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date (1874-06-23) newspaper_issue I 




VOL. XXXVlll. ^ 



MAVSVILLE, KY., JUNE 23 , 1874 . 



NUMBER 48 



LAW CABDS. 



i^AW 



CARD. 



W, H. WADSWORTH. A* WADSWORTH. 

Wadsworth & Wadsworth, 

Attorneys at Law. 

Maysville .... Ky. 

will practk-e In this and adjoining counties. 
Prompt attention given the coUe .*tloa of uU 
lalms. janiuw*wiy. 

PUGH, 

'a ttorney at la w, . 

VANCIUBURG, Lewis County Ky. 

practice Ills profession lu 



ALBERT’S COLUMN. 



the Courts or 



Prompt atten- 
WIU have tueasslst- 



Wlll . 

Lewis and adjoining counties, 
tlon given to collectlon-s. Will 
ance of Judge Thomas In special cases. 
novTtw&wtf 

"j^AW CARD. 

ll.\RHISON TAYLOK. QEORdii R. (ilLL. 

TAYLOR & GILL, 

Attorneys and Counselors at Imxv. 

t'oarl Ktreel, llayavllle, Ky. 

(eU 

Will practice li. '.la.TOii amt adjoining counties 
and la tbe  *ourl of Appeal. 

C-Speclal atteiiClon paid to collecUou of claims. 
ju 2 «tw&wly elijyls. 

r AW CARD. 



J..UKS BABaOl'B. 



HOST. A. COCUBAN 



BAKBOU& 6l COOHRAnr. 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Lnr, 
MnysvIUe, Ky. 



OOlce'.No. 11 court street. 



iiovWtwtwiy. 



1 K. JOHNSON. 



(I.aie of Flemlngsburg, Ky.) 

Attorney at Law, 

vakcebi'ro, ky. 

will attend promptly to business entrusted to 
his care. 



HOTELS. 



j^ARNU.M’S HOTEL, 

Cor. Broadway and Twentieth St., 
NEW YORK. 

ON BOTH ABEKIOAN ANU EfBOeKAN PLA.SS. 
Complete with all modem Improvements; 
rooms eu suite and single; private parlors, baths, 
elei atoisi, otc. Location unsurpassed, l elDg In 
the very centre of fashion and brIlUaut New 
York life, lu pro.vlmlty to churches and places 
of amusement, and Lc rd & Taylor'.s, Arnold A 
constable’s and . I. A C. John.ston’s Dry ooods 
Palaces. The hotel Is under the muiiagemenf of 
A. s. Bamum, formerly of Bai num's Hotel, Bal- 
timore; I. N. tJreen, of Dayton, Ohio, and recent- 
ly of New York, and Ereemaii Barnum, of Bar- 
lium’s Hotel, 81 . Louis. 

K. Henby Cahteb, Oeo. W. Bkown. 

Late of the Walnut Street Bouse 

MEIUMI ANTS’ HOTEL, 

I,ate Dennison House, on Fifth street, between 
Main and Syeamora, Cincinnati. 

0 1 It friends and the Iratellng pnWlc are re- 
spe(UfuUy notified that we Lave purcha.sed 
from Messrs. McIntyre & Bruce the lease, furni- 
ture and fixtures of the Merchants’ Hotel. We 
have engaged an attractive and efilclent corps of 
as.slstanls fn every departmeui, and will here- 
afier devote our entire time and atlentlo* to the 
comfort of those who may favor us with their 
patronage C.iR'rER A BROWN, 

oc9-tr Proprietors. 



iM 



LINE^O:^TRAYEL. 

A \ S V 1 1 i Ir E AND C I N C 1 N - 

NATI PACKET, 

wii,nw»ui . 

,lAs. Power. Ai.ei. Ei.uott, 

Commander. Clerk. 

la aTPsMa.vsvllle tor Cincinnati every Tuesday, 
Thursday nnd Saturday at 11 o’clock, a. m. 
Leaves foot of Walnut street for Maysvllle, eve- 
ry Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 12 o’clock, 
m. 

For freight or pas-sage apply on board, or to E. 
W . MitcheLl, Agent. 



R egular u. s. packet be- 
tween CINCINNATI, RIPLEY. MAYS- 
VILLE It PORTSMOUTH.— The splendid 
new steamer 

POTO.W.KC’. 

B. Moore, D. W. Y'ouno, 

Master. Clerk. 

Leaves Cincinnati every Tuesday, Thursday 
and Saturday at 12 o’clock, a. m. Leaves Ports- 
mouth every Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 
1» o’clock, A. stopping at all way and regular 

landings. Freight received at all hours on the 
wharf boat, toot of Market st. rt. Oraham, Agt, 
Maysvllle, Ky. 



’^HE 



CARPET & WALLPAPER HOUSE. 

GREAT NOVELTIES! 

CHEAP CARPETS ------ ;J0. :i3. :!5, 45c. per yard ; 

I.MPORTED CARPETS .50. 55, 70c. " 

BEAl'TIFUL ‘2-PLY ------ 7.5,80,85.90c. '• 

SUPER AND EXTRA FINE - - - 95c.. $1.00, f 1.10. SI .35 " 

EXTRA SUIIERl’TNK. AXMINSTER AND KIDDEIl.MINSTER (WK- 
PETS, - *1.X), $1.40, $1,.50. “ 

A SPLENDID STOCK OE ENGLISH BRUSSELLS. 

nil nUAflicFrom FIFTEEN INCHES to EIGHTEEN FEET WIDE 
Vfll V./IUHI 9 At from 25c. to $175 per yard. 

MATTINGS IN GREAT VARIETY, 
Brussells and Velvet Rugs and Mats. 

AM) ALL HOUSE FrHMSHINi; GOODS. 

2000 WINDOW SHAD£S at FROM 15c. to $5.00 £ACH 

20.000 PIECES WALL PAPER, 

IN MOST BEAUTIFUL PATERNS. 

CHEAPER THAN EVER. 

5.000 Pieces of Wall Papers, Job Lots! 

AT FROM ,5c. PER ROLI. l.TP, A RARE CH.XNCE TOS.WE MONEY ! 
I’RETTY P.\PER at ,5c. ; 

HANDSOM E P.APER at KK’. ; 

BEAUTIFUI. PAPER, 121c. 

Splendid Preneh Gilt Papers I Chinese and Japanese Papers 

At R. ALBERT'S China Palace. 



R. ALBERT’S 

CHINA PALACE! 

AHRAl) OF EVEKYBOOY AND EVEKYTHING 



C HINA . G LA SS, O VEENS WA R E, 

S IL VER AND PL A TED WA R E, 

T.VBLE (TTLhRY: CHANDELIERS ; LA5IPS; LOOKING-GLASSES 
TEA-TRAYS & WAITERS; FANCY GOODS; BIRD-CAGES; Etc.; 

In the newest pattem.s and at lowest cash prices. 

Will discount any Cincinnati Bill wholesale and retai 



R. ALBERT, 
Watchmaker and Jeweler. 






Watches, ,Ieirelr!f, Clocks, Common and fine Pebble 

Spectacles. 

.‘tnd every article to be found In any first class Jewelry .store, at and below tliecheapast Clnelniiatl 
ca-sli prices. 

.Ml W.\TOHWOiiK k Kep.\iu 8 warranted to give perfect Satisfaction, or no chabhf. 



OF BEST MAKERS, AT FROM 

$50 to $150 less thanCincinnati Prices fully guaranteed 

SECOND-HAND PIANOS Rented and Exciianoed. 

rw-For sale l Splendid 7^^ octave PIANO, nearly new, tor Btoo. worth »6.so. Also- 1 Fine 7 octave 
PIANO at »20O. worth JlW. 

R. ALBERT. 



DRY GOODS, &C. 



DRUGS, &c. 



1(S74' 'rKADE. 



T 



BALXniUUE & OHIO Uuilroad 



Is I he Shortest and Quickest Route to Wash- 
lugrtun, Baltimore, the East and south -East. 



CONDENSED TIME-TABLE THROUOH TR.AlNS ! 



VTA PARKERSBURG. 
May 10 , 1874. 


FastUne' 


St. IzOUuM 
Expresw. 




Dally. 


Dally. 


Lve L'lnclnnall 


9 00 a m 


9 30 p m 


Arr Loveland 


10 00 »• 


10 34 “ 


•• Clillllcothe 


12 30 pm 


1 10 a la 


•• Portsmoutli 


6 16 •* 


10 20 “ 


" Marietta 


4 60 “ 


5 20 “ 


•' Parkersburg 


6 00 


5 80 •« 


Lve Parkersburg 


6 30 


6 00 ** 


Arr Grafton 


9 16 “ 


9 40 


•• ^Oakland 


11 24 “ 


11 34 “ 


“ Deer Park 


li 43 « 


n 47 “ 


“ Cumberland.. 


1 50am 


2 00 p m 


*• Martlnsburg 


4 25 


4 20 •* 


“ llarper'8 Ferry 


5 02 “ 


4 50 “ 


“ Point ot Rocks 


5 35 ** 


5 20 “ 


“ Wasblngton 


7 10 “ 


“ 


‘ Richmond 


1 30 pm 


4 54) a m 


" Rela.v 


s 2S a m 


7 35p m 


“ Baltimore 


8 40 “ 


7 60 


•• Wilmington 


iz 17 pm 


1 31 a m 


* Philadelphia 


1 20 “ 


2 35 “ 


‘ New York 


5 16 “ 


i 6 05 “ 


Boston 


5 50 a m 


1 4 50 p m 


VIA BELLAIKE. 
May 10, 1874. 


Fast Line 


Express. 



Lve Columbus.. 
AIT Newark 
Lve Sandusky 
vll 



Dally. 

11 45 a m 

12 55 p m 

7 40 a m 

8 25 “ 

10 13 “ 

12 45 p m 

2 00 ‘ 

4 50 



Monroeville 
“ Mansfield... 

Arr Newark, 

“ Zanesville.. 

“ Belialre.... 

** Wheeling 6 10 p m 

•• Grafton . | “ 

•• Oakland 

Deer Park 

“ cumberald 

Martlnsburg. 

“ Harper’s Ferry. 

“ Point of Rocks 
•» Washington.... 

Richmond 

** Relay 

Baltimore 



WllmliigtoD .. 
Philadelphia.. 

New Yoik 

Boston 



,11 U 
'll 43 
1 50 a m 

4 25 “ 

5 02 “ 

5 35 

7 10 “ 

1 SO p m 

8 25 a m 
8 40 

12 17 p m 
I 20 “ 

5 15 “ 

. 4 50 a m 



Sun. Kx. 

10 45 p m 
12 18 a m 

7 00 p m 
7 50 ^ 

12 15 a m 
1 20 

4 40 

5 45 
9 20 

11 34 
11 47 

2 OO p m 

4 20 
4 55 “ 

' 5 20 “ 

6 60 •' 

4 50 a m 
7 36 p m 
7 50 ■■ 

1 31 a m 
1 35 
0 06 
4 50 p in 



n. R &A. R RIKRE8S. 



«. W.BLATTfiRHAX 



; SECOND STREET COR. (.’OURT. 



DRYGOODS 



WHOLESALE & RETAIL] 



SITTOA STREET, 



MAYSVILLE, KY. 



We keep our stock t'omplete to evvry depart- 
Dieiit, and sell at 

VERY LOW PRICKS, 



—AND — 



ON MOST REASONABLE TERMS 

■M. R. & A. R. Burdess. ! 



Q.E0Rti 



USOBUE COX, 



iE COX k SON. 



W. It. Cox* I 



DEALERS AT 

WHOLESALE RETAIL 

— IN— 

DRUGS and MEDICINES; 

BENT BRANDS OV 

PURK WHITbl J.EAl), 
Paints, Oils, Varnishes, 

I .Ydama’ Biuslies, Dye Stufls, of all 
kinds. Window Glass, 

' Spices, Teas, 

j &C..&C. 

COLGATE'S SOAPS, 

^ TOILET ARTICLES-^ 

CO.MPRISINH 

I BRUSHES, CO .MBS, SOAPS, 

I 

\ CORMETIQI ES, PERFUMERY F,XTR.\CT9 
(French English and Ameflcan.l 

i 



Mrs. Lucy Audubon. 

(From the Courier Journal.) 

Mrs. Lucy Audubon, the widow of 
John James Audubon, the most distiii- 
^ished of American ornithologists, 
died of old age at the resindcucc of her 
sister-in-law, Mrs. William G. Bake- 
well, in Shelbyville, Ky., oi. the 7tli 
iust. 

Mrs. Audubon was born in England 
and came to America with her father, 
Mr. Bakewell, when asmall girl, not 
more than 12 years of age. The family 
settled on a farm on Pcrkioiiiiug creek, 
near the banks of the Schuylkill river. 
Pennsylvania. 

Audubon was born on a plantation in 
Louisiana -May 4, 1780, and died in 
New York January 27, 51. When a 
child he manifested the strongest dis- 
position for the study of birds. He be- 
gan of his own will to draw the birds, 
and, disclosing considerable talent as a 
draughtsman, he was taken by his fath- 
er to France, there to be educated. 

M’ben seventeen years of age he re- 
turned to America, and, having become 
pos.scssed of a line farm on the banks of 
Schuylkill, in Pennsylvania, where the 
leisure of rural life allowed him abund- 
ant opportunity for prosecuting his pre- 
dominant taste, it was bis habit to hunt 
from the break of day till dark. 

Whilst on one of these rambles in 
search of the numerous feathered tribe 
which appear in his celebrated book. 
.\udubon first met Miss ljucy Bakc- 
well. He loved, wooed and won, and 
the union proved congenial and happy; 
furthermore the .vouug wife soon mani- 
fested a disposition to encourage |lier 
husband in his researches as a natural- 
ist and remlered him invaluable assist- 
ance. But the greatest aid c.ame not 
through inimediute service in the pur- 
suit of his studies: Audubon’s entliu- 

.siasm. which ultimately led him nucon- 
.sciously to fortune, first lead him to 
poverty and tlicn caused him to drag 
his amiable wife in to the same Unhappy 
condition. He siient his own fortune 
first and then soon afterwards sacrificed 
that of his wife to the one object of his 
life. But filled with enthusiasm for his 
work he had faith and courage. And in 
the particulars JIrs. Audubon sufl'ered 
no disadvantage. For a number of 
years they mkde their home in Ken- 
tucky, the town of Henderson being 
their place of residence. A few years 
before the publication of his book, and 
while sojonrmns in New Orleans in 
search of specimens, he was reduced al- 
most to absolute penury. A dark hour 
seemed to he growing upon the hitherto 
happy couple; hut in the time of need, 
with the same ease and familiarity with 
which he applied himself to all other 
projects, Audubon turned daneiiig-inas- 
iter; raised n .school and carried on a 
successful Easiness. In like manner, 
whenever necessity deinanded, he turn- 
ed ^is h8n4*‘-torsIjft'crcnt callings, and 
iiiaae siiSiciciit mei»ii-  to keep oiu ot 
debt. He became celebrated, and on 
this account his life was for years full 
of strongly contrasting scenes and inci- 
dents, such, for instance, as feasting 
abroad one day with the most opulent 
of the land, receiving the most magnifi- 
cent entertainment, and the next day 
surrounded by the circumstances of 
poverty at home. In all the vicissituds 
of his life his wife was a patient and 
faithful sharer. AVith the publication 
of Audubon’s great work. “The Birds 
of America,” in 18‘28, fortune began to 
return. -After several voyages to Eu- 
lOpe, where the couple ivcre received 
with the honors due to royalty, the 
couple returned to America and settled, 
finally, in 1833. on Minnies Land, on 
the Hudson, then near New York. 
Here Audubon died, leaving his wife 
in the possession of the homestead 
which was sold soon after his death for 
about $6(5,000. The city of New Y'ork 
now embraces this property, which is 
known as Audubon Park, and is worth 
over one million dollars. 

After her husband's death .Mrs. 
Audubon returned to Kentucky to live, 
and took up her abode with her sister- 
in-law, at hhelbyville. She was the sis- 
ter of Win. G. Bakewell. of Louisville; 
.Mrs. Alex Gordon, of New Orleans 
Thos. Bakewell, of Cincinnati, and 
Mrs. Nicholas Berthoiid, all of whom 
have died in old age within the past two 
.years. Mrs. Bakewell is a sister of 
Mr. W. II. Dillingham and a half-sister 
of Mr. Charles Chapman, of this city. 

Mrs. .\uduhou died at the age of 
eighty-eight years, in the full iiosscssion 
of all her faculties. Duriu" her latter 
years she has written and juujlished the 
life of her husband. The booTc is full 
of interesting and thrilling interest, and 
it is said, will compare favorably with 
the several works written upon the same 
subject. 

Her relatives started for New York 
yesterday with her remains for inter- 
ment there beside the grave of her hus- 
band. 

The Cloud in the AVest.— The Re 

t mblican State Convention in Illinois 
las opened the campaign with a platform 
declaring boldly for free banking and 
inflation. AA'hile jiatting President 
Grant on the back with the object 



DB1I.RB.S IS . 



Pullman Palace Drawlns-Room and Sleeping 
■Cars from St. Louis, Cincinnati and Columbus, 
to Washington and Baltimore — without change. 

Through tickets and further Intormatlon can 
be obtaliied at all principal 'ncket OIBees 
throughout the West, Southwest and North- 

Thomas P. Barry, L. M. Cole, 

Western Pass Agt., Gan ’I Ticket Agt., 

ClDclnnatl. Ohio. Baltimore, Md. 

Tuouak R. Sbabp. 

Master of Transportation, 

Baltimore, Md. 



FANCY and staple 

D RY GOODS, 



Carpeting, 



Our stock of goods hms l een greatly Increased 
I by purcha.se.s, from first hands. In the Eastern 
cities, and we oiler inducements to prompt buy- 
I ersetiual to any House in the West. 

Orders from Druggists. Physicians, or 
I Merchants filled with promptness and despatch. 
I G. W . BLA’TTERMAN A CO., 

I June6-wAtw Ma.vsvllJ*, Ky. 



Merchantis. Physicians, & Others 



of 

keeping him in good temper with the 
federal office-holders who form 
ed the majority of the Convention, the 
Illinois republicans repudiated his hard 
currency doctrines, virtually condemn 
ed his veto and his memorandum and 
planted themselves on the 
ground of an increased currency 
fair distribution between the sections on 
the basis of population, and opposition 
to the control of the currency of the 
country by capitalists and combination 
of capital. Tlie position of the Illinois 
Convention, President Grant’s own 
State, is most significant, and points uu 
raistakably to a sectional financial issue 
in the next Presidential election. 



Oilcloths, 



Mattings 



ORDERING 



AND 



Housekeeping Goods Ctenerally. 

Second Street MaysTlUe, Ky. 
marchSitwAw 



imilRSNEUICnES, 



and such (foods as are usually sold In Drugf 

stores, wiu eet jfood articles at low nrlces. 

JunC-wilw-foi JOB. F. BKODRICK 4 SON. 



The Crops in India, we are told, are 
full ot promise. Three hundred thou- 
sand persons are still fed by the govern 
ment. The copious rains nowi falling, 
while brightening the face of nature are 
also gladdening the hearts of men. 
Providence has come to the aid of the 
government. It will be well if the In 
dian government, having learned the 
lesson of experience, shall so make pro 
vision for the future that famines and 
Providential interposition, in the way 
of relief, shall be prevented or rendered 
unnecessary, 



Francis Butler’s Death, 

On Tuesday night Francis Butler, the 
distiuguisned dog fancier of Peck Slip, 
after several hours of terrible suffering 
died at his residence at Prospect and 
Bremen streets, Brooklyn. About six 
weeks ago a gentlemen left at his place 
of business a small Spitz dog. The ani- 
mal had been for some time ailing, and 
the owner wished to obtain Mr. Butler’s 
opinion whether the symptoms were 
those of hydrojihobia. The veteran ex- 
pert hardly believed in the existence of 
the disease, or at all events he had full 
confidence in his own ability to cure it 
in its worst phases. He declined to give 
an opinion at the time on the case, and 
asked that the dog might be left with 
him for a few davs for treatment. The 
owner consented and went away, and 
Mr. Butler, as a preliminary measure, 
gave the animal a dose of salts. It was 
no easy task, for the dog was terrified at 
the sight of medicine, and struggled vio- 
lently. The assistant held the animal, 
nd Mr. Butler forcing its mouth open 
with his left baud was in the act of 
pouring the dose down its throat when 
the creature broke away from the assis- 
tant, and before Mr. Butler could move 
his right hand it had seized him by the 
thumb and lacerated it badly. Before 
he could fling the animal from him the 
finger was almost severed. 

In a long exi erience with dogs Mr. 
Butler had again and again been bitten 
though never so badly as on this occa- 
sion. He was not at all alarmed, how- 
ever, tor long familiarity with the dan- 
ger had rendered him callous to it, and 
‘ike most dog fanciers, he believed that 
though all mankind should die of hy- 
drojiliohia lie at least was invulnerable. 
The dog evidently resjuired close atten- 
tion, and .Air. Butler decided upon tak- 
ing it to his residence in Brooklyn, 
where he had many aninmls in training, 
or under treutment. He bound up his 
wounded hand, and putting the dog in a 
liasket, directed his hoy to take it over. 
‘Vs the Roosevelt street ferry-boat, bv 
which the lad was crossing to South 
Seventh street, was entering the slip, 
the lid of the basket was unloosed, 
the dog sprang out and ran among the 
liassengers on deck, snapping viciously 
at everybody. It seemed then to have 
ery well defined symptoms of hydrop- 
hobia ; the froth was dropping from its 
mouth, and its e.ves had that fixed glare 
which is characteristic of canine mad- 
ness. Every one got out of his way as 
quickl.v as jiossible, and not a few near- 
ly fell into the river in their efforts to 
escape a worse fate that drowning. In 
few moments, however, the boat en- 
tered the slip, and the passen- 
gers hastily disiiersed, but not before a ' 
man, wlm.-'e name has not been ascer- 
tained, had been bitten in the leg. 
Soon afterward a imliccman killed the 
7ibid animal. 

Air. Butlei theu hecaiue a little uii- 
asy as to the rosulr of wound ; he 
h:id it carefully imulticed and dressed, 
and watched closely every day; hut he 
was still free from any apprehension of 
its resulting in hydrophobia. He took 
jrecautioiis more with a view of al- 
eviating the anxiety of his family than 
from any fear entertained on his own 
account. The wound healed as rapidly 
as could be expected, but Mr. Butlers 
general health was not good. He suf- 
fered severely from sciatica, and was 
unable to leave his house for a long 
time; his spirits sank as his strength 
dii^inished, but though filled with 
gloomy forebodings on other subjects 
he almost forgot the wound on his 
thumb. 

A few days ago the wound began to 
fester slightly, and something like a 
I’elon seemed to be forming. It gave 
.Air. Butler condiderable pain, and oc- 
casioned great anxiety to his family. 
On Monday morning he was sitting at 
breakfast at the usual hour, apparently 
in somewhat better health and spirits 
than he had been in for some time. 
His wife handed him a cnji of tea, which 
he raised to his lips: instantly a tremor 
ran through his frame, and he set the 
cup on the table, remarking that it was 
the strangest feeling he had ever ex- 
perienced. A second time he tried to 
drink the te,a. but the' result was even 
more marked than before, and shudder- 
ing convulsively, he pushed the cup from 
him. lie said he felt a horrible sensation, 
at the sight of it, and asked his wife to 
get him a seidlitz powder. Airs. Butler 
was deejily agitated; she knew but too 
well that the terrible poison with which 
her husband had been inoculated six 
weeks before was at last doing its fatal 
work, and that his hours were number- 
ed. She procured the seidlitz powder, 
and offering it to him, carefully watched 
the result. It was un'equivocal; he at 
once became violently convulsed and 
cried to her to take it away. She then 
sent for Dr. Lorette, but long before 
his arrival the sufferer was fully alive 
to his peril. He was perfectly self-pos- 
sessed, and gave instructions regaruing 
the arrangement of his affairs with his 
usual keen, common sense; he knew 
that he was dying, and said he had no 
hope of living to see another day. He 
also knew that his end was to be no 
tranquil one, and not wishing the mem- 
bers of his family to see his sufferings, 
he ordered them out of his room. After 
12 o’clock he lost all mastery over him- 
self; his wife could hardly prevail upon 
him to rcmain.at home, and he ran up 
and down stairs striking at every one 
he met with a stick. AA'hcn Dr. Francis 
M. Lorette arrived he found him fright- 
fully agitated, but able to converse and 
understand what was said to him. He 
said he was suffocating, and the doctor 
prescribed a glass of water. He tried 
hard to drink it, but the effort threw 
him into violent convulsions, in which 
he was nearly suffocated. From this 
time the paroxysms increased rapidly in 
freijuoncy and violence; his snfferings 
were fearful, and he entreated those 
around him to hasten his end. Soon 
afterward he wrote on a slip of paper a 
request that he might be relieved in 
some way — even by death. A blister 
was then placed upon the throat and 
chest, and sulphate of morphine was ap- 
plied to the abrased surface. This 
seemed to afford him some relief. The 
paroxysms became less violent, and at- 
tacked him at longer intervals, and at 
length he became unconscious, and 
died. 



Mr. Butler, who was in his 64th year, 
was born in the town of Stroud, Glou- 
cestershire, Englaud. lie belonged to 
a family moving in the first society in 
England. He was liberally educated, 
and as a linguist had very few superi- 
ors, speaking six or seven languages 
fluently. He came to this country 
thirty-six years ago, and was well and 
favorably known as a professor of lan- 
guages. He was connected for a long 
period with Fairfields Academy in 
Brooklyn, and also filled the post of 
French teacher in an educational insti- 
tute in Flushing. He published a 
French and German “Speaker,” which 
was a work of consideraole repute. A 
love of dogs which had characterized 
him in his early years was by no means 
lost durine his checkered career in 
America. He owned several of these 
animals, and his friends sent him their 
pets when they required medical treat- 
ment. About twenty years ago he re- 
solved to give up his literary pursuits 
and establish himself as a trainer and 
breeder of dogs. He opened his well- 
known establishment in Peck slip, and 
his success far surpassed his utmost ex- 
petations. He was undoubtedly the 
leader of his profession in America. 
Those who are acquainted only with 
the little store in Peek slip can hardly 
imagine the immense business he did. 
A notion of its magnitude may be 
gathered from the fact that* on his pro- 
perty in Brooklyn, consisting of eight 
lots around his dwelling house, he had 
frtsjuently as many as three hundred 
dogs of all breeds for sale or undergoing 
medical treatment. He acquired con- 
siderable wealth, which he leaves to his 
family, consisting of his wife and five 
children. 

State News. 

Bowling Green Bepublican: “A 
specimen of the coal oil which exploded 
at Oakland and caused the death of Miss 
8allie Smith, on the 18th inst., was 
brought to this city and tested by a com- 
petent chemist. The fluid flashed at 98, 
and took fire at KN(. The legal standard 
for coal oil in Kentucky is 130 degrees, 
and every one of an inferior quality is 
liable to the law. The person who sold 
this coal oil is not only liable to the law, 
but morally' liable for the murder of 
Aliss Sallie Smith. AA'e understand that 
within two years, there has been five 
deaths from the explosion ot coal oil in 
the vicinity of Oakland. Isn’t it about 
time that the citizens were inquiring in- 
to the matter?"’ 

.Y severe wind storm in Harrison 
county last week killed two children; a 
high limh fell on a seven-year old boy 
as he was going through the woods with 
his mother, instantly killing the child 
ind^verely wounding the mother in the 
other instance, the house of J. AI. Smed- 
ley was blown down, killing one of his 
children. 

Clark County Democrat. “A friend 
of ours had quite an a.dyenture with the 
fire-ficud a few days ago. He awoke 
about miduight, impres.sed with the no- 
tion that somebody was in the back- 
yard. Gettinghis pistol, which lay load- 
ed in the drawer, he cautiously recon- 
noitcred through the window, and dis- 
covered what he took to be a man stoop- 
ing over a coal of fire in the effort to 
produce a blaze, which he did not doubt, 
was intended to be used in setting fire 
to his dwelling house. Taking careful 
aim, he discharged his pistol and saw 
the fire fly, which was a fair shot on a 
dark night. Still the man kept his po- 
sition. He tried another barrel, with 
the same result. Just as he was getting 
ready to shoot again his wife, who had 
heard the reports of the pistol, came 
came running and asked what was the 
matter. AA'hen he explained she looked 
out and laughed heartily. She had been 
having some soap made the day before, 
and the plucky incendiary, who had 
never moved, was the black kettle, 
which had not been put away. This it 
was, and nothing more.” 

A dispatch from Hartford, Ky, to the 
Courier- Journal: — Your readers have 
been kept well informed of the progress 
of the contested lottery-ticket case at 
Beaver Dam, in this county. It will be 
remembered that the suit was brought 
by a club of fifty-three persons residing 
in that town and vicinity, against Rev. 
Dr. Coleman, of the Baptist Church, Dr. 
J. J. Mitchell and F. AI. Bibb, for the 
ownership of one coupon in ticket num- 
ber 2„101, which drew the second prize 
in the late Library drawing of $7^600. 
The amount involved was therefore $7,- 
500. The case was argued by able law- 
j’ers on both sides, Hon. H. I). AlcIIen- 
ry appearing for the plaintiffs. The ev- 
idence was concluded some two weeks 
ago, and argument postponed until this 
week. After two days’ argument the 
J udge rendered his decision last night 
in favor of the club of fifty-three. Thus 
ends one of the most interesting cases 
of the kind ever before the Kentucky 
courts. 

Dispatch to the Courier- Journal from 
Danville:— Messrs. AYilliams, AIcGarvey 
Grubbs and others, of the committee to 
whom was referred the Danville Christ- 
ian Church troubles, made their report 
to-day, at the Christian church, in pres- 
ence of a large and deeply interested 
audience. Among other points of in- 
terest it may be mentioned that the ref- 
erees recommended the resignation, at 
the next Church meeting, of Elder John 
D. Goodloe, for the reason that his 
prominent connection with the recent 
troubles might interfere with his useful- 
ness hereafter. The late deposition of 
Elder James Ayres, which was one of 
the chief questions before the committee 
for investigation, was declared to be an 
irregular proceeding, but he was also 
recommended to resign, for the same 
reason that Goodloe was. The charges 
against Air. Blanks, the present pastor, 
against Messrs. Dunlap, Jones and 
other members, were declared not sus- 
tained. 

Rob’t Riddle, Esq., the present Com- 
monwealth’s Attorney of the 13th Ju- 
dicial District, was nominated for 
.ludge, and J. A\^. Kendall, Esq., of 
Morgan, for Commonwealth’s Attorney, 
by the Democratic Convention, which 
met at Stanton on the 12th. The coun- 
ties of Bath and Montgomery withdrew, 
but as the rest of the district was unani- 
mous, it is not thought there will be an 
independent ticket. 



Tir-Weekly Eagle. 

T. M. 43REKM, Editor and Proprietor. 



SUBSCRIPTION PER ANNUM $4 IN ADVANCE. 



MAYSVILLE, KY„ JUNE 23, ‘74. 



THE REVENUE LICENSE. 

[t ha.s been paid by Tnos. F. 
Hakgis, and repeated by the parti- 
san press that would sustain him 
in spite of any amount of proof of 
his guilt of the highest crimes, 
that when the editor of this paper 
first heard of the matter of the 
revenue license, he treated it with 
contempt, and said it did not mat- 
ter when Mr. H.\rois took out his 
revenue license. This is partially 
true, but is calculated, and was 
published in order to create a false 
impression. We were first told of 
this matter by M. C. Hutchins, and 
shortly afterwards by Thomas A. 
Davis, and from both we understood 
that Mr. Hargis had not applied for 
his revenue license until Septem- 
ber 1st, 1874; and we did treat the 
information with contempt in both 
cases, because we knew that very 
frequently men did not apply for 
license until long after the time 
fixed by law for .such application, 
and that when there w'as no at- 
tempt to evade or avoid the law 
no penalty had been enforced by 
the Government. But when we 
looked at the record’ it.self, and 
found that not only had not Mr. 
Hargis applieil for license until 
September 1st, 186C, but that he 
had been assesmi and had actually 
paid only from that time to ]\lay 
1st, 1867; and harl not been 
or paid for the time prior to Sej - 
tember 1st during which he claim- 
ed to have practiced; — when we a.s- 
certained these facts we regarded it 
as a very neriom laatier. We lost no 
time in informing Mr. Hargis of 
the discovery, and in asking him 
for an explanation. He seemed 
much taken aback, said he did not 
know what to say about it; but 
stated that there bad been great 
intimacy and friendship between 
Clarke and himself, that Clarke 
knew his straitened circumstan- 
ces at the time and that hi.'^ ) rac- 
tice was but small, and he 
had on that account exhonorated him 
from paying the small amount due 
fronr the Istof May to the 1st of Sep- 
tember, ifthiswasnot true, he .said, 
he dtd not know how else to explain 
it. Our sympathy had been keenly 
aroused for him; we TnTd already 
seen Alley’s certificate that Hargis 
had been sworn into the practice in 
the cx)unty court in April or May; 
and we accepted the xupposition of 
Hargis as the true explanation of 
the apparent inconsistency be- 
tween Alley’s statement and the 
record of the internal revenue of- 
fice. In our anxiety to shield one 
whom we believed and wanted 
to believe innocent — we were only 
too ready to give credence to any 
statement of his Avhich had about 
it the coloring of plausibility. But 
so far from treating it lightly, we 
warned him that it was a matter 
which “would give him a (/real dmi 
of trouble.” In the presence of .Ino. 
A. Campbell, in Carlisle, we spoke 
of it again so seriously as to draw 
from him that half-despairing dec- 
laration, that he had done all that 
any honorable man could do, and 
that he could do no more. Almost 
our last advice on parting with 
him, was to urge him to lose no 
time in obtaining from Clarke a 
statement of the facts, which we 
did not doubt would verify Hargis’ 
own statement to us, which he 
promised to do, and for which we 
were waiting before answering the 
first letter of C. E. .1. But when 
we met Clarke at Morehead, he 
emphatically and indignantly re- 
pudiated Mr. Hargis’ mpjwsition; 
declared that he would not have 
permitted personal intimacy or the 
poverty of the subject, to have in- 
terfered for one moment with the 
discharge of his official duty as an 
assistant asse.ssor of the United 
States; and that his construction 
of his duty was, that Thomas F. 
Hargis would have been liable to 
tax from the very moment of his 
swearing in to the practice in any 
court, and ostensibly holding himself 
out for s^ich practice, without regard 
to the amount of the practice, or 
whether he had any at all or not; 
that if he had known of Hargis 
having taken the oath in May, or 
of his having held him.self out os- 
Unsibly for practice at that time, he 
would have assessed him from the 
beginning of that month; and that 
he felt certain he uoidd have known 
it, had it been the case. Mr. Clarke 
is a man of intelligence, of high 



I and goodeharaotur, and a minister 
of the gospel. However anxious 
I wo were to receive Mr. Hargis’ 

I supposition as fact, we could not per- 
I mit it to weigh for one moment 
I against such evidence as this, back- 
j cd up as it 'vas by the record and 
I the requirements of the law itself, 

I which we had not carefullv exam- 

I *■ 

inetl at the time the information 
was first given to us by Hutchins 
and Davis. Then, when we came 
to interrogate Allej', we found that 
his certificate to Hargis was decep- 
tive and absolutely worthless; that 
he had no recollection of having 
recorded the order swearing in 
Hargis in the county court; did not 
remember ever having seen it on 
record; did not remember that Har- 
gis ever had taken the oath in the 
county court; and only thought so 
from such-circum.stanccs as that he 
had been a candidate for County 
Judge in 18CG. Such stuff as thi.s 
could not weigh against the evi- 
dence of the record and the state- 
ment of Clarke, and] we were re- 
gretfully driven to the conclusion 
that that Avas true to which so 
many circumstances pointed: The 
oath in the circuit court on the 
28th of August Avas the first oath 
ho had ever taken as an attorney 
in any court of record, and that he 
was not liable to tax befoi-e that 
time. That Avas also the date of 
his fir.st admission to the Bar, as he 
told Jno. P. Norvell, and that Ihe 
practice he may have liad before 
that time Avas only, as he himself 
says, ".some in the Magistrates courts," 
Avhich he had, if he had it at all, 
Avithout having taken the oath in 
any court, and .without being legal- 
ly and technically a •‘practicing 
.Utornev.” 



HON. W. S. BOTTS. 

'I'lie course of this gentleman as 
special .fudge of the BoAvan Circuit 
Court Avon for him the plaudits of 
the Barand the people. Uniformiy 
courteous to all members of the 
Bar, and e.si)ccially kind to the 
younger and more inexperienced 
of the profession; jiatient ami Avill- 
ing to listen to the arguments on 
both sides of every question that 
came up for di.scussion; anxious to 
expedite the business of the court, 
and yet hot harshly or rudely e.x- 
acting; his mind niot jumjiing to 
conclusions, Jmt Avorking unerr- 
ingly fo"T^e truth; — .-uch a man 
and such a course could not have 
failed to have given satisfaction. 
Judge Botts jiosses.scs many of the 
qualities Avhich are most admirable 
in a Jurist; and among these avc 
fiarticularize unsAvevering integri- 
ty, an unbending love of truth and 
justice for their oavh sake, a cour- 
age to do that Avhich his judgment 
jxiints out as the right thing to lie 
done, a temper even ami equable 
and yet firm enough to repel indig- 
nity;— a man unswayed by party 
alitins or prejudices, holding every 
other man innocent until he is 
proved to be guilljq charitable to 
hrmian Aveakness, and chary of con- 
demnatory speech; — not a man of 
brilliancy, but a sound and sure 
laAvyer, and ready to deal out exact 
justice to friend and foe alike. 
The ])eople of RoAvan coAinty have 
rarely had a Judge upon the Bench 
Avhom they likeil better; the Bar 
seldom one Avhom they approved 
as heartily. His course in the 
matter of the indictments against 
Taber Avas one that Avill commend 
itself to all; — firm, just, manly and 
dignified. It Avas a case almost 
anomalous in (he history of the 
criminal jurisprudence of the State, 
and 3’et his mind grasjied and 
comprchcndetl the situation and 
his action Avas prompt, decided and 
right. In questions of doubt, he 
held that the citizen accused must 
have the benefit of the doubt, and 
AA'hen an accused person demanded 
a trial it should be accorded him 
unless there Avere overAvhelming 
reasons why it should not. That 
the State had no right to keep a 
man under an indictment, not that 
known evidence might be had but 
merely in order that testimony 
then unheard of might turn up 
against him. That in asking fora 
continuation the State must shoic 
its hand. It is a pleasurable thought 
that this course Avas pursued to- 
Avards one destitute of the means 
to emploj' coAinsel — a man poor and 
almost unfriended — while his pros- 
ecutors Averc men of influence and 
poAver. We say Avith the people. 
Well done, good and faithful ser- 
vant. 



The Republicans in this section 
of the country plume themselves 
on favoring the election of good 



and Competent men to ofFioe. In 
Fleming county they have an ex- 
cellent opportunity to make good 
their Avords. H. Basil Dobyns is 
a candidate for re-election to the 
office of Circuit Court Clerk. Al- 
though nexperienced Avheu he 
first entered upon the discharge of 
the duties of the office, he has since 
mastered them in all their details. 
He has made a most excellent of- 
ficer. He understands his duties 
thoroughlj’ and discharges them 
efficientlj'. He is jiolite and ac- 
comodating. He has been faith- 
ful and honest. His habits are 
good. He earns the .salarA' by his 
labor, he needs it for the support of 
his famih'. His course has been 
most acccqitable to the Bench, to 
the Bar and to litigants. Now, 
Avbat more can the Rejiublicans 
Avant in a ministerial officer? If 
he is turned out, the public Avill be 
the loser; for this thing of chang- 
ing clerks ev’erv few j'ears breeds 
confusion. To be consistent Re- 
publicans ought to vote for him, 
and Ave are not Avithout hope that 
the more liberal members of the 
party Avill do so. It is true that 
Dobyxs Avas in the Confederate 
army, but the Avar is over, and that 
ought not to stand in their way. 
Withdraw your opjjositiou, gentle- 
men of tlie Republican ranks, and 
let Dobyns have a full fiwing aud 
a clear field. .And then j’ou may 
Avith some propriety claim support 
for your oavu candidates, Avithout 
regard to their politics, Avhen j'ou 
]iresenf men Avith superior qualifi- 
c.ations for the offices they .seek. 

Having heard of the remark.alde 
piviceediiigs of the convenient 
Jacob Hargis in broAv -beating a 
Avitne.ss in the Grand Jury room of 
RoAvan county, because his evi- 
dence dill not help to make out the 
lircdetermined case against John 
R. Taber, Ave Avrote to R. G. Scott 
for the facts. The folloAving is his 
reply, viz: 

Farmers, Rowan Co.. Ky.   
•fnne 18, 1874. j 

-If/'. Grrni : 

Dear Sir: In answer to yours of 

.Tune IJtli. 1 will say that I was sum- 
moned before the grand jury at our last 
May term and after being SAVorn by the 
foreman, John .Scott, (who is H nephew 
of mine and also a Radical friend to ^ 
.iudge Thomas F. Hargisj lie sliowod 

me the two f’orjrrd rrrAef^on pige IfitI, 

I bclicA'c, aud asked me if I know whose 
lundwrite those orders were, and I 
stated that I did not know, jmt that the 
words, (in the order appointing Hen- 
derson overseer) “ordered and appoint- 
ed,’’ looked more like Col. .John Har- 
gis’ writing than any person’s that I 
kncAV of. .Jacob Hargis, who was on 
the grand jury, jumped up. came to 
where I was standing, and said ‘by God,’ 
or something to that effect, that his 
father should not be accused of that 
forged order before the grand jury, and 
seemed very much excited. I then 
shoAved the jury orders that had been 
made by Col. Hargis when he acted as 
clerk, and that the words, “oriiered and 
appointed, looked to me like the same 
as on tjie forged orders, .lake remark- 
ed that they did not resemble a danin 
bit. and that he could prove it by AVat. 
AndreAvs, and that he would have Mr. 
.Andrews brought up and prove that it 
Avas not his father’s handwrite. But I 
think he failed to do it. I thought he 
Avas going to jump mo, whether or no, 
and us he is a bully in the mountains, 
and as 1 always feared bullies, I made 
my exit from the Grand Jury room at 
the first opportunity, 

Respectfullv. 

R. G. tiCOTT. 

.A Proper Decision, bet .a Close 
Vote- That of the .Imliciarj- Com- 
mittee of the House to impeach 
Judge Durell and Judge Bnsteed. 
The vote Avas six for the proposi- 
tion and five against. Let us hope 
the House, notAvithstandin'g the 
closeness of this vote of the .Hulici- 
arj’ Committee on part}' considera- 
tions, Avill accede to the recommen- 
dation and bring these Judges be- 
fore the bar of public opinion and 
tbe laAvs. The South needs a rid- 
dance of such judicial vampires 
and ti»«'brands, and a, searching 
and thorough investigation will do 
much to accomplish that. 



The Wyoming Soda Lake. i 

Yesterday in company with Mr. I 
{'harles Poyntz, N. K. Boswell, and M. i 
C. Brown, we visited the soda lakes that 
lie betAveen Laramie and Sheep Moun- 
tain, and notwithstandiiig the reports j 
that were in circulation concerning the j 
extent of the deposit, iti immensity was I 
surprising to the analyst and ye editor. 
The area of one lake aa;is oA-er sixty 
acres. The material Avhich covers it 
resembles ice in appearance and solidity. 
There having been a fall of rain the 
night previous, an inch or more of Avater 
lay upon the incrusted lake, and this 
was so highly impregnated with soda as 
to be damaging to leather and make a 
white spot wherever a drop of it touch- 
ed the clothing. Holes have been dug 
four feet into this soda without reaching 
bottom, and it would certainly be safe 
to estimate its average depth at three 
feet. As ii extends over an area of one 
hundred acres, the amount of sulphate 
! soda may be easily computed. Rut, as 
this is derived from a constantly-flowing 
spring, it is fair to presume that the 
quantity is dimply inexhaustible. 

Mr. Roy itez thought that a furnace 
could be e icted on the premises at a 
moderate c xpenditure, which would con - 
vert the crude sulphate of soda into a 
merchantable carbenate at per ton 
ton. and this could be delivered in Chi- 
cago at iSl.*). which would leave a hand- 
some margin of S20 on each ton for a 
staple article of commerce, the demand 
for Avhich is so great that its value would 
not be affected by this discovery. 

About ail our soda comes from Eng- 
land. whe' ! it is manufactured from 
salt, being li'.'st conA'erted into a sulphate 
of soda by i lie use of sulphuric acid. Af- 
ter all the processes are completed it is 
then shipped to America, where a duty 
has to be paid, and a profit to^the impor- 
ter, and it is sold in Neiv A’ork at S1.5 
per ton. 

A dispatch from St. Louis. .June 10th, 
says; tfince the mutiny in the peniten- 
tiary at. leflerson City, a few days ago, 
there has been a A-ery turbulent spirit 
manifested by the convicts, and much 
unruly and insubordinate conduct. For 
two days all work in the shops had to 
be suspended and prisoners kept in 
cells, icsterday several of the ring- 
leaders Avere lashed seA’erely on the bare 
back, and this will be continued from 
day to day until all those most ai tive in 
the mutiny are punished. One of those 
.whipped yesterday confessed that a plot 
to escape had been planned, and an at- 
tempt was to have been made to carry it 
out yesterday, but the action of the au- 
thorities in confining the jirisoners in 
cells prevented it. It is believed that 
the inntinons spirit has been quelled, 
and that no more trouble will occur. 



MARRIED. 



CARR— BHOWNING— lu Mic Presbyterian 
cbiircli, or Mavsllok, .lune s, 1874. by Rev. .1. Al. 
Evans, .Mr. Bi njamln O. Carr to Miss Laura B. 
Browning. 

PEARCE— VUMSTltONO— At Newport, Ky., at 
the .M. K. cb'irch, .south. June Sd, 1874, by Rot. 
Mr. Nolan, Mr. John Q. Pearce to Miss Kate 
1). Armstron .i 



DIED. 



JOHNSON— In Paducah Ky, June 14tb, 1874. 
Elijah Johnson aged 31 years. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



.Anuoini€'eiiieii(H Five DollarN. 
rirl'illl Jn.iKe. 

AVo are reiiueslcd to announce T. K. H.AKGIS, 
of Nicholas, .uj a candidate for Judge of the 
Circuit Court in this Judlrlal Ulstrlct, subject 
to tbe decision of a Democratic ConA entlon. * 

AVe are authorized to announce Hon. GEORGE 
M. THOMA.s, of LcavIs county, a8 a candidate 
for nrcult Judge at tlie ensuing August election. 



Eor Judge of. Alaaoii Coiiiily Court. 

AVeare authorizeil to announce OARRE'Prs. 
AV.AIXosa candidate for Judge ot Ihe Mason 
County Court, at the ensuing August election, 
subject to any mode that may be selected by the 
Democratic jiarty as a means of deciding be 
lAveen candidates. 



For Coiiimonn'eallti*N Attorney'. 

AVe are authorized to announce A. E. Cou:. 
ot Flemlngsburg, a.s a candidate tor Common- 
wealth’s .Attorney In tills Judicial District, sub- 
ject to the de cision ot a democratic convention 

Cireiiit t'lerk, 

\Ve are authorized to announce T. .A. KES- 
PK.SS as a candidal e for Clerk of the Circuit 
court of Mason County, subject to the Ceolslon 
ot the Democratic party, cither a.s.semblcil In 
Convention or at a Primary Election. 



4'oanty Clerk. 

AVe are authorized to announce ARTHI R 
BERRY as a canilldale for County Clerk, at ihe 
August election, 1874. 

Matsvili.e, Ky., Feb. 3. 1874. 
EniTOR Eagi.s; ^ 

Please announce me as a candidate for the 
Otnee of Clerk ot the Ma.son county court, at the 
ensuing August election, subject to the decision 
ot tbe llemot'racy of Mason county. In Conven- 
tion or by Primary Electlon.^^^ 



We are autbortzed to annouDce JAMES 
SMITIIER as a candidate for ibeoIMceor As- 
sessor or Masou county, at tbe ensulnfr Aug^ust 
Election, subject only to tbe decision ot tbe 
people at tbe polls. 



For Hberiff, 

AVe are anihorlzed to announce JOHN R. 
MASTERSON as an Independent candidate for 
tne otHce of .sheriff of Masou county, at the eu- 
sulng August election, subject only to the will 
of the people as expressed at the polls on Ihe 
day ot the en*ctlon. 

AVeare auihorlzed to announce .TOS. F. PER- 
RIE aa a candidate for Sheriff of Mason county, 
subject to the action ot tbe Democratic party, 
either In Convention or Primary Election. 



Jailor. 

AVe are authorized to announce AVm. N. HOAVE 
as a candidate for Jailor of Mason county, at the 
ensuing August election, subject only to the de- 
cision of thi people at the polls. 



A very significant statement concern- 
ing the advance of Russian power in Cen- 
tral Asia comes from the Berlin corres- 
pondent of the London Times. It is 
well known that England has lately suc- 
ceeded in sending an embassy to the 
capital of the independent State of 
Kashgar, Avhich lies north of Thibet,, 
and Avas formerly a jirovince of China, 
and that the Britfst envoy, Mr. For- 
syth, has negotiated a favorable treaty 
of commerce Avith the sovereign 
or Ameer of that little-known 
country. Now it is announced 
that China is about to at- 
tempt the conquest of this territory with 
troops armed with European rifles, and 
that Russia accordingly “is preparing to 
concert measures of defense with the 
Ameer of Kashgar.’’ This means that 
Russia does not like the English influ- 
ence at the Ameer’s court, and sees in 
the prospective war a fine opportunity 
to supplant it by an alliance which 
would lead ultimately to absolute sway. 



Editor OF E 40I.K : 

In response to i be several calls made upon me, 
i’ou are authorized to announce mease candi- 
date tor the office ot Jailor ot Mason County, 
subject to the decision of the Democracy, 
Respectfully, 

AV. AV ■ AA'^EEDON. 



We are authorized to announce THO.S. Y 
JOHN^N as a candidate tor Jailor at the next 
August election, subject to the decision of a 
Democratic convention. 



POX SPRINGS. 



FOX SPRINGS 



■SVILLOFEN MIDDLE OF JUNE. 






«I3 FER WEEK. 

HALF PRICK FOR CHILDREN AND SERVANTS 



Louisville, June 17. — Duchess of 
Oneida, a 2-year old heifer, purchased 
by W. J. Alexander at the New York 
Mills sale last fall for $19,000, died on 
the Alexander farm, Woodford county, 
of pneumonia. 



DEDUCTION HA DEBT MONTH, 

OOOD BAND IN ATTENDANCE. 

June 18 -sw. 



W BW ADYEBTIS tiMBNTS, 

STATEMENT 

OP 



OHINA A ND GLAsaWARB, 
ATTENTION! 



RESOURCES OF MASON COUNTY j 



IT IS A FACT 



Debts Incurred, claims allowed, tco., lor the 
year ending May llth, 1874, viz : 



Net turnpike and bridge tax | 7,602 15 

“ Sinking Fund tax 11,373 44 

“ Deflclt claim tax 7,602 is 

“ AVhltc tithe tax 3,827 ’20 

“ Negro Pauper Fund 48i 84 

“ Coilectlous from auditor’s list . 55 40 

Cash from rent ot Masonic lodge room 75 Oo 
Cash from rent ot Office OO 



$31,074 24 

The following claims against Mason 
County, for the year ending as above, 
Avere allowed at the May term, 1874, of 
Court of Claims, and ordered to he paid, 
viz : 

GENERAL CLAIMS. 

O. AV. Sulser, clerk’s tees, Ac $ S75 40 



Kass A Ro.’iser, printing . ’iS 50 

Thomas *. Davis, printing 20 00 

A. Sorrles, repairing lock In Jail ... 6 75 

W. B. Mathews, lumiver 27 28 

n. Flcklln A sous, dry goods 6 60 

s. W. Wood, holdingcounty court 10 00 

31. R. A A. R. Burgess, blankets for Jail 21 25 

J. F. Perrle, slieriff’s tees 11 oo 

J. J. AVood A Bro., gla.ss, Ac 10 70 

J. B. Wisenall, carpentering 1 75 

J. Frank A son. tlnwork at Jail and 

court house •. 20 35 

J. J. Perham, constable’s tees lo oo 

Perry Jeffei-son, sherlll’s tees . . 63 60 

G. \v. Sulser, three Justices’ dockets. 15 oo 

(,’harles Dobyns, constable s tcee 15 so 

Charles Dobyns railroad fare prisoners s 60 

Maysvllle Gas Co., gas clerks ofllees. 6 36 

AV. AV. Weedon, sherlirs tees 03 69 

W. T. Lindsay, services on irnirsaary com. 35 OO 

AA'. D. Coryell, services on Infirmary' com. 89 10 

T. DauUon, services on Innrmary com. 50 00 

E. L. Gault, services on Inlirmary com. ‘26 OO 

AVllllam Carr, Jailor’s fees 816 55 

.lohu Ryan, constable’s tees lo oo 

J. A. Slack, arresting vagrants 5 00 

James smltber, arresting vagrants. . . 2 60 

G. AV. Sulser, extra services as railroad 

commissioner 60 00 

G. S. AA'all, salary a.8 county attorney 500 00 

J. K. siiuiral, salary as county Judge. l,ooo oo 

G. AA’. sulser coal for clerk’s olllee .... loo oo 

G. U. sulser, stationary 60 oo 

J. .\. Keith and J. G, Bacon expendi- 
tures on Blue Run and aiiderson 
Ferry turnpike , 212 17 

Gtllcersol election and Justices 322 52 



Total H.990 21 

WHITE pauper claims. 

C. P. Dleterlch, provisions for poor $ lo oo 

Dr. J. Phlsler, medical services 7 60 

M. 1’. Cockrel, coroner’s tecs . . 35 60 

Samuel like, printing 2 ’25 

Thomas M. Green, printing 2 50 

L. Hill, groceries for poor 16 00 

A. Cochran, clothing for pauper 21 00 

Dr. J. T. Fleming, medical services lo oo 

•vtrs. F. Miller, atbrntlon to puujier 60 oo 

q. A. Means burial ot pauper 10 60 

P. OHborne, keeping pauper 60 oo 

M. 8. Dimmit, burial ut paupers . 16 oo 

TUos. Daulton, expenses on liillrmarv . . 6:'. 86 

Sylvester Davis, coffin 0 70 

Lucy AVllllams, keeping pauper girl 25 oo 

Thos. Colburn, keeping Cobb chlldieD . 60 no 

Harriet Barbour, keepTag negro child . 25 oo 

John roach . . . . 15 no 

Hannah suns 6 ue 

Monroe Car and family 60 00 

R. Bradford aud tamlly 40 OO 

James Mastersou . . 30 00 

John Nelson and family lo oo 

Mrs. Wells and children ... noon 

Dr. B. C Duke, metb’al services lo 00 

Mrs. .M. .\. Beckett, keeping crippled sou 75 00 

J. mastersou. hlinselt and family 50 oo 

.lohii Colvin, kiA’plng widow and sou 76 oo 

.Sarah Holliday, keeping blind chlliL 25 oo 

AVlIliam Flora, keeping two boys .w 00 

T. J. Dobyns. poorhouse physician 15(1 oo 

AV. .1. Tully, boldlngluquest 6 40 

Eliza Pollard, keeping Infant, 1.50 00 

Isaiah Davenport, keeping pauper 75 CO 

Tho.s. Colbuni, keeping Cobb chllilren . . 40 00 

H. V. Rlggcn, goods tor pauper 4 25 

1). Sapp 76 00 

W. s. Beaucamp, burial of pauper 8 (K) 

31. AVIllls, dlgglnggraves 10 00 

John Downing, keeping giundson 50 00 

31rs. A. RIgdou 30 00 

John H. Cllfi .50 00 

Benjamin Campbell 75 00 

Adallne Combs, steambont isro 25 00 

Dr. John Sbackietord, amputating leg of 

I). Fltcb 75 00 

Dr. J. D. Daugherty, amputating legot 

D. Fltcb and attennanee T5 00 

Lewis Jefferson, superintendent iiud 

receiver ptxyrhouse 100 OO 

Henry Howard tobacco for paupers . . 28 oo 

Superintendent aud receiver poorhouse 3,000 00 



Total $1,903 45 

Junen vv tw 

NEOKO FACPER CI.AIMS. 

q. A. 3Ieans, burial ot paupers $ 42 00 

Dr. J. T. Fleming, medical .services ‘20 00 

Dr. SI. F. Adamson, medical services. . 187 5u 

.1. A. Keith, altehtlon to pauper 62 oo 

AV, s. Beaucamp, coffins 14 oo 

John S. Goff, coffins 1000 

1)1. .1. A Reed, medical services 50 oo 

M. S. Dlmmttt, coffins 10 .50 

Dr. Alex Hunter, inedleal services 16 Oo 

Dr. J, R. Best, medical services 411 .50 

Dr. J. S. Hood, medical Hervices 15 00 

.1. A. Jackson, clothlngfor pauper 7 .w 

Amy, colored, keeping child 25 oo 

James T. Best, conveying woman to 

poorhouse . i .50 

CharlesBland, burial of paupers c oo 

George AV. Dye, coffin tor pauper. . 6 oo 

Wesley 3'lcroy, coftlii for pauper lo 60 

Harriet .50 00 

Achsah Goodler 60 oo 

Dr. H. I,. Parry, medical services -20 oo 

Dr. H. L. Parry, medical services . . 25 oo 

AVIllls Threlkeld .50 oo 

Total $978 00 



The following appropriation and sub- 
scriptions Avere made to turnpikes and 

bridges; 

Kenton Turnpike road $l,ooo per mile; 

*• “ “ $200 to build bridge over 

Lawreuce Creek; 

Lewis A Mason Co. Turnpike, (Cabin Creek 
branch) $500 to build bridges; 

Minerva A Beasley Creek Turnpike 810,000 lo ex- 
tinguish debt; 

TuckaUoe Ridge Turnpike, $1,000 to e.xUnguish 
debt; 

3IaysvlUe A Blue Run Turnpike, $500 for repairs 
on road. 

3IaysUck A EllzavlUe Turnpike, $1,000 per mile; 

MaysHek A Ellzavllle Station Turnpike, $600 to 
complete road; 

Dividing Ridge turnpike, $1,000 per mile; 

■Maysllck A llelona Turnpike, $9O0 to pay off 
debtot road; 

Hiram Dye, $ 1,000 for expenditures ou May slick 
and Sardis Turnpike; 

Purcha.se of land for county Infirmary . .415,000 

Cost of Buildings tliereon 6,390 

Attest: G EG. W. SUL8 ER, 

C’lerk Mason County Court. 



— tiiat- 

G. A. McCarthy & bro., 

are selling 

CHINA, GLASS, QUEENSWARE, 

Knives, Forks, Spoons, 
Pocket Knives, 

Silver Plated Ware, 

L6okiny Glasses, 

Lamps, Fvnit Jars, 

Sealing Wax, Bird 
Cages, Stoiie Ware &c,, 

A OREAT DEAL CHEAPER 

* THAN ANT 

HOUSE IN .HAISVILLE. 
DONT F.A.IL TO CALL 

and secure bargains at b.)th 

J 

WHOLE, SALE AND RE’TAIL. 

G. A. MeCARTHEV, 
China 

NO. :50, SECOND STREET. 

June 20. 

HARDWARE. 

“O.&B” 

11 AB DWARF, 

BOOTS, SHOES 

AND HATS. 

5 & 7 Second Street. 

We ask I he attention ot merchants aud others 
to our large slock of the above gooths, nearly all 
ot which are. made for us, and we believe are 
“good” good.8. 

Headquarters tor 

.STRAW CUTTERS, 
Forks, Segthes ang Snaths. 
GILM & LE.VniER BELTING, 

Lace Leather. Rivets & Biirs, 

BARN-JJOOR HINGES, 

WHEEL BARROWS, 

BABBITT BSBTAZi, 

OAKAM.CAKASS ROPES, 

Tackle BIoeLs, 

— ANO— • 

HOME - MADE CRADLES ! 

WOur stock Is tun aud well assorted ot 
everything In Ihe hardware line. June is- 

Q B. ANDERSON, 

WHOl.ltSVI.E i.NU hKTAlI. DEILSB IN 

HARDWARE, 

a u N s:. 

1 BOX ANT) \ANV1LS, 
Coach and Saddlery Hardware 

No. 20 and 21 Market Street, 
MAYSVILLE,\KY. 

sepistwtwt 

The BECKWITH 



pRUlTJARS, 

M.asoii Screw Top 

SELF SEALING 

FRUIT JAR! 

Best amt Cheapest in the World. 

FOR SALE AT 
a. A. McCARTlIEY & BRO'S 
CHINA DEPOT, 

No. 30, kSecoud Street. 

jun20tw-vk-2m 



  MOLIERK. 

1 A BEAUTIFUL ENTERTAINMENT, 

I WILL BK GIVEN BT TUS 

SODALITY B. V- M., 

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 
evenings, 24th, 25th and 26th. 



They will representon the stage. In their own 
ball. Limestone street, tbe celebrated comedy 
of Mollere, “Tbe Pretended Nobleman,” (le 
Bourgeois Gentelboinme,) translated for the pur- 
pose. 

As tbe Hall Is ot small dimensions, the tickets 
wall be limited to two hundred each evening, 
and tor .sale only by Father (ilorleux, and at 
Mullins s Hunt’s, (5. W. Blntterman A' Co.’s, 
.Tame.s .smith’s book store and John O’Donnell’s, 
3larket Street. 

SWThc proceeds u  be devoted to the educa- 
tion of poor orphans. 

Door open at 7  , o’clock; performance begins 
ats o’clock. June20 iw. 

• 



PORTABLE 



Family Sewing Machine* 




i Price, 



. with StrcDffth. 

^CrtpacUy 
3 equal to Any* re- 
Bnrdleea of co«t. 
tt WithSemi-Guiding Foddt 
and AotomftUc Stitch Fastener. AH other MaclilnM 
require the movement of from 26 to 30 piece# to 
every stitch— this requires but Two! Hence 11 Is a 
evmbolot himpIlcUr and strength. Foriullrytle- 
Ulan send for Circular— then buy no other until you 
fee the Machine, ftor “aeelng Ubellovlnj *’ Ageuts 
wanted $n eeery Anra /rt the eomutrp. K U are sent 

with the order the balance can be C. O. D. Apenta 
must pav ft»ll price for single Machines, per ceutairo 
on drHU'ol»c deducted when six Mnrhine.*-are Mid 
 or. Terms to apeuis. cash with order, or C. C. D. 



q m. Cn.. Dr ? Rrnadw^v. N. V 



JQEATH TO VBRMIM. 

PARIS GREEN! 

— FOR— 



Killing Potato Bag.s . 

FOR SALE BY 

BRODltlCKN: SON, 




AKE THE WEEKLY RAGLE 

BdperAmiiii, fu Advoe. 



juD2(Hwwtw 



Druogist.s, 

Maysvllle, Ky. 





COUNTY and CITY DIBECTOIiy 

COUNTY OKUCKBS, 

Circuit Judge Hon. U. H. Stanton. 

I 'ommonwealtU’b Attorney . . ..Ueorge T. Halbert. 

idrcult Clerk TUos. .A. liespa.s.s. 

county Judge Hon. J. K. Sumrall. 

county Clerk ueorge \V. Sulser. 

county Attorney Oarrett s. Wall. 

sberlff I’erry Jefferaon. 

Asse.Hsor W. L. I’arker. 

Jailor... Win. Carr. 

coroner M. T. Cockrell. 

Circuit Court convenes, spring term, Tue.sday, 
after second Monday, In April; tall terra, Tues- 
day after second Monday In October. 

County Court convenes second Monda.t in 
every montb. 

quarterly tkmrt convenes second Monday in 
Marcli, June, September and December. 

emr 0KKICBR.S. 

Mayor— Henry L. Newell. 

Marshal— James Uellln. 

Demitles. • Hoblnson. 

Deputies.! k. m. Skinner. 

Clerk- Dowlas 1’. Ort. 

Collector— Treasurer— J. W. Watson. 
Assessor— 

Wharfmaster— Mike Brown. 

Wood and Coal Inspector- Ben. ulven. 
Market Master— Win. McCallough. 

Alms Hou.se Keeper— Wm. Mills. 
I'ndertaker— Q. A. Means. 

NEMBKKSCITY COUSCIU 

President- .\. T. Cox. 

First Ward— Wm. N. Uudy. 

C. S. Prank. 

Tho.s. WelLsj 

Second Ward- Dr. G. W. Martin. 

Ur. W. U. McGranaghau. 

 1. H. Rains. 

Third Ward— Dr. John Shackleford. 

'Dr. .John M. Duke. 

Richard Dawson. 

Fourth Waid— -A. T. Cox. 

J. 1.. Grant. 

A. B. Cochran. 

Fifth Ward— O. D. Burgoyue. 

E. L. Pearce. 

George T. Wood. 

sdsosic nmEtTOBV. 

Maysvllle couimander.v , No. 10, Knights Tem- 
plar— slated ctihvoi'aliuii, Alb Monda.v In each 
uionth. M. C. Ruascll, E. C. 

.1. B. Gibson. Recorder. 

Maysvllle council. No. SC, stated communica- 
tions, Tuesday after 4th Monda.v in March, June, 
September and December. 

M. H. Smith, P. J. G. M. 

H. R. Blalsdell, Recorder. 

Maysvllle chapter. No. *, stated communlca- 
ilons, :td Monday In each month. 

Hamtllou Gray, H. P. 

w. H. Holmes, seedy. 

conlldence Ixxlge, No. sa, .stated commiinfi a- 
tlons, llrst Monday In each mouth. 

II. R. Blalsdell, W. M. 

W. H. Holmes, seedy. 

Mason Lodge, .No. S42, stated commuulcatloms, 
2nd Monday in each month. 

I.. M. Klckett-s, W. M 
J. W. .Alexander, seedy. 

Sardis Lodge, No. 1»6, communications In, or 
litter full tnooti, tu every mouth. 

James Bratton, W. M. 
Tlios. Y. Dobyu.s, seedy. . 

CBI BCII DIKECTOKV. 

Christian Church, Elder J. B. McGinn, pastor. 
Services Lord's day at n o’clock, a. ra., and ; p. 
in. Sunday School at » o'clock, a. m. Prayer 
Meeting Thursday at 7 p. tn. 

Presbyterian Church, (Synod), Rev. J. E. Spll- 
i«an, pastor. Services alternate Sabbaths, at 
their church building on Court street, at l«,‘, a. 
m. and 7 i p. m. Prayer meeting Wednesdaj at 
7 o’clock, p. m. Sunday School at 3 p. m. 

Preslivderlan Church, (Gen. Asseinlily), Rev. 
s. B. Alderson, pastor. Services alternate Sab- 
tiaths at their church oulldlng on Court street at 
oij o’clock a. m. and" p. m. Sabbath School at 
o’clock. 

Presbyterian Chapel, Rev. S. B. Alder.son, pas 
lor. services alternate Sabbaths at lot, a. m 
and 7 p. m. Sabbath school at .3 p. m. 

M. E. Church, South, Rev. R. H. Reed, pastor. 
Services Sunday at lo a. m and 7 n. m. Sunday 
School at 9 o’clock. Prayer meeriug Thursday 
at 7 p. m. 

M. E. Church, Rev. D. Slavens pastor. Sun- 
slay services at 11 a. m. and 7 p. m. Seats free. 
Prayer meeting Wednesday at 7 p. m. Sunday 
scin’iol at 2 p. 111 . 

I , ’hurch of Nativity, Rev .Mr. Foute, Rec- 
tor. Sundav servlces at 10)4 a. m. and 7 i . m. 
Sunday school, 9 a. m. Prayer meeting, Friday 
at 7 p.'m. 

Baptist Church, Rev. J. M. Frost, Jr., pastor. 
Services every Sunday at 11 o’clock, a. m. and 
7 p. 111 . Sunday school at 2 p. m. Pra.ver meet- 
ing Thursday at 7 p. m. 

Catholic (.’hurch. Rev. Father Glorleux, pastor. 
Services Sunday at ll a. m. Sunday school at 
2 p. m. 

Maysville and Lexington R. R., N. D. 

GOING NORTH. 

I io.:joa. M. 
(5.50 p 

(K) A. 

p. 



Tri -Weekly Eagle. 

MAYSVILLE KY., JU-N'R 23, '7Y 






S..n. FKTTEXGILIk A 'o.,ST Park UOW 
New York city; No. lo state sireet, Boston, and 
701 Chestnut Btreet, PhUadelplila, are Agents for 
the Maysvillb (Ky.) Tki-Wkkkly and Wkkki.t 
Kagle, In tYo above cities, and autAorlzcd to 
contract for advertising at our lowest rates. 



Ctitft with Wood barkN will not 
Insertod in ihiM paper herenfier. 



be 



LOCAL INTEL L IGENCE. 

Campaign Eagle . — Wc will send sin- 
gle copies of the Tri-Weeki.a' Kagle 
to any address for six months, for $2.00 
and for three months. SI. To clubs of 
ten we will send it for six mouths for 
$17, and for three months for $0. .Send 
in your orders. 

The AVeekly Kagle will be sent to 
single subscribers for six months, for 
**2, and for three montlis for 50 cents 
each. To clubs of ten for six months 
for $8, and for three months for $4, and 
in each case one copy to getter up of 
club. 

Cash ill advance in every ca.«e. 

ir»f. P. Coons is now the Democrat- 
ic candidate for County Attorney, Air. 
J. L. Whitaker havingwithdrawn on ac- 
count of his ineligibility. 

The entire artillery corps of Alaysville 
was in eager search for Tom Collins on 
Sunday. Major Manuen was the only 
person who found him, but Tom apolo- 
gized so abjectly audhiieekly that the 



Very Remarhahh . — A gentleman in 
the neighborhood of Johnson’s Station, 
M. & L. railroad, has a horse on his 
farm that can vomit and relieve himself 
of any excess of food in his stomach, 
and also rtdieves himself of colio. 



Mr. Thomas H. Soward has just re- 
turned from :i tour through Lewis coun- 
ty, when he has bcerc very successfully 
engaged in opening Granges. Mr. Sow- 
ard has also done some cood work in 
the temperance cause. 

The case of Col. Terrell, for killing 
Harvey Myers was before the Kenton 
Criminal Court on Friday. The de- 
fense moved for a continuance, which 
the iirosccution resisted. The Judge 
took the matter under advisement. 

An Oralorio Conrert will be given by 
the pupils of the Female Institute,Tues- 
day, June 2;5d, at 8 o’clock, p. m. No 
complimentary tickets will be sent. .\d- 
I mission ‘25 cents. 

I Miss J. R. Farke, 

j Principal. 

j Foundry . — There is no need for our 
I farmers to send away their agricultural 
j machinery for repairs. AVm. Hood, 
j of the Maysville foundry , is prepared to 
j do all that kind of work in the best 
i style. Wc saw some work of his on the 
I inside of a steam engine for threshing 
i purposes, and it was of the most expert 
j workmanship. Give home machinists 
: a fair trial before sending your work to 
I a distance and iiayiiig unneees.sary costs 
: of transportation. 

1 John II. Tuber published in the Re - 1 

kind -Major could not fiml the heart to j of Saturday, a communication ! 

kill the scamp ns he deserved. j plentifully interlarded with epithets | 

-n iTTi i • T • 1 characterizing Thos. F. Hargis. But 

(leorgc I . Halbert IS stumping Lewis , . ^ j-j - g 

- , I he isn t a patcliing to the candidate tor 

lor the candidates 01 the I’ loiningsburg | 

Convention, and is earet'iil to he partic - 1 

ularly abusive of Jno. K. Taber. The 



A Gorman correspondent says; 
Count von Moltko wont recently to his 
estate. Kreisan, in Silesia. In speak- 
ing of his sojourn there he expressed 
his intention of visiting the village 
school. Though no day was mentioned 
the honor was daily made known in the 
village. The result was great joy, but 
still greater preparations. The school 
was dismissed and the day devoted to 
scrubbing and cleaning. With his usu- 
al unpretentious way Count von Moltkc 
reached Landau by rail and, stepping 
out of the car, hired a plain one-liorse 
wagon to drive him out to the village. 
An hour later he reached Beerburg, 
walked to the school-house, but found 
no one but a frau, who, scrubbing away, 
told him the school was dismissed for 
the day because in the morning they ex- 
pected grand visitors. Soin what 



Go West Through St, Louii.— 
During the Summer Season, the Mis- 
souri Pacific and Kansas Pacific 
Through line, via St. Louis and Kan- 
sas City, will sell Excursion Tickets 
from St. Louis to Denver and Return, 
good ninety days from date of sale, at 
extremely low rates thus affording every 
one an excellent opportunity to visit the 
famous resorts of Colorado, among the 
beautiful Parks of the Rocky Mount- 
ains. 

To all who are seeking new homes in 
or arc about to take a trip to Missouri, 
Colorado. New Alexico, Nebraska, Ore- 
gon or California, we recommend a 
cheap, safe, quick and direct route by 
way of St. Louis, over the Missouri Pa- 
cific Through Line. It is equipped with 
fine Day Coache.s, Buck’s Reclining 
Chair Cars, Pullman’s Palace Slcepcrf 



II wuat as- 
tonished he returned to the v.agon and the fiimous Miller Safety Platform and 
drove hack to Landau. As the driver I the celebrated Wcstiughousc Air Brake 
stopped before the hotel he was surpris- I and runs its trains from St. Louis to 



prised to see an immense flag waving 
from the piazza, and the market place 
crowded with people, who greeted with 
loud cheers his plain looking passenger 
as he alighted. For the first time he 
knew he had been driving the great Gen- 
eral von Moltke. 



latter receives more left handed coin- 
plimeiits thtin nearly any individual we 
know. 



Qni/e a number of citizens were on a 
hunt, on Saturday and Sunday, for that I omit Mr 
universal slanderer. Thomas Collins, i 
Had the wretch been caught he would j 
have been pounded to a jelly, out into | 
mince meat and shot all to pieces. He i 
escaped within an inch of his life. 



tioii and we advise him to abandon it. 
Having already published the “Open 
letter,’’ we conclude that it is quite j 
enough to satisfy the appe tites of our 
readers for that class of literature dur- 
ing one season and we very cheerfully 
Taber’s eflFusion. 



of our fellow citizens of Irish 
and descent, met at the Court 



410INU SOCTH. 

1 .....Maysville.. 

ii'i. S:! ■ !“ 



.) 

3.45 F. H. ^ 
7.H.5 a. .m. ) 

4.00 r. M. [ 
7.15 .A. M . I 

4.10 F. M. I 
7 ’2r  A. M. j 
4.20 F. JS. I 

7.30 A. M.   

5.00 F.  1. ( 

8.10 A. M. ) 
5.’20 F. M. I 

8.30 A. M. ) 
5.56 F. .M. I 
8.05 A. M. ) 
Ii.’25 F. 31 . I 
9.40 a. m. f 



I 9.45 
■( 5.00 
( 9.:i5 
'( 4.50 
( 9.25 
1 4.40 
I 9,20 
( 4.35 
) 8.50 
( 4.00 
J 8.30 
( 3.40 
f 8.00 
■( 3.05 
„ . ( 7.30 

^ 1 2.35 



Helena... 

Johnson... 

...Elizaville.... 

Kwiug 

.Myers 

Carli.sle — 

....Millersburg... 



.M. 

•M 

■M. 

M. 

M. 

31 . 

M. 

.M. 

.M. 

-M. 

.M. 

M. 

■M. 

31 . 

M. 

M. 

31 . 

31 . 

M. 



We are glad to learn that Thomas 
Jackson is fast recovering from his re- 
cent injuries, and will soon be able to 
appe.ar again upon the street. Mr. 
Jackson is a useful citizen, and liosts of 
friends will rejoice that we are unt'to 
lose him from the active eominniiitv. 

A 

The examinations in the public 
schools last week were very creditable 
to both teachers anil pupils. We have 
heard that of the classes under charge 
of Henry (h Smith spoken of in terms 
of high commendation Captain  S. C. 
Pearce was so delighted with the per- 
fect manner in which the young people 
recited, that he treated the whole 
school to ices and cakes. 



Some 
birth 

House on Saturday, and declared their ^ 
determination to support W. N. Howe. - 
for Jailor; John R. Masterson, for sher- 
iff; and James Smithers, for Assessor — 
all of them Independent candidates. 
AVc regret that we could not attend the 
meeting. We learn that thejspeech of 
young Mr. O’Brien, of Bourbon, was 
well delivered and produced an impres- 
sion very favorable to his talents. 



A Quaker Printer’s Dream. 

Never sendest thou an article for pub- 
lication without giving the editor thy 
name, for thy name oftentimes secures 
publication to worthless articles. 

Thou shouldst not rapat the door of 
a printing office, for he that aiiswereth 
the rap sneereth in his sleeve and 
loseth time. 

_ Neither do thou loaf about, ask nues- 
tions or knock down tyiie, .for the do}’s 
will love thee like they do shade trees — 
when thou leaveth. 

Vou shouldst never read the copy on 
the printer’s case, or the sharp and 
hooded container thereof, or he may 
knock thee down. 

Never iii(|uire thou of the editor for 
the news, for behold it is his business 
at the appointed time to give it to thee 
without asking. 

It is not right that' thou shouldst ask 
him who is the author of an article, for 
his duty requireth him to keep such 
things to himself. 

When thou dost enter into this office, 
take heed unto thyself that thou dost 
not look at what may be lying open and 
coneerneth thee not, for that is not meet, 
in the sight of good breeding. 

Neither examine thou the jiroof-sheet, 
for it is not ready to meet thine eye, 
that thou inayest understand. 



principal jioints in the AV'est without 
change. The 'Texas connection of thit 
Road is now completed and jiassengers 
are offered a first-class all-rail route 
from St. Louis to Texas, either over the 
Alissouri. Kansas & Texas R. R., via 
Vinitia. 

For full information in regard to Col- 
orado Excursions, or trips to any point 
in the Great West, address or call upon 
either of the following named Agents of 
the Line; J. F, Thompson, l57 Ex- 
change St., Buffalo, N. Y.;S. H. Thomp- 
son, Union Depot, Columbus. Ohio; or 
E. A. Ford Gen’l Pas.senger Agent, ^ 
South Fourth Street, St. LouLs Mo. 
Questions icill he cheerfully and prampt- 
ly answered. 



paper tn any 
it immeiliate- 



Kenliirky ycniral Time Table. 



FRSseiiger Trains will run as lollowa : 



GolDE Soutn ; 



No. t. 

Tlirougli Ml.xed. 
Ac’m’d’n 

2:10 p m 8:15 p m 
8:57 p m n:4S p in 
5:15 p m 2:«s a m 
6:00 m 4:0 i a m 
6:50 p m 5:25 a m 
7:15 p m 5:45 a m 
7:55 p m 6:50 a m 
No. 5. 

Through MLYPd 
Express, 

Leave Nlcholasvllle 6:10 a m 12:36 pm 6:00 p m 

Arrive Lexington . . 6:50 a m 1:1.5 p m 7:00 p m 

Leave l-exlngfon. .. 7:00 am 2:00 pm 7:30 pm 

Arrive Fails . .. 7:50 a m 2:45 p m 8:50 p m 

Arrive tlynthlana . . 8:33 a m 3:30 p m 10:40 p m 

Arrive Falmouth 9:45 a m 4:40 pm 110 a m 

Arrive Covington 11:40 am 6:30 pm 4:26 am 

Trains run by cinclanaM time. All trains run 
dally, Sundays excepted. 



No. 1. 
Through 
Express, 
'*.eave Covington . 6:30 a ra 
Arrive Falmouth... 8:20 am 
Arrive Cynthlona.. 9:40 am 
Arrive Farts . .10:25 am 

Arrive I.exlngton.. 11:16 am 
la-ave I.exln^u... 11:26 a m 

ArrtveNlehoTasTlllel2:05 p m 
No. 4. 

Going North ; Through 
Ao’m’dm 




Manhood: How Lost 
How Restored! 

JiLst published, anew edition 
, ot Dr. COLTKRWELi,’s celebra- 
tted Essay on the radical cure 
’(without medicine) ot Sper- 
matorrhoea or Seminal Weak- 
ne.ss. Involuntary seminal losses, Impotency, 
meuul and physical Incapacity, impediments 
to maiTlagc. etc.; also, consumption, epilepsy 
and nts. Induced by seU-lndulgence or sexual 
extravagance: piles, Ac. 

HT-prlce, In a sealed envelope, only six cents. 

The celebrated author. In this admirable es-’ 
say, clearly demonstrates from a thirty j ears 
successful practice, that the alarming conse- 
 iue.nces ol self-abuse may be radically cured 
without the dangerous use of Internal medicine 
or the application of the knife; pointing out a 
mode of cure at once simple, certain, and effec- 
tual, by means of which every sufferer, no mat- 
ter what hLs condtlon may he, may oure himself 
cheaply, privately, and radically. 

r»‘'l'hla lecture shonld be lit the hands of 
everj’ youth and every man In the land. 

Bent under seaL to any address. In a plain 
sealed envelope, on receipt of six cents, or two 
postage stampa Also, Db. .Sii.isbee’s Remedy 
lor raes. Send for circular. 

Address the Publishers. 

UHAS..I. (’. KLINE & CO., 

1*7 Bowery, New York, I*. O. Box 4,R86. 



Orersight caused us to neglect to give 
Mr. Geo. R. Gill the credit for the re- 
! port of the speech of Thomas F. Har- 
gis, on the 13th inst. Without being a 
professional reporter Mr. Gill has a rare 
talent for the work and rarely fails to 
give an accurate report of any speech 
he attempt.s. He has no superior among 
amateurs in this particular. 

('hiiia Palace. — H. Alherl still keeps 
up the reputation of his establishment 
on Second stratit. It is the place for la- 
dies to go for everything in his line. 
The little garden in the rear of the store 
is as pleasant as any one need 
wish to enter. Exquisite t-iste is dis- 
played ill the selection of the ])lants. 
and in every arrungemeut. Go and 
look at it even if you buy nothing. 

llarretting has fairly commenced in 
this county, and from all parts the re- 
port is eiicoiircging. The barley is 
good and the wheat excellent. Of the 
latter grain the quantity is above the 
average, and the quality is very super- 
ior indeed. Now let the farmers take 
our advice ; Sell your wheat when it is 
ready for market, and pay your notes in 
bank and store hills. It is the best pol- 
icy to pursue one year with another. 

The tobacco crop in Southern Ken- 
tucky will be almost a total failure. In 
this part of the State, with the most 
favorable season from this time forth, 
there cannot be grown more than half a 
crop. The loss to farmers will be very 
heavy. But it will he salvation to deal- 
ers in the leaf and manufactured arti- 
cle who have large stocks on baud. It 
is estimated that there is more, tobacco 
in Europe thsu there ever was before, 
and that the stocks now in the hands of 
dealers arc sufficieut to run the world 
for eighteen months to come. 



|:^ININGER’S 

Old London Dock Gin. 

Lpeclally designed for the use ol the Medical 
- ■ — Ithf ' — 



Wheat and Cold . — Emerson says 
that people can always find gold if they 
will only dig for it. It seems that many 
wise pioneers who sought gold in Cali- 
foniia have found wheat. An estimate 
of the harvest for this year alone is 
thatafter dcductingthe amount of wheat 
used for home cousumptioii, enough will 
remain for exportation to double the 
amount exported last year by Russia, 
much larger indeed than that exported 
by the rest of the United Ftntes. It 
would be an odd and at the same time a 
gratifying circumstance if the land of 
gold should become the land of wheat, 
and richer from its wheat than it could 
ever have been from its gold. 



The following has been handed us for 
puhlicatiou. viz : 

BoLiv.AU, Miss., June 1C, '74. 
Mrs. G. ir. Blatlerman: 

De.vr M.ADA3IE: I have the honor 
and pleasure to acknowledge the timely 
receipt of your letter of the 30th of 
.^Iay, and by the steamer Thos. 8her- 
lock, the two boxes of clothing sent by 
your “Relief Association.” Please ac- 
eejit riiy thanks for the clothing as well 
as the thanks of the poor people who 
received the goods, ft is a timely gift 
and one that is duly appreciated. The 
spirit that prompted j’our effort in our 
! behalf is tliat heaven-boru charity so 
clearly taught by Christ and his tnuF- 
followers. 

Very respectfully. 

J. E. EDMONDS. 



Prefer thine own town 
other, and subscribe for 

ly- 

Pay for it in advance, and it sliall be 
well with thee thine. 



The Springfield Republican says: “In 
Great Britain the transaotious of the 
London Stock Exchange are 25 jier 
cent, le.ss than last year, and the hank 
clearing-house indicates a much smaller 
increase of clearances than usual. In 
Frwice the business accounts of the 
gretit bauk of the etnmtn’ shows a con'- 
siderable diminution in the discount of 
eomniereial hills and in loans, a fact 
harmonizing with and explaining in 
some measure the increase of specie in 
the vaults of the bauk. The Bank of 
Prussia shows a similar state ot affairs, 
though the change is not so marked. 
It is universally a year for paying debts 
and investigating as little as possible in 
business,” 



- The Rush toKan.sasand Colora- 
do. — The indications are that the rush 
to Kansas and Colorado will be greater 
than ever in 1874. 'The shortest way to 
reach the far West is through St. Louis, 
the great Mississippi-Valley City, of 
over 450,000 inhabitauts and thence west 
over the St. Louis, Kansas City and 
Northern Short Line, which reches all 
the great land grants in the West, and 
runs six fast Express trains, two more 
than any other road, between the Mis- 
sissippi and Missouri Rivers. This 
road, in the last two years, has expend- 
ed over two million dollars, besides 
earnings, in extraordinary improvements 
ef roadway, in relaying its line with best 
quality ot new steel and iron rails, on 
broad new ties, and in passenger e juip- 
inents, having substitute i^or ordinary 
cars new reclining chair coaches, with 
every appliance for comfort and safety, 
being elegantly carpeted and fitted with 
dressing rooms, with toilet conveniences 
for ladies, geuticmau and families travel- 
ing with children, free of any extra 
charge. Any ticket agent sellingthrough 
tickets to the West will furnish tickets 
by this excellentroute through St. Louis, 
over the St. Louis, Kansas City and 
Northern Short Line, the bestand short- 
est to Kansas, Colorado. Nebraska, Cal- 
ifornia and the great AVest, it being the 
only line running through cars between 
St. Louis and Omaha. For map, circu- 
lars and time tables address either J 
F. McCarthy, Cincinnati, 0., or P. B 
Groat, St. Louis, AIo., either of whom 
will furnish any information desired. 



The curious library of the late AI. 
Lucicu de Rosney, father of the eminent 
Japanese scholar, was lately sold by 
auction in Paris. It was rich in fine, 
and above all, eccentric bindings, such 
as ill skins of cat. garnet colored and 
bluff; crocodile, mole, seal, fur of the 
Can,adiau black wolf, royal tiger, otter, 
white bdbr. sole, and rattlesnake. The 
legendery human skin binding is alone 
wanting in the list. 



Liberty of speech is not one of the 
blessings now enjoyed in Germany. \ 
sentenee of imprisonment for a year and 
a half has been passed upon a Deputy. 
Herr Most, for certain sjiecehe.s deliv- 
ered by him at some some iiieetitig of 
working men. The most serious eharee 
made against him was that he had de- 
nouneed a standing army. This was re- 

f arded by the Alinister of AVar, A’^on 
Cameke, as an insult to the meiubcrsjof 
the anny, and the proseeutioii was set 
on foot at his request. 

The population of Great Britain and 
Ireland at this time is stated in the Re- 
gister General’s returns to be 32.412,- 



iSaturate a piece of bread or incatwilli 
gastric juice, and \t will dissolve. This 
is digestion. -\dd to sttcb a mixture a 
little alcohol and it will not dissolve 
This is indigestion . Beware, then, of 
tinctures and tonics, or decoctions con- 
taining spiritous liquors. Shuu all rum 
“tonics.” and rely solely on Dr. AA'.alk- 
er’s A’inegar Bitters, the finest di- 
gestive invigoraut known, and free from 
the fiery curse of Alcohol. JnelTlw 



Maine’s Self-Sealing FRUIT JAR 

(loe.s not require Wax, and Is the Cheapest self- 
sealing Jar In the Alarket. l-'or sale 

AVIIOLE8ALE A RETAII.. 

( . AV. Hlattermau & (k).. 



Second Street. 



Ch-m Rulief Association. “r *iW),U(K» more than double the 

I population enumerated at the hrsf ceu- 

i BUS in 1801. 'fhe population of Ireland 
in 1874 is only 84,000 more than in 1801. 
The population of Scotland in 1874 is 
212, (KM) more than double the popula- 
tion of 1801. 'fhe population of Eng- 
land and AA'ales in 1874 is above 5..500,- 
(kXI moi’e than double the population 
in 1801. 



Maysville Wholesale Market. 
corrected BV II. GRAY & CO. 

COFFEES. 



Rio ¥ pound 

Manlllu 

Slugn pore Java 

Miirlcalbo 

Santos 

GOV Java 

Mocha 


nm 1 


CIIEKSK. 




Western reserve ip pound .. 

Factory 

.Niitmee' 


14 «1S 

14 ^15 


Kentucky Cream 


18X^13 


CANDLES. 




Tallow candles » ib 

star •• 


80(dr.21 


KISH. 




Mackerel bbl 

“ half bbl 

“ qrs, bbl 

“ kits , 


STQIC 

4Cd9 

1,SO(«8,00 



: Family, pos.ses.slng those In 
irlnslc medicinal properties which bclo 



Protesslon and 

(long to an 

Olb and Pure Gin\ 

Indispensable to Females. Good for Kidney 
complaint. .A delicious Tonic. Put up In cases, 
containing one dozen bottles each, and sold by 
all druggists. Grocers Ac. A. M. Blotnger A Co. 
fsiabllsUed 1778, No. 15 Beaver Btreet, New York 
seplCvraJitwl 



Carretl S. Wall is from a family long 
settled in Alason, ofhigli repute, but no 
member of which, if we are correctly in- 
formed, has ever before solicited office 
from the jieople. He is a young gen- 
tleman of good jirivatc charncter, at- 
tentive to his business, and if elected 
will do his utmost to make for the 
! county a faithful and acceptable officer, 
j Air. Wall has now no opposition, and 
we hope will have none. It will be ut- 
terly futile to oppose, and for one we 
want the canva.ss to pass off with as lit- 1 
tie excitement as possible. JLet him I 
have the full vote of his party, with as ! 
many Kepuhlicans as may be thrown ' 
in. 



Our Neighbors. 

MINERVA. 

Business engagements have prevent- 
ed your correspondent from discharging 
his duty recently. 

(,)ur little village is exceedingly quiet, - 
so far as within the town limits are con- 
cerned — but we can hear the music of 
machines all around, indicating that 
harvest is at hand. AVheat is looking 
splendid, corn and tobacco quite poorly. 
Potato-bugs are taking the day — being 
as fond of the potato-vine as preachers 
are of chickeus. 

8ome improvements are going on in 
the town, such as fencing, etc. 

-Alethodist (Quarterly meeting here 
last .Saturday and Sunday. Eld. Evaus, 
P. E., preached several sermons on in- 
fant baptism. The way matteis now 
stand, he will have a chance to make 
things mere satisfactorily, at least to one 
party. 

Praechiug also at the Baptist Church, 
with two additions. Alecting also on 
fourth Sunday iu this mouth. Subject: 
Baptist Church History. 

On the night of the 12th instant, the 
Alethodist sisters gave au ice-cream 
and strawberry supper, for the benefit of 
their church. Though the writer was 
not there we understand it w.as a suc- 
cess. 

There will be a grand Masonic cele- 
bration at the Germanto.wn fairgrounds, 
on the 24th instant. A huge time is 
anticipated. Alore anon. 

Constantine 



hemfseed .and hay 

Hemp f) ton 

Flax Heed bushel 

Hemp “ •• 

Clover “ “ “ 

Timothy seed ^ bushel 

Hay ten 



80(^95 

1,40(41,50 

1,76 .42.25 

0,75@7,)J 

3,25(44,00 

16(818 



GRAIN. 



Th(* Indianapolis Sentinel .says : 
“The yield of wheat in Southern Indi- 
ana is retjresented as wonderful. Dr. 
A. C. Stevenson, of Putnam county, 
lately mad$ a visit to different portions 
of Gibson county, and he* thinks very, 
many fields will give an average of 
twenty-five bushels to the acre, an(I 
some will go as high as thirty. Thus 
fill’ the season has also heeu generally 
favorable for corn, of which a good 
stand is ujion the ground, promising au 
imiueusc yield from the unusual 
breadth planted in the spring. AA’ith 
these prospects before the farmer it is 
not an easy thing for him to keep coun- 
tenance and lower his ohin much be- 
low the proper point. Good crops are 
an assured fact and good crops mean i 
good times iu spite of adverse condi- ' 
tious in the bu.siness world.” | 

“I’d hate to be in your shoes,” said a j 
woman of the East Side, yesterday, as 
she was quarreling with a neighbor. | 
“You couldn’t get in them,” sarcasti- i 
cally remarked the neighbor . — [^Terre 
Haute A'.i’prcjw.] 



Flour bbl 

Wheat is bushel 
Rye “• 

Corn “ “ . 

Oal.s 



1,30(81,60 

60(876C 

68(872 

40®.50 

3IOLASSES AND .SVRUFS. 
Molasses New Orleans bbis. 

«» 6* ii w 

SyTupa bbls 



“ Kegs 

PROVISIONS. 

Bacon Sides iji tb 

“ Hams ^ 11 ) 

“ Shoulders W Hi 

Lard ¥ hi 

Butter SI lb 

Chickens is dozen 

Eggs “ “ 

Potatoes "lit hu.shel 

Rice is tb 

(SUGARS. 

Sugar %l Ib 

Crushed sugar ¥ «  

Granulated sugar ¥ lb 

Powdered sugar (g hi 

SOD.A.- 

Soda English illb 

Soda -American 

SUNDRIES. 

Feathers VI8 

Tallow ^1 lb 

Salt i bu.sliel 

Whiskey V gallon 



76^85c 

85(896 

60(890 

66(81,00 

60^1,00 



10(810H 

11(812 

8«8H 

1IC812X 

1801S 
2,96(83,00 
10 ® 11 
150(8200 
9H®ioy4 



9X012C 

12),®14 

12X«14 

I2%®14 



iXfdSO 

7 ^7X 

45(850 

06(806 

36(840 

1.00@7,56 



BOOKS AND STATIOKABY. 

1874. 



SPRING TRADE. 



1874. 



BOOKS & STATIONARY. 



Ladies’ Portmonies and Fancy Ar 
tides. 



Embracing all Books, Ordinarily Used In .Schools 
FOOIiSC’AP PAPERS, 

LETTER PAPERS, 

NOTE k BILLET RAPERS, 
envelopes k INKS 
of all popular brands, 

BLANK B(X)KS and 

OFFICE 8TATIONKRT 

Wallpaper and Window Shades. 



M^lng a full line of goods, which I wIUmU 
n holesale and Retail at reasonable rates. 

, _ JAMES SMITH, 

nlae-wkt 



STOVES AND TINWARE. 



QOOPER. BISSETT & CO., 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

STOVES, 

TIN AND STONE WARE, 

FRUIT JARSOF ALL KINDS, 

best In the market, and manufacture of 

Tin Copper & Sheetiron Ware 

Especial attention paid to 

Till RtKifiii^ K (jialvani/ed Iron 
tkirnice. 

A Iso, Plumbers, Gasand Steam Fitter 

and dealers Iu 

Wrought Iron and Lead Pipes. 
Steam Packing, Pumps &e,„ 

Nos. 21 and 23 East Second Street, 

Ilnjr.vllle. lay 



COAL. 



QOAL! 



Charles Phister, 

COMMISSION, LUMBER 



-AND 



COAL MERCHANT, 

3d Btreet near Court Street, 

Just received, a barge load of Ashland Coal* 
considered the best coal that comes down the 
Ohio river Also, a very superior load of Pome 
joy coal. Constantly on hand. Bailed Hay, Corn 
Hand, Lumber, ShluKles. Doors and Sash. 

JUlVlft 



CONFECTIONER. 



nEO RGB ARTHUR, 



WIIOLE.SALE AND RETAIL 

Confectioner, 

8ECOND STREET, (Near the Post 
Office), MAYSVILLE, KY. 

I respectfully announce to the citizens of this 
city and vicinity, that 1 have opened my Ice 
Cream 8aI(x B tor the season, and reduced the 
price to $2.00 per gallon. I use only the best ma- 
terial and guarantee a very superior article. 1 
have an excellent 8 xla Fountain In operation, 
nd a full supply ol Uie choicest syrups. 
Wed(ling parties supplied on shortest notice 



May. I 



GEORGE ARTHUR. 



CARRIAGES. 



gTYLISH EQUIPAGES. 

GARKIAGES, 



Superior tn stvle and 
lowest rates. 



finish, and sold at the 



REPAIRING DONE PROMPTLY 

ON THE LOAVKST AND 
MOST REASONABLE 
TERMS. 

Allen  £• Burrows, 

Second Street, between Sutton andWall , St. 
wlv MaysTlIle, K.t. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



WANTS 



«'AXTED— We will pay the market price for 
Five I bon»an l BuiBbeln of Corn. 
marc23wtwtf THOMPSON 6, PILES 



OHIO VALLEY 



PIANO COMPANY, 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



Grand, Square, and Upright 



Y-^ixroiS. 



-Among the sub.scribers for the stock 
of a Connectieut insurance company are 
Mark Twain for $;')0,( (K), and Senator 
Jones, of Nfcvada, for $75,000. 



Notice to Tax-payere . — City taxes are 
now due. To save five per cent, come 
and pay them at once. Treasurer's of- 
fice — Povntz' tan yard building. 

J. W. AVat.son, C’ol. k Treas. 
i June 9, 1874. 4w 



^AW CARDl^ 

I^AW CARD. 



W. B. WADSWORTH. A. WADSWORTH. 

Wads-worth & Wadsworth, 

Attorneys at Law. 

Maysville .... Ky. 

will practice In this and adjoining counties. 
Prompt attention given the coUectlon of all 
lalms. jaaittwkwiy. 



The “Valley Gem.” 



M. J. CHASE, President, 
SAM’L UREGG, Vice PresY, 
JAS. RETNOLD9, Treas., 
O. BAMBACB, Jr. SeCy. 



RIPLET, O. 



]uly 26 -wktw 






Tri -Weekly Eagle. 

MAYSVlTJ^KY.rJUNE 2^4 



News. 



A large frog, whose age is placed in 
round numbers at one thousand years, 
was recently found ten feet below the 
su rfacc at Sodus, Yew York. He junij)- 
ed away quite lively as soon as he could 
re member how he used to do it. 

The Sharpsville (Penn.) Advertiser 
quotes the following statement from an- 
other paper: “AVe have before us a 
clipping from a copy of Liberty Hall, 
pub lished in this city in 1816, where a 
mo st marvelous phenomenon is related 
— the name of the physician being given 
—of a Mrs. John Kelly, of Mercer 
Co unty, Penn., who had just given birth 
to five children, that being the second 
effort of the kind within twelve months, 
or ten children born within the year.” 
And the Advertiser adds this: “Mrs. 
Kelly, referred to above, resided in 
Lac kawannock township. Mrs. AVal- 
lace, now residing in this place, remem- 
bers the circumstances of the birth of 
ten children very well, having been 
present on both occasions. Dr. Ma- 
goffin. of Mercer, was the physician. 
Mrs Kelly died about a year after this 
event, but in the meantime had twins, 
bavin given birth to twelve children 
within twenty months. Mr. Kelly is 
still living, and now resides in 8haron. 

A Poor Victim of Liquor who was 
sent to Blackwell’s Island for six months 
on the 22d of last month was on June 
17th, taken before the Police Justice 
who had sentenced her on a charge of 
intoxication. When asked how' she ob- 
tained her liberty she stated that she 
and others had been discharged from 
the AVorkhouse by the Commissioners of 
Charities and Correction on the pretence 
that the place was overcrowded. This 
is how the “population” under the con- 
trol of the Commissioners is counted 
up. The names of the prisoners tlius 
illegally discharged remain on the books 
and are enumerated over and over in 
the census in order to make the popula- 
tion appear large and to excuse the enor- 
mous expenditure for supplies. 

A dispatch from Chicago June, 19th, 
says : Some days since a young girl 
named Rosetta J^ackson. died suddenly 
at the house of a Mrs. Kate Helland. in 
this city, and the suspicions of the i o- 
lice being aroused as to the cause of her 
death, an investigation was instituted, 
and the body of the girl, which had 
been shipped to Mauston, AA'isconsin, 
for interment brought hack. A post- 
mortem examination showed that she 
had died from the effects of an abortion, 
and the Coroner’s inquest, concluded 
this evening, resulted in the arrest and 
commitment without hail, to await the 
action of the Grand Jury in the Crimin- 
al Court, of one Dr. Charles Karll, who 
attended the girl, AA'^in. H. Flagg, her 
brother-in-law and supposed seducer, 
and Mrs. Helland, at wnose house she 
died; Earl as the murderer, and the 
other two as aecessoides before the fact. 

(From a late London Letter] 

Yesterday the eldest son and heir of 
Lord_ Petre renounced the brilliant 
position to which he was born, and the 
wealth and honors of his birthright, and 
was ordained a Jesuit priest in the 
churchiof that Order in Farm street. 
He is in his twenty seventh year. 'I’his 
makes the second heir to a British 
peerage who is now a Jesuit priest, the 
other one being the brother and heir of 
Jjord Arundell of AA’’ardour. Lord 
Petre has estates which yield a revenue 
of A'25,000ayear. AA'hat canbe the motive 
which inspires a young nobleman thus 
to forswear all the joys of thi.s world and 
to become an humble priest, subject in 
all things to the will of a Superior, and 
liable to be sent at a moment’s notice 
on some mission to the ends ot the 
earth? . 



IiINEB OS’ TRAVEL. 

ao SOUTH, 

SOUTBWX 2 ST «k 

SOUTBBAST. I 

VrATIIE ‘ 

I 

LuulsvUle & Great Southern i 



UAILROAI) LINE, 

This Is the Great Direct and Through Line, 
and the only All Rail Route to all points In 

TEXAS, AKKAXSAS. LOUISI- 
ANA, MISSISSIPPI. ALA- 
BAMA, FLORIDA, GEORGIA. 

THE CAR0LINAS'& TENNESSEE 

I’OR.M THE 

NORTH AND EAST. 

Pullman PALACE CAES 

Run via this line both tvays as follows : 

Louisville to N. Orleans without change. 
Nashville to Memphis without change. 
Louisville to Little Rock without change. 

NO CHANGE OF CAES 

From LOUISVILLE to MEMPHIS. 
MONTGOMERY or NASH- 
AMLLE, 

Thus making a Great through 

Continuous Ail Rail Route South 

.\ voiding all Perries and Transfers. 

MAMMOTH CAVE, 

Tlie greatest ot Natural Curiosities, la located 
on this line. Passengers can stop over, visit 
the Cave, and resume their Journey at pleasure. 

tWGreat Inducements to Emigrants, .ai-i 
For complete Information as to connections 
time and accomodation, send for the Locisvillk 

AND OBSAT SOCTHERN MONTHIT RAILWAY GCIDE. 

C. P. ATMOHE, 
so OenT Pass. & Ticket Agt., 

2lwt ,be Louisville, Ky. 



MUSICAL INBTHUMENTS, 

^^SICAL INSTRUMENTS 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Stein way & Son’s 



AND THE 



TAILORING. 



J^OCIS STINE & CO. 

Merchant Tailors 

AND 



J^OUISVILJiE & CINCINNATI 
SHOETLINE EAILEOAD 



TtieOnly Mono 

Running Its entire passenger trains through 
to Louisville. 

The Oiilv Knnd 

Making quick time between Louisville and 
Cincinnati. 

The Only Kond 

Running four dally trains. 

The Only Rond 

Arriving In Louisville In time to connect with 
the fast train on the Memphis & Louisville 
and lAiulsvllle & Nashville R. R. line, reach- 
In^rlnclpal southern cities. 

One Train in Advance of All Rival 
Lines. 

To secure the AoranTuges offered by this 
through route, ask for tickets and be sure they 
read 

Louisville and Oincinnati fihort Line. 

Henry Kte«’l'ee. 

General Ticket Agent, Louisville. 

H. IS. ,l« neM« 

General Passenger Agent, Louisville, 

augtwi 2 tf.* 



Burdett Organs. 



The undersigned are General Western Agents 
both at Wholesale and Satatl for the above cele- 
brated instruments, which are well known to be 
the tlnest 



PIANOS anti 0 EGANS 



GROCERIES, Etc. 



IN THE L'NITED STATE 



J^AMILTON GRAY & CO. 



Wholesale Drocers, 

LIQUOR DEALERS, 

Forwarding and Commission 

MEECHANTS. 

Coruer Second and Sutton Streets 

Janisw-twlv Maysvllle, Ky 



j rn A. MATTHEWS, 
GENT S EUENISHEES, ; ^ * _with— 

Woodside, Oreen & Labai’ee, 



Our Hrm, unclianged In —Inclnnatl for Thirty 
Years on the 6th of June, is;3, possesses unusual 
facilities for purchasing at the lowest possible 
prices, and as we occupy part of our own build- 
ing and receive from the Cincinnati Chambek of 
COMNEHCEANOMK aCBANTSExCBANUB End Other 
tenants a full Interest on our investment, we es- 
timate nothing for rent, and can sell to dealers 
at a very small advance and quite os low as they 
can buy First. 

In addition to the above uuequaled Instru- 
ments, we have a large stock of 



oooo, 

KBLXABIiB 
LOW razosB 



JanoakVs Block, MAT.SVILLE, KY , 



especttully Inform tbelr frlend-s and the public 
generally that they are In receipt of all season- 
able goods In their line, which will be made up 
to order 

Oil ^he Most Favorable Terms. 

Keep a full assortment ot 

GENTS FURNISHING GOODS 

which will be sold as cheap as can be bought In 



this market. 



dec31w&wt 



^ED CORNER 

CLOTHING HOUSE! 

Blum,Hechiiiger |Co. 

We again take pleasure to announce to our 
many patrons, and the public generally, that 
our Mr. DAVE HECKINGER has returned from 
the East, wltli an excellent and well assorted 

STOCK OF GOODS, 

consisting of a splendid variety of 

Eeady Made CLOTHING, 



WHOLESALE DE,\LERS IN 

Tea, Tobacco and Ciyars, 
No. 59, Walnut Street, 

Cincinnati, O. 



Pianos and Organs, 



8. Woodside. 



J. H. Labaree. , 
R. L. Green. ] 
ulyw-twly 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



the 



OHIO YALLEY 



PIANO COMPANY, 



A1 lot Which are our own make. -Also a magni- 
ficent assortment ot 



FRENCH & ENGLISH 



PIECE GOODS, 



Which, we flatter ourselves, we make up super- 1 
lor to most taUorlng establishments. We al.so 
call particular attention to our new stock of 1 



HATS AHl) SHIRTS, 

&ud all kind of good.^ pertaining to 

1 GENTS’ OUTFIT. I 



manufacturers op 



Grand, Square, and Upright 






Which wa are Selling at 



EXTREMELY LOW PRICES. 



GOOD, 



We return thanks to our many friends and 
patrons, and hope by selling them good goods 
at lower prices lhan they can get them any- 
where alse, we may continue to enjoy their fav- 
ors, Respectfully, 

Blum, Heckinger & t’o. 



The “Valley Gem.” 



M. J. CHA8E, President, 
SAM’L GREGG, Vice Presi, 
JAS. REYNOLDS, Treas,, 
o. B.uiBACH, Jr. Secy. 



RIPLEY, O, 



july»-w&tw 



NEW, 

5 OCTAVO 

ORGANS at $75, 

And a liberal discount to dealers 

SMITH & NIXON 

Merchants’ Ezclunge]6uilding, 

N .29, 22, 24,26 W. 4th st., 
Cincinnati, O. 

3un«tUw-w 



$25 



A DAY guaranteed using ou. 
WELL AUGER & DRILLingood 
ferrilory. Endors.d by Governor. 
oflOWA, ARKANSAS &DAKOTA 
CtUlogsefne. W.SILISiBLLcsls.lta. 

npSY.’IIOM.aKC'T. or UM.AIt.VI- 

* IN«.” How either sex may fasclnateand 
gain the love 4: alTcctlons of any person they 
choose Imstantly. This simple, mental acquire- 
ment all can posses-s, free, by mall for tsc, 
together with a marriage guide, Egyptian 
Oracle, Dreams. Hints, to Ladles, Weddlng-Nlght 
Shirt, Ac. A queer book. Address T. WILLI.VM 
A CO Pubs. Phlla. 4 w 



FOR 

COUGHS, COLDS, HOARSENESS, 

AND ALL THROAT DISEASES, 

USE 

WELLS’ CARBOLIC TABLETS 

PUT or ONLY IS BLCE BOXKS. 

A TRIED AND SllBE REMEDY. 

Sold by drui.-glsts. 4\v 



I A.KTOS 



FLORENCE 

The long contested Suit of the 

:IXOKi:.\( KsKW l ' 4 .VIACHIM-:   o. 

: against me singer, Wheeler A Wilson 

anuGrOvi r A Baker Co’s, Involving over 
S230,Ouu. 

' Is nually d ;clded by the Supreme court of 
: the Unite J states in favor of the FLOR- 
ENCE, (which alone has Broken the 
MoD'ipoly of high prices. 

TH E NEW FLOHEXCK 

' Is the onlv machine that sows backward 
: and forward, or to right and left. 

simplest— Cheapest^Best. 

SOLD FOR CASH O.VLY. SPECIAL TKKM3 TO 
Clubs Hiid l eiilers. 

: April, 18T-1 . Florence, Mass. 



“EDEOGRA I'HY” A new book on the art of 
Writing by s .uud; a complete s.vstem of Pho- 
netic Shorl-1 and, the shortest, most simply, 
easy, and con prehensive, enabling any one In a 
short time to leport trials, speeches,, sermons 
Ac. The Lorn'.s Prayer Is written with 49 strokes 
ot the pen, ami 14« words per minute. The un- 
employed should learn this art. Price bv mall 
60 cents. Agents wanted. .\ddre.ss T. W. 
KVAN; a CO., 139 S. Uli 81., Phlladelpbla, Pa. .4 

The highest medical authorities of Europe say 
that the strongest tonic, purWer and deobstni- 
ent known to the medical world Is 

J TJLjrULTDOlDa., 

It arrests decay of vital forces, exhaustion of the 
nervous system, restores vigor to Ihe debilitat- 
ed, cleanses vitiated blood, removes vlslole ob- 
structions and acts directly on the llveisjnnd 
spleen. Price $l a bottle. John (). Kellogg, is 
Platt street. New York. 4w 

LIVINGSTONE IS DEAD. 

For thirty years Millions have intently watch- 
ed his FEBiLOus yet usuoic strcooles, and grand 
ACHIEVEMENTS and now eagerly desire theCoiu- 
plete Mife-Uistory of this world renowned 
HERO and benefactor, which unfolds aLsu the 
curiosities and wealth of a “wild” and “wonder- 
ful” countrj-. One agent sold 1S4. another 19C 
one week. For particulars, address 11 CU- 
BA RD HROv., either Phlla., Boston, or C’ln., 
O. 4W. 



A « E M T N 
WANTEll 

FOR THE 



CENTENNIAL 



(iAZETTEER 



OP TTIE 

UNITKD STATES. 

No book has f'ver been published of such univer- 
sal InteresL V » Uie Amerlcau people. It appeals 
io no part Icui.ir class alone, but to all classes; to 
men an4 woiivo of all professions, creeds oc- 
cupations aii i political opinions— to Farmers, 
Lawyers, Bavuiess Men, Mechanics, Physicians, 
PollUclaas, T acliers, students. Manufacturers, 
salesmen, o of learning and men who can 
only read, to uldand young. All want It aOs a 
book of constant reference, and to preserve for 
their chlldrou and children's children as the 
only complete and reliable work, showing the 
gigantic results of the fir»t one liiiiidre^l 
yearM of th ‘ greatest repiiblie ilie norl l 
ever Haw* It Is not a luxury but a necessity to 
every well informed American citizen. Agents 
make $Ioo $doo per month. Send for circular. 
ZIEGLKK A McC'I’ltDY, Cincinnati, O. 4W. 



Waters' Concerto Organs. 

are the most, beautiful In style and perfect in 
tone ever made. The Concerto stop to the best 
ever placed In any Organ. It Is produced by an 
extra sett of reeds, peculiarly voiced, the effect 
of which Is most charming and soul-stlrrlng, 
while Imitation ot the human voice Is superb, 
Terms Liberal. 

WA'I’ERH’ Philhariiioiile. Vesper niid 
Orehestrinl Orgrans bi Unique French Cases 
are among the best made, and combine purity 
of Voicing wlib great volume or tone, suitable 
for Parlor, Church, or Mmslc Hall. R ATERS’ 
Mf w Seal® Pianos have great power and Hue 
singing tone, with all modern Improvements, 
and are the b -st Pianos Made. These Organs 
and Pianos ai e warranted for 6 yem’s. I'rices 
extremely low for cash or part cash, and balance 
Id monthly or quarterly payments. Second- 
hand instruments taken In exchange. Agents 
Wanted In every county in the I'. A', and Canada. 
A liberal discount to Teachers, Ministers, 
Churches, .vchools, Ixidges, etc. Illustrated 
CataloguesMalled. 

HORACE W.4TERS /k SON. 

481 Broadway, New York. Box 356;. 



Valuable Information. 

Boston, Deo. I’l, ls69. 

Gentlemen ; My only object in giving you 
this testimonial Is to spread valuable informa- 
tion. Having been badly alBlcteU with Salt 
Rheum, and the whole surface of iny skin being 
covered with pimples and eruptions, many of 
which caused me great palp and annoyance, 
and knowing It to ne a blood disease, 1 look 
many of the advertised blood preparations, 
among which was any quantity |of sarsaparilla, 
without obtaining any benellt, until I commenc- 
ed taklDg;the Veoktink and before I had com- 
pleted the first bottle I saw that 1 had got the 
right medicine, consequently I followed on 
with it until I hail taken seven bottles, when I 
was pronounced a well man, and my skin Is 
smooth and entirely free from pimples and erup- 
tions. I have never enjoyed so good health be- 
fore, and I ati ribute It all to the use of Veoetine. 
To benefit those, afflicted wllh Rheumatism, 1 
wH* make mention also of the Veoetine’s won- 
derful power of curing me of this acute com- 
plaint. of which I have suffered so Intensely. 

C. H. TUCKER, Pas. AgT Mich. C. R. R. 

69 Washington Street, Boston. 

EVERY UVE NPEAKH FAVOR.4RI.T. 

East Marshfield, Aug. 31, 18T0. 

Mr. Stevens: Dear Sir: 1 have been troubled 
with Canker from childhood, causing my mouth 
to be so sore at tlme,s that 1 was unable to cat. 
Have taken many preparations, but with no ef- 
fect until I ti :cd your VEOETINE. After taking a 
few doses, I found It relieved tbe-faintness at 
the stomach i hat always accompanies Canker 
humor; and b\ the time I had taken the third 
bottle my mouth was entirely cured. Have not 
been troubled with It since that time, which is 
eight months ago. 1 have recommended it to 
several of m.v acquaintances; and everj' one 
speaks favorably ot Its good effect. 

Yours truly, P. S. SHFIRMAN. 

RepoYt from a Prnolloal l'bomi«t uuti 
Apolliooary. 

BOSTON, May 1, 1871. 

Dear Sir: This Is to certify that I have sold at 
retail, sixtv-rhroe doz. (T56 bottles) of your 
VEOBTiNKSihee April 12, 1870, sud can truly say 
that It has given the best satisfaction of any 
remedy, for the complaints for which It Is re- 
commended, that I ever sold. Scarcely a day 
passes without some of my customers testifying 
to its merits on themselves or their friends. I 
am personally cognizant of several cases of 
scrofulous Tumors being cured by Veobtine 
alone In this vicinity. 

Very respectfully yours. AI GIL.MAN, 
To U. H. STEVENS, Esq. 468;nroadway. 

FURTHER PROOF. 

Spbinofieij), Me., May 4, 1874. 

Mr. R. H. .S'TEVENS: Dear sir: Kfy daughter 
has been out of health for about two years. 
About two yeiirs ago she had a tumor come on 
her side, which was very painful, I saw Veuk- 
TiNE advertLs.'d In the Farmer, and sent to Ban- 
gor and got I wo bottles, she Is now taking the 
second bottle; her health Is much Improved, and 
the tumor Is going away as fast as it came. 
Every one le this vletnlty knows what Vege- 
ilge has done tor my daughter, and I take eveo’ 
opportunity to recommend It to those who are 
not aware ol lis great value. Very respeeff 
Mrs. SUSAN C. RANDALL: 

SOLD BY A I.L DRUGGISTS. June 164w. 



J 



OSEPH F. MARTIN 

DEALER IN 



CHEAP FURNITURE 



No 29 Second Street, 

MAYSVILLE, KY. 

I REPAIRING 

• done In style and abort notice. 



PUBLICATIONS. 



Prospectus for 1874 — Seventh year 
THE ALPINE, ' 

An Illustrated monthly Journal, universally ad 

muted to be the the handsomest period- 
ical In the world. A representa- 
tive and champion of 
American ta.stes. 

Not for Sale in Book or News Stores. 

The .\LmsE. while Issued wllh oB the regu- 
larity, has none of temporary or tlni' . Interest 
characteristic of ordinary perlixllci It Is an 
elegant mlscelany of pure, light, i graceful 
literature; and a collection of i. ..res, the 
rarest specimens of ;irtlstlc skill. black and 
white. Although each succeeding lumber af- 
fords a fresh pleasure to Us frl  nos. the real 
value and beauty ot The Aldini; ■ 111 be most 
appreciated after It has been boned up at the 
close of the year. While other pub! a lions may 
claim superior cheapness, as comp red with ri- 
vals ot a similar class. The Aldink is a unique 
a fid original conception— alone and i uapproach- 
cd— absolutely without competition In price or 
character, 'rue possessor of a complete volume 
c.annot duplicate the quantity of fine paper and 
engravings In any other sba^ or number of vol- 
umes for ten times Its costs ; and then ! there 
are the chjomos, besides '. 

AETI EPAET31ENT,1H74 

The Illustrations of The Aldine have won a 
world-wide reputation, and In the art centres of 
Europe Is If an admitted fact that Its wood cuts 
are examples of the highe.st perfection ever at- 
tained. The common prejudice in favor of 
“steel plates," Is rapidly yielding to a more ed- 
ucated and discriminating taste which recogniz- 
ed the advantages of superior artistic quality 
with greater facility of production. The wood- 
cuts ol The Aldine possess all the delicacy and 
elaborate finish of the most costly steel plate, 
while they afford a better renderlfig of the art- 
ist's original. 

To fully realize the wonderful work which 
The Aldlne Is doing for the cause of art culture 
In America, It Is only necessary to consider the 
cost to the people of any other decent represen- 
tation of the productions of great painters. 

In additions to designs by the members ot the 
National Academy, and other noted American 
artists. The Aldine will reproduce examples of 
the best foreign masters, selected with a view to 
the highest artistic success and greatest gener- 
al Interest. Thus the subscriber to I'UE Aldine 
will, at a triaing cost, enjoy In his own home 
the pleasures and refining inlluences of true 
art. 

The quarterly tinted plates for 1874 will be by 
Thomas Moran and J. I). Woodward. 

The ('hrlstmas ls.suo for 1874 will contain spe- 
cial designs appropriate to the season, by our 
best artists, and will surpass lii attractions any 
of its predeces.sors. 

PEEMIUM FOE 1874. 

The Illustrations ot The Aldine for the year 
1874 will receive a pair ot ehromos. The original 
pictures were painted In oil for the publishers of 
I'uK Aldine, by Thomas Moran, whose great 
Colorado picture was purchased by Congress for 
ten thousand dollars. The subjects were chosen 
to represent the “East” and the “West.” One Is 
a view In the White mountains. New Hampshire; 
the other gives the Cliffs ot Green River, Wyom- 
ing Territory. The difference In the nature of 
the scenes themselves Is a pleasing contrast, 
and affords a good display of the artist’s scope 
and coloring. The curomos are each worked 
from thirty distinct plates, are in size (12 x 16 ) 
and appearance exact fac-slmlles ot the origin- 
als. Tne presentation of a worthy example of 
Americas greatest landscape painter to the 
subscribers or i he Aldine was a bold but pe- 
culiarly happy Idea, and Its successful realiza- 
tion Is atte.sted by the following testimonial, 
over the .signature ot Mr Moran himself. 

Newark, N. J. September 20 tb, 1873. 
Messrs JAMES SUTTON A Co; 

Okntij;men:— I am delighted with the proofs 
In eolor of your ehromos. They are wonderful - 
Ij successful representations by mechanical 
process of the original paintings. 

Very respectfully, 

(signed,) Thomas Moran. 

These ehr onios aje In every sen.se American. 
They are by uu original American process, with 
material ot American manufacture, from designs 
of American scenery by an American palmer, 
and presented to subscribers to the first suc- 
cessful Ainertcau art Journal, if no better be- 
cause of all this, they will certainly possess an 
Interest no foreign production can Inspire, and 
neither are they any the worse if by reason ot 
pei ullar facilities of production the.v cost the 
publishers only a trllle, while eiiual In every re- 
spect to other ehromos that are sold singly for 
double the subsi’rlptlou price of Thk Aldine. 
Persons of taste w 111 prize tliese pictures for 
themselves— not for the price they did or did not 
cost, and will appreciate the enterprise that 
renders their dlstibutlon possible. 

If any subscriber should Indicate a preferenco 
for a figure subject, the publishers will send 
“Thoughts of Home,” a new and beautiful chro- 
mo, 14 X 20 iDchc.s, representing a little Italian 
exile whose speaking eyes betrav the longings 
of hlK heart 

T E II M S : 

per Aniiuni, in Adance, witli 
Oil ehromos Free. 

For 50 cants extra, the ehromos will be sent, 
mounted, varnished’ and prepaid by mall. 

The Aldine will, hereafter, by obtained only 
by subscription. There will be no reduced or 
club rate ; or handed to the local canvasser, 
without responsibility to the publlshens, except 
In cases where the eertlflcate is given, bearing 
tlie trc-slmlle signature of James Sutton A Co. 

CANTASSEES WANTED, 

Any person wishing to act permanently as a 
local canvasser, will receive liiformatlon bv ap- 
plying 10 

J A-WKiS SUTTON &U0.: Fiib's, 
58 Maiden Lane N. Y. 



PRINTING, 



jgOOK AND JOB’PRINTING! 



MAYSVILLE EAULE 



Job Printing Office, 



COURT OTREST, 



MAYSVILLE, KENTUCKY. 



S£j£j]DSy &c« 



gEEDS. 

LANDRETKS’ & DREER’S 

PHILADELPHIA W.VRRANTED 

GARDEN SEEDS, 

Vegetable and Flower Seeds 

NEW CROP JUST RECEIVED 
— BY— 

C.P. DIETERIGH &BR0., 

No. 34 E. SECOND ST. 

-Vmong the unusu.ollv large Invoice ot vegeta- 
ble and ilower seeds received by us, we call es • 
pedal attentlou to the following choice varie- 
ties: 

Trophey Tuninto, lientlqnarler Need. 

Mfryptlitn anil Basilan's extra early 
beet. 

Carter's tirst crop peas, earliest 
known. 

Casaba. lee Cream and Itlonntaln 
sweet .Melon seed, warranted. 

llanson I.ettuee. 

New' Giant Wax Bean. 

Sweet Totatoes for Aeed. 

Karly Rose Peerless Potatoes tor 
seeti. 

Silver skin A' Other Onion sets. 

Ilavlng extensive greenhouses within one 
mile ot the city, we are enabled to test all seeds 
offered for sale by us. An experience of twen- 
ty years In the propagation of seeds and plant-s 

f ives us an advantage possessed by no other 
ealer In the city. All seeds sold by us war- 
ranted pure. 

t^Our new catalogue of seeds, greenhouse 
and bedding plants mailed free to any one send- 
ing their address. 

Mar. 3-wAtw6m C. P. DIETERICH & BRO 



We are prepared at the shortest notice possl 
ble to furnish 



ALL KINDS OF 



JOB PRINTING 



Done niik PronsptneM, 



Particular atuuilon given to all kinds 



oiumercial Printing 



Id all styles, In colors and bronze, got up • 
superior manner and on the most 



R£ASONABL£ T£RMS 




I Numbering 1 75 PACES, and coataining I 

• tiv* “®***^*® nowrwdj, I 

• our pAtroos the^ trill bo tn&Hod us nsnsi, i 
free ; to all others, oo receipt of 36a, which • 

I we return In SeedBorPlaota, with firet order. | 
' _ Jdirchasfrt of our Books, either • 
\ Gardening for , 

■ EA ^ Floricnltare ' 

|Fr^ 11,50 each (prepaid by maU,) 

■fvtr Tiames entered on our and ioiUt 
mrceeive above Cataloouei annuaUv, free oiM 
■efiarye. ' ' '■ 

' Seedtmen, 35 Cortlandt street, New York. 
tPl-JkNTSI 



JOB WORK 



Special attention paid to ptlnong 
 ■ 

Fards, 

Fill Heads, - 

Letter Head, 
Shipping Bills, 



School Programmes, 
Concert Programmes, 
Pamphlets, 
Catalogues, 

Circulars 



Hooks, 

Visiting Cards, 

Handbills 

Labels, 



Way-Bills, 

Dodgers, 

Tickets, &c. 



EXECUTED IN FIRST-CLASS STYLE, Addrees 

At THE MAVevrLLR Eagle Office 



Tlios. M. Green, 

Maysville, Ky. 



The Tri-weekly Maysville eagle, 1874-06-23

4 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt71ns0kt38j
 Local Identifier: tme1874062301
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/tme/xt71ns0kt38j.json
Location
  Published in Maysville, Ky., Kentucky by Thomas B. Stevenson
   Mason County (The Bluegrass Region)