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VOLUME THIRTEl^N. 



DANVILLE, KENTUCKY, FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1877. 



NUMBER 11. 



THE ADVOCATE 

— IS PUBLISHED BY— 

MA11R8 & BRUCE, - - - Foprietors. 



TERMS: 

T W DOLLARS PER ANNUM 
INVARIABLY IN ADVANCE. 

church directory. 

S ECOND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH— 

Corner 3d and Broadway. ID v. W. ID IIkn- 
dkkson, Pastor. Services every Sunday at 11 A. 
M., ami at 8 P. M. Sunday School, 9:30 A. M. 
Prayer Meeting every Wednesday evening at 8 P. 
M. Seats free and the public cordially invited. 



MEDIC A L. 



rPHK CENTRAL KENTUCKY MEDICAL 

I Association holds its regular meetings on the 
third Wednesday in January, April, July and 
October, respectively at Danville, Lancaster, Ilar- 
rodsburg and Stanford. 

WM. HUFFMAN, M. D., President. 

Gko. T. Erwin, M. 1)., Permanent Sec’y. 



T HE BOYLE COUNTY MEDICAL Soci- 
ety meets on the first and third Tuesday of 
each mouth, at 9 o’clock, P. M. 

W. B. IIARLAN, M. D., President. 
L. S. McMuktky, M. D„ Secretary. 



E AT HO NS OE HUSBANDRY. 



D anville grange, no. 152 heg- 

ular meetings every Second and Fourth Sat- 
urday in each month, at 2 $ o’clock, P. M., at their 
Hall, over Welsh & Co.’s Store. 

W. J. LYLE, W. M. 
Jno. Metcalfe, Secretary. 

KNIGHTS OE HONOR. 

B oyle lodge, no. 385 . k. of h„ 
meets at their Hall, over the Store of Samu- 
el A Warren, every Friday night, at 7 o’clock. 

E. II. FOX, D. 

H. S. McGinnis, Reporter. (janl2 

KNIGHTS OE EYTHIAS. 

UTOPIA LODGE, NO. 33, K. OF P., 

U meet at their Castle Hall, over the store of 
 Y clsh A Co., every Tuesday night, at 7 £ o’clock. 

It. S. NICHOLS, C. C. 

J. S. CnRlSM AN, K. of R. & S. 



ODD FELLOWS. 



C ENTRAL LODGE, NO. 8, I. O. O. F., 

meets at Odd Fellows Hall, every Monday 
nignt, at 6 £ o’clock. Visiting brethren cordially 
invited. 



Geo. Smith, Roc. Sec’y. 



G. II. Dobyns, N. G. 



K edron ENCAMPMENT, NO. 7, I o. o. 

F., meets on the hi and 4 th Monday night# in 
each mouth, after the adjournment of the Subor- 
dinate Lodge. 

GEORGE SMITH, C. P. 

S. F. Maguire, Scribe. 

MASONIC. 



“ITt RANK LIN LODGE, NO. 28, F. & A. M., 

Jp meets at Masonic Hall, on the 1 at and '6d 
Thursday nights in each month. 

W. L. THOMAS, W M. 

S. D. Van Pelt, Secretary. 



F RANKLIN R. A. CHAPTER, NO. 22, 

meets at Masonic Hall on the '2d Tuesday night 
in each month. 

H. G. SANDIFEIt, II. P. 

J as. 8. Chrism an, Secretary. 



D 



lANVILLE COUNCIL, NO. 48, K. & S. SI., 

" meets at Masonic Hall on the 4 th Saturday 

niyhte in March, June , September and December. 

li. G. SANDIFKR, X. 1. C. M. 
R. IV. Robertson, Secretary. 



TITAN COMMANDER!, KNIGHTS TK1W- 
JLV l l»r, meet at their Asylum, (Masonic Hall,) 
on the 4;/t Thursday niyht in y^li month. - 

W. h. THOMAS, Commander. 

J as. S.Chrisman. Recorder. 



MIC 1HC A I.. 



-J^OTICK. 

Dr. COWAN, 

N consequence of the fire, has opened an olllce 
emporarily in his residence on Fourth street. 
dec.8-tf.) 

LA If. 

JOHN COWAN, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

DANVILLE, KY. 



Office on Main Street, over the Express Office. 
Jett-tf.) 

yy H. LUCAS, 

'a TTORNEY A T LA W, 

DANVILLE, KY. 



OFFICE— With Fox & Fox, Main Street. 
mayll-Sm.) 



"yV^AI.TON A KAUFFMAN, 

V ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

LANCASTER, KY. 

OFFICE over the Garrard County Deposit Bank. 
Will practice in the Courts of Garrard and ad - 

{ oining counties. Frompt remittances and col- 
ectious. [ apl.SU. 

JOHN M. PHILIPS, JB., 

* ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

Offick— East Side court House Square, 
STANFORD, KY. 



Will practice in the Courts of Lincoln and ad- 
oining counties, and in the Court of Appeals. 
jan.5-tf.) 



Jt US IX JCSS CAJtDS. 

XV. BARKER, 

TAIL OR! 

South side of Main, rear of Telegraph office, 

DANVILLE, KY. 

Special attention given to the cutting and ma 
facture of Gentlemen’s Clothes. [mar.lfi-tf. 

YTKW SHOP. 

CARPENTERS’ JOB WORK. 

THE undersigned has opened a shop on Third 
street, in the frame building near James’ Hall, 



and is now prepared to do work in the Carpen- 
ters’ line, oi every description, at very moderate 
rates. Call and see him. He will be glad to have 



your orders. 
mar.31.) 



JOS. 15. HOLMES. 



■J^IDWARD H. FOX, 

Uh.otograph.ic -Artist, 

MAIN STREET, 

DANVILLE, KENTUCKY. 

EVERY style of Picture known to the Art made 
on reasonable terms. Old Pictures copied and en- 
larged, and all work warranted to give satisfac- 
tion. |feb.l2. 

^OMETUING NEW AND ATTRACTIVE. 

House and Sign Painting! 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 






UlCOUSi 



Tin; battle or mo hole. 



THE ACCOUNT GIVEN BY GENERAL GIBBON AND 
OTHER OFFICERS. 



HAVTNG taken rooms over Batterton & Cort- 
right’s Manufactory, on Third street, I am now 
prepared to do every description of work in my 
ine, from the smallest and plainest to the most 
extensive and complicated, requiring the best oi 
material and the most skillful workmanship. My 
long experience in the business fully warrants 
mo in guaranteeing complete satisfaction. Or- 
ders for House Painting, both inside and out, ex- 
ecuted iu the best style, and very promptly. 

Sign Painting a Specialty. 



eelTe attentio n. This class of work gotten up on 
entirely new and original designs. 

My terms for work will corres] 



end with the 



GRAINING for the trade and the public will re- 

rk 

„ ISDOl 

times. Parties will please call and see me, or ad- 
dress throughthe Danville Post Ollice, and I wiil 
cheerfully furnish estimates. 
apr.».) G. S. W ATKINS. 

ANTED- 

50 Acres of Choice Land, 

TO be put In Barley this fall. Applv to 
jyao.) G. li. LUCAS. 



(From tlic New North-west. 1 

The accounts of the recent battle have 
been given in general terms in extras, yet 
there is still details of the operations pre- 
ceding and the plan of action untold. 
This we will give briefly and as correctly 
as we can collate it from numerous 
sources. 

The march of Gen. Gibbon and com- 
mand from Fort Shaw to Missoula with 
100 men, arriving just after the forced 
passage of the hostiles through Lo Lo is 
well known. Here he took Capt. Ilawn’s 
and Capt. Browning’s little commands, 
and putting his infantry in wagons 
pushed as energetically as horses could 
go up the valley after the Indians, then 
in Upper Bitter Root Valley. His entire 
command of regulars consisted of 148 
men. To these were added, principally 
near Sleeping Child, volunteers to the 
number of 33. The hostiles numbered at 
least 250 warriors, with squaws, children, 
horses, etc., the latter somewhat encum- 
bering their movements, but calculated 
to make their lighting doubly desperate. 
Thus matters stood on July 7th, when 
the command passed out of the Bitter 
Root Valley and over into what is called 
Ross’ Hole. On the south side of the 
valley the command encamped. That 
night Lieut. Bradley in command passed 
on. Lieut. Jacobs, Bostwick, post guide 
at Fort Shaw, and Sergeant Wilson, with 
21 regulars and volunteers, bringing the 
number up to about 60 mounted men, ac- 
companied him. They rode ahead all 
night and at daybreak on the morning of 
the 8th came close upon the Indian rear 
guard without alarming them. The com- 
mand rode off the trail and dismounted. 
Two men went forward on foot and re- 
turning reported they could see and hear 
the Indians chopping in camp. Lieuten- 
ants Bradley and Jacobs then went for- 
ward two miles, climbed a high hill and 
then a tree and found the situation as re- 
ported, seeing the herd and hearing the 
Indians distinctly. A courier was at 
once sent back to Gen. Gibbon, 12 miles, 
with word that the camp was found. 
Gen. Gibbon dropped his train and pushed 
on reaching the advance at dark and the 
train arrived soon after. 

Gen. Gibbon at once determined on a 
night movement and a daylight attack. 
Tw,o days rations aucj 100 rounds of am- 
munition per man were issued, and or- 
ders given to move forward at 11 o’clock 
that night. The wagon train, under 
Hugh Kirkendall, was parked and left 
with a guard, and the howitzer with one 
pack mule and 2,000 rounds of ammuni- 
tion left with it, but ordered to move up 
at daybreak. Promptly at 11 o’clock the 
command moved forward, Lieut. Bradley 
having the left and Capt. Raum the right, 
the command moving left in front. As- 
tonishing as it may seem the Indians, 
who had not moved camp during tlie day 
or discovered the presence of Bradley’s 
force, had neither scouts, rear or camp 
guard out, and from whatever cause, au- 
dacity or fancied security, were camped 
as defiantly and bodly as though there 
was no war and the soldiers were “Ten 
thousand miles away.” 

Emerging from the mouth of the can- 
yon the trail down the Big Hole River 
hugs close along the foot hills of the 
mountain. This the command followed 
three or four miles. The Indian herd 
was grazing on the foothills— the Indians 
encamped in the bottom. In advancing 
the command passed directly between the 
herd and camp. Gen. Gibbon on nearing 
the camp, suggested to Bostwick, post- 
guide, that he had best take a small force 
and drive the herd back and up the can- 
yoa, hut Bostwick remarking there was 
probably a strong herd guard requiring 
many men to whip them, and that the 
alarm would arouse the whole camp close 
by, the General was so impressed by the 
suggestion that he countermanded the 
discretionary order. It subsequently 
transpired there were no herders out. 
Moving on, the command emerged on a 
bar about 50 feet higher than the valley 
and directly overlooking, at a distance of 
700 or 800 yards, the Indian camp on the 
the right which was on the opposite side 
of Ruby Creek, a little stream 35 or 40 
feet wide and from knee to breast deep. 
The creek ran nearly parallel with the 
bar and was fringed on both sides with 
clumps of willows. Gen. Gibbon and 
three other officers had horses; all the 
rest of the command were on foot. The 
Indian camp was only about 800 to 1,000 
yards distant. They tfould see the camp 
fires gleaming, hear the men jabbering, 
dogs barking, and babies crying. Present- 
ly the fires died down gradually, and 
Bostwick said, “They have no idea of 
our presence; after while you will see fires 
replenished if we still remain undis 
covered.” Sure enough, in the course of 
an hour the squaws started up the fires 
again, and all was quiet except the occa 
sional whinneyiug of horses, hundreds of 
which were grazing near the command 
and took ho alarm from their presence. 
Gen. Gibbon then, it being near day- 
break on Thursday, moved his command 
down to the willows skirting the creek 
and they were all or nearly all in position 
within 100 yards of the teepees when the 
fight opened. The line deployed as skir- 
mishers was formed parallel to the Indian 
camp which lay in a bend of the stream 
and contained 89 lodges. The orders 
were “when the first gun is fired charge 
the camp with the whole line.” The gun 
was soon fired. It is a question of doubt 
with the officers we have interviewed who 
fired the first shot. It is certain, how- 
ever, that an Indian started for the herd 
about daybreak on horseback and came 
upon the left of the line under Bradley, 
who had the volunteers. Either he or 
they fired and the battle was opened. He 
was killed. In a moment the whole line 
charged, was broken up somewhat by the 
willows and stream, but was in the camp 



in two or three minutes, tearing open 
teepees and blazing away at every Indian 
^Been. It was the most complete surprise 
possible, and to this and the tremendous 
execution of the first few minutes is at- 
tributable the fact that the command was 
not annihilated. How many Indians 
were killed in the next ten minutes is not 
now and perhaps never may be known. 
It is probable, however, that over one 
hundred were killed in the next few min- 
utes. Some of the Indians dashed into 
the willows and among others the one 
who met and shot Lieutenant Bradley, 
probably the first man killed. Hurlburt, 
of K Co., shot this Indian dead as Brad- 
ley fell. The others broke to the rear 
which was open prairie but ran for the 
flanks and got under cover of the willows 
and trees from which they did fatal exe- 
cution. Capt. Logan was soon after shot 
through the head and fell dead instantly. 
The Indians rallied quickly and a heavy 
fire was opened all around, squaws, bucks, 
old men and children all taking a hand. 
The soldiers tried to burn the camp, but 
most of the teepees were canvass and 
damp with dew or frost and ignited 
poorly and only four or five were burned. 
Here in the willows and the camp, back 
and forward, routing the squads of In- 
dians from cover of willows, trees and 
creek beds, only to find them renew the 
fire from other points, the battle raged 
for two hours, many a good man went 
down in the fray, but double their num- 
ber of Indiaus bit the dust. Veterans of 
many campaigns tell us it was the hard- 
esr contested field they were ever on. 

During this time the howitzer, which 
had been brought up within a short dis- 
tance of the fight, was intercepted by 50 
or 60 warriors who enveloped the piece 
and the five men with it. Three shots 
were fired. Both Sergeants were shot and 
the corporal killed, and the wounded 
horses fell on the driver. Two men with 
the piece deserted their comrades and fled. 
After firiug the three shots the Sergeants 
upset the gun, threw away the friction 
primers and ran for cover, they and the 
driver finally getting to the command. 

On hearing the gun discharged twice 
and then silence ensuing, the command 
knew the piece was captured and sup- 
posed the train was captured also, but 
Hugh Kirkendall and his 15 or 20 men 
were equal to the emergency, entrenched 
quickly and were ready for an attack but 
none was made. The Indians destroyed 
all the powder in the gun ammunition, 
picked up the wheels between two horses, 
and carried off and hid them and every 
possible portion of the gun apd carriage. 
Sergeant Wilson says that when me gun 
was silenced, a portion of the men thought 
there was an order to go back and capture 
it, and quite a number started back on 
that mission, but halted to fight again in 
the willows. No such order was issued. 
Finally the Indians, who had occupied 
all the commanding and protected posi- 
tions with sharpshooters, at some dis- 
tance, were picking off too many men 
who were unprotected in the open field, 
and Gen. Gibbon, fearing his ammuni- 
tion would not he replenished determined 
to withdraw from the bottom and take a 
defensive position. The order was given 
and taking their wounded with them the 
command fell back to the right and rear 
about 1,000 yards to get possession of a 
wooded point on the trail they had come 
over. When nearing the bluffs, falling 
back under a hot fire, a portion of the 
line got restless and hurried, when Gen. 
Gibbon, who had been in the thickest of 
the fight and was already dismounted and 
wounded, told them unless they moved as 
ordered he would make them fight it out 
right there. The line moved thereafter 
as on parade. The Indians had already 
gotten possession of the objective point, 
but were soon dislodged. The command 
got into position, but were completely 
surrounded by sharpshooters and under a 
galling fire, the Indians doing splendid 
work and eliciting from the beleaguered 
command expressions of admiration for 
their excellent marksmanship as well as 
their prowess in fierce, close work. It is 
the universal opinion now that the Nez 
l’erces are the best Indian fighters on the 
continent, and it is therefore the highest 
tribute to Gibbon’s gallautcommand that 
he attacked them in double his numbers, 
whipped them out of the camp and held 
it and killed double the number he lost. 
It is the most heroic Indian fight on rec- 
ord, save the hopeless one of Custer’s and 
has covered the Seventh Infantry with a 
glory that will not fade. 

Getting into position tiie command at 
once began to intrench, and although 
only two companies had trowel bayonets 
and the sharp-shooters’ fire was murder- 
ously accurate, a sufficient rifle pit was 
soon thrown up in an irregular circle to 
afford considerable protection. One-half 
of the loss, however, was sustained after 
getting this position, Co. A suffering es- 
pecially from being in a position exposed 
to a front and flank fire from a strong 
force of Indians. The soldiers were dis- 
posed to return the fire as fiercely, but 
Gen. Gibbon urged the husbanding of 
ammunition, knowing bis pack animal 
reserve of 2,000 rounds was gone, fearing 
the train had shared the same fate, and 
having no idea when Howard or other re- 
lief would come. The fire, therefore, 
slackened, and ev«ry cartridge was made 
to count. Soon another danger threat- 
ened— starvation. The rations in the 
haversacks had been ruined in the re- 
peated charges to and fro across the creek 
and many had thrown them away. The 
Indians had struck their lodges and were 
apparently moving their main force away 
but the command was still environed by 
a circle of destructive marksmen under 
cover of willows and trees and they could 
not be dislodged. Getting to windward 
of the position, the Indians also fired the 
timber and grass, and although there was 
no fear of a fair charge, to which the 
command repeatedly heard the chiefs 
urging their men, they were apprehensive 
that under cover of a dense volume of 
drifting smoke they might come down en 
masse and carry a portion of the works 
This, however, was soon dissipated as 



the fire was a failure, and night found the 
command masters of the situation in all 
save food and water. The latter was ob- 
tained by going down the bank some 25 
or 30 yards, and a wounded horse was 
killed for food. Gen. Gibbon says, “I 
ate a piece of it and it tasted very well.” 

During the night Edwards and another 
man started for Deer Lodge bringing the 
first news. Five volunteers also left for 
Bitter Root declining to stay and take 
chances on starvation. Early the next 
morning (Friday) a courier from Howard 
made his appearance and gave the wel- 
come news of Howard’s approach. On 
being questioned about the train lie re- 
plied that he had seen nothing of it, and 
as he had to pass within a few yards of 
it in a canyon, this confirmed the belief 
that it had been captured. However he 
soon recollected of hearing some horses 
neigh as he passed the point described, 
but thought they were Indian horses. 

The hope thus inspired led to the organ- 
ization of a party, who went back and 
found the train all right. It was worked 
up at once and readied the camp with 
full supplies that evening, ending the 
two day’s starvation. The next day, 

(Saturday) at noon, Gen. Howard, with 
Capt. Robbins’ Bannack scouts and an 
escort of one Company of Cavalry rode 
into the camp and were gladly welcomed 
by the beleaguered command, although 
the worst bad passed, and but 18 or 20 
Indians were hovering around. Sergt. 

Wilson and Mr. Blodgett, who had made 
a reconnoissance from a neighboring hill, 
had seen the camp that moruing some 15 
or 18 miles to the South-west, and the 
dust indicating the herd was moving 
towards Lemhi. Gen. Howard’s Cavalry 
all came up on the 12th. The dead, foe 
and friend, were all buried. The Indiaus 
had carried off mauy of their dead war- 
riors and all the wounded, leaving 15 
bucks and all the squaws and papooses on 
the field. The wounded soldiers and 
citizens were placed in wagons and on 
Monday, 13th, Howard pushed off after 
the hostiles and the wounded came down 
the Big Hole, meeting the ambulance 
train and escort 15 miles this side the 
battle-ground. This is a meagre outline 
of the operations preceding and succeed- 
ing the battle of Big Hole, as gallant a 
fight as ever made and the hardest blow 
the hostiles have yet received. Other 
facts relating thereto aud some e-Tuneous — the latter with 12,000 acres. He 



Brigham Young’s Will. 

All Estate Worth $’2,000,000 Divided Among 
Seventeen When and Forty-four Children. 

