near corner Short and 
Spring streets. Terms reasonable. 
For particulars call phono 63 4. 

26-t£ 



Lexington Savings and Build- 
ing Association, Plaintiff, 

vs. • Notice of Sale. 

Tim Clohesy and others, Defendants. 

The undersigned, in pursuance of 
a judgment In tlio above styled action, 
will sell to the highest bidder on 

MONDAY, MAY 11, 1903, 

at the front door of the court house, 
in the city of Lexington, xibout the 
lu)ur of noon, the following described 
property: 

That certain parcel of land with 
the improvemcMits thereon, located 
on Main stret. in the city of Lexing- 
ton, beginning on Main street, 22 feet 
from Megowan street, which is the 
corner of the house on said street, 
thence with the lino of Clohcsy’s 
property on this corner of Main and 
Megowan streets and parallel with 
Megowan street, ninety-seven (97) 
feet to an alley; thence in a woster- 
I ly direction and parallel with Main 
j street thirty-two (32) feet to a stake; 

I thence with the line of Wm. J. IIou- 
I lihan’s properly and parallel with 
; Megowan street ninety-seven (97) 

I feet to the line of Main street; thence 
with the lino of Main street thirty- 
two (32) feet to the beginning, and 
being the same property referred to 
and described in the judgment and 
pleadings in the above styled action. 

The said property will be sold upon 
a credit of six and twelve mouths, 
(lie purchaser will be required to ex- 
ecute bonds for the purchase money, 
with approved surety and bearing in- 
terest from date thereof until paid. 

GEO. C. AVIOIIH, M. C. F. C. C. 

J. R. MORTON. Attorney. 



FOR RENT — One room. 
No.) N. Upper streeL 



Apply 65 fold 
17-tf 



FOR RENT OR FOR SAI,E— A cot- 
tage on Clay avenue, with all mod- 
ern conveniences: on slr ^t car line. 
Apply at Herald office. 23-tf 



FOR RENT — !.,argc store room, No 
19 Chcapridc, Payne Building; now 
occupied 'y I..cxi!»gton Distillery (’o. 
Apply to Mrs. Chas. Kerr. 3-(i 



FOR RENT — A front room, third floor, 
on Mill street, between Main and 
Short streets. Apply Mrs. Kerr, 658 
N. Broadway, Fayette Phone 1001. 



FOR RENT — Stable with lot. opening 
on alley between Mill street and 
Broadway, Second and Church. Ap- 
ply to No. 183 (new No ) North Mill 
street. G-tf 



FOR SALE 



FOR SALl*] — A few chnleo Jersey 
cows aittl heifers, wiili first calf. 
Apply to H. F. Hillcnmoyor Son. 

10-lUt 

FOR SALE— lUMUiAlN— IMaccd in 
my hands for a few days a small 
number of shares of the Triumph 
Oil and Refining Company, (’Incin- 
nati, Ohio. Tins is the company 
that made the recent great strike 
at Williams))urg. Ky.. and is now 
erecting innks prenaralory for mar- 
ket shipment. Bids fair to be an 
early monthly dividend producer. 
Companies stork withdrawn from 
the market. Strike while the iron 
is hot. The early buyer makes the 
money. First conic, first served. T. 
Ijogan Hockcr, No. 119 North Mill 
street. 8-Gt 

FOR SALE — At a !»argain, suburban 
home, five, ton or fifteen acres, with 
all improvements, one and one-half 
miles from the court house on ihe 
Versailles pike. G. E. Prather, Old 
Phone 807-B. 26-1 m 



COMMlS SlOKE n^S SAIL 

FAYETTE CIRCITT COURT. 

William Alexander, &c., Plaintiffs, 
vs. 

Amelia Alexander, Defendant. 



By virtue of a judgment of the Fay- 
etto Circuit Court, rendered in this 
cause upon April 27th, 190.3, the un- 
dersigned Master ('omnilssloner of 
said Court will sell at public auction 
to the highest and best bidder at the 
front door of the Court House in Lex- 
ington. Ky., at about the hour of 
twelve o’clock noon, upon 

MONDAY, MAY 11, 1903, 

the following described property, tn- 
wit: 

A certain tract of land situated on 
the Lexington ami Versailles turnpike 
road al»out five and three quarlor 
miles from Lexington, Ky., and con- 
taining about sixteen and oiie-fonrih 
acres and thirty-one polos of land; 
situated and being in Fayellc county, 
beginning at a stone standing on the 
nerth side of said pike corner to the 
land formerly owned by the heirs of 
Mary Kconc, deceased: thence N. ^/  
W. 11 0-10 poles to a stone another 
corner to. said heirs (see figure 2); 
i hence N. 88 Vj W. 69 54-100 polos to 
a stone; thence S. 71^/^ W. 70 8-10 
i)olcs to a stone corner to Smcdlcy 
(see figure 4); thence S. W. 

12 3-10 poles to the edge of said pike; 



thence with the edge of said turnpike 
to the boginning; it iieiug the same 
property conveyed to Thomas F. 
Alexander by William S. Murray and 
wife December 12th, 1892. said deed 
being recorded in the Fayette County 
(.Merk’s office, to which deed reference 
is here made for a greater certainly 
of description; and being the same 
properly referred to and dcscril ed in 
the judgment and pleadings In tlio 
alK)ve styled action. 

Tltc said property will bo sold upon 
credits of six and twelve months, the 
purcha.scr will be required (o execute 
bonds for the purchase money witli 
approved security and bearing inter- 
est from date until paid. 

GEO. C. WEBB, M. C. F. C. .C. 

HOBBS & FARMER, Attorneys. 



NOTICE 1 0 CRS JITORS, 

FAYETTE CIRCUIT COURT. 



W. C. Hcarne, Palintiff, 

vs. Notice to Creditors. 

M. T. Lyle, etc., Defendants. 

All persons having claims against 
the firm of M. T. Lyle & Co. arc here- 
by notified to present same properly 
proven to the undersigned Master 
Commissioner of the Vayettc Circuit 
Court, at his office in the Sottthern 
Mutual laveslmcut Company Build- 
ing. 

GEO C. WEBB, M. C. P. C. C. 



Lexington City National 
Bank 



Call Fop Stockholders’ Meeting. 

The Stockholders of the Lexington 
City National Bank are hereby noti- 
fied that a called meeting of the 
Stockholders of said Bank will bo 
held at the banking room in Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, on Saturday, the 16th 
day of May, 1903, betwe-on ilie hours 
of 10 a. m. and 2 p. m. The object 
of this meeting is to consider and 
act upon the proposition to increase 
the Capital Stock of the Bank in liie 
sum of $100,000.00. said stock to be 
offered to the present StocklioMcrs 
pro rata, at $150.00 per share; the 
extra $5t‘,0O0.O0 derived (herefrom to 
1)0 added to the Surplus Fund oi the 
Bank. 

EveiT Stockholder Is urged to be 
present in person, if possible; If not, 
then by proxy. 

JAMES S. STOIJ., 

24-lOt. Presidont. 



NOTICE. 






MOYNAHAN & DENTON, 
Contractors end Builders. 

New Phone 115. Old Phone 110 

Office: 

New No. 153 West Short Street. 
Old No. 49 west Short Street. 

ONE WAY SECOND-CLASS 
RATES TO THE NORTHWEST. 

Extremely T^w Rates to the North- 
west via L. S: N. R. U. and Connec- 
tions. Tickets on sale Daily to June 
15.1963. Applies to various points in 
Washington, Oregan. British Colum- 
bia an«i Montana. Call on Agents fur 
particulars. 



W. H. HARRISON, 
T. P. A. 



J. P. MOORE, 
G. A. 



NASHVILLE, TENN., AND RETURN 

$8.15 

VIA L. & N. R. R. 

Tickets on sale Mav 19 . 20 and 21. 
Limited to June 1. Privilege to June 1. 

On Account of General Assembly 
Cumberland Presbyterian Church 



W. H. TfAURISON, 
T. I*. A. 



J. P. MOORE, 
G, A. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LOS 
ANGELES, CAL., AND RETURN. 

Via L. N. R. R. and Connections. 

Tickets on sale May 11 to 17, inclu- 
sive. Limiled lo July 15. 

Account General Assembly 

Presbyterian Church. 



W. H. HARRISON, 
T. P. A. 



J. P. MOORE. 
G. A. • 



FOR SALE — Every variety of early 
garden plants; can bo had cheap 
at No. 67 Georgetown street. Phone 
155. 2l-tf 



FOR SALE — Small platform scales as 
good as new. Fayette ’phone 643. 



NEW PHOENIX CAFE 



i NEW FIRST-CLASS CAFE FOR 
Ladies and Gentlemen has been 
opened in the Phoenix Hotel Annex, 
opposite the C. & 0. Depot, where all 
the delicacies of the season are 
served In first-class style. Ladles 
are especially Invited. 







For 

Lunch 



Lexington Beer is the best of all bev- 
erages. It is ijottled by ourselves, 
the greatest care being taken to pro- 
tect it from the slightest contamina- 
tion, as pure beer must be kciJt pure. 



LOST 



ILexingfon Brewing Co 



LOST — A pair of gold-rimmod snccta- 
clcs. Liberal reward will be paid 
for their return to The Herald Of- 
fice. 9-3t 



STRAYED 



Name. Ward. Block. 

Holly. Belle 6 36 

Foster, Susie 6 36 



COLFAX STREET, PAYABLE JANUARY 1st, —MACADAM. 

1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 

49 
48 



1898 



1899 



1900 
7 18 
10 29 



1901 1902 
6 87 6 63 
9 94 9 60 



STRAYED — From my place, Wednes- 
day. a cow without horns. Reward 
for return to Mrs. Mary Duff, cor- 
ner Seventh and Broadway. 9 



LYON’S Frenoh Periodical Drops 

strictly vegetable, perfectly harmless, sure to accomplish 
DESIRED RESULlS. Greatest known female remedy. 

filUTIQN •“Itatlons. The ecnulnc I* pu» up onl^ In paste-hoard Car 

VMIIIlvn ton with fac-siml o ou £iJe of thu b^nilc. t *u i ^ ^ j ^ 

Peua for Circular Vo WIULlAMS Mi?u. 30.. ^olo Agent*. Olevelaua. Oaio. f 1 

FOR SALE BY THOMPSON-NORTON DRUG CO. 






THE MOHNINC; HERALD. 



MONDAY. MAY 11, ISftr, 




EXCLUSIVE STYLES IN 

SPRING CLOTHING 

Critical men are coming more 
and more to dispense with the custom 
tailor. 1 hey find that in MILLER’S 
clothing equal style and just as good fit 
can be secured for half the price. 
Exclusive styles in the 
neatest colorings and all 
the very latest fabrics, 
for men and youths. . . 




— ■ — ■ lU. —P 

BOX OF DYNAMITE | ITcss.) Tltc police so far have failed 

INCIDENT NOT EXPLAINED, to solve the mystery surroi«idiug the 

leaving of a box of dynamite on the 

NKW YOicK, May lU. — (Associated {'unard Line dock yesterday. There 



BUGGIES 




la a diversity of opinion among the 
oflicials as to whether the matter was 
intended to he a hoax or not, but all 
agree tlmt the possibilities of a great 
explosion and a great loss of life were 
many. 



INTERFERENCE 



OF THE GOVERNOR IN THE Me 
CARTY CASE NOT EXPECT- 
ED IN FRANKFORT. 



REMOVAL 

R. M. Buckmaster 

OSTEOPATH 

Will on Thursday, the ITth of this 
month (.May) remove his office from 
(ho Mct,'Iel!and Building to lu» resi- 
dence, ilLl South Upper street, be- 
tween High and Maxwell, where he 
will be pleased to meet all his friends, 
as well as those who are interested. in 
Osteopathy, and especially those who 
arc suffering from disease of any kind 
(except contagious). If you want the 
bciieiU of the knowledge of the oldest 
and most experienced Osteopath in 
Lexington or Fayette county, call on 
Dr. Buckmaster. Hours. 8 a. m. to (J 
p. m. Now Rhone 204, Old Phone 828. 



First-class variety. Such as are u sed by trotting horse and livery men 
to select from. 

Can save you about Twenty Dot tars on the Buggy. 

Also first-class line of Harness, machine and hand made. 

NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS. 



E. B. DRAKE 



Cheapside 



Lpxington, Ky. 



FRANKFORT. Ky.. May 10.— When 
Governor Beckham rctnrns to the 
capital tomorrow' ho will consider and 
dispose of the petition filed by Lex- 
ington parties for commutation of the 
death sentence of William McCarty, 
the wife murderer. It is not thought 
that the Governor w'ill interfere to 
save McCarty. He has learned that 
there is nothing in the story that the 
condemned murderer is dying of con- 
sumption. but that, on the contrary. 
^IcCarly is in fairly good physical con- 
dition. The protest against any action 
Is vigorous. McCarty is under sent- 
ence to be hanged on Friday, May 15 
next. 



DEADLY 



SPOTTED FEVER BREAKS OUT ON 
RECEIVING SHIP MIN- 
NEAPOLIS. 



row say: 

Deadly cerebro spinal mcnigitis, 
popularly known as "spotted fever," 
and one of the hardest contagious 
diseases to combat, has broken out in 
the ranks of the 1.200 men abroad the 
receiving ships MiimcaiwUs and Puri- 
tan at I.^ague Island Navy Yard. Al- 
ready it has killed three young re- 
cruits, w'hilc five more are hovering 
between life and death. Grave fears 
prevail that others among the embyro 
blue jackets who ate, worked and 
slept with the stricken may fall into 
the fever’s embrace. Today the work 
of raising thirty-five tents will be 
started, and as soon as the canvass 
shelters arc In place the twelve hun- 
dred young tars will bo put out to 
camp, giving them plenty of fresh air 
and more room for exercise, which, it 
is thought. W’ill materially lessen the 
chance for a further Inculiation of the 
disease. 



DISASTROUS FOREST FIRES. 

.TOHNSTOWN. Pa.. May 10.— (Asso- 
ciated Press.i-^One of the fiercest 
and most damaging forest fires in 
the history of the Allegheny moun- 
tains has been raging since early this 
morning rbout Dunlo, a big coal and 
lumber to.vn in this county. At 8:20 
o'clock tonight much apprehension Is 
felt for the safety of several camps 
of lumbermen who arc in the district 
which has been swept by the flames. 
Some may have perished. 



BOOTH TARKINGTON IMPROVING. 



INDIANAPOLIS. May 10.— (Associ- 
ated Press.) — Booth Tarklngton. the 
author, has just passed the crisis in 
a very serious case of typhoid fever. 
Physicians predict his recovery. 



PHILADELPHIA. Pa., May 10.— 
elated Press.) — The Press w'lll (omor- 



NO TROUBLE EXPECTED. 

ST. LOUIS, Mo.. May 10.— (Asso- 
ciated Press.) — The local situation in 
the Mobile and Ohio strike is qiilet, 
and the indications are that there will 
be no trouble. 



Name. 


Ward. 


Block. 


Lot. 


Foster, Susie 


6 


36 


1 


tjoodloe, G. (-’ 


6 


3G 


47 






3G 


•  


Holines, Win 


C 


:iG 


46 


Shelton. M 


G 


;iG 


45 


Barber, .\nnie 


6 


3G 


44 


King. T 




3G 


43 


Dewitt, Daniel 


() 


3G 


34 


Cox. Jas. 1 1 ) 




36 


33 


Cox. Jas. (2) 




3G 


32 


(k)x, Jas. (3) , 




36 


31-30 


(hKich, Sarah 


G 


36 


29 


Mnkos, .\nianda 


6 


36 


28 


Cox, M. J 




36 


27 


('ox, .M. J 




36 


2J 


Shea. John 


t; 


36 


26 


Barnett, Est. of Asa 


G 


3C 


24 


Dodge, Asa 


G 


36 




Dodge, Asa 




36 


19 


Neal. Susan 


G 


36 


4 


Bradshaw, Sam 


G 


ihi 


5 


Marlin, P 


t; 


:;6 


6 






36 


7 


Nichols. A 


G 


3G 


8 


Dunlap 


G 


36 


9 


Spears. Della 


G 


36 


10 


Wilson. A 


0 


36 


12 


Lewis, P 


G 


36 


n 


JjCwI.s, Geo 


G 


36 


13 


Harris, Jno. 1) 


G 


36 


14 


Sliaiis 


t; 


36 


15 


Schane. Miss Rosa 


G 


36 


16 


Turner. C 




36 


17 


SCT)U, 11 


G 


36 


18 


Straus. Emily 


i; 


36 


42 


Tucker, L. .M 




36 


22 


Coleman, .M 


G 


3G 


41 



1801 



1802 



1803 



1894 



1895 



1806 



1897 



1898 



1809 



1900 


1901 


1902 


10 


23 


9 


94 


9 


60 


10 


2S 


9 


94 


9 


60 


9 


9G 


9 


61 


9 


28 


8 


14 


7 


77 


7 


51 


7 


49 


7 


12 


6 


88 


5 


14 


4 


07 


1 


80 


3 


97 


3 


81 


3 


G8 


6 


8G 


6 


63 


6 


41 


6 


86 


0 


63 


6 


41 


6 


86 


6 


63 


6 


41 


6 


86 


6 


63 


6 


41 


4 


18 


3 


97 


3 


83 


5 


14 


4 


97 


4 


79 


4 


29 


4 


14 


4 


00 


5 


56 


5 


30 


k 


11 


•  


43 


3 


32 




21 


17 


90 


17 


23 


16 


64 


5 


11 


4 


97 


4 


79 


6 


00 


5 


80 


5 


61 


11 


14 


10 


68 


10 


31 


5 


14 


4 


97 


4 


79 


5 


14 


4 


97 


4 


79 


4i 


43 


«  

•  


32 


tP 


21 


•  


43 


O 


32 


ty 

O 


21 


6 


86 


6 


63 


6 


41 


G 


86 


G 


63 


G 


41 


•   
O 


43 


O 


32 


3 


21 










6 


41 


«» 

u 


i:{ 


3 


32 


3 


21 


G 


86 


G 


63 


6 


41 


6 


86 


6 


63 


6 


41 


G 


86 


G 


63 


6 


41 


G 


86 


6 


63 


6 


41 1 


6 


86 


G 


63 


6 


41 






5 


29 


5 


11 






17 


41 


16 


81 



6 23 



Name. Ward. 

Haverly. Jas 2 

PaxiUMiger and Belt U. 1’. Uo 2 

I’assengiM* and Belt U. K. Uo 2 

Belt Improvement (,'o 2 

(’lay, Annie. U 2 

Doll, Mrs. Laura 2 

Tliornpson, Scott .^. . . . 2 

Ariispjger. II 2 

Herd. E. T.. and Nat. B v^ L. Asso.. 2 

Wallace. Est. of Jno. B 2 

Vllcy, .Mrs. Mary B 2 

Yancey, S. H 2 

Fayette Park Uo 2 

McClelland, Est. of B 2 

Lynch. E.st. of .Jno. F. . - 2 

Dunlap, Kate C 2 

(’lirjstiaiL Leslie 2 

Wheeler, .Mrs. Lixzic 2 

Scearcc, Jas. M 2 

Applegate. Susan France 2 

Goff, Thos 2 

ITioe, Webb 2 

Price, Lida, and Oliver 2 

Price, D. W 2 

Price, 1). W 2 

Bateman, W 2 

Asa Dodge, W. J. I.^MU*liridgo and 

Esl. of H. P. Stoll 2 

Widows’ and Orphans’ H')nic of the 

I. O. O F. of Ky‘ 2 

Spiirr. L. P 2 

(’arrithers. A. T.. and H. .M. Beard.. 2 

Dunlap. G. W 2 

Episcopal Kesidence As.so 2 

Uuiherford. Edwin H.. and Jno. Y. . . 2 

(’nrran, W. F 2 



WEST SIXTH STREET, PAYAABLE APRIL 1st.— MACADAM. 

Block. Lot. 1801 1802 1803 1804 

53 8 

53 6 

53 r. of w. 

5:i 6 

1 



45 

45 

45 



.to 

30 

30 

40 

IP 

IP 

IP 

40 

4P 

40 

40 

IP 

40 

IP 

IP 

IP 



30 

i*3 

4P 

30 

:to 

30 



3-4 



4 

6 

St. 

0 

3p 

35 

3:; 

32 

2'J 

28 

4 

•I 

«» 

3 

1 

5 
G 



8 

V 

27 

O 

7 ‘ 



16 


11 


16 


U 


16 


11 


16 


11 


16 


It 


16 


11 


16 


11 


16 


n 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


6 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


61 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


5 


64 


7 


24 


7 


2 4 


7 


24 


7 


24 


7 


24 


7 


24 


7 


24 


7 


24 


8 


06 


8 


06 


8 


06 


8 


06 


9 


06 


8 


06 


8 


06 


8 


06 


14 


49 


14 


49 


14 


49 


H 


49 


11 


10 


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P. 


J. GARLAND, 









BOWEN H. M. 



REVIEWS NEGOTIATIONS 



City Auditor. 



ALLIES COULD HAVE ENJOYED 

PREFERENTIAL TREATMENT 
FOR THE ASKING. 

WASHINGTON. May lo.— (Associ- 
ated Press.) — How Great Britain, Ger- 
many and Italy for the asking could 
have secured from Venezuela prefer- 
ential treatment in the settlement of 
their claims, had they asked it in 
time, and thereby been relieved of 
the necessity of appeal to The Hague, 
with consequent expense and delay, 
is told in the blue book which Herbert 
W. Bow'cn. who acted as Venezuela's 
plenipotentiary in the peace uegotia- 
Uons in Washington, has prepared, 
containing correspondence and cable- 
grams relating to the Venezuelan pro- 
tocols. 

It shows that President Castro con- 
ferred on Bowen two sets of pow’crs, 
one authorizing him lo conduct nogo- 
Uatlons exclusively with represonta- 
tivos of the allied pow’crs of Great 
Britain. Germany and Italy, and the 
other granting him full authority to 
effect a settlement with representa- 
tives of all nations havjng claims 
against Venezuela. 

Bowen, on the day of his arrival 
here, called at the embassies of all 
the powers present. He presented 
first his full powers, though expecting 
that these would be objected to 
promptly, in which event he intended 
to fall back on the original powers 
granted him. Instead, the Italian and 
British ambassadors and Gorman 
charge accepted without question 
Bowen's letters empowering him to 
negotiate with the creditor nations. 
In so doing they waived at the out- 
set the question of separate or pref- 
erential treatment for their govern- 
ments and this point was not raised 
until the peace protocols were prac- 
tically ready for signatures. 

The blue book begins with Presi- 
dent' Castro’s note December 0, 1002, 
expressing willingness to arbitrate 
the differences of the allied powers; 
the Caracas government requesting 
Bowen to represent Venezuela as ar- 
bitrator. Many cablegrams were\ ex- 
changed between Venezuela and the 
allies, via Washington, before they 
would agree to President Castro’s 
proposition for preliminary negotia- 
tions at Washington, looking to the 
raising of the blockade. The allies 
stood out for immediate reference to 
The Hague of the entire question, un- 
til Secretary Hay transmitted to them 
a cablegram from Bowen, at Caracas, 
pointing out the unreasonableness of 
"forcing” any nation lo carry a con- 
troversy to The Hague, which is es- 
sentially a peace tribunal. 

Bowen's Letter. 

The book makes public for the first 
time the text of Bowen’s note of Feb- 
ruary 20th to Sir Michael Herbert, 
British ambassador, which for the 
time threatened to break off negotia- 
tions. It is as follows: 

"I have given due consideration to 
your government’s proposition that 
two-thirds of the 30 per cent of cus- 
toms receipts of LaGuira and Puerto 
Cabello be given the allied powers 
and that the remaining third bo paid 
the peace powers. That proposition 
I must decline. I can not accept, 
even in principle, that preferential 
treatment can l )0 rightly obtained by 
blockades and bombardments. It 
would ho absolutely offensive to mod- 
ern civilization to recognize the prin- 
ciple and to incorporate it into the 
law of nations, as it would have to 
be If the allied powers and peace 
powers should agree to It and ac- 
knowledge it. Furthermore, that 
proposition is objectionable because 
It would keop (he allied pow'ers allied 
for a period of more than six years. 
Venezuela can not. I am sure, be ex- 
pod od to encourage the maintenance 
of alliances against her. On this side 
of the water we want peace, not  alli- 
ances. 

"Now. as the question of preferen- 
tial treatment is the only one on 
which*wo have not agreed, I hereby 
proiwsc that we leave that question 
to The Hague. What we have al- 
ready agreed upon we can hold and 
stand by. We need only add to it 
that we have decided to submit the 
question of preferential treatment to 
The Hague. 

“If this proposition is accepted — 
and I do not see how it can be de- 
clined— there would be, of course, no 
reason to continue the blockade. 

"This solution of this controversy 
is honorable to all parties, and I bog 
you to communicate it to your col- 
leagues at your earliest convenience.” 
Retraction Demanded. 

Sir Michael Herbert demanded re- 
traction of the entire note, but Bow- 
en refused to comply with the de- 
mand. The correspondence shows 
that thereupon negotiations on the 
part of the allies with Bowen were 
broken off and that President Roose- 
velt was invited to arbitrate the entire 
matter. This* correspondence of the 
British government took exception to 
Bowen’s statement that an AngW-Ger- 
man alliance would ho continued for 
six years were the allies to be given 



ELECTRICAL ElMCIlMgER 
AND CONTRACTOR 

NO. 42 McClelland building. 

APPROVED ELECRICAL MATERIALS AND FITTINGS, 

COMPETENT MEN TO INSTALL IT 

AND THOROUGH PERSONAL INSPECTION 

Are the elements which make lov/er insurance rates, immunity from fires 
resulting from defective work and greater convenience to users of electric 
light and power. 

My work is guaranteed lo bo the best that can be ppoduccd. Beware 
of tlioso who liand you an excessively low bill and with It the “imitation” 
of bettor work, which may pass a lenient inspection. 

I invite the strictest inspection of my work during and after installa- 
tion. Let me servo you by talking it over with 5 'ou, and more clficiently by 
doing your worlc. FAYETTE PHONE 1106. 



Carriages, Phaetons, 
Runabouts, Buggies, 

Surreys, Etc. 



LARGE AND VARIED STOCK TO SELECT FROM. 

STYLE AND QUALITY UNEXCELLED. 

A NEV/ AND UP-TO-DATE REPOSITORY. 

, EXAMINATION SOLICITED. 

YOU ARE NOT COMPELLED TO BUY. 
WE ARE ANXIOUS TO SHOW YOU WHAT WE HAVE. 



DAVID C. FROST 

SHORT STREET, Opp. Court House. 



preferential treatment, and that the 
State Donarlmcnt assured the British 
lorcign office that It was of opinion 
that such would not be the case. The 
Slate Department received these as- 
surances as information. I^rcsidenl 
Roosevelt announced his inability to 
accent the invitation lo arbitrate llie 
matter, and negotiations with Bowen 
were re.sumed. Venezuela’s repre- 
sentative was not a party to the arbi- 
tration invitation to President Roose- 
velt. but his viev/s rc.specling it ap- 
pear from the following note which 
ho sent several weeks ago to the 
British ambassador: 

"You never gave me a copy of your 
note F'ebruary 6th to Hay. and I 
have never possessed a cony of it. 
What you wrote to Hay February 
26th, if 1 remember rightly, was a 
proposition that the question of pref- 
erential treaimenfet be left to the 
President of the United States to  le- 
cldc. That proposition I op’ oscd the 
moment your ^aid letter was read to 
mo. There the matter ended.” 

P,owen loft Wasliiugloii for New 
York today and on Saturday will sail 
for Caracas. Hay congratulated Bow- 
en upon the successful completion of 
his mission and his "splendid work 
in Washington.” Cordial notes of 
congratulation wore also exchanged 
between Mr. Bowen and the Italian. 
British and German ambassadors. 



passed through this city last night on 
his way from Louisville to M(. Ster- 
ling. 



Glenn’s ices always please. 10-2t 



CLAY’S 

REAL 

ESTATE 

BAIjGAINS 



CHAIRMAN YOUNG HERE. 

Chairman AlliOt W. Young, of the 
Democratic E.xccutlvc Committee, 



A 







A onc-story brick, five rooms, 
closet, pantry, all out-buildings, cis- 
tern, hydrant water in yard. Lot, It) 
by 200 feet, plenty of shade. This 
beautiful little home is located on 
East High street, and the brick street 
taxes are all paid. It is located op- 
posite the handsome Stone residence, 
and wo predict this the coming swell 
resident district of the city. This 
property is sure to increase in value. 
If you want a nice home sec this. 
Delay may mean a loss to you. 






C. l Mill 

Beal Estate Btotei 

154 West Short Street 



Two-story brick, seven rooms, 
bath, cellar, right down in 
town, a very large lot, with 
plenty of fruit, first-class 
neighborhood, on shady siile 
of street, autl I can sell it for 
$3,500.00. Come to my office 
and lot mo tell some more 
about it. It will do to buy. 



Two-story brick, seven rooms, 
splendid neighborhood, good 
cnougli for anybody and lo- 
cated on Broadway, for 
$3,000.00. 



Six hundred-acre farm, with 
good improvements, about 
three Imndred acres in grass, 
balance in high state of cul- 
tivation; plenty of water, and 
only a short distance from 
I^oxington, that 1 can sell 
worth the money. This is 
one of the best farms in our 
country. 



Two hundred acres, • with 
good iiiiprovcmeiils, on turn- 
pike. and within six miles of 
Paris, Ky., for $11,000.00. 



Bishop Clay, 

Real Estate Broker 

Opposite Phoenix Hotel. 



MONEY 

TO LOAN 



VO TO- 




D. ADLER & SON 

We loan moii?y on Dia- 
monds, Watches, Jewelry, 
and articles of value. Bus- 
iness strictly confidential. 

17 S. Upper Street 



Morning herald (Lexington, Ky.), 1903-05-11

8 pages, edition 01

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Location
  Published in Lexington, Ky., Kentucky by [Lexington Pub. Co.]
   Fayette County (The Bluegrass Region)