Salt Lake City, Sept. 3. — Brigham 
Young’s will was read to-day iu the pres- 
ence of all his wives and children and a 
fewfriends. Brigham Young, Jr., Geo. 
O. Cannon, and Albert Carrington are 
named as his executors. The estate is 
largely real estate, and is probably worth 
$2,000,000. The will was made four years 
ago. when the younger child, born of Mary 
Van Cott, was three years old. Brig- 
ham Young was the father of fifty-six 
children, and left seventeen wives, six- 
teeih-^ms, and twenty-eight daughters. 
The will aims to make an equitable di- 
vision of the property between all the 
wives and children, with no preference to 
any. Most all of them have already had 
something deeded to them. On this a 
valuation was set, and it is to be charged 
to the recipients as part of their share, 
though not necessarily at the valuation 
he put on it. That is to be equitably ad- 
justed when the estate is divided upon 
the youngest child coming of age. Mean- 
while the income is to go to the various 
mothers according to the number of their 
children, and they can withhold it if the 
children behave badly. All are provided 
for as far as their present needs are con- 
cerned. His first wife and Amelia are 
given a life interest in the Amelia Falace 
—a large, modern, new, fine house; but 
lie is known to have changed his miud 
about that, chiefly because they declined 
it for reasons best known to themselves, 
although nothing in or out of the will 
has as yet jiome to light showing it, and 
they are inSt otherwise provided for ex- 
cept by their share of the income. De- 
ceased held many interests in trust for 
the churci; and for iudividuais. II is exe- 
cutors are directed to turn them over 
properly. The church is forbidden by 
law to hold more than $50,000 worth of 
property; and so it was largely held by 
Brigham Young in trust. His frieuds 
will not entertain the notion that lie ever 
abused that trust. There is no inventory 
of the property on the estate, and it is 
widely scattered. With the country pros- 
perous and full of money, it would he 
worth twice the above valuation. Re- 
cently Brigham Young endowed an aca- 
demy with lands at Provo and another at 



reports and conjectures from tost news, 
will he found uaflur^Spcccooive extras 
published herewith. There is uo dcubt 
the hostiles are badly crippled, and w 
believe with Gen, Gibbon that their total 
destruction within a few davs is inevi- 
table. The country owes a debt of grat- 
itude to Gen. Gibbon and his brave hand- 
ful of regulars and volunteers for the 
telling and terrible blow struck on Big 
Hole. Circumstances prevent the writiug 
of a fitting tribute or mention of details 
in this issue, but these are the general 
facts as nearly as can be obtained. There 
is work yet to be done and if it shall re- 
sult in the annihilation of the hostiles it 
will bring peace to the border for many a 
year to come. 



The Mean Small Boy. 



The mean small boy is different from 
the mean big boy, because all of his tricks 
are calculated to make other hearts ache. 
He now takes a silver quarter and makes 
it fast to a string, aud to see him hang- 
ing about the post-office one would set 
him down as a boy who never had an 
evil thought. He selects a victim, and 
drops the quarter where it will do the 
most good. The ring of the metal com- 
mands notice at once, and the programme 
is carried out as in a case yesterday. The 
victim was a short man, with a very red 
neck, and when he heard the quarter 
drop he clapped his hand on his pocket 
and looked around. 

“Did you drop a quarter?” mildly ask- 
ed the mean small boy, pointing to one 
on the stone floor. 

“Ah! must be a hole in my pocket,” re- 
plied the fat man, as he pulled up the 
knees of his pauts and bent over to pick 
it up. 

He had his fingers on the money when 
it slid away, and as he straightened up 
he was greeted with fiendish chuckles 
from half a dozen mean big and mean 
small boys, one of whom inquired: 

“Which pocket has a hole in it?” 

The man didn’t say. From some inex- 
plicable reason he refused to enter into 
any explanation, but hastened away. 

Tiie Happiest in Death. — Deacon 
Rathfel asked his family physician last 
week: “Doctor, you have had such an 
extended experience at death-beds, and 
have seen so many go hence, that I would 
like to ask you what class are most re- 
signed, and die the happiest?” The aged 
man cleared his throat and said: “Well, 
Deacon, I have not seen so very many 
deaths, hut, so far as 1 have been able to 
learn, the people who die the happiest are 
those who are hanged.” — Advance. 



had determined to endow one at Salt 
Lake, hut did not live long enough to do 
A person present at the reading of 
ill says it seemed to be very satis- 
tory to all concerned. It will be pro- 
as soon as possible. It will he wqo- 
enul if some dissatisfaction does not 
creep in within tiie next thirteen years.— 
N. 1'. Tribune. 



a — s 
t JO. 1 

e -Yfiie w 

li IU" 1 



The Telephone. 

A Description of the 



Instrument and Its Construc- 
tion. 



Five sons and seven daughters of the 
late Mr. and Mrs. Johnathan Barker, of 
Nantucket, are now living whose ages 
are respectively 78, 76, 73, 70, 68, 65, 63, 
59, 67, 56, 53, 51. These twelve constitute 
all the children of the family, except one 
who died in infancy. The father was, at 
the time of his death, 88, aud tiie mother 
died at the age of 77. 

^ 

"Ouida” iu Ariadne: Why is a black- 
smith always a half heroic and even al- 
most poetic person, and a cobbler always 
more or less absurd? Is it viler to shoe 
men than horses? You may make a 
shoeing-smith a very Odyssus or Hector 
in your poem, aud no one will laugli at 
you or your picture; but your human 
shoemaker is always beneath contempt. 
It is very unjust. 



Our Neighbor Mars. 

W hat Hill Not A train Delight the Astronomers Until 
1892. 



NE W ADVERTISEMENTS. 



INSURANCE. 



North Carolina negro hymn: 

I shake de dust off ob my feet. 

And walk barefoot ou the golden street, 
I know my hide's chuck full of sin, 

But I know old Pete will let me in. 

Den rise, children, up In a crowd, 

An’ shout an’ sing to the angels loud; 
An’ flx your eyes on the lan’ oh rest, 
Kase hell ain hot as a hornet’s nest. 



The New York Telephone Company 
have in practical operation a new kind 
of telephone, which, from its simplicity 
of construction and perfection with 
which it works, bids fair to become an 
article of every-day use. The telephone 
is operated entirely without the use of a 
galvanic battery. It is in appearance a 
pear-shaped piece of mahogony, with an 
orifice at the large eud, and a flexible 
silk-covered wire emerging from the 
small end. Being opened it is seen to 
consist of a powerful steel magnet run- 
ning nearly through the instrument, 
lengthwise, and wound with a coil of in- 
sulated wire, which is connected witli tiie 
line in front of this maguet, but in con- 
tact with it is a disc of soft, thin iron. 
The voice strikes against this disc and 
causes it to vibrate, and as it approaches 
and recedes from the magnet a curreut 
of electricity is generated. This current 
passes over the wire, and attracts and re- 
pels the disc in the telephone attached to 
the ot^r end of tiie line; this same sim- 
ple instrument being used in sending and 
receiving messages, or rather, iu talking 
and listening. Attracting the attention 
of the gentlemen at the Broad-street of- 
fice, the reporter was directed to apply 
the instrument to his ear while a conver- 
sation was held between the two points. 
A roaring sound, like that perceptible 
when a shell is applied to the ear, was all 
that was noticeable at first; then a voice 
was distinctly audible, saying: “I hope 
the gentlemen is pleased with tiie work- 
ing of the instrument.” The voice sound- 
ed as if the words had been spoken from 
the floor below through an ordinary speak- 
ing tube. The roaring noise, as explain- 
ed, was the noise of the street, which the 
wire picked up on its way between the 
two points. Tiie telephone was then 
placed in connection with an office at 
Broadway aud Thirteenth street, and a 
young man answered tiie call, who not 
only spoke audibly, but sung a rollicking 
song and whistled “Tommy make room 
for your Auntie,” which was very dis- 
tinctly heard. This telephone has been 
tried a distance of eight miles with equal- 
ly satisfactory results.— N. l r . Special to 

Cin. Enquirer. 

■ — 

A Colored Diplomatist. 

A well dressed negro applied to tiie 
Judge of Probate of this city for a mar- 
riage license. He was asked how old his 
intended was. aud answered witli great 
animation, “Just sixteen, Judge — sweet 
sixteen, and de handsomest girl iu town.” 
The Judge said he could not do it as the 
law forbade him to issue license to any one 
under eighteen. “Well, hold on, Judge,” 
exclaimed the man. "1 know dat dem 
girls am deceitful and lie about der age. 
She is nineteen if a day.” “Will you 
swear to it?” asked the Judge. “Yes, 
sail,” he replied, and did. “And how old 
are you?” said tiie Judge. The chap 
looked suspicious, and replied cautious- 
ly, “Thirty-five,” and added, “If dat 
won’t do. Judge, I’ve got more hack.”— 
Mobile Register. 

* » • 

Why not establish a quiet retreat for 
the loafer, where his bad examples of 
idleness would have no influence upon the 
rising generation. The men who toil 
not, nor spin, seem to get along best in 
this world, and the young folks see it. 



Mars is now a superb object seen 
through the telescope. We had on Tues- 
day evening a view of the ruddy planet 
through the fine instrument of the Roger 
Williams Observatory. A fiery bail of 
glowing red seemed suddenly to spring 
into existence as tiie planet entered the 
field of vision. In size it approached that 
of the full moon w.len high up in the 
heavens, and such was the brightness 
and fierceness of its rays that we invol- 
untarily sought to shade our eyes from 
the glare. At first we saw nothing but 
a brilliant, flame colored disc, its circum- 
ference aglow with prismatic hues caused 
by chromatic aberration, without a trace 
of zones of snow or the strange markings 
that practiced eyes discover on the Mar- 
tian globe. As we observed more care- 
fully, tiie ice bound circles came as plain- 
ly into view as the well known features 
of tiie man in the moon in our own lu- 
minary, and wo enjoyed a peep at the 
Martian poles, the southern polar cap be- 
ing much larger than tiie northern, for 
it is summer in the Northern Hemisphere, 
and the ice zone around tiie pole lias 
partly disappeared under the influence of 
the sun’s heat. A still more careful 
scrutiny revealed tiie presence of dusky 
spots on the beaming disc. These indi- 
cate the land, which is of a reddish hue 
when the planet’s atmosphere is clear. 
The lighter parts, of a greenish hue, mark 
the contour of the seas and oceans. 

Thus with our own eyes we saw land, 
water, aud ice on tiie surface of our Mar- 
tian neighbor, and had a view of its rud- 
dy disc, which, after a few weeks have 
passed, will not be equaled in size and 
brilliancy until 1892. Though Jupiter, 
with its brilliant belts aud sparkling 
moons, is a grander telescopic object, and 
Saturn, witli its wondrous ring system 
and numerous moons, exceeds in beauty 
every sight in the celestial picture galle- 
ry, yet we obtain a better view, and on a 
larger scale, of Mars than of any other 
object in tiie heavens except the moon. 
It is probably the only planet whose real 
service is ever visible; for Venus, though 
the most splendid of all planets to the 
naked eye, is, on accouut of its great lus- 
ter, unsatisfactory for telescopic observa- 
tion, and Jupiter and Saturn are sur- 
rounded by cloud envelopes of immense 
extent that hide the solid portions from 
the eyes . — Providence Journal. 

“Mother, I saved the house, hut I 
shall die,” said a six-year old girl to Mrs. 
Theodore Markham as she entered her 
home at High Market, Lewis county, one 
 1i»y this week. The cliiM, «K l« 
ing to light a lamp to warm some milk 
for a baby, set fire to her clothing. Her 
first thought was to run out of doors, 
fearing that the house would be burned 
and the baby hurt, but noticing that 
shreds of her clothing had fallen upon tiie 
floor, she carefully extinguished the 
flames. Then she ran to a horse-trough 
in the yard, and plunged into tiie water. 
Returning to the house, shb waited pa- 
tiently for her mother to return, dying in 
an hour after the accident. 



HOTELS. 




Lexington Races! 

FALL MEETING, 1877. 

KENT UCK Y ASSOC I AT ION. 



MO NDA Y, S EE T. 1 7. 

TUESDAY, SEET. IS, 

WEDNESDAY, SEET. UP, 

TH I USD t V, S EET. 90, 
ERIDAY, SEET. 91, 

SATURDAY, SEET. 99. 

THREE RACES EACH DAY! 

RACES COMMENCE PROMPTLY AT THREE 
O’CLOCK, P. M. 



L. THOMAS, 

General Insurance Agent. 

DANVILLE, KY. 

Represents the Connecticut Mutual Lite Insur- 
ance Coin pany. A ssefcs, $40,000,090. 

Also the following Fire Companies: 

The London Assurance Corporation. Assets 
$15,000,000, gold. Established in 17*20. 

The Phoonix Insurance Company, of Brooklyn, 
New York. Assets, $3,000,000. 

toY” Rates as low as* any other Companies. 
Losses promptly adjusted. [nov.20. 



a. w. WKLSII, JK. 



JNO. A. CHKKK. 



For particulars sec official programmes. 

J. P. robinson, Jk., Pres. 
I). Vertner Johnson, Sec’y. 
aug.81-tf. 

PROGRAMME 

—of the— 

Kentucky Trott ng Horse Breeders’ 
ASSOCIATION, 

—COMMENCING— 

Tuesday, Ocl. 9lli, ’77, — Five Bays, 



PREMIUMS, $6,200. 



FIRST DA Y. 

First Race— T hree-year old class; nurse $400; 
$250 to llrst; $100 to second, and $50 to third horse. 

Second Rack— T hree minute class; purse $000; 
$400 to llrst; $140 to second, and $00 to third horse. 

Third Race— 2:27 class; purse $800; $400 to llrst; 
$140 to second, and $00 to third horse. 

SECOND DAY. 

First Rack— F our-year olds that have never 
trotted better than three minutes; purse $400; $260 
to first; $10o to second, and $50 to third horse. 

Second Rack— 2:34 class; purse $000; $400 to 
llrst; $140 to second, and $00 to third horse. 

THIRD DAY. 

First Rack— 2:50 class; purse $000; $400 to first; 
$140 to second, and $60 to third horse. 

Second Rack— 2;30 class; purse $000; $400 to 
first; $140 to Hecoiid, and $00 to third horse. 

FOURTH DAY. 

First Rack— T wo-year olds: purse $400; $250 to 
first; $100 to second, and $50 to third horse. 

Second Race— 2:40 class; purse $000; $100 to 
first; $140 to second, and $00 to third horse. 

FIFTH DAY. 

First Rack— T hree-year olds that have never 
trotted better than three minutes; purse $-100; $250 
to first; $100 to second, and $50 to third horse. 

Second Rack— F our-year old class; purse $100; 
$250 to first; $100 to second, and $60 to third horse. 

Third Rack- 2:23 class; purse $600; $400 to first; 
$140 to second, and $60 to third horse. 



•J^OTICE. 

GORESBURG HOUSE 

GORESBUUU, KY. 

AT TIIE CROSSING OF C. S. It. W., 

Is now open to accommodate the traveling public. 
Every effort will be made to comply with the 
wants of the public. 

jy27.] JAMES GORE, Proprietor. 



Entrance Fee (10) ten per cent., and must 
invariably accompany the nomination. 

Association may postpone on account of the 
weather. 

Heats may be trotted alternately. 

A horsCHistancing the field will receive only 
first preilmnn. 

Where uAdit or more horses start in heats, dis- 
tance wilK 1 DO yard*. 

-A 44- vf. ' t* F* fe** It 

dKIs, v. HI ;Jt ,vi'.l V»e ui i 



;cxc u t  l i tM M 



Five ul more entries to nil, nml three to start. 
Particular attention is called to National Rules 
Nos. 2, 3, 6, T and 8. 

Trotting to be governed by Xatonal Rules. 
Entries to close October 1st, and must be ad- 
dressed to 1*. It. Hunt, Secretary, Lexington, Ky. 
scp.7-tf. T. ,1. M EG 111 BEN, Pres’ t. 



OLLIbAYSKUKO SEMINARY, 



The most rapid waste of a fortune on 
record is that accomplished by John Tay- 
lor Johnston. His father, iu the course 
of a long life, accumulated a million for 
his son, and the latter sank the whole of 
it in two years. He had become l’resi- 
dent of tiie New Jersey Central Hoad , iu 
which he embarked his entire fortune. 
The failure of this road ruined him in a 
complete and hopeless manner. Never 
before lias a million been so rapidly 
thrown away bv a man who had no bad 
habits, and was making every honest ef- 
fort to increase liis wealth . — Philadelphia 
Press. 

Birth of the Cucumber.— Boston 
Courier says: 

“A .seraph was sick with colic one day, 

And, weeping, leaned over the moon; 

The tears, as they fell, floated lightly away 
On the gossamer pinions of June. 

“But one, as it drifted along in the damp. 

Sank wearily down to the earth; 

As trembling it lay, ’twas embraced by a cramp, 
And the cucumber blushed into birth.” 

Dr. Mary Walker, feeling that she 
stilllacked some manly accomplishments, 
took a chew of tobacco one day last week, 
and in twenty minutes thereafter she 
was so limp she had to swallow a ramrod 
before she could sit up in the street car.— 
Haivkeye. 

- m 

WnEN a man is making love to a 
widow he always feels as if he had to be- 
gin where the other fellow left off. 

A little hoy’s first pair of trousers 
always fit, if the pockets aredeep enough 



II 

A BoardingSchool for Young Ladies, 

HOLLIDAYSBURG, PA. 

THIS institution offers, with the comforts of a 
refined home, educational advantages not sur- 
passed by any other school in the country. 

The attendance is limited to ninety --dx boarders 
and represents twelve or fifteen States. The Corps 
of Instructors is composed of experienced and 
eminently successful teachers. 

The location is at the foot of the Allegheny 
Mountains, near the head- waters of the **15lue 
Juniata”— a place noted for its beauty and health- 
fulnoss, its genial climate, and romantic scenery. 

Access can be had from Cincinnati, Cleveland 
and Philadelphia by numerous daily trains, over 
the Pennsylvania Central R. R. The buildings 
are new and elegant, the grounds extensive, the 
atronage select. School opens September 12th. 
’or " 






je29 



Catalogue and particulars address 
 9-tf.) \V. P. HUSSEY, Pi 



WELSH & CHEEK, 

GENERAL 

mmm asms, 

OFFER protection to the citizens of Danville and 
Boyle County in the following Companies: 

ASSETS. 

Royal Insurance Co., Liverpool $18,009,429 0* r   

Home, of New York 0,047,021 74 

Continental, of New York 2,845, iff r  04 

Farmers’ and Drovers’, Louisville 270,421 17 

Mutual Life, New York 78,830, 1 04 71 

. JtoY'’ OFFICE— First National Bank, Danville, 
Ky. (mar. 10. 

m th cut pm its 

YIO SHALL KNOW THEM. 

THE ietn;a 

INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HARTFORD,   ONNKCTICUT. 



jto^THE AETNA STANDS: 

First in Cash Capital 

First in Available Assets 

First in Annual Pre miums 

First in Ixisscs Paid 

First 



f3.UKI.000 00 

0.046.208 73 

3.017.204 00 

41.000.000 00 

solid business elements of experience, 
strength, progress and success. 

THE BEST IS ~THE CHEAT ESI. 



JJ^Y^The yEtna offers its protection to the citi- 
zens of Danville and Boyle county through their 
Agents at the Central National Bank in this place, 
jan.l-tf.] J. W. PROCTOR A SON, Agents. 



(i ROC ERIKS. 



J^EMOVAL. 

E. B. LINK E Y 

HAS REMOVED HIS STOCK OF GOODS TO 
room formerly occupied by Henry Lyons, 

so urn si n e of mainst. 

1IIS STOCK CONSISTS OF 

STIFLE &FAMH'R()CERIES 

QUEENSWAKE, GLASSWARE, 

(JOAFKCI'JOAS. (LLS GOODS, 
AND FANCY ARTICLES. 



By close attention to business and LOW CASH 
PRICKS he hopes to merit 



public patronage. 



i liberal share of the 
(sep. 2‘1 - tl . 



M ISCE L L A NE O US. 



S 



AM. F. MAGUIRE, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in all kinds of 



Saddles and Harness, 




rineipal. 



Great chance to make money. If 
you can’t get gold you can get green- 
backs. We need a person in every 

town to take subscriptions for the 

largest, cheapest and best illustrated family pub- 
lication in the world. Any one can become a suc- 
cessful agent. The most elegant works of art 
given free to subscribers. The price is so low 
that almost everybody subscribes.’ One agent re- 
ports making over $150 in a week. A lady agent 
reports taking over 400 subscribers in ten davs. 
All who engage make money fast. You can de- 
vote all your time to the business or only your 
spare time. You need not be away from home 
over night. You can do it as well as others. Full 
particulars, directions and terms free. Elegant 
and expensive outfit free. If you want profitable 
work send us your address at once. It costs noth- 
ing to try the business. No one who engages fails 
to make great pay. Address “The People’s Jour- 
nal,” Portland, Maine. aug.24-tf. 

P. A. MARKS 

—WANTS ALL TU EXAMINE HIS- 

MEW  »OOI»S!!! 

— AND BECOME CONVINCED THAT THEY ARK— 

TIIE BEST 

IN MARKET. 

sep.7-tf. 

BW 






and everything usually found in a 

First - Class Saddler Shop. 

Work guaranteed to compare with any found in 
this market, both as regards quality and price. 
A full supply of the celebrated VACUUM OIL 
always on band. 



Repairing a Specialty. 



The people are invitee 
selves. Terras— CASH 



to call and see 
N V ARIA Itl.Y. 



for t he m- 
Ue.2. 



N K ' 



PAINT SHOP. 



TIIE undersigned has locate^, in the room ad- 
joining Smiley A Temple’s blacksmith shop, on 
Fourth street, and announces that he will do all 
kinds of Carriage Painting, Trimming and all 
other necessary repairs, in the latest and most 
approved style, with neatness and dispatch. Sat- 
isfaction guaranteed, and prices to suit the hard 
times. Give me a call. 
apr-13. JOHN M. FROST 

P. A. MARKS 

-HAS JUST RECEIVED IIIS- 

F ALL GOODS! 



■VI^AILKY’S 

SCAIiES. 

THE manufacture which was broken up in con- 
sequence of the war, is now resumed by 

l . W. WAILEl , AT l.i:\l\GT 0 \, KV. 

4(K) in use in Kentucky, from 15 to 24 years, all of 
which have given satisfaction. Refers to Messrs. 
Karsner & toll Ins, and J. K. Price, who have a 
new one in operation on corner of 4th and Main, 
in Danville. 

Old Scales repaired and made as good as new. 
Prices as low as the lowest. Patronize him. 

P. S. As 1 am just starting anew my scale bu- 
siness, and wishing to get up some circulars, per- 
sons who have been using mv scales, put up pre- 
vious to the war, will confer a favor by sending 
me a short certificate on a postal card, giving 
their opinion as to quality, correctness and dura 
hility iu comparison witli other scales. 

jy20-8m.) 

MOKE ACCIDENTS. 

The On It/ Perfectly 
Lamp in the 



u. XV. WAILKY. 



Safe Kerosene 
World. 



The Rhind Patent Safety Lamp. 

THE time has actually arrived when a Kero- 
sene Lamp is introduced in this market which is 
a perfect safeguard against all accidents. 

SAMUEL A WARREN, Danville, 
jy20.) Sole Agents for Boyle county 



-AND THEY ARE— 



JUST 

sep.7-tf. 



ELEGANT! 



^OTIC’E. 

LINCOLN CO., TAX 



ALL that wish to save the EXTRA TROUBLE 
without profit to themselves, will come forward 
and pay their taxes for 1877; ami those that owe 
back taxes can save costs by pav ing up iu full. 

A. M. V EL AND, 

scp.T-tf. Sheriff Lincoln County. 



C H„V,. 

BOOTS AND SHOE 

FOR CA SH. 

PERSON8 buying Boots and Shoes for cash 
will find it to their interest to rail at 



Third St., Near the Post Office, 

before purchasing elsewhere. Special attention 
paid to CUSTOM WORK, and orders for the man- 
ufacture of Ladies’ and Gentlemens’ Boots and 
Shoes, in all the latest styles, will he filled nt 
short notice. Material, fit and workmanship war- 
ranted. mar. I. 



N 



OTICE. 



M 



ET UO 1*0 LIT A N 






TAXES. 



MILLS! 



THE tax-list for the year 1877 is now due, and 
has been placed in my hands for collection. All 
persons interested will please come forward at 
once aud make settlement. 
je29.) R. L. SALTER. 



P. A. MARKS 



— nAS THE— 



WE RESPECTFULLY ANNOUNCE TO THE 
public that we have our New Mill all furnished 
and complete, and are now prepared to do your 
grinding, and guarantee satisfaction. Will grind 
for same toll as water mills. All we ask is«a trial. 
Cash for grain. Flour, Meal and Feed always on 
hand for sale. Leave orders «t P. O. Box 44. Our 
regular days for custom are Tuesday, Thursday and 
Saturday. 
jan.l'75-tf.l 



POTTS A MERSHON 



JIOR SALE, 

Or Given in Exchange 

FOR good young Cattle or Mules, a new No. 1 7 l i 
octave Piano; also a second-hand one ou the same 



terms. 

jeO.) 



For particulars apply at 



THIS OFFICE. 



CHEAPEST, & KNOBBIEST 



IN' 

sep.7-tf. 



THU STATE. 



rjYO HKKEDKItS. 

A. TOWN BULL. 

I AM standing a good Bull, thorough-bred and 
very fine, for the convenience of the people of 
Danville. He is in a stable on Green street, near 
the Colored Reform Church. Service, $2 50. 
aug.24-tf. J. H. DAVIS. 




THE ADVOCATE. 

DAHVILLE. 
FRIDAY SEPT. 14,1877 



Yellow fever lias beguu to make con- 
siderable headway at Fernandina, Fla., 
but has not yet spread to other places. 

m • » • m 

The Murphy Movement has proved 
wonderfully successful in Louisville. It 
is said the number of blue ribbon men 
now in that city run up to six thousand. 



■ -a i wr I lf - ■ 

Clay Crawfcud 
he isn’t Osman 
following from 
New York dis- 
pels the pleasant delusion: “The Turk- 
ish Legation has the honor to inform the 
press that the Marshal of that name was 
born in Asia Miuor, of Musselmen pa- 
rents.” 



•A" 



The many friends of 
will regret to learn that 
Pasha any more. The 
the Turkish minister at 



Within the last few days Senator 
Morton’s condition has been growing 
worse, and those in a condition to know 
are apprehensive that his days are num 
bered, and his death may be expected at 
any hour. 

- - - — - 

It is said that the President is not at 
all pleased with the partial and condi 
tional indorsement of the Pennsylvania 
Republican Convention. Hartranft had 
promised him an unqualified indorse- 
ment, but was unable to deliver the 
goods. 

The Courier-Journal says: Very pleas- 
ant reading is that this morning in the 
local columns of the Courier-Journal con- 
cerning the revival of business in Louis- 
ville. In fact, the whole country has 
been feeling better in the past few days, 
with the exception, perhaps, of portions 
of Pennsylvania. 

TnE Louisville City Council has at 
last, after two years of lighting, granted 
a new Gas Company the right to lay down 
pipes in the streets of the city. The 
present monopoly charges $2 70 per thou- 
sand cubic feet for gas, and will doubtless 
contest the new Company’s privileges 
bitterly in the Courts. 

Reports from Maine indicate the re- 
election of Gov. Conner, last Monday, by 
about 6,000 majority, and a decided ma- 
jority of Republicans in both branches of 
the Legislature. Of thirty-one Senators 
twenty-nine Republicans are reported 
elected. The Greenback candidate for 
Governor received about 3,000 votes. 

Almost the entire press of the South 
concur in the opinion that that section 
is especially blessed this season. Every- 
body is at work. The crops have been 
cultivated with economy and promise a 
heavy yield. From almost every quarter 
come the good tidings, which indicate a 
prospect of abundance. 

We printed a little paragraph in the 
last issue of the Advocate, on the au- 
thority of the Frankfort correspondent of 
the Cincinnati Enquirer, to the effect 
that Hon. Isaac Caldwell was no longer 
a candidate for the United States Senate. 
The correspondent was mistaken. Mr. 
Caldwell says he has never written a 
word to any member of the Legislature 
about the United States Senate or any 
other subject since the last election. 



Pinkerton’s detectives have discov- 
ered between 190 aud 200 boys in various 
parts of the country each of whom an- 
swered more or less to the description of 
Charlie Ross. The subscription of $20,000 
made by prominent citizens of Philadel- 
phia has been almost entirely expended 

in the search. 

— ^ 

The joint discussion that has been ar- 
ranged in Ohio between Senator Mat- 
thews and Gen. Ewing will consist of 
four meetings: At Dayton on Monday, 

17th inst.; at Chillicothe on the 18th; at 
Shelby on the 20th; at Alliance on the 
21st. The contest in that State is waxing 
warm, and the prospect for Democratic 
success is growing brighter every day. 

Thos. Francis Curley, who was 
hanged in Pennsylvania, last Monday, 
was only nineteen years of age. Two 
years ago he killed Miss Mary Ann Whit- 
by merely beeause she refused to corrobo- 
rate a falsehood which he had told his 
employer. The Sheriff refused to allow 
the brother of Miss Whitby to attend the 
execution. 



The Democrats at the recent election 
in California won a splendid victory. 
The Democratic majority on joint ballot 
in the Legislature will be thirty-eight, 
and what is more important, this body 
will choose a United States Senator in 
place of Sargeaut, who is an extreme Re- 
publican. Sargeant is a very corrupt 
politician. He is believed to have bought 
his election to the Senate. The possess' 
ion of a large fortune is the only thing 
that has given him any respectability. 

Referring to the SpoaUorahip, the 
Cincinnati Enquirer is of the opinion that 
Milton Sayler’s chances are very good for 
securing the prize. Assuming that the 
Speakership does not fall to a Southern 
man, it says that “Randall aud Cox in 
the East are to be pitted against Sayler 
aud Morrison in the West— a four-handed 
game. The Western side has the advan- 
tage in that the Western candidates are 
really playing as partners, while the 
Eastern men are playing both against 
them and bitterly against each other. It 
is now certain that Cox will not be the 
Speaker, and that strong elements are at 
work against Randall. 

— 

The twelve apostles who now have su- 
preme control in the Church of the Lat- 
ter-Day Saints, are engaged in looking 
over Brigham Young’s books and papers. 
They want to find out what belongs to 
the Church and what belonged to Brig- 
ham. The Prophet had a habit of mix- 
ing things, and taking personal title to 
property of which he was really only trus- 
tee for the Saints. It is said that there 
is a fine crop of lawsuits in prospect, and 
if the lawyers get a fair whack at it, 
there will not be much left for division 
among the seventeen wives and forty- 
four living children out of the $2,000,000, 
at which Brigham’s fortune has been ap- 
praised . 

The venerable Alvin Adams, the foun- 
der of the Adams Express Company, who 
died at his residence in Watertown, Mass., 
a few days ago, at the age of seventy-five 
years, began life in poverty. For three 
years he was his own messeuger, cashier, 
clerk, label boy and porter. His entire 
establishment consisted of Adams, a 
valise, aBd desk room in an office. He 
did not dream of the magnitude the bu- 
siness would assume, but it followed the 
development of the railroad and the 
steamship, till not only the United States 
but Europe, Asia and Australia were in- 
cluded in the network of its agencies. A 
few years ago Mr. Adams said that al- 
ways in some quarter of the globe the sun 
was shining on his name— a nobler boast 
than that of England that the roll of her 
drum followed the sunrise round the 
globe. 

The rascality of the South Carolina 
ring thieves is being brought to light, 
The New York World on the 10th, print- 
ed a long aud detailed statement, or con- 
fession, made by Niles G. Parker, Ex- 
State Treasurer of South Carolina, but 
at present living in Jersey City, in which 
he makes startling charges of corruption 
against Ex-Governors Moses, Chamber- 
lain, and Scott, United States Senator 
Patterson, Financial Agent Kimpton, 
and other members of the ring which 
plundered the Palmetto State of millions. 
Parker frankly acknowledges his own 
guilt in all this, since it appears by his 
statement that most of the stolen moneys 
were paid out by him in his official ca- 
pacity. He is now under indictment. 
He professes sorrow for his crimes, and 
his readiness to go to South Carolina for 
trial. His statement, if substantiated, 
will confirm the formal charges against 
Patterson, and doubtless lead to the in- 
dictment of Chamberlain. They are cor- 
roborated by a voluminous array of fig- 
ures, dates, circumstances, &c., in which 
the connection of Governor Chamberlain 
with the fraudulent issue of bonds seems 
to be made clear. Parker’s motive for 
making the confession is given by him- 
self in his refusal to be made the scape- 
goat for the crimes of his allies. 



The following, from that intense Re- 
publican journal, the Cincinnati Gazette, 
is rather encouraging: “It begins to look 
as if the Democrats, with a little gener- 
alship, might be able to control the or 
ganization of the United States Senate 
at the October session. Senator Morton’s 
absence will reduce the Republican ma- 
jority to two, and one of those two, it is 
claimed by the Democrats, can be in- 
duced to “rise above party” for the occa- 
sion. Senator Spencer’s prolonged stay 
in the Black Hills is only wanting to the 
success of the programme. 



\m i\\ % 



Reported for the Advocate. 

LINCOLN COUNTY. 



Beporfed for the advocate. 

Parksville, Sept. 12, ’77. 

Mu. Wm. Scomp has gone on a pro- 
tracted visit to his relatives in Indiana. 

Mr. Jas. Brknnen is back at bis old 
stand, where he will handle his last and 
awl. 

Elder Jesse Walden will preach 
here next Saturday night and Sunday, 
and will probably continue several days. 

There is a fair crop of hickory-nuts, 
and it is estimated by our corpulent 
friend, Tom Orr, that there are at least 
three squirrels to each nut. 

School opened here last Monday, 1st 
Monday Sept., with fifty-five pupils, and 
with a fair prospect to have seventy-five 
before the end of t he week. 

Married, on the 6th inst., at Clems 
Chapel, near this place, by Rev. John 
Hamilton, Mr. Jacob Clem to Miss Mary 
Martin, all of this county. 

Capt. Cozatt, not satisfied with all 
the modern attachments to his mill, is 
now erecting a stack of brick, which, 
when completed, will be the highest in 
the county. 

If some of the posts and flat rails that 
so obstruct our passways were converted 
into a fence around our graveyard, they 
would answer a better purpose, and pro- 
bably save the owners thereof some costs i 
as they are likely to incur for allowing 
such obstruction to remain. 

The Boyle County Teacher’s Institute, 
will be held at this place, commencing 
Tuesday, Oct. 2, ’77, and continue four 
days. Committees on entertainment. 
Reception, &c., will be duly announced. 
Everybody is invited from this and ad 
joining counties, aud a genuine, good, 
old and instructive time is confidently 
expected. 



Tiie following literary item is extract- 
ed from a New York journal. It will be 
interesting to a number of the Danville 
friends of the talented lady: ‘‘We learn 
with pleasure that Mrs. Annie Chambers 
Ketchum, the well known Southern 
poetess, is about to have a volume of her 
poems issued by D. Appleton & Co., of 
this city. The volume will be appropri- 
ately entitled "Lotos Flowers,” and will 
make its appearance early in September. 
The poems it includes are the result of 
those years of introspective thought and 
passionate emotion, through which high- 
ly gifted sensitive and contemplative na- 
tures are likely to pass. Their publica- 
tion will be awaited with interest by the 
many readers already familiar with Mrs. 
Ketchum’s name.” 



At Wapakoneta, Ohio, last Thursday 
night, between 9 and 10 o’clock, the 
County Treasurer, on his way home from 
a festival, was captured almost in the 
center of the town, gagged, carried down 
an alley, held a prisoner till midnight, 
then taken to the Court House, and, after 
being subjected to a severe ordeal of fire, 
which was placed between his feet as he 
lay on the floor, was compelled to divulge 
the combination of the county safe, and 
some $40,000 was taken therefrom. Mr. 
Myers, the Treasurer, discovered 

next morning in a helplessAul suffering 
condition. liis-wiets. f-T»”tnouth and 
face were witness to much suffering. Mr. 
Myers was the outgoing Treasurer, and 
should have delivered up the ollice ou the 
1st inst., but owing to some delay in the 
settlement of accounts, he was still in 
possession. 



There is not a more consistent Dem- 
ocrat in the Union than Senator Bayard, 
of Deleware, nor one whose utterances 
are received with more favor. He was 
interviewed recently at Richmond, Va., 
and the following is the substance of 
what he said regarding the l’resident’s 
Southern policy: “I thank God for the 

policy of President Hayes. He has dis- 
posed of the only obstacle that stood be- 
tween the suffering South and the full en- 
joyment of her constitutional liberties. 
He has not only carried out the Demo- 
cratic policy, but he has carried the Re- 
publicans with him. I think he has the 
cordial support of fully seventy-five per 
cent, of his party. Many who were doubt- 
ful at first, now see that the time was 
ripe for the restoration of every Southern 
State to self-government under the Con- 
stitution. The history of the States since 
the troops were removed is one of the 
very best arguments why Republicans 
and Democrats should approve of Mr. 
Hayes’ policy on this subject.” In re- 
sponse to the question, “What do you 
think of the situation in Ohio?” Senator 
Bayard is quoted as saying: “I am not 

qualified to speak of the contest in detail, 
but 1 must say that the doctrines ad- 
vanced by Mr, Sherman in his financial 
address lately delivered are of the great- 
est significance. It is the first time in 
the history of the country that a Cabinet 
Minister has taken the stump in bold and 
open advocacy of the tenets of the Com- 
mune.” 

President Hayes, Secretaries Evarts, 
McCrary and Thompson, and Postmaster 
General Key, with the members’ fami- 
lies, will positively be in Louisville on 
the 17th and 18th of September. Secreta- 
ry Schurz will probably be with them. 
General Devens has not been heard from. 
Twelve or more Governors will also be in 
Louisville during the Presidential visit, 
among them Hampton, and very likely 
Nichols. The people are very enthusias- 
tic over the coming of the distinguished 
parties, and the welcome to be extended 
them, will in every way reflect credit up- 
on Kentucky. There are thirteen squares 
from the Ohio and Mississippi Depot to 
the Galt House. Each square is to rep- 
resent one of the original States, and at 
each corner there will be decorations 
with devices symbolizing the State.— 
Fourth street is to represent Kentucky, 
the first-born of the Union, and will be 
decorated appropriately. At certain cor- 
ners the decorations by the committee, 
combined with those of the citizens, will 
make one of the finest scenes ever wit- 
nessed. The invitations to the reception 
at the Galt House, have been distributed, 
about 2,000 in all, to various parts of the 
State and different cities of the country, 
as well as to the people in Louisville, 
and it is expected that the attendance of 
prominent personages of this and other 
States will be large. The School Board 
has declared the 17th and 18th holidays, 
and it has been resolved by the General 
Council of the city of Louisville that the 
freedom of the city be granted to Presi- 
dent Hayes and his suite and the Gover- 
nors of the different States, and the most 
cordial and earnest welcome is hereby ex- 
tended them, aud further, that the Gene- 
ral Council wait upon them in a body. 



Reported lor the Advocate. 

Perryville, Sept. 12th, ’77. 

Rev. I. W. Bruner, of Ilodgenville, 
expects to move to Perryville shortly. 

Mrs. Harriet Karrick has been 
quite sick for several days, but we under- 
stand she is recovering slowly now. 

W.G. Broyles sold on Monday, 3rd 
inst., a pair of three-year old horse mules 
to Graves & Miller, of Marion county, 
for $280. 

Little Finis, son of Wm. Calvert, 
died ou Friday, 7th inst., aud was buried 
in the Perryville Cemetery on last Sat- 
urday evening. 

Weddings are becoming fashionable 
in the “West End.” On Monday night, 
3rd inst., S. H. Gowin, Jr., was married 
to Miss Jane Watkins, by Rev. Davy 
Bruner, in Washington county. On the 
evening of the 6th inst., H. Clay Preston 
was married to Miss Sallie Lawson, by 
Rev. R. L. Purdom, in Washington 
county. On the evening of the 6th inst., 
Geo. Carpenter, Jr., was married to Miss 
Lucy Martin, by Rev. Wm. May. On 
the morning of the 6th inst., R. S. Scott, 
formerly of the "West End,” but now of 
Middleburg, was married to Miss Jennie 
Coffey, of that place. 

Colt Snow.— Last Saturday, 8th inst., 
was colt show day iu Perryville, and 
some fine ones were on exhibition. R. 
II. Gray received premium on best horse 
colt by Wm. Stigall’s horse, "Ben Hill, 
and John B. McGinnis premium ou best 

mare colt by ounie horse. Winter lirewer 

premium for best horse mule colt by his 
jack, “Gabe,” and Thos. Lewallen prem- 
ium on best mare mule colt by his jack, 
“Rough aud Ready.” John C. Martin 
premium on best mare mule colt by W. 
G. Broyles’ jack, "Stonewall,” aud Wm. 
Mitchell premium on best horse colt by 
his horse, “Hippy, Jr.” G. W. Dugan 
premium on best mare mule colt by Chris. 
May’s jack, “Crockett,” aud Thos. Wil- 
liams premium on best horse mule colt 
by same jack. J. P. Wingate premium 
on best horse mule colt by his jack, 
“Black Hawk,” and R. Marksbury prem- 
ium on best mare colt by his fine horse, 
“Anonymous.” 



Stanford, Sept. 12, ’77. 
No business of importance was done in 
Quarterly Court, last Monday. 

Jerry Maxwell sold to Ed. Hawley 
17 head of cows and heifers at 24 cents 
per pound. 

At a sale near town, last week, seven 
hogs weighing from 250 to 275 pounds 
brought $13 50 per head. 

Rev. W. T- Tyree, of the Baptist 
Church, will preach at Shelby City, next 
Saturday. Assisted by Rev. J. M. Bruce, 
of this place, he will conduct a protracted 
meeting there. Mr. Barnes’ meeting in 
this place still continues with unabated 
interest. 

If any reader of the Advocate is in 
want of a Good Farm Wag on he should 
certainly give Wearen & Evans, of our 
city, a "call before making a purchase 
elsewhere. They are selling wagons of 
the best make at lower rates than ever 
heard of before in this part of the country. 
Their prices are as low as those of whole- 
sale dealers anywhere. Those who need 
wagons appreciate this and come eager to 
purchase. Messrs. W. & E. informed us 
that their sales often amounted to four 
wagons a day and that they expect to sell 
one hundred or more of these wagons per 
year. We advise farmers, even if they do 
not need anything of the kind, just to 
call and examine for themselves. 

The murder of John Engleman, Sr., 
which occurred last Friday evening, has 
perhaps been heard of by many of your 
readers. The particulars are about as 
follows: On the evening meut^Aaed, Mr. 
Engleman and his sou Sam went up on 
the knobs to Henderson Young’s store 
for a load of boards. Sam drove and his 
father rode on horse-back. While iu front 
of Young’s store loading their wagon, 
Jerry Brown, a very black, short, heavy- 
set negro about twenty-five years of age, 
came along driving a two-horse wagou. 
He stopped aud went in the store. When 
he came out and tried to start, his horses, 
being young, did not move off gently, but 
“cut up” a little. Mr. E. made some 
humorous remark to the negro, who re- 
torted in an insolent manner. Just then 
his horses started, aud this ended the 
matter for a short time. Mr. E.’s wagon 
was loaded and ready to go, so he mount- 
ed his horse and rode on, leaving Sam to 
drive the wagon. In some 300 or 400 
yards Mr. E. overtook the negro and an 
altercation ensued. The party from whom 
our information is obtainei was not near 
enough to hear what waj said, but he 
could see from the motions of the two 
that angry words were parsing. Pretty 
soon the negro whirled of! his horse aud 
stooped to pick up a rock. Mr. E. did 
the same, aud then each started around 
to meet the other. Mr. E. either threw 
his rock or attempted to throw it, and iu 
doing so fell on his hands and knees, being 
a very weak, old man, 70 years or more 
of age, and while iu this posture the ne- 
gro sprang on him and struck him in the 
back of the head with his rock, mashing 
in the skull aud then pushing him over 
ou the ground. This done, he mounted 
his horse and drove on. Jos. Baugh 
near whose house the affair occurred, saw 
the latter part of it and shouted at the 



ur 






GABRAKI) COUNTV. 



Reported for the Advocate. 

East End of Garrard, Sept. 12. 

Mr. C. D. Moore is dangerously ill. 

Good fat hogs are now worth $4.00 per 
hundred in this county. 

On the 11th the Court of Appeals af- 
firmed the cause of Poor, &c., vs. Robin- 
son, &c., from Garrard. 

Col. R. P. Gresham, 'of Laurel, is in 
the county visiting his father-in-law, Mr. 
R. B. Ward. The Colonel is as jolly as 
ever. 

Mr. Francis Lutes, of Rockcastle 
county, was married to Miss Emma 
Ward, daughter of R. B. Ward, Esq., of 
this county, last Tuesday, 11th inst. 

Robert, a little son of J. II. West, 
had two fingers so badly crushed in the 
cogs of a cider mill, last week, that it was 
necessary to amputate them. 

Many of our fair loving people are in 
attendance at the Lexington Fair this 
week. Mr. H. C. Buford took over his 
pair of premium mules yesterday, and 
proposes to cleau out bluegrassdom with 
them. 

Tiie farm of G. B. Dunn, in Garrard, 
was sold at public sale, last Wednesday, 
330 acres, subject to dower, fer $33 per 
acre. Col. J. W. Poor, purchaser. One- 
third cash first of next January, — defer- 
red payments bearing 8 per cent. 

In the opinion of Col. Tom Scott, the 
greatest triumph of American statesman- 
ship would be another amendment of the 
Constitution providing for an increase of 
the Federal army to protect the Pennsyl- 
vania Central Railroad and its connec- 
tions. 

Eld. It. M. Gano’s meeting at Fair- 
view, is creating much interest. There 
have been about twenty additions up till 
now and the meeting will probably con- 
tinue until Sunday night. He preaches 
every morning at 104 and at 74 o’clock 
in the evening. 

The following young ladies left their 
homes last week to attend school at the 
following places, during the collegiate 
year just commenced: Miss Nannie Ram- 
sey goes to New Albany; Miss Lizzie 
Schooler to Woodburn; Miss Lizzie Tevis 
and Miss Sallie Denny, to Shelbyville, 
Ky. 

Last Sunday night at the conclusion 
of the meeting at Fairview, the horse at- 
tached to a buggy containing Mr. Bud 
Dunn and wife, of Bryantsville, took 
fright, ran away and over-turned the 
buggy. Mrs. Duuu was uninjured, but 
her husband was not so fortunate, re- 
ceiving some very painful injuries which 
will confine him to his bed for sometime 
to come. The buggy was almost com- 
pletely demolished. 



On the 5th inst,, forty-two head of 
Short-horns were sold at Wmdmere, 
England, for $81,400, or an average of 
$1,940. 5th Duchess of Hillhurst brought 
$21,500, and the 3rd Duchess of Hillhurst, 
$20,500. 

Mr. A. K. Collins’ colt show for the 
season of 1876 will take place iu Danville 
on Monday (County Court day), the 17th, 
when he will award a $10 premium to the 
best horse colt of Ericsson’s get, and $10 
to the best mare colt. Bring them, aud 
let’s see who will wear the blue. 

It is est imated that there is over 15,000 
bushels of orchard grass seed unsold in 
Boyle, Mercer and Lincoln counties. 
Dealers are offering from 60 to 65 cents, 
as to quality. About 4,000 bushels have 
been shipped from this depot by C. H. 
Lucas. Market dull with no buyers. 

Rye is being delivered at depot here at 
40 cents, with dealers indifferent buyers. 
At this price it will bring the farmer in 
debt, and we think all who are in a con- 
dition to hold ought to do so, as the de- 
mand will improve in a few months, and 
prices be higher. 

Capt. T. D. English reports to the 
Advocate the following sales: On the 

5th, the Jackson Mann farm of 216 acres, 
in Mercer, was bought publicly, under 
the hammer, by Wm. Robinson, of Mer- 
cer, at $45 45 per acre. At the same 
time aud place Calib Adams, of Mercer, 
bought the James Adams farm of 135 
acres at $36 90 per acre. 

Mr. A. J. Gross, a prominent live 
stock trader of Breckinridge county was 
with us, this week, buying some fine 
stock. Among other purchases, we note 
the sale of two cherry red Short-Horn 
heifers from the herd of Mr. J. H. Davis. 
Belle the 7th, calved Februaiy, 1874, by 
Filligree Gem, 17089; dam Belle the 5th. 
Lettie Lee the 2nd, calved Dec. 1875, by 
3rd Duke of Oxford 16897; dam Lettie 
Lee. Good prices were obtained but not 
made public. 

Last Monday was Court day at Lex- 
ington, and there was an immense throng 
of people, attracted mostly, however, by 
Goldsmith Maid’s trot, were present. The 
display of stock of various kinds was 
pretty large. There were near 800 cattle 
on the market, not all of which was sold, 
however. The prices ranged from 3 cents 
to 4i cents. Mules brought from $100 to 
$150. Some broke mules brought from 
$65 to $138. The horse trade was, as 
usual, dull. 

The Live Slock Record urges farmers 
and breeders to return to the rearing and 
breeding of carriage and coach horses 
It is a wonder from the dearth or scarity 
of fine coach teams and the prices they 
command, that more people do not turn 
attention to the subject. Breeding coach, 
carriage and handsome coupe horses 
must pay handsomely for years to come, 
as the demand is far in excess of the sup- 
ply. During the past ten or fifteen years 
the high prices trotters have commanded 
have turned most of our farmers trotting 
mad, to the neglect of the old style of 
coach horses. 

The wool market is considerably de- 



NE if A D TERTI8EMENTS. 








negro to stop, being too far away to reach , ,, .. . . 

* , ■ . , ... . , JUIS&M all over the country, and sales 

the spot in time to prevent the deecr.Aie . 



assisted Mr. E. to rise and then, after a 
little while, to mount his horse, which he 
rode several miles— as far as Mat. Mar- 
tin’s— where, overcome by sickness pro" 
duced by the blow, he was compelled to 
stop. He was there attended by  v pliysi- 
ciaus who did all they could, but without 
avail, for ho died on Saturday evening. 
Jerry Brown, the murderer, made his es- 
cape, but was overtaken and arrested in 
l'ulaski county, near Cumberland River, 
aud brought back here early Monday 
morning and lodged in jail, but for 
greater security to him he has been taken 
to the jail in Richmond. We are not in- 
formed as to when his examining trial 
will take place. 



amt, mul 



W. D. Sutherland, of Clark, sold 15 
extra broke mules a day or two ago to S. 
S. Phipps, at $140 per head. 

Dr. J. M. Meyer has for sale 5 male 
hogs of the R. L. Irvine stock; one pure 
Alderney bull calf, and also a few grade 
milkers. * 

White CocniNS.— A few, pure bred, 
White Cochin Cockerels, ready for ser- 
vice, can be had by early application at 
this office. . * 

Wheat Wanted.— The highest mar- 
ket price will be paid by the Co-Operative 
Store lu Danville, for a few thousand 
bushels of wheat for immediate delivery. 

Tiie recent showers we have had inthis 
locality have freshened up the grass, but 
have been hardly sufficient t6 wet the 
ground to a sufficient depth for fall plow- 
ing preparatory to seeding. 

Mr. T. Porter, at Gilbert’s Creek, 
in Lincoln county, has for rent about 40 
acres of land, well set in grass, com- 
fortable dwelling, &c; also 50 acres more 
of grass, if desired. *2t 

Mr. Tiios. Lillard, the veteran Or- 
chard Grass seed grower of the county, 
sold his crop at 75 cents delivered in 
Louisville, — the delivery to be made this 
week. 

Eugene McGoodwin has selected the 
11th of October, for the closing out sale 
of the stock, crop, &c., at Melrose farm. 
Please notice advertisement next week 
for full particulars. * 

Quite a number of our farmers have 
tried the experiment of shearing their 
lambs and the result has been very satis- 
factory. The wool is worth 23 to 25 cents 
and lambs are benefited by having it off. 

W. W. Yeager, of this county, has a 
Berkshire sow which has produced 45 
pigs iu 18 months,— 43 of which she sus- 
ceeded in rearing. This is a remarkable 
productive sow. Who has one that can 
beat her? 

Any person having a nice, well im- 
proved farm of about 40 or 50 acres, near 
Danville, Stanford, Hustonville, or any 
other town in this part of the State, 
which they wish to sell, may find a pur- 
chaser, by addressing Editor of Advo- 
cate, giving particulars, with price, &c. 

The produce and provision markets 
have a hardening tendency. In view of 
the heavy foreign demand, farmers are 
not crowding their crops into the hands 
of speculators. A very wise policy. 

The barley market is lifeless and noth- 
ing doing. Yesterday’s Cincinnati mar- 
ket quoted Spring at 65 to 75 cents, and 
prime Fall at 55 to 63 cents. Our farmers 
still refuse to take the price and we have 
not heard of a single sale. 

Special Bargains in Wagons. — 
The Co-operative Store in Danville has a 
lot of the celebrated Fish and Mitchell 
Wagons for sale, and in order to close 
them out immediately, will be sold at 
reduced rates. This is the chance for 
a bargain iu a good wagon. Call early. 

The Cincinnati Enquirer publishes 
eight columns of crop reports, which 
prove that the yield of wheat this year iu 
Ohio and Indiana is the largest known 
for years. The oats crop is above the 
average, aud the corn promises well. 



Mothers who Do«e their Darlings with 
drastic purgatives incur a fearful responsibility. 
The gentle, moderate (yet effective), laxative, al- 
terative, aud anti-bilious operation of Takkant’s 
Skltzkk Aperient peculiarly adapts it to the 
disorders of children. 



a week in your own town. Terms and $5 
outfit free. 11. HALLETT & CO., Port- 
land, Maine. 



have been made in Eastern markets at 
l^iau were paid to the farm 
fta in Boyh^county last June. The 
reason is that the manufactured article 
has not advanced as was anticipated, and 
for the present the trade is demoralized 
Long combing woolj such as was sold in 
the Danville market at 34 to 35 cents, is 
now slow sale in Cincinnati at 30 to 32 
cents. The Boston quotation is 36 cents, 

The farm of 200 acres, belonging to 
the heirs of Leonard Taylor, dec’d., sit- 
uate in this county, on the waters of Salt 
River, was rented publicly, last Satur 
day, to Jas. II. Taylor, (one of the heirs,) 
at $710 for the year. This is considered 
a good price. We find that the demand 
for rented land is good, but it is difficult 
to sell at any price. We do not,’ think it 
possible for the best blue-gras3 lands in 
this section to get any lower than they 
are now, and those who contemplate buy- 
ing should not neglect the present favor- 
able opportunity. 

We note a slight improvement in the 
condition of the wheat market since our 
last report, dealers and millers having 
advanced toll 05 for choice lots, medium 
aud prime selling at 90 cents to $1 00, as 
to quality. We are still of the opinion 
that later in the season prices will ad- 
vance. The European countries want all 
the wheat we are able to spare, but can 
not take it all at once. The visible sup- 
ply of grain at the principal cities is now 
fifty per cent, less than at this time last 
year which is a healthy sign. 

Lexington Press: Mr. E. DeLong 
made recently the largest sale of cabbage 
seed ever made in Lexington. One pound 
is considered a good sale, but he sold one 
hundred pounds to the Shakers. It ap- 
pears that that community, good farmers 
as they are, were unable this year to raise 
any good seed, owing to the depredations 
of a worm which destroyed the very head 
of the cabbage. The blight thus occa- 
sioned has been so general as to cause 
the price of cabbage seed to advance over 
100 per cent. 

There was an immense attendence at 
the Fair grounds, at Lexington, last 
Monday, to witness Goldsmith Maid 
trot, but owing to the rain the track was 
heavy, the time slow" and the crowd was 
disappointed. The Maid only trotted 
two miles, the first in 2:341, and the sec- 
ond in 2:32i. Her running mate was a 
thoroughbred out of one of the training 
stables, and was with difficulty restrain- 
ed from running away from her. As an 
enterprise the affair was a success, as a 
sport a failure. 

In several issues of our paper we have 
made it a point to try and induce our 
farmers to commence in time about 
making their selections of seed wheat. 
Above every other consideration see that 
it is clean from chess, cockle and rye. We 
saw to-day a choice article of wheat sell 
at ten cents below the market price by 
having rye and cockle iu it, making a 
difference of over $50 on the crop, enough 
to have paid for the seeding of the land 
with clean wheat. It is no trouble to 
clean wheat. Those not able to buy a 
seed fan can get a No. 8 seive, which will 
make the proper seperation. Much greater 
attention is being given to wheat grow- 
ing in Kentucky than ever before, and 
the Kentucky wheat, when choice, com- 
mands the highest prices and we hope our 
farmers will make the standard better 
and better each year. Our soil is much 
better adapted for wheat than many of 
our sister States, and we venture the as- 
sertion that iu a few years, with careful 
and prudent management, our State can 
be made the great seed State of the Union, 
thus giving our wheat an increased value. 
Wheat has already been shipped from our 
market to Virginia and Texas, and in- 
quiries have come from other StateB, 



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BETHEL COLLEGE, 

RUSSELLVILLE, KY. 
CHEAPEST SCHOOL IN THE SOUTH. 

Entire expense for one year, including Tuition 
Board, Lodging, Incidental Fee, Washing, Lights 
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Before coming send postal for circular. Address 
LESLIE WAGGENER, President, Russell- 
ville, Ky. 



Fancy Cards, no two alike, with name, 10c., 
post-paid. Nassau Card Co., Nassau, N. Y., 
Box 50. 



C ENTENNIAL AWARD MEDAL AND 
DIPLOMA to .) EN M \ i  BROTHERS, 352 
PEARL ST., NEW YORK CITY, on their man- 
ufacture of the JAPANESE PAPER WARE. 
Their Pails, Basins, Bowls, Cuspadores, Foot- 
Baths, &c., &c., are a great success. Trade sup 
plied. 



MEDICAL PREPARATIONS. 



FORTY YLAUS 1IEFOKE TIIE PUBLIC. 

DH. C. M^LANE’S 

Celebrated American 

WORM SPECIFIC 

-OR- 

VERMIFUGE. 

SYMPTOMS OF WORMS. 

rpHE countenance is pale and leaden- 
1 colored, with occasional flushes, or 
a circumscribed spot on one or both 
cheeks; the eyes become dull ; the pupils 
dilate ; an azure semicircle runs along 
the lower eye-lid ; the nose is irritated, 
swells, and sometimes bleeds ; a swell- 
ing of upper lip I occasional head- 
ache, with humming or throbbing of 
the ears ; an unusual secretion of saliva; 
slimy or furred tongue; breath very 
foul, particularly in the morning ; ap- 
petite variable, sometimes voracious, 
withagnawing sensation of the stomach, 
at others, entirely gone ; fleeting pains 
in the stomach ; occasional nausea and 
vomiting ; violent pains throughout the 
abdomen; bowels irregular, at times 
costive ; stools slimy ; not unfrequently 
tinged with blood ; belly swollen and 
hard; urine turbid; respiration occa- 
sionally difficult, and accompanied by 
hiccough ; cough sometimes dry and 
convulsive ; uneasy and disturbed sleep, 
with grinding of the teeth ; temper 
variable, but generally irritable, &c. 

Whenever the above symptoms 
are found to exist, 

DR. C. MfLANE’S VERMIFUGE 

Will certainly effect a cure. 

IT DOES NOT CONTAIN MERCURY 
in any form ; it is an innocent prepa- 
ration, not capable of doing the slightest 
injury to the most tender infant. 

The genuine Dr. M?Lane’s Vermi- 
fuge bears the signatures of C. M?Lane 
and Fleming Bros, on the wrapper. 

DR. C. M?LANE’S 

LIVER PILLS. 

These Pills are not recommended as 
a remedy for “all the ills that flesh is 
heir to,” hut in affections of the Liver, 
and in all Bilious Complaints, Dyspepsia 
and Sick Headache, or diseases of that 
character, they stand, without a rival. 

AGUEAND FEVER. 

No better cathartic can be used pre- 
paratory to, or after taking Quinine. 

As a simple purgative they are un- 
equaled. 

BEWARE OP IMITATIONS. 

The genuine are never sugar coated. 

Each box has a red wax seal ou the 
lid, with the impression Dr. M?Lane’s 
Diver Pills. 

Each wrapper bears the signatures of 
C. MVLane and Fleming Bros. 

Sold by all respectable druggists and 
country storekeepers generally. 



OFFICIAL P URLICATIONS. 



rjXOWN 

ORDINANCE. 

BE IT ORDAINED, By the Board of Trustees 
of the Town of Danville, that the owners of the 
following described lots and fractions of lots, sit- 
uated in the Town of Danville, and having a 
boundary on the streets hereinafter named, in* 
and they are hereby required on or betore the 1st 
DAY OF OCTOBER, 1877, to pave with new 
bricks and curb with substantial stone curbing 
the sidewalks in front of their said property on 
said streets, at the width aud elevation herein- 
after designated. to-wit: 

1st. The lot of Jos. II. Thomas, ou West side of 
llarrodsburg street, beginning at a point in the 
line of said lot, opposite the Western terminus of 
the side-walk on the North side of Main street, 
and running South the eutire line of said proper- 
ty,— the side- walk to be eight feet wide aud of an 
elevation six inches higher than the grade of the 
street upon which said lot is situated. 

2nd. The lot owned by the heirs of Ilobt. Rus- 
sel, dec’d., on the corner of llarrodsburg and 
Walnut streets.— the entire line of said property, 
having a boundary on either of said streets,— the 
side-walk to be eight feet wide and of an eleva- 
tion six inches higher than the grade of the 
streets upon which said property is situated. 

And the owners of the above described property 
are hereby notified to construct said side-walks 
in the manner ami time aforesaid; and if they 
neglect or refuse to do so, the town will cause the 
same to be done at the expense of the lots adjoin- 



ing said walk. 
Aug. 6th, ’77. 



G. W. WELSH, JR., 
Chairman, Pro. Tern. 



rjiowN 

QTULi^wiisrcL:. 

BE IT ORDAINED, By the Board of Trustees 
of the Town of Danville, that the liardinsville, 
llarrodsburg, Danville and Crab Orchard Road 
Company be, and they are hereby required on or 
before the 1st day of September next, to repair 
their turnpike road leading through the said 
town, by putting on the said road turnpike rock 
at least six inches in depth, the entire width of 
said road-bed, from Fifth Street to the cast end of 
Main Street in said town. 
jy!3.J U. E. WISEMAN, C’h’m. 




THIS COLUMN 



BELONGS TO THE ORIGINAL 



Firtf-ld Coil 



-AND- 





STORE! 



CHEAPEST PLACE 



IN DANVILLE 



OR ANYWHERE ELSE TO 



BUY GOODS. 



ARE NOW RECEIVING 



t % 



A BRAN NEW STOCK 



-AND INVITE- 



EYERYB O X) Y 



TO CALL A XI) EXAMINE. 



LOOK OUT FOR 



A DESCRIPTIVE ADVERTISEMENT 



1TEXT WEEK. 



PROPRIETOR, 



NORTH SIDE MAIN STREET, 



DANVILLE, KY. 



sept.14.) 




EDUCATIONAL. 



g ELECT 

S C 1^0 O L . 

MISS II. WILSON will re-open her Select 
School for girls and hoys on MONDAY, SEPT. 
3d, 18TI, at her home, on the corner of 3d and 
Broadway. She respectfully solicits a liberal 
patronage. (jy 20 . 

JJKOF. GKIMME’S 

MUSIC SCHOOL. 

THE first term of five months begins Septem- 
ber 3rd, 1877, and ends Jan. 19th, 1878. Instruc- 
tion in Vocal and Instrumental Music, Piano, 
Guitar, Organ. Thorough Bass and Harmony. 

TUITION PER TERM: 

Two Lessons per week, 45 minutes each, or 

one double lesson, \y % hours $30 00 

One Lesson per week, 45 minutes 20 UU 

All private lessons at pupils’ residences, fl 00 
each. Your patronage is respectfully solicited. 
Please call on, or address me for further arrange- 
ments at Prof. Withrow & Ford’s I). C. M. A. 
aug.31-tf. ERNST GRIMME. 

CENTRE COLLEGE, 
DANVILLE, KY. 

The session for 1877-’8 will open the FIRST 
MONDAY IN SEPTEMBER, with a lull faculty 
and enlarged course of study. Tuition, $40 for 
session of lo months. Contingent fee, $5 addition- 
al. The sons of Ministers of the GwhiJ-oI-in-ric- 
nominations, and young men of limited means, 
admitted free. Rooms in the COLLEGE Home, tup- 
plied with plain furniture and free of chary e for 
rent, will be furnished, to a limited extent, to 
worthy applicants. 

For a catalogue and further particulars, apply 

ORMOND BEATTY, LL.D., Pres’t, 
Or Rev. J. L. McKEE, D. D., Vice Pres’t. 
jc29-3m.) 

THE NEXT SESSION " 

—OF THE— 

KENTUCKY INSTITUTION 

— FOR- 

DEAF-MUTE8 

—WILL OPEN- 

MONDAY, OCTOBER I, 1877. 

ALL Deaf-Mutes in the State between the age 
of 10 and 30 years are entitled to admission. 
Board ami Tuition free. For further information 
or for admission apply to 

JNO, A. JACOBS, Principal, 
aug.l7-tf. Danville, Ky. 

FRANKLIN I NST IT U TE^ 

LANCASTER, KY. 

FIRST MONDAY IY SEPTEMBER. 

TERMS I-ER U CARTER: 

1st, 2nd and 3rd Grades $ 7 00 

4th, 5Tn and 6 th Grades a oo 

Freshman and Sophomore Classes ll oo 

Junior and Senior Classes is oo 

BaV*- No charge for Janitor’s Fee. No charge 
for Graduation. No charge for French or Latin. 
No charge for Rudiments of Music. Painting 
taught if desirable. 

Lessons on Piano or Organ, $40 for ten months. 
Lessons on Guitar at reasonable rates. Ten per 
cent, deduction in tuition if paid within first 
month. Board obtained for $2 50 per week. Call 
and inquire particulars. 

aug.3-tf. GEO. W. DUNLAP, Jr., Principal. 

BELL SEMINARY 

FOR YOUNG LADIES, 

DANVILLE, KY. 

SECOND ANNUAL SESSION WILL BEGIN 

Wednesday, Sept. 5th, 1877. 

FACULTY. 

JAMES L. ALLEN, Principal, 

Mental and Moral Sciences, Evidences of Christi- 
anity, Political Economy, Elements 
of Criticism, Logic. 

Mrs. MARY BELL ALLEN, Associate Principal 
Rhetoric, Composition, Elocution and English 
Literature. 

Miss LOTTIE CAMPBELL, 

Higher Mathematics and Natural Sciences. 
Miss LILLA MORRISON, 
Preparatory Department. 

Mrs. JENNIE B. HITCHCOCK, 

Latin. 

t Miss MARY HOOKE, 
ntly a student in the Literary and' Art 
Schools in Stuttgart, Germany, aud Neufchatel. 
Switzerland,) 

French, German, and Art Department. 

Miss MOLLIE ALLEN, of Cleveland, O., 
Vocal and Instrumental Music. 

TERMS: 

For entire session of forty weeks, payable one- 
half in advance, the remainder in February. 

Board, $4.50 per week, 40 weeks $180 00 

Board for pupils from Monday to Friday. . . 150 00 

Tuition in Collegiate Department 56 00 

Tuition in Preparatory Department, $30 to 40 00 

Contingent Fee 2 (g) 

Washing at laundress’ prices. 

extra studies. 

Ancient Languages, each $!«, oo 

Modern Languages, each 40 00 

Instrumental Music 50 00 

Vocal Music so oo 

Use of Piano 10 00 

Painting in Oil 50 00 

Drawing 20 CIO 

Diploma 5 00 

A deduction will be made on the billsof daugh- 
ters of ministers of the gospel. 

Pupils will be received at any time, but not for 
less than one term, unless previously arranged 
with the Principal. No deduction will be made 
for withdrawal from school except in cases of 
protracted illness. 

The session just completed was one of marked 
success. The Course of Study is thorough and ex- 
tensive, and the instructors have experience and 
ability. We therefore confidently expect to make 
this institution equal to the best iu this or any 
other State. 

Bhtif A class of small boys will be admitted. 

JAMES L. ALLEN, Principal 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



rpHE 



Danville Transfer Company 

IS NOW prepared to convey passengers and 
baggage to and from the Railroad Depotto any 
part of Danville. Orders left at our Livery 
Stable, on Main street, near Central Hotel, will 
receive prompt attention. 

WAKEFIELD St STODGIIILL. 

aug.24-tf. 

QOTSWOLD 

EWES FOR SALE. 

I HAVE for sale TWO HUNDRED COTS- 
WOLI) EWES that have been carefully selected 
from first flocks, and will shear from 8 to 10 
pounds of wool. Bucks were put with them 1 5th 
of August. S. D. HINKLE, 

scp.7-2t. Bloomfield, Ky. 



P. A. MARKS 

—HAS A HANDSOME STOCK OF— 

EVERYTHING 



—IN THE LINE OF— 



(MTS’ PUNISHING GOODS. 



8ep.7-tf. 



IMP0RTANT_DISC0VERY. 

TO MILL OWNERS. 

FOR $‘iS CASTI 1 will furnish each mill 
owner with a receipt to clean wheat that is in- 
jured from smut, let it he ever so badly stained; 
and that it will make as nice flour as though 
there never had been any smut in it, at a cost of 
% cent per bushel. Write, for further informa- 
tion, to the subscriber at Buckeye, Ky. 
ang.n-tf. W. N. POTTS. 



GOAL.! 



GOAL! 



GOAL! 



I AM prepared to deliver Pittsburgh and Can- 
nel Coal to citizeus of Danville and vicinity at 
market rates. C. II, LUCAS. 

sep.7-tf. 



i iv view or 

A CHANGE IN OUR FIRM 

IT becomes important to 
settle up the business of the 
old firm. ALL PERSONS in- 
debted to us, whose ac- 
counts were due July 1st, 
are requested to come for- 
ward and settle promptly. 

S. V. ROWLAND* SON. 



THE ADVOCATE. 



D A1TVILLE 
FRIDAY SEPT 14,1877. 



{fits 



Fresh Oysters at Gilcher’s. 



HSnry Lyons sells Clothing cheaper than any 
house in town. Try hjm. ♦ 



R. B. TRUSS DALE Jt Co. give a written quaran- 
tee with every Watch they sell. * 



An immense stock of Gents’ Underwear at Hen- 
ry Lyons’. * 



On next Wednesday, the 19th inst 
the fine farm of the late Dr. Danl. Yei- 
ser, near town, will be offered for sale to 
the highest bidder. This is a valuable 
tract of land, and persons on the look-out 
for a fine blue-grass farm should not fail 
to attend. See advertisement elsewhere 
for particulars. 



Extra Copies of the Advocate, of the present 
issue, put up in wrappers, at five cents per copy. » 



R. B. Trcesdale & Co. will sell you a good 
American Watch for $12 00. 



All the latest Fall Styles ol' Hats just received 
at Henry Lyons’. * 



Go to R. B. Truesdale & Co. for Spectacles and 
Nose Glasses in Gold, Steel and Silver Frames. * 



L- ’ 



'J. 



“V 






I 






Orders t'oj fine Job Printing promptly filled at 
^ the Advocate office. Call and see specimens and 
•lees. * 



learn prlc 



Newest designs of Visiting Cards just received 
and printed in the most fashionable style at the 
Advocate office. » 



J. W. Proctor has for sale at the Central Na- 
tional Bank seven thousand dollars in bonds of 
the town of Harrodsburg, which will be sold at 
rates that will yield ten per cent, on the invest- 
ment. * 



Henry Lyons has just deceived Ms immense 
stock of New Fall aud Winter Keadv-made C loth- 
ing, for men and boys 9 wear, from the finest to the 
lowest price goods, and is now prepared to suit 
everyone. Give him a call, as he intends to sell 
at close figures. * 



Samuel A Warren sell 3 Shelf Walnut Book 
Racks for 90 cents; three Shelf Walnut Corner 
Brackets, 90 cents; Walnut Wall Pocket and 
Bracket combiued, 90 cents. Their stock is large 
and complete, and at prices that will defy compe- 
tition. Will sell as low as any house. Their 
frame stock is large and handsome. All they ask 
is an inspection of their goods and prices before 
buying. * 



To Country Merchants.— T he Fifth AVenuc 
Hotel, Louisville, Ky., will entertain, in first- 
class style, all Country Merchants while visiting 
the city for the purchase of goods, at the rate of 
tioo dollars per day. Its location is the most cen- 
tral and nearest to all places of business and 
amusements. Merchants and Traders will find it 
to their ipterest to try It. J. W. Batchelor is 
the Proprietor. * 



WE^desire to cafl the special attention of busi- 
ness men to the superior facilities of the Advo- 
cate Establishment for every description of Job 
Printing. We have just received a large invoice 
of first-class material for printing Letter Heads, 
Bill Heads, Statements, Circulars, Business Cards, 
Envelopes, Ac., and we are prepared to duplicate 
the prices of Cincinnati and Louisville. AH that 
we ask is a chance to show what we can do. Call 
and examine specimens and learn our prices. 
Orders by mail promptly filled* and work return- 
ed per express. * 



Will and IJemiiitl, 



The prospect for an active fall trade in 
Danville is good, if we may judge by the 
largfe supplies of -goods our merchants, 
grocers, and other tradesmen are now re- 
ceiving. 



We print on the fourth page of the Ad- 
vocate to-day, under the head of “Cur- 
rent Topics” artiples from the Richmond 
Register and Frankfort Yeoman that have 
the ring of the true metal. 



To-day (Friday) will bring joy to the 
hearts of the “small boys” and it is con- 
fidently Mpected that a number of lai 
will be 



Roblnsoi 

midst. 



i” will spread bis 



Hon. M. J. Durham left, last Wed- 
nesday, for Baltimore, to attend the an- 
nual meeting of the Grand Lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows in the 
United States, which will convene in 
that city next Monday. 



Dr. H. P. Bosley aud wife, of this 
city, will leave Garrard next week for 
San Antonio, Texas, to remain a number 
of months. The visit is made with the 
hope of restoring the health of Mrs. B., 
who has been for several years an invalid. 



Mr. Felix G. Fox, formerly of this 
city, we see from a late St. Louis paper, 
was one of the incorporators of the Mu- 
nicipal Gas-light Company, a new organ- 
ization in that city. The capital stock is 
fixed at $1,000,000. 



The number of students in Centre Col- 
lege proper had run up to one hundred 
last Tuesday,— a larger’number than had 
matriculated up to second week of last 
session. There are twenty-two seniors 
this year,— the largest elass since the 
war. 



The Danville Classical and Military 
Academy has opened under the most fa- 
vorable circumstances. There will be a 
larger number of boarders than formerly, 
and by the end of the month the matricu- 
lation of cadets will be fully up to the 
average. 



Our worthy colored town carrier, John 
Toliver, has received the contract from 
the Government for carrying the mails to 
and from the Depot to the Post Office, in 
this city. His bid was $125 per year, and 
was the lowest of eleven bids sent to the 
Department. 



We print elsewhere the particulars of 
the murder of Col. John Engleman, a 
well-known citizen of Lincoln, compiled 
by our accurate Stanford reporter. Mr. 
Engleman was in the 70th year of his 
age, and was married to Mary F. Clark, 
in 1828, who survives him, but is a help- 
less cripple. She and her sons have the 
sympathy of a large circle of friends in 
ail this part of the State. 



Marshal Williams arrested a man 
named John Trimble, from Mercer, in 
Danville, last Saturday, on a warrant 
sworn out against him by Mrs. A. E. 
Philips, charging him with abducting 
her daughter, Nancy, for carnal inter- 
course. Both were taken to Harrods- 
burg, and it was expected that Trimble’s 
trial would take place this week. The 
worst features of the case are: The girl 
is a niece of Trimble, only about 15 years 
of age, while he is a married man with a 
family and about 50 years of age. 



We are pleased to announce that we 
have on file for publication in the next 
issue of the Advocate a well-written 
biographical sketch of Dr. Ephraim Mc- 
Dowell. This sketch was written for our 
columns, and will correct some inaccura- 
cies contained in two articles, of recent 
dates, that were re-printed in the Advo- 
cate from the Frankfort Yeoman. The 
criticism, which has been prepared for 
the Advocate, is based upon a careful 
study of the history of the career of the 
eminent surgeon which was recorded 
many years since by a learned aud faith- 
ful biographer, who gathered the materi- 
als for his memoir from the most reliable 
sources with painstaking care; and also 
from conversation with some of the few 
remaining cotemporaries of Dr. Mc- 
Dowell. 



In an editorial paragraph in the last 
issue of the Advocate concerning Mr. 
Jas. Clemens, Jr., there were some inac- 
curacies as to dates. Mr. Clemens left 
Danville in October, 1811 for Sparta, 
Tenn., where he remained until April, 

1815. From there he went to St. Gene- 
vieve, and thence to St. Louis, in April, 

1816, where he has remained ever siuce, 



We print on the first page of the 
Advocate to-day the graphic account 
of the late battle between Gen. Gibbon’s 
command and the Nez Perces Indians, — 
one of the most brilliant fights recorded 
in the annals of border warfare. This 
was the fight in which Lieut. West 
Jacobs and Sam. Heron, of this place, 
were engaged, to which a brief allusion 
was made in the last issue of the Advo- 
cate. 



TnEcolored people have an irrepressible 
inclination to attend Court, and during 
the late session a number of them were 
in the habit of indulging in comfortable 
naps. Our vigilant Sheriff, thinking it 
disrespectful to the Court to turn it iuto 
a lodging Iiousp, had several of them be- 
fore his Honor, who reproved them, and 
gave them to understand that they must 
seek other lodgings than the “sanctuary 
of justice.” 



Our friend, Mr. John Duncan, late 
editor of the Farmer's Home Journal , is 
now a special correspondent of the Cou- 
rier-Journal and editor of the Agricultu- 
ral Department of same journal. lie is 
a valuable acquisition. We are glad, al- 
so, to note the fact that he contemplates, 
at an early day the publication of a 
Farmers’ Monthly Magazine. An enter- 
prise of this character, under his compe- 
tent and excellent management, ought 
to succeed. 



Abe. Williams, of color, made a nar- 
row escape from the penitentiary at the 
late term of our Circuit Court. He was 
saved only by the color of the hog he had 
stolen. The indictment was for a red 
hog, whereas it was proved that he had 
stolen a black Berkshire, and on this tech- 
nicality he was permitted to go free. He 
was a delighted darkey, sure, when hs 
found out that he had saved “his bacon” 
by the mistake of the jury. 



Mrs. B. M. Noel, of Boyle county, 
less than 45 years of age, has given birth 
to 27 children. — Henderson Neics. 

You must locate your item elsewhere. 
Boyle county has not the honor of claim 
ing Mrs. Noel. 



The Murphy meetings were closed at 
Somerset last Sunday night. About 600 
signers to the pledge. The meetings 
were conducted by Mess. Wenzell and 
Rogers. 



The death of Mrs. Roht. Rankins, for- 
merly of Scott county, this State, occur- 
red at Halena, Ark., last Tuesday night. 
She was well known in Danville as a visi- 
tor to the family of Elder J no. I Rogers. 



We extract from the Cincinnati papers 
of last Saturday the following item con- 
cerning the Southern Railroad freight 
tariff: “In consequence of the various 
reports through the city papers, and com- 
plaints made to the hoard in regard to 
the high rate of freight tariff charged by 
the Cincinnati Southern Railway, the 
Committee on Southern Railroad met 
yesterday morniug at the oflice of the 
above board to discuss the same. It was 
finally resolved that the Secretary be in- 
structed to address a letter to President 
W. H. Clements requesting him to exam- 
ine into aud investigate the cause of these 
complaints, and the committee adjourned 
subject to the call of the Chairman.” 



Dr. Gaillard, in the last number of 
the Bi-Weekly, pays a compliment to the 
Advocate that is highly appreciated. 
Coming from the distinguished source 
that it does we hope our readers will 
pardon the vanity that we may manifest 
in printing it in our columns: 

A Secret Worth Knowing.— It is 
not the duty or the function of a medical 
journal to say anything of secular news 
papers; but even though the editor of the 
lii- Weekly may be scolded for doing this, 
he will, at the expense of a scolding, tell 
the Profession a secret worth knowing. 
It is this: If any one wishes a first-class, 
enterprising weekly newspaper, one whose 
editor is always on the qui vivi, and ac- 
tive in catering for the leading public, he 
should take the “Kentucky Advo- 
cate,” published and edited by Messrs. 
Marrs & Bruce, Danville, Ky. It is a 
paper of high tone and purity, and is re- 
markable for its judicious and able sup- 
port of the Medical Profession. 






service at the 
now generally 



On and after next Monday we will have 
two trains a day each way, on the South- 
ern road, North of this point, and we 
will receive our Cincinnati aud Eastern 
mails in Danville between 11 a. m., and 
12 m. It is not determined that we will 
have two trains south of Danville, but 
the probability is there will be only one 
and that a “mixed” train. Of course 
trade and travel will have a good deal to 
do with it, and if it is found necessary in 
order to meet the demands of either or 
both, other trains will doubtless be run. 



We learn that a large number of the 
better class of the colored population in 
Fayette, JeSsaipine, Bourbon, &c., are 
going to Kansas, This will be a serious 
blow to the agricultural interests, as it 
will deprive that t?cti0n of some of its 
mrist reliable lane:' * Jvtj* cl 



Micajah Roivsey succeeded in get- 
ting a new £r; \i h ^ case.:' Com 

..V. — 



rerrve is mafle up c-^"' - 03e who work ai 
home, and ws have not the least doubt 
will succeed in Kansas, or anywhere else 
they may go. It is unfortunate that the 
lazy, trifling fellows cannot be induced to 
go, and leave the more industrious labor- 
ers with us. But this will never occur. 



The advance Agent of Prof. Baldwin, 
the great modern exposer of spiritualism, 
is in Danville, and is billing the town for 
an exhibition on Wednesday night of 
next week, the 19th, at James’ Hall. 
Wherever Prof. Baldwin has been he has 
completely exposed this humbug, and has 
delighted the people with his inimitable 
performances. The press speak in un- 
qualified terms of praise, not only of the 
Professor, hut also of Miss Clara Bald- 
win, who accompanies him, and whose 
specialty is the Katie King mystery, 
that so wonderfully “took in” the cele- 
brated Roht. Dale Owen. 



The negro, Jerry Brown, who killed 
Mr. John Engleman, Sr., was brought 
through Danville, last Monday, having 
been captured in Pulaski, the evening 
previous. He had got on the train at the 
Tunnel on Saturday night and got off at 
Somerset, and then returned some dis- 
tance North on the railroad, where he 
was captured. He was evidently making 
off. He was badly frightened when we 
saw him. 11 is appearance was not pre- 
possessing. He has a villainous face, 
that indicated a brutal nature. He was 
a Virginia negro, and came to this coun- 
try as a railroad laborer. He had re- 
cently been living with Dr. Barbour, near 
Hall’s Gap. 



Jas. Harlan, Sr,, died at the resi- 
dence of his nephew, Jacob Harlan, Esq., 
in this county, on Wednesday, the 10th 
inst., in the 79th year of his age. The de- 
ceased was one of our oldest and best 
known countymen, and was highly es- 
teemed as an honest man, a good citizen, 
and a devoted follower of Christ. Ho 
was identified with the Reformation 
movement of Alexander Campbell quite 
early and adhered through his long life 
with tenacity to the principles of primi- 
tive Christianity as taught by him. He 
was, for a number of years, an Elder of 
the Christian Church, in this city, and 
died in office. In his life he had his re- 
verses of fortune, but they did not seem 
to weaken his faith or lessen his devo- 
tion to the Great Master. His faithful 
wife and friends are blessed with the 
positive assurance that he has exchanged 
the disappointments and sorrows of this 
life for the “rest that remaineth to the 
people of God.” 

Our Circuit Court is still in session, 
but will probably adjourn to-day. The 
juries were discharged last Wednesday. 
A good deal of business has been cleared 
from the docket, aud four persons of color 
have been sent to the penitentiary for 
grand larceny, viz: Frank Jones, 2years; 
America Craig, 2 years; Edgar Cecil, 18 
months; Ilenry Eater, 3 years. The most 
important civil suit that was tried was 
the consolidated causes of R. C. Hart vs. 
J. L. Ward & Co., and R. T. Hart vs. 
Mrs. S. P. Grigsby, involving about 
$28,000, and being suits brought to re- 
cover that amount from defendant on 
notes endorsed as a feme sole. After 
having the matter fully presented by the 
able counsel on both sides. Judge Owsley 
decided that the plaintiffs could not re- 
cover, because the action of the Lincoln 
Circuit Court in making defendant a 
feme sole was not legal. An appeal was 
taken. The plaintiffs were represented 
by Ex-Gov. Porter, of A’ersailles. and 
Durham & Jacobs; the defendant by Judge 
Kinkead, of Lexington, John Cowan, 
Van Winkle & Rodes, of this city. 



Lexington Fair.— In company with, 
a number of friends, we attended the 
great Fair at Lexington, on Tuesday. 
The crowd was not large, but the display 
of stock was remarkably fine. The day 
was devoted to Cattle— Sheep— Hogs— 
Farming Implements— Agricultural Pro- 
ducts— Poultry, &c. The show of Cat- 
tle, Sheep and Hogs, was decidedly the 
best ever seen at a Kentucky Fair. Mr. 
A. II. Davenport, formerly of this coun- 
ty, exhibited a large number of South- 
down Sheep and Berkshire Hogs, most of 
them fresh importations. His Sheep 
were imported in August, direct from 
the herd of Lord Walsingham, in Eng- 
land. He captured a number of blue ties. 
The officers were prompt and efficient in 
their duties; the people generous in their 
entertainment. A large number of gen- 
tlemen on this side of the River are in- 
debted to Mr. W. H. Gentry for a splen- 
did dinner. We would like to speak in 
detail of a great many things, in connec- 
tion with the Fair, but our space forbids 
us doing so at .present. 



The hour for evening 
Churches in this city is 
fixed at 7 :30. 

The Presbytery of Transylvania will 
convene in the Presbyterian church of 
Somerset on Friday night, Sept. 21. 

Eld. G. L. Surber, of the Christian 
Church, will begin a protracted meeting 
at Somerset the latter part of this month. 

Regular service at the Methodist E. 
Church, South, in this city, next Sunday. 
It is expected that Rev. J. R. Deering 
will be returned by the Conference now 
in session at Winchester. 

Rev. Stuart Robinson preached his 
first sermon last Sunday night, in Louis- 
ville, since his return from Europe. He 
spoke of the workings of the Pan-Presby- 
terian Council. 

Rev. Wm. R. Henderson, of this 
city, will assist the paster of the Presby- 
terian Church, at Columbia, in a sacra- 
mental meeting, beginning to-day (Fri- 
day) and continuing over Sunday. 

Eld. E. Y. Tinkerton was unani. 
mously elected last Sunday morning by 
the congregation to the pastorate of the 
Christian Church, corner Fifteenth and 
Jefferson streets, Louisville. He lias ac- 
cepted the position and entered immedi- 
ately on his work. 

Lexington Gazelle, 10th: We were 
informed by Elder McGarvey yesterday 
that (25) students have entered the Inde- 
pendent Bible College and that they 
know of enough to run the number up to 
thirty-two or three. This is a good be- 
ginning for the new enterprise. 

The following dispatch was received 
yesterday, (Thursday,) from Rev. J. R. 
Deering, in regard to the appointments 
made by the Conference of the Methodist 
E. Church, South, in session at Win- 
chester, this week: “Harrodsburg Dis- 

trict — Danville, Stanford and Perryville 
preachers retained next year.” 

There will be no preaching at the 
Baptist Church on Sunday next, as the 
pastor is engaged in a meeting at Simp- 
sonvidle, but will fill his pulpit here on 
Sunday, 23d, at which time a series of 
meetings will begin. Rev. Green Clay 
Smith will he present and assist in the 
meetings. 



Ije Siirkte. 



The Live Stock Markets.— Cattle.— At Lou- 
isville, on the loth, the cattle market showed a 
slight decline since last report. Extra shippers, 
*4 50a5 SO; extra butcher, |S 75a4 23; fair to good, 

42 75a3 S3; common, $1 50aS 50; oxen, 43a4 At 

Covington (same date) hest shipping cattle 5 i»6c. ; 
good do. 5a5‘ 4 e; good smooth oxen 4'„a4 fit),- ; 
eoarse fat do, 4a4 ' 4 o ; common oxen and stags, 
3’ 4 a3  4 c; best butcher steers and heifers 4.40a4 ,c; 
good do, 4a4 ;c; good light butcher 3;,a3‘ 4 c; com- 
mon do, 3 h3‘ 4 c; extra cows 4a4j£c; good do, 8 £a 
3’ 4 c; common do, 3a3’ 4 c; scalawags, l ;a’2c; best 

bulls 2^a3c; common do,  4a2j*c /Vt New 

I ork the latest quotations are at same rates as 
those of previous week, or 8  4 al2‘ 4 c per lb. for in- 
ferior to extra native steers, and S  4 a«Xc for some 
50 car loads of Texas, Cherokee and Colorado 
steers; sonic of the early sales of selected steers 
were at 12 jal3c, hut these llgurcs were outside of 
the market; fair to good botchering steers were 
generally sold at lO&aH.^c. Rather more than 
400 fat native steers were taken for the English 
market. Exports for the week were 2,800 quarters 

of fresh beef, and 135 head of live cattle 

Sheep— At Louisville, extra, 43 50a4; stock sheep, 
42 i5a3 15; lambs, extra, 43 50a4; common, 42 50a 

3 A t Covington, extra, 4 ia5c; good, 4a4‘ 4 c; 

common to fair, 3' 4 a3Xc. Lambs— extra, 4 ‘;a4,^c; 

good, fiU ( 4 c; common, 8  4 a3c;c At N. York 

the market was quiet but firm for sheep, and a 
trifle easier for lambs; sheep, 4 faG fc per lb.; 
lambs B’faGijc; a number of car loads of mixed 
sheep ami lambs, 5J£a6^c. Exporters took 100 
head. The shipments for the week were 500 head 

a *'ve Hogs.— At Louisville, extra, 45n5 20; 

common, 44 50a4 75; market closed rather weak. 



XE IT AD V E It TlnjttMKNTS, 



F 



UKNITl'KK! FURNITURE!! 



HU 



IV’ E GOT THEM! 



wife of IssACUAK 1*. Fisher, Esq., of this place, 
Mrs. Fisher’s maiden name was Virginia 
Armstrong McKinney. She was born in Fay- 
ette county. Ky., on the 18th of May, 1815. (Jn the 
30th of July, 1835, she was married to Mr. Fisher. 
Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Fisher settled in what was then Lincoln, hut 
Jiow Boyle county. They resided in the country 
for fifteen years, and then came to Danville. Mrs. 
I'isher had four children, two of whom— a son 



In the death of Crazy Horse the Indi- 
ans lose one of their fiercest and bravest 
chiefs. If Joseph would only die now at 
least one of our generals would be happy. 



BnB .Trrwjwc^. i , e 

Geo. Philips, at Shelby City, in 1871. In 
the last issue we announced that the jury 
had returned a verdict for man-slaughter 
and fixed his punishment at two years in 
the penitentiary. We learn that the 
counsel for Mr. Rowsey were able to es- 
tablish the fact that the Court had erred 
in instructing the jury, upon what was 
considered by the defense a vital point, 
i. e: a combination on the part of the 
Philips party against Rowsey, which jus- 
tified the latter in taking the life of Geo. 
Philips to save his own. The instruc- 
tion as given by the Court did not go far 
enough to reach this fact,; and hence ad- 
mitted that it was a just and reasonable 
ground for a new trial, and so ordered. 
Mr. Rowsey immediately gave bail in the 
sum of $700, and was set at liberty. He 
is confident that he will be able to es- 
tablish the fact of the combination 
against him, and that when he struck 
Geo. Philips with his knife he had the 
best of grounds for believing that it was 
necessary in order to save himself. 



Miss Lulu Vance, the youngest 
daughter of Col. W. L. Vance, of Mem- 
phis, (formerly of Mercer,) was married 
in that city, a few days ago, to Mr. R. 
V. Vredenburg, who is said to he a most 
estimable gentleman. 



Bowling Gbeen Democrat : Never 
before in the history of our city and coun- 
ty have prospects been more bright to the 
people than they are now. Probably 
never before were there such wheat, to- 
bacco. and corn crops juxjwn. 



icatlj: 



Dpnbat Urbaua, Ohio, Momtuv night, August 
2“tll, I'.I, Mrs. Yiruinia Armstrong Fisher, 



The Somerset 
says- 
O' set, 
basTs. " 
the pledge i 
Wenzell and 
.elements 



i up 



The efforts of the Grand Jury, during 
the present session, to ferret out and 
bring to punishment the keepers of the 
negro bawdy houses which so notoriously 
infest the town, deserve the thanks of the 
community, and are the first steps in a 
move which must go on until these infa- 
mous places are cleared out. The Grand 
Jury have done their duty, aud what re- 
mains to be accomplished in this matter, 
must be effected by the town authorities 
aud citizens, and it is gratifying to see 
marked indications that public interest 
is being awakened to the vast extent and 
enormity of this evil in our midst. We 
trust that the necessity for using prompt 
and energetic measures for its suppress- 
ion will be speedily recognized, as it is 
time that something is done towards it, 
if we wish to preserve the good name of 
our town, and what is of far greater im- 
port, the morals and health of our sons, 
and of the youth from a distance intrust- 
ed to our care and supervision. Every 
parent, as well as those in charge of the 
education of these young men, is directly 
interested in seeing that these loathsome 
dens are exterminated. As has been 
stated in a late issue of the Advocate, 
these houses have greatly increased of 
late years in number and inmates, and 
the latter have been allowed to pursue 
their degrading calling so long unchecked 
that they have become audacious and de- 
fiant to an insufferable degree. The 
blight of these foul places is felt every- 
where, not alone on the moral and phy- 
sical well-being of the frequenters, but 
it is seen in the depreciation of all prop- 
erty in their immediate vicinity. They 
are spreading disease and ruin in every 
direction, and half of the evils propagated 
by them have not been enumerated. The 
story of that unfortunate young white 
woman who was found wandering around 
town last week, recently escaped from a 
Lunatic Asylum, as told on the witness 
stand, was a startling corroboration of 
many of the statements made here in re- 
gard to them. That many of them have 
long been receptacles for stolen goods of 
every description is more than suspected, 
and that idle and worthless negroes 
swarm about them constantly is a noto- 
rious fact. Here they are soon trained, 
if not already proficient, in all manner of 
vicious habits. In the cities, when these 
establishments become too obnoxious, the 
police have a way of raiding them, and 
subjecting those arrested to a course of 
law. Cannot this system be inaugu- 
rated here or some other means as ef- 
fectual be put in operation? We shall, 
from time to time, as occasion demands, 
revert to this subject as long as these vile 
resorts are allowed to flourish. 



the by-paths of 



blazed all the trees on the route 
this they are men of intellect, 
fluent speakers.” 



ey have trav?: 

perance, and hi 

Besides 
aud also 



The Lebanon Times and Kentuckian 

says: “The steam mill of Mr. Samuel 

Maupin, of Taylor county, was totally 
destroyed on Monday last, by the explo- 
sion of the boiler. While under a high 
head of steam the mill was stopped for 
the purpose of mending a hand when the 
accident happened. Mr. Josiah Brock- 
man, standing a hundred yards off, was 
instantly killed, while the elder Maupin 
and his two sons, J. D. and William, were 
seriously, if not fatally, scalded. Richard 
Wise, a mill hand, was also very badly 
scalded. We learn that the boiler and 
engine were both old and much the worse 
for wear.” 



It is quite clear that fighting on a 
grand scale has been going on about 
Plevna since Friday morning, hut the 
correspondent who reported the capture 
of the fortress on Sunday appears to have 
been largely in advance of his facts. 
Plevna is still held by the Turks, though 
they are slowly losing their grip. Osman 
Pasha is so hemmed in that he is not ex- 
pected to do much telegraphing. The 
probability is that a very destructive con-’ 
flict is in progress. We presume the Rus- 
sians will heat the Turks at Plevna, for 
they have for five weeks been gathering 
up their strength for that purpose. If 
they do not win a victory, they will suf- 
fer a disaster that will place them on the 
defensive until the campaigning season 
is over. 



Bloody Work in Nelson— Swift 
and Just Retribution.— Last Sunday 
morning before daylight, Chas. and Geo. 
Murrell, two Taylor county desperadoes, 
and Sam Ford went into Bardstown and 
robbed a large tailor shop there. A col- 
ored boy discovered them, and awoinrTflW 
Town Marshal, Geo. W. Hunter, who 
with the aid of a brother-in-law attacked 
the robbers and ran them out of town, 
woundiDg Charles Murrell in the arm. 
During the day a possee of men started 
in pursuit of the three men, and came up 
on them asleep, about five miles from the 
city. A fight ensued, in which Charles 
Murrell received a load in the left side of 
his face, shooting off the lower part of 
his jaw and killing him. He was just in 
the act of firing at the Marshal. The 
other two men were arrested and lodged 
in the Bardstown jail. Threats to lynch 
them have been numerous, and Judge 
Wickliffe Monday appointed a special 
guard of eight men and a special sheriff 
to guard them. The Murrells have been 
very desperate men, and, with Holtz- 
hauser, were liberated last December 
from the Bardstown jail by friends, be- 
ing then under arrest for murder. Ford 
is also a desperate man. 



How it is Hone. 



bid daughter— only arc living. The deceased 

‘ ” ’ Cli 



united with the Presbyterian Church, in company 
will her husband, in this place, in the fall of 184l . 
Tpe church was then in the midst 



of a revival 

ndneted by Dr. Young, with the assistance of 
Rev. N. 11. Iiall. It was a precious work of grace, 
aiyl many it is believed experienced a radical and 
pwmaaent change of heart. Thus for thirty-one 
years the deceased followed her Divine Master. 
Urftil her twentieth year Mrs. Fisher attended, 
parents, the Baptist Church, hut after 
removal to this county she attended Dr. 
Nil’s church. When she became a member of 
tb«f chinch, she addressed herself to the study of 

■ 1 # . . . i" MaI ll.; A A. A .. .1 l : i : . — A. I _ 1 *. a 



with her i 
lies reniov 
Y op Nil’s e 



thqdoot l ines of religion, and diligently souglit to 
influe per mind with “the truth as it is in Jesus.” 



Tha influence of Divine truth upon her life was 
nppiireht to all who knew her. 



Her pietv was 
conliant and unobtrusive. Her heart was ruled 
ny if strong desire to do good, thus imitating Him 
“wife went about doing good.” She took into her 
fainMy from time to time orphan children, and 
keptpbem with her until they were well grown, 
she bestowed upon them the affectionate and 
watolful care of a mother. How much good she 
was tius enabled to accomplish for the temporal 
and sliritual interests of these persons, eternity 
alonekvill disclose. In their different spheres in 
life tlfey cannot fail to realize the beneficial in- 
llnonde of her kind, patient Christian culture. 
Mrs. jrisuKH was constitutionally timid aud mod- 
est; Bence her many excellencies of character 
weretouly fully known and appreciated by those 
who Wtre more intimately acquainted with her. 
She elljojed the loving regard aud confidence of 
all h«r friends. Among all her acquaintances, it 
l,s said, she had not a single enemy. Although 
she hint been ill lor some days, no one apprehended 
that her end was so near. So far as we know, she 
herself did not realize it. But we have every rea- 
son to believe that grace had wrought a good, 
thorosfgH work in her heart, and hence that she 
was fdjlv ready to respond to the Master’s sum- 
mon*. Mrs. Fisher has passed away, but her 
memory willever be mingled with the savor of a 
good lifp. “And I heard a voice from heaven sav- 
ing unto me, write, Blessed are the dead which 
die in the Lord from henceforth: yea, saith the 
Spiritithat they may rest from their labors; aud 
thocTVjkftrks doiollow them.” * 



_Tir quantity of Pprk and other im- 
K food consumed is enormous and 
luces its inevitable results in innu- 
tble types of disease, especially those 
lie blood, exhibited in Pimples, Sores, 
Tched, etc., all of which, however, 
Ld rapidly aud surely to Dr, Bull’s 
ad Mixture. • * 



xe ii 1 1 ) rj; it r i   x its xrs. 



J   OAUDTNt. 

J A FIRST-RATE PLACE, 

for a few day 



‘YE PEOPLE 0E 77!” 



PUBLIC SALES. 



n AKRA8D 

LAM) FOR SALE. 



high 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 15th* 1877, about 

IOO ACRES OF LAND, 



or all that portion of the tract of S. Doty, dec’ll 
lying on the Northern side of the Lancaster & 
Richmond Turnpike, and near Hyattsville Depot. 

TERMS 



■One-third cash, the balance in one 
and two years, with interest at the rate of eight 
per cent, tier annum. Sale will take place at the 
Hyattsville Depot, at 11 o’clock, A. M. 

JESSE DOTY, Trustee. 



JjlOK SALK OR KENT. 

HOUSE AMD DOT 



ON the north-west corner of Walnut and Fou rt 
streets, opposite the Reformed • hnreh. If no 
sold by the 1st of September* it will be for rent. 
Apply to 

J ”*) «. W. WELSH, Sr. 



ALSO, at the same time and place, and on the 
same terms, the heirs of S. Doty, dec’ll., will sell 
100 ACRES, adjoining the lands of Win. Hyatt, 
Napoleon Price aud Trammel Conn, 
aiig.l'-tf. 



FXJI3LIC SALF 



—OF A— 



GOOD BOYLE CO., FARM. 



I WILL sell to the highest bidder, on TU 
DAY, OCTOBER 2nd, 1877, 

THE FARM 



ES- 



bclonging to the estate of B. West, dec’ll., sitna- 
ted uear the Perryville and Mitchellsbnrg pike. 



in Boyle county, 'Ky., about U 
former place, containing about 



miles from the 



THINK OF THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO 
go to the city and buy their 



Furniture 



But now there is 



no more use for them to do it, 
for here is 



M’CULLOUGH 



Who has been in the Furniture Business all his 
lile, and has just come from the city with a 



Handsome Lot of Furniture, 



front the commonest to the finest, and the prices 
he is selling at are 



FAR LOWER! 



than the same (Joods can he bought for in Louis- 
ville or Cincinnati. 



THERE IS NOTUIXG LIKE IT. 



1 here never was and never will be at the prices 
he is now selling at, for they will go up on the 1st 
of October. Call at liis stand, 



THIRD ST., OPPOSITE THE P. 0., 



AND LOOK FOB YOURSELF. 



300 ACRES OF COOD LAND, 



with comfortable dwelling and all necessary out- 
buildings, linely watered, and a most EXCEL- 
LENT OUCIIAKI), and is well adapted for grain 
and stock. This section of the countv is noted 
for its temperance ami morality, good schools, Ac. 
There is also a good gravel roa'd leading from the 
pike to the dwelling. About 225 acres in cultiva- 
tion, balance set in grass, with first-rate timber. 

At the same time and place, 1 will also sell 
several good mares and work mules, about 40 
head of cattle, 200 sheep, a large lot of corn, oats, 
hay, farming implements, Ac. 

For further particulars call on or address either 
of the undersigned. 

JAMES WEST, 

auff.Sl-td. R. M A RKSBU RY, 

1. D. English, Auc’t. Terry vHle, 



XjlOIt SALK. 

A GOOD BRICJv IlESI DEJNCE 



7! I 1 !?'! ^t rcct ? an, l a comfortable FRAME 
RESIDENCE on Fourth street, Danville, Ky. 
J*otii are in excellent neighborhoods and good re- 
pair. A!m , a HuU.SE in Miclbv City. Apply to 
mnr.lG-tl ,j. W. PROCTOR. 



JIOR SAi 

The 



,10. 



1 alualdc Property 



Ol Mrs. W. L. Moore, mi Main street, adjoining 
the property ol Mr. W. I. Moore. It eontains 
about three acres ol ground. The dwelling new I v 
painted. For particulars applv to 

„„ S. V’. ROWLAND, 

n I ,r - 20 -  Or W. H. HARRIS. 



Jj301t SALE. 

LINCOLN' 



FARM, 



( ON T AIN ING 200 acres, situated two miles fioni 
Stanlord, on the Lancaster pike. Has new fr; m •. 
house, containing seven rooms, conveniently ar 
ranged. The farm is well -improved, well-watei d 
and is mostly well-set in grass. For further par- 
ticulars Apply to 

I). B. BOWMAN, 



V 



fob. II -2m. ! 
HOB SA LK 



Stanford, Ky. 



Ivy. 



JjlXECUTOlfS AND 

ADMINISTRATOR’S SALE. 



IN G A Hit A It 1 1 COUNT V. 



I OFFER at pri vate sale 130 acres   • t wood land 
moderately improved, situated in Garland comi- 
ty, on the pike leading from Lancaster to B y- 
antsville, 3 miles from the former place. It is 
known as the Middleton tract. Will sell all, or 
divide it to suit purchasers. The place is very 
desirable, and I am in earnest about selling. 
.ian.2o-tr.) b. f. Robinson. 



I^Oli SALE. 

COTTAGE RESIDENCE 



WE, Tlios. Me Roberts, Executor of the estate 
of A. McRoberts, dec’d., and W. L. Caldwell, Ad- 
ministrator of the estate of Mrs. Sarah  /. iMc Rob- 
erts, dec’d., will sell publicly to the highest and 
best bidder, on 



TUESDAY, SEPT. 25, 1877, 



on the premises where decedents lived and died, 
in Boyle county, Ky., on Salt River, all the 



1* E BCKO.V A E I» IS O l» E IS T 1 



consisting of 4 head of Horses, 1 Mule Colt. G head 
of cattle, (some part Alderucys and good milk- 
ers,) 10 or 12 head of good Sheep, about 3(1 head of 
good Hogs, % of 14 acres of Corn, two stacks of 
H — — ... . . 



Hay, one Roe'kaway and Harness; and also the 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS, 



Jpring 

Wagon, Blows, *S:c., Ac. All the HOUSEHOLD 
aud KITCH EN FU RN ITU R E, several stands Bees 



TERMS— Said property will be sold on a credit 
of four months for all sums over $10- that amount 



ami under cash in hand. Purchasers to 
notes with approved security, payable in 
before removal of property. 

Sale to begin at or near *10 o’clock, A. M. 



gives 
ha nk 



le Cottage, centrally loe,, 
t streets and in one of tli 



the 



A BEAUTIFUL li 
ted, on one of the he 

most desirable and healthy neighborhoods ... 
Danville. I he place is well improved, ami suited 
lor a small lamiiy . Plenty of tinest fruit and a 
good cistern on the place. Parties desiring a 
pleasant little home would do well (o examine 
Ibis place before pun basing elsewhere. 

Enquire at this office. (Je22-tf. 



JjlOK SALK. 

CENTRAL 



li -TEL. 

DANVILLE, KY. 



U (SUING to change my business, 1 will sell 
the above Hotel on the most reasonable terms. It 
eontains 3U moms, mid lias just been painted and 
fitted up all over. H i„ one of the very hest loca- 
tions in (lie stole, and lias always done the lead- 
-iig business of the place. For terms aud partic- 
ulars apply to or address 
mar,24.) .1. l\ THOREL. 



Ty ESIRA BI.K 

FAllM FOR SALE. 



sep. 7-til. 



THUS. McKOBKRTS, Ex’r, 
W. L. CALDWELL, Adm’r. 



jyOYLE COURT COMMON PLEAS. 

Commissioner’s Sale. 



Dr. R. W. Dunlap, Pl’iL, vs. T. .1. S. Pendleton, 
Ae., Def’ts. Stagg, Ward A Co., Pl’ffs., vs. E. 
A. Pendleton, Ac., Dcfts. 



RY' virtue of a judgment of the Bovle Circuit 
Court, at the March Term, 1873, thereof, in the 



above causes, (now pending in the Bovle Common 
Pleas Court,) I will, on MONDAY, "SEPT. 17! 



7th. 



1877, at 11 o’clock, A. M„ or thereabout, (being 
County Court day,) sell to the highest bidder, at 
public outcry, before the Court House door, in 
Danville, Ky., the following property, to-wit: 



A HOUSE AND LOT 



J recharges yon nothing for looking at his goods, 
hut will consider it a pleasure to price and Show 



♦•»**"» to oae anil all. 



NEAR the centre of the town, 
boarders. Enquire at 



sep.4.) 



THIS OFFICE. 



[Ml’. COTSWOLD BUCK. 



SWANWICK PRINCE, 



WILL be permitted to serve a limited number of 
ewes at $ s to insure a lamb, at Elmwood, 3 miles 
from Danville, o«i the Stanford pike. 

Swauwick Prince, by Prince, out of noted and 
prize ewe of England and Canada. Bred by Rus- 
sell Swauwick, England. 
sep.14.) R. GENTRY A SON. 



1 



TlOlt SALE. 



Small Boyle County Farm. 



NEAR Danville, on the Perrvville pike, about 
three-fourths of a mile from depos of C. S. U’y, 
containing 



THIRTY -FIVE ACRES 



of No. 1 land, well improved with a comfortable 
new frame house of eight rooms, barn, stable and 
other out-buildings, line young orchard, and an 
abundance of water. Parties desiring to pur- 
chase can get further particulars from R. W. Gra- 
ham, \Y. K. Bvani, or the undersigued on the 
premises. 

sept.l4-3m.) A. COOK. 



pUBLIC SALE OF 

KNOB LAND. 



AS AGENTS, we will sell at public sale, in Dan- 
ville, on MONDAY, SEPT. 17, 1877, (County Court 
day.) at 11 o’clock, A. M., about 



130 Acres of Knob Land! 



bcltnging to the estate of the late J. F. Bell, and 
near the C. S. R. W. Terms made known on day 
of fale. 

J. E. LEE, 

J. L. ALLEN, 

$p.l4.) Ageuts. 



J UBLIC SALK OF 

DESIRABLE 



BUILDING LOTSI 



DOWNTON’S ADDITION 

TO DANVILLE. 



On Wednesday, October 17, 1877, 



WE will sell at public auction about 



ofland, immediately adjoining the depot grounds 
ofthe Cincinnati Southern Railway, in Danville, 
K'., which will be divided iuto lots suitable for 
bisiness or residence purposes. 



This land is vory desirably located between and 
aejoiningthe Perryville fetn-pikeon the north, and 
tie Lebanon pike on the south, and on both sides 
ofthe Cincinnati Southern Railway, with a never 
failing spring of water on the premises, making 
a lesirable location for manufacturing purposes. 



The sale is made for the purpose of closing up a 
pirtnership, and will be carried out in good faith, 
without reserve or by-bidding. Title perfect. 



This property will he sold for one-fourth of the 
purchase money in hand, and the remainder in 
epinl instalments of one, two, and three years, 
with 8 per cent, interest— or cash, at the option of 
the purchaser. 

Mrs. M. J. DOWNTON. 



sep.14.) 



The first object in life witli the Ameri- 
can people is to “get rich;” the second, 
how to regain good health. The first can 
be obtained by energy, honesty and saving; 
the second, (good health,) by using 
Green’s August Flower. Should you 
be a despondent sufferer from any of the 
effects of Dyspepsia, Liver Complaint, 
Indigestion, &c., such as Sick Headache, 
Palpitation of the Heart, Sour Stomach, 
Habitual Costiveness, Dizziness of the 
Head, Nervous Prostration, Low Spirits. 
&C., you need not suffer another day. 
Two doses of August Flower will re- 
lieve you at once. Sample bottles, 10 
cents. Regular size, 75 cents. Positively 
sold by all first-class Druggists in the U. 
S. Call on Samuel & Warren, Danville, 
or W. Burnside, Lancaster. * 



a 



(tiqit'14. 

t ; 



PItIVA TE SALES. 



E 



7H)K 



SALE OR RENT. 



THE TWO-STORY BRICK BUSINESS HOUSE 
and DWELLING combined, ou Main street, op- 
posite Central House, Danville. Immediate pos- 
session can be given. Apply to 
aug.3-tf. E. B. RUSSEL. 



JpiOR SALE. 

Valuable Farm in Lincoln Co. 



BEING desirous of reducing my landed estate, 
I offer at private sale my farm, situate about two 
miles from Milledgevillc, about 2K miles from 
Hustouville— a portion of the farm running up 
uear the depot grounds of the C. S. R. W. Said 
tract contains 325 acres, is excellently watered, 
with fair improvements, and is nearly all well 
set in grass. For further particulars call on or 
address 

A. W. CARPENTER, 

je22-tf.) Milledgevillc, Ky. 



JlOK SALK. 

BOYLE COUNTY FARM! 



I OFFER at private sale my 
ing about 



FARM, contain- 



144 AAJRES 



OF GOOD LAND, with moderate improvements. 
The plaee is well watered and well adapted for 

Ing purposes. " 

ks 



grazing purposes. It is situated l,q miles North 
of Parksvillc, on the cross pike. 

For further particulars call on address the un- 
dersigned at l’arksville, Ky. 
sep.7-tf. S. E. BROWN. 



f or 

SALE OR RENT. 



I OFFER for sale or rent the 

LARGE AND VALUABLE PROPERTY 



on Fourth street, situated only two squares from 
the Court Honse, Danville, Ky., and now occupied 
by the subscriber. It has ten rooms, besides pun- 
try, kitchen and two servants’ rooms; all neces- 
sary out-houses; two cisterns at the house, and 
one in the stable; a good sized garden, ami a large 
yard handsomely set with trees and shrubbery. 

There is also attached and adjoining, a 



FOUR-ACRE PASTURE LOT, 

Possess- 



with a never-failing spring within it. 
ion can be given very soon. 

gfcay*-Idonot offer my property for sale with 
the intention of leaving Danville. 
sep.7-tf. SAML. AYRES. 



C. Tatum. R. W. ltaukin. T. Embry. J. E. Norris. 

TATUM, EMBRY & CO., 

C3-DETTEI2.A.IJ 

Live Stock Commiss’n Merchants 

—FOR THE SALE OF— 

CATTLE, HOGS AND SHEEP I 

BOVJUtON STOCK YARDS, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



ALL stock shipped to us shall have our ner- 
soual aud best attention, and returns shall be 



made promptly on sales of stock. 
Miipp: 



Persons .-hipping us should notify by mail or 
telegraph, with instructions as to remitting pro- 
ceeds, AC. 

We will honor drafts on us for two-thirds value 
of stock, if accompanied by bill of lading. 



fjff 



fy AE6 B-C0 



Watches, ('locks. Jewelry ami Silrer- 

w lire lor sale and repaired. Also the 
very best Needles, Oils and Acces- 
sories for all Sewing Machines. Any 
Goods not kej)t in stock ordered oh 
approval. No goods sold or work 
(lone on credit. K. FLAIG. 









tiru V ii \ ) , .. ovUit ill .mil r.in i •! y , iimiy iiic, 

‘enu.; J. S. Barrett, Cashier German Security 
lauk; John W. Coppage, Riley Station, Ky.; E. 
lest, Garrard Co. Ky.; It. M. Flautt, Memphis, 



References.— J. J. Barrett, (Pres. Citizens’ 
Nat. Bank, Louisville, Ky., Pres. Bourbon Stock 
Yard Company); Woodard and Embry, Nashville, 
Tenn.; J. 

Bank ' 

Best,. 

Tenn.; Joe. Scott, Bourbon Co., Ky.; J. J. Wyatt, 
Fredonia, Ky.; Geo. Birch, Supt. Bourbon Stock 
Yard Company; M. A. Downing, Supt. Indianap- 
olis Stock Yard Co.: J. F. Owens, Parksvillc, Ky.; 
Stegar aud Reed, Princeton, Kv.; L. A. Moore, 
Stanford, Kv.; Wm. H. Fant, Bowling Green, 
Ky.; John i). Harris, Madisen Co., Ky.; P. P. 
Nunnely, Winchester, Ky.; James llays, Edin- 
burgh, Ind. (sept. 14. 



50 Acres of Choice Land, 



TO be put in Barley this fall. Applv^to 



j  ’* •) 



LUCAS. 



in Shelby City, Ky., the property of Eliza A. Pen- 
dleton, and bounded as follows: On the West by 
the Danville A Huston vide turnpike road; on the 
South by the lot of James Coppage; on the East 
by the lot of James Coppage, ami on the North by 
the lot of Anna C. White, wile of T. M. White, or 
sufficient thereof to produce the sums of money 
ordered to be made. 



TERMS.— ^ The sale will be made on a creditor 
eight mouths, the purchaser being required to ex- 
ecute bond with approved security, having the 



force of a judgment, and bearing 6 per cent, in- 
terest from date of sale, with a hen reserved on 



the property until the purchase money is paid. 

JOIJN COWAN. Commissioner, 

KI.IC SALK OF A ' ’ — r r*;- 



AS Executor of John Jackson, dec’d, I offer for 
sale the farm of said decedent, situated on the 
Danville and Pleasant Hill turnpike, one milo 
from Danville. This faint is in two tracts ol 100 
acres each, divided by tie turnpike, with com- 
lortable Dwelling, is well watered ami fenced, 
and in every respect a desirable place. The two 
tracts may be sold separately or together. Apply 
to 1 1 J 



jel-tf.) 



C. S. JACKSON, Executor. 



YALUA15LK 

Mill Property for Sale. 



IIA\ ING rone huleil to chance our business, we 
Wish to sell our Mill and Distillery I’nqiertv on 
Dix River, Garrard eoiintv, Kv., at the oros’sinir 
Irom itarredshurc to Bryantsvi'lle, Willi 40 in- res 
of cliff aud bottom land, one or three y-ood Difell- 
jiig Houses, good apple orchard, stables, iee 
houses, &c. Taking everything into rnnsidcra- 
tiou, it is one ol' Ibo best loeations for milling amt 
distilling in Kentucky. 

Any one wishing to engage in the above busi- 
ness would do well to call and examine property 
or address us at lSryant-ville, Kv. A good bar- 
gain enu lie had bv Mfimedialo application. 
feh.23-tl.) D. c. II. K. KING. 



* raid: bargain in 

^ DANVILLE PROPERTY. 



THE undersigned having gone to Texas, is «i 
sirous of selliujt his property in Danville, co 
Sisting of a largtv 



pn 



A. FINE 

BOYLE CO. FARM. 



A8 Agent for the heirs of the late Dr. Daniel 
Yeiser, 1 will sell at public sale on the premises, 
on WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER l»th, 1877, 



THE FARM, 



situate about one mite north of Danville, on the 
Lexington turnpike, and 



Containing About 425 Acres 



of No. 1 land. The boundaries make it nearly 
square, the turnpike forming the line on the east. 
About 300 acres are in grass, and the remainder in 
a line state of cultivation. It is wonderfully pro- 
(luctive, ami the larger part of it cannot be ex- 
celled in this or any other county. What thin 
land thero is on the place is well set in grass, 
with a line stream of water running through it. 
The entire place is well watered and fenced. The 
improvements consist of a 



Good 



Brick Dwelling House! 

,ry out! 
i will 



with all the necessary outbuildings in the way of 
take pleasure in show- 



St aides. Sheds, Ac. 
ing the farm to any one desiring to purchase, or 
parties at a distance desiring further particulars 
can address the undersigned at Danville. 

Also, will he sold at the same time a valuable 



TltA  T OF li\OII I.A\I  



containing 316 acres, convenient to the railroad, 
aud a lot of House and Kitchen Furniture, Farm- 
ing Implements, Ac. 



Terms liberal and made known on day of sale. 
jy20.) IIENRY YEISER, Agent. 

T. D. English, Auc’t. 



1-’TJ13LIC SALE 



—OF A— 



GOOD HOY LE FARM. 



I WILL sell at public sale, to highest bidder, on 

THURSDAY, MOV. Dili, 1S77, 

privately before 



on the premises, (if not sold 
that time,) 



MY FARM! 



situated in Boyle county, 4 miles Ea4 of Dan- 
ville, on the Lexington turnpike, iu a most ex- 
cellent neighborhood, convenient to schools, mills 
Ac. The tract contains 



300 ACRES OF COOD LAND, 



which is susceptible of division, if deemed best, to 
suit purchasers. The farm is well fenced, has 
an abundance of water, and several excellent 
feeding lots enclosed. The land is in a good 
state of cultivation,— 40 acres in hemp, 100 acres 
in grass, 70 in corn, aud the remainder has been 
in small grain the past season. The improve- 
ments cousists of a substantial TWO-STORY 
BRICK FAMILY RESIDENCE, containing 7 
rooms, halls, Ac., with large dry cellars under 
the whole building ;uid cistern at the door; also 
a (iOO I ) BARN, with sheds and cistern attached, 
ami other out-buildings, including an excellent 
HORSE MILL that can be used for grinding corn 
and cleaning wheat and other grain. 



A VALUABLE ORCHARD, 



(considered one of the best in this section of the 
State,) in full bearing,— containing 500 selected 
Apple Trees, 40 Pear Trees, with other small 
fruits, is on the place. 

As I am determined to sell, it would be to the 
interest of all persons seeking a good home to 
call and see it or write me for further particu- 
lars. I will make the terms liberal, giving ample 
time on the larger part ofthe purchase money. 

Will also be sold at the same time a lot of stock, 
crop, farming implements, Ac. 

B. W. GAINES, 

T. I). English, Auc’t. Danville, Ky. 

aug.24-tf. 



SALE. 

Y01JGHI0GIIEJNY COAL! 



IN quantities to suit purchasers. Enquire at 
the Gas Works iu Danville. 

JOHN A. GEARY. 



sep.7-tf. 



JNDUSTKIAL 

IRON 



WORKS. 

J. W. MATTINGLY, Proprietor. 

18 East Seventh Street, 

COVINGTON, 3  Y. 



'ossession can he givc»i at 
 m\ time, and the property, will be sold at a rare 
biirgai". A address It. W. Robert^ 



in Danville. 
inar.23.) 



A. S. ItOBKRTSON. 



OR S A 1.10. 

V aluable School Property. 

'VI- desire to sell tlieqiroporty known ns 

Christian College, Hustonvi le Ky 

W.. I- ^ ... 7 * 



We know no more favorable location for n school 
and we would call the attention of anv whodc- 
81 re lo devote themselves t » teaching. As the 
property has heretofore been offered under re- 
stricti.Mis, we would have it known that now an 
absolute title to the same may be obtained if de- 
sired. leniis made known on application, 
dress 



Ad- 



(Uare 



Miss 11. bURGIN, 

• r.l. M. Cook,) llustonvillo, Ky. 



y^oit sali; 

GOOD HOY LE FARM. 



I- 0 1, M l-  R I. ) o w nod liy ( lark (irrgiiry, si I iintod 
III' Iloilo county, on dio (juirk’s Itun'piko, li\e 
milo. Hill, I Danville, adjacent to “West Kn.l 
1 rotting Bark,” contain in-- 



200 ACRES. 



The improvements are llrst-class, consisting of a 
new frame house, heautifiillv locate* I, witli all 
necessary out-buildings, and the place well 
watered. The land i  No. I and in a high state of 
cultivation, and lies nearly in a square. For fur- 
ther particulars, ad ‘ 
ryville, Ky. 
aug.lO-tf. 



Idress tlie undersigned at Per- 
W B. CECIL. 



'yy r ASHINUTON COUNTY 

FAEM FOE SALE. 



I II A\ !•: a small FARM of 127 ACRK8 of yo,.,l 
land, in Wasliintrioni-ounty, Kv., on Dm turnnike 
road leadiiiK I'rnui Max villa to 'Springfield, wtiii li 
1 wish to sell, q iioro is on the premises 



A GOOD DWELLING HOUSE, NEW BARN, 
NEVER-FAILING WELL GOOD WATER 
AT Til K DOOR, YOUNG ORCHARD, 

AND SMALL VINEYARD. 



I could give possession of the fields in time to 
seed, and of all the huihliiigs hv 1st of December 
next. Terms easy. Parties wishing to buy ean 
rail on J. S. Hiatt, on the place, 2), miles from 
Maxville. Or on me. 

aug.l7-2in. EDMUND HI ATT. 



LIOIl SALE. 



Danville Property. 



sidencc nearer my 

i.i., • J 



WISHING to secure 

church, I will sell on reasonable terms my House 
Lot in the suburbs ol Danville, situated ini Har- 
rodsburg street, and two thirds of a mile from 
the Court House. 'The house is new and conveni- 
ent, containing seven rooms, exclusive of cellar 
and kitchen. The outbuildings are new and well 
arranged. The lot contains five acres of beauti- 
ful land, three of which are in grass, the remain- 
der in yard and garden. The fruit trees are nu- 
merous and well selected, consisting of atiplo 
peacli, pear and cherry trees. Small fruit in 
abundance. Anyone desiring a liome in the pret- 
tiest part of Danville, this is the plaee. Apply to 
tho undersigned on the premises, 
jj 13.) TUGS. M. VAUGHAN. 



J  OYLE AND MERCER 

31.AJND FOR SALE. 



I OFFER for sale my HOME PLACE, situated 
in Boyle aud Mercer, lying immediately between 
the Danvilie and Harrodsburg and Dry Branch 
turnpikes, live miles from Danville, containing 



280 ACRES OF GOOD LAND, 

adjoining the lands of Jos. McDowell, C, 



T. 



\\ ortlungton, &c. The improvements are good, 
consisting of a large FRAMEHOUSE, with all 
necessary out-buildings. Also, a FARM of 



100 ACRES, 



lying on the Danville and Harrodsburg pike, 
which will be sold on long time. For further par- 



ticulars apply on the premises, or address at Dan- 
ville. D. G. NAVE. 

aug.!7-tt. 



^MOST DKSIKA BLK 

SMALL FARM FOR SALE. 



—MANUFACTURER OF— 



Wrought Iron ICuiliii; 



and all kinds of Architectual Iron Work. Also 
agent for the celebrated Champion Fence, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa. Wrought Railing a speciality, at 
bottom prices. Address as above, or apply to C. 
II. Lucas, Main Street, bet. 3d and 4th, Danville, 
Ky. ljy.20. 



1 DESIRE to sell my farm, containing 106 acres, 
in Lincoln county, Ky., on the pike leading from 
Danville to Lancaster, 8 miles from the former 
place and 3  a Irom the latter, and 6 miles from 
Stanford, a good turnpike road the entire distance. 
I do not know of a little farm that is more desira- 
ble; the neighborhood is excellent, the land is 
good, well improved, and in the very highest state 
of cultivation— no briars, Ac., on the place. A 
large spring that never fails, and furnishes abun- 
dance of water at all -seasons for the entire place; 
timber ami plenty of firewood. I raised in one 
Held of 20 acres last year (lKTOf 14 bids, of corn to 
the acre, measured, and another Held of 80 acres 
has yielded as much as 22 bushels to tho acre of 
wheat. Thereia40 acres for corn this year, and 
15 acres for wheat; the rest in grass. C ome and 
see, and learn my terms, which are according to 
the times. 

It. R. NOEL. 

may 25.) Lancaster, Ky. 






* 









The Richmond Tragedy. 



lift 3 Fnrm. 



The Man of 



Rusiness and 
Ulan. 



t In* Rusiness 



The Richmond Register , of 7th inst., 
has the following: “The gravest appre- 

hensions have been entertained by a 
number of citizens of this place lest the 
friends of the parties who met such a 
tragic death in the streets of Richmond 
should form a party for the purpose of 
making a raid on the town and avenging 
what they regard as the uncalled for kill- 
ing of their fellows. As some grounds 
for such fears, telegrams have been re 
ceived from unknown persons warning 
the authorities to be on their guard, as it 
was believed at Stanford that an organ- 
ized effort having this object in view was 
in contemplation by certain desperate 
men in that county. These warnings 
may have been sent by parties whose mo- 
tives were entirely worthy, or they may 
have been originated with others whose 
desire was to create an uneasy excitement 
and a continued dread of impending dan- 
ger. Whatever the motive, we are candid 
in the statement that no further alarm 
need be felt. The citizens of Richmond 
have determined that the good order 
which has prevailed in their midst for a 
number of years past shall continue un- 
interrupted, and that no set of men from 
other counties shall come here and mo- 
lest the officers of the town in the lawful 
discharge at their duty. Whilst they de- 
plore the circumstance which necessitated 
the killing of Walter G. Saunders and D. 
h. Ballard; whilst their sympathy for the 
stricken widow and her two helpless chil- 
dren is most profound, and whilst they 
would offer her every consolation in her 
hour of bereavement and deep sorrow, 
yet they remember that duty to law and 
order and a proper regard for their own 
households demand that they shall stand 
by their officers when, in the discharge of 
the obligations of their office, they risk 
their own lives in the defense of the honor 
and good name of the town. And the 
bad men who are contemplating any fur- 
ther attack in this direction may as well 
understand, once for all, that there is no 
sort of division of sentiment here in re- 
gard to the preservation of peace, and 
that no matter who the men may be who 
come here for unlawful purposes they 
will be dealt with in the most severe 
and summary manner. The disgraceful 
state of society in some other towns of 
Kentucky where outlaws and fugitives 
from justice are permitted to go free, a 
terror to the more peaceful class of cit- 
izens and in defiance of public senti- 
ment, has been a terrible warning to the 
good people of this community, and they 
have resolved as one man that no such 
condition of affairs shall exist in their 
midst. If reckless parties from other 
neighborhoods desire to shoot and slay 
their fellow-men, they must seek some 
other field for their slaughter, or accept 
the fate which is sure to overtake them 
if they seek to make Richmond their 
battle-ground.” 

The Crime at Newcastle. 

There can be little doubt in the minds 
of persons familiar with the circumstan- 
ces, that the four men hung at Newcas 
tie, on Monday night, were all guilty of 
cold-blooded, cruel, and inhuman mur- 
ders. Not only from strong circumstan- 
ces was this conviction forced upon the 
public mind, but through the direct evi- 
dence of one or more members of the Jim 
Simmons gang. It was clearly shown 
that as many as six irtn*a«rs in.tha n— 
degree had* ueen committed in Owen a.id 
Henry counties in the last four or five 
years, and that all of the men so summa- 
rily executed at the hands of a mob were, 
singly and collectively, responsible for 
these crimes. The names of these per- 
sons were James Simmons (the head of 
the gang, aud called, generally, “King 
Jim”), Bob., Joe. and Sam. Goodrich. 
The latter protested his innocence, and 
declared that he had never participated 
in any of the murders. There is a bare 
possibility that he might have been inno 
cent, but circumstances are fearfully 
against him. 

The act of hanging these men was one 
which finds precedent in almost every 
State of the United States. It has grown 
common in nearly every community, and 
it illustrates plainly that society is pas- 
sionate, and that being outraged, it will 
retaliate, and not brook the delays of the 
law. These lessons are salutary and in- 
delible. They strike terror to wrong-do 
ers, and have the effect to paralyze crime; 
aud yet, under the laws of the land, such 
acts, at the hands of a mob, are high 
crimes of themselves. They are contrary 
to the spirit of all law. They are dis 
ruptive of the social organization, and 
they should be everywhere condemned. 

All men who commit crimes under this 
government are entitled to fair trials by 
juries duly chosen under the forms of 
law. No matter what may be the results 
of these trials— no matter how they an- 
tagonize the public conviction— they are 
a part of the social compact, and their 
sacred character ought to be respected. 
The inspired source of all law has given 
us the admonition that “it is better nine- 
ty and nine guilty men should escape 
than that one innocent man should be 
punished.” Without a trial and con vie 
tion by jury, it is impossible to say abso- 
lutely that any man is guilty of murder, 
Public opinion is easily controlled. It 
takes shape from sympathy, and a thou- 
sand circumstances that may exist to the 
prejudice of the prisoner. It is impulsive, 
variable, aud not to be relied upon as in- 
dubitably correct. 

In this case, it is true that everything 
combined to prove the guilt of these par- 
ties. An examining trial had been held, 
aud they were committed without bail 
for appearance before the higher court. 
They were confined in a jail amply guard- 
ed to prevent their escape. One member 
of the gang, Richard II. Shuck, had al- 
ready been tried, convicted, and hanged 
under regular process of law, and there 
was every reason to believe that these 
wretches would meet a similar fate. 
What necessity, then, was there for this 
extraordinary action? The courts were 
honorable and unimpeachable. The judge 
was known to have no sympathy with 
criminals, and everything gave promise 
of a full vindication of the law’s of the 
land. There can be no apology for this 
act. It was wrongful in the highest sense 
of the term. It belonged more to the ir- 
regularities of border life, than to the 
very centre of society. It was an over- 
riding of the law, a high-handed assump- 
tion that the courts were incompetent, 
aud that justice would not bo done. 

Let us have no more of this disgraceful 
procedure in Kentucky. It not only vio- 
lates the rules of government, but it 
brings the law and the law officers into 
disrepute. It rellects upon the municipal 
power, and declares that courts are in- 
competent. It takes from the people the 
surest bulwark of their liberties, and the 
only safe-guard to their rights.- It is wan- 
ton, lawless, and disgraceful.— Frankfort 
1' toman. 



Is Ilog Cholera Contagious? 

No, it is not contagious in the sense 
that touch will communicate the disease 
from one to the other, but it is infectious 
in some forms, aud more especially where 
the intestined fever, resembling very 
much the typhoid fever in man, is devel- 
oped. As I understand it, the poison 
which produces typhoid fever is partly 
that of vegetable matter in the same 
state. Where swine are fed in the same 
yards, kept in the same pens, pastured in 
the same fields, drink at the same springs, 
streams or troughs, and are subjected to 
same air, influence, and surroundings 
poisonous, malarial, or otherwise, they 
are alike infected, and where, under such 
circumstances, disease appears, it is to a 
certain degree infectious, but not to the 
virulent extent the rinderpest is, or as 
contagious as the glanders are. This ma 
laria infects the system with a poison 
which nature throws off. with more or 
less success, through the lining mem 
branes of the intestines and some of the 
related organs. Where the constitution 
is vigorous, and all the functions in full 
health and activity, there is very little 
disturbance of the system; but where the 
contrary state obtains, then the poison 
accumulates, and then follows intestinal 
or typhoid fever, which is more or less 
severe and fatal, according to the meas 
ure of the health and strength, and of the 
constitution of the attacked, and the 
treatment which follows. This is typhoid 
or intestinal fever, whether it appears in 
swine or in man, aDd the cause being the 
same or similar, and there being a toler- 
able parallel or analogy between the phy 
sical construction of the two, the treat 
ment of the two should be reasonably 
alike. 

Under the old mode and manner of 
treatment, when bleeding, blistering and 
cupping were the order of the day, when 
calomel and jalap, scammony and gam 
boge, one or both or all were the first and 
last resort in all cases of fever, and in 
fact in sickness of almost every kind 
then typhoid fever was quite, if not more 
fatal, than cholera is now, and the first 
thing the patient did, after learning he 
had the disease, was to make his will 
But investigation, experience, and scien 
title research have changed all this, and 
in the hands of a well-informed physi 
cian, or those of a skillful nurse, typhoid 
fever is seldom fatal. And the change 
has been brought about by discarding the 
old heroic remedies, and leaving drugs 
and medication out of the account — the 
reliance being wholly on keeping the 
strength of the patient up by feeding, 
aud the liberal use of preparations of 
milk and buttermilk, which has been 
found to be as near a specific for typhoid 
fever as any one thing within reach. And 
here is the explanation why so many sick 
hogs die when dosed by cow and horse 
doctors, and the brutes, their owners 
who administer spirits of turpentine 
kerosene, copperas, blue vitriol and the 
like, and why they recover when fed with 
milk, flesh, and buttermilk. That these 
latter remedies will cure hog cholera in 
advanced stages I do not pretend to claim 
indeed, nothing will, for in such cases 
lesion and decomposition of the organs 
have taken place, and it would be as 
much of a miracle as to cure the wounds 
after a hog’s throat had been cut from 
ear to ear. In the early stages of the hog 
rt r “ where it takes tn- 01 ty 
phoid icver, warmth, quiet, and shelter 

and the right food and drink at the right 
time, are as necessary for the recovery of 
swine as for men in the same condition 
When hog cholera appears in the form of 
lung diseases, or those of the liver and 
throat, and in the form of dysentery, the 
disease is not contagious, nor is it infec 
tious; and here is the explanation of the 
conflict of opinion between observers, 
some saying that it is, and some that it 
is not, infections— both being, in their 
particular cases, in the right. 

Referring to the brief note of Vaniz 
page 169, current volume, that he had 
been inclined to adopt the views of this 
(your) correspondent as to the origin and 
cause of the disease under notice, but be 
cause a neighboring butchers ’s hogs, fed 
offal, had been attacked, he seems in 
dined to reject them, I beg to remind 
him that it has never been claimed that 
offal-fed hogs were wholly exempt from 
attack; but that, notwithstanding their 
terrible offensive surroundings, they are 
as a whole more healthy than exclusive- 
ly corn-fed hogs, and this condition is at- 
tributable to their nitrogenous diet. As 
to the "contagiousness” of the disease, I 
think Vaniz will find it to be infectious- 
ness— the distinctions between the two 
having been explained in the above para- 
graph. 

In closing these - paragraphs on hog 
cholera for to-day, and in explanation or 
excuse for what may be said hereafter, 
let it be understood by those who are in- 
clined to be critical, that I do not claim 
what is here set down to be scientifically 
exact and absolute, but that it is an ap- 
proximation to the truth, and without 
any great or vitiating amount of error — 
that the object is to instruct and explain 
on subjects where both are much needed 
— that I recommend no costly or radical 
changes; advise no violent or dangerous 
remedies; reject as unworthy of confi- 
dence any and all nostrums, and apply to 
the prevention and cure of the diseases 
of animals, and especially swine, the re- 
sults of human experience in that which 
relates to mankind.— Country Gentleman. 

Another enemy to the hogs is men- 
tioned by the Flemingsburg Democrat: A 
Kentucky hog breeder recently had one 
hundred and sixty hogs poisoned by eat- 
ing the young cockle bur. Out of the 
number twenty died in the space of fifteen 
hours from the time they partook of the 
poisonous plant. It is well known that 
after a heavy rain this cockle bur springs 
up in a day or two, throwing out two 
slender leaves which the hog greedily 
devours, and just so sure as he swallows 
a certain quantity of the poisonous plant 
he is a dead hog. The plant at older stage 
loses its poisonous quality. After three 
or four leaves appear, and the plant as- 
sumes vigorous appearance, the virus dies 
in it; the difficulty, meanwhile, is to 
guard against the hog’s eating it in its 
early stage, at which it is a fatal poison 
to the porcine family. 

— 

A Chicago commission merchant has 
prepared an estimate of the wheat yield 
in 1877 from Iowa, Minnesota, Kansas, 
and Wisconsin, and places it in round 
numbersat 96,000,000 bushels. The yield 
in Minnesota is estimated at 17 to 19 
bushels per acre, and in Kansas at 13 to 
15 bushels. The receipts at Chicago for 
the crop year are estimated at 25,000,000 
bushels, against 11,116,452 in thelastcrop 
year. The estimate is about 10.000,000 
bushels below the receipts of 1873. The 
quality of the Western wheat is spoken of 
in the highest terms. 



The man of business and the business 
man both have business to do; but the 
business man is the one who deserves it. 
The business man thinks, moves, acts, 
and makes himself felt in the world. If 
a thought comes into his head it is one 
of breadth and compass; it does not cen- 
ter on self and its narrow world. It 
reaches away and embraces others. It 
has a wide range and does not stop till it 
touches and affects for good the interests 
of all. 

Nor are the thoughts of such men im- 
mobile. They become acting, living re- 
alties in the wide aud busy world. The 
authors of them make of these business 
thoughts actualities, give them “local 
habitation and a name,” and steamboats 
are built and ocean is navigated, and dis- 
tant climes are brought together; an elec- 
tric telegraph springs into being as by en- 
chantment, and lightning becomes gar- 
rulous and voluble, thought out-travels 
the winged winds; and in a twinkling 
the bands and shackles of trade are loosen 
ed. 

Such are the workings produced by the 
business man. lie awakens the drowsy 
and helpless multitudes, puts life and 
thought, energy and action into them, 
and makes the world leap joyously along 
the path of ages. Where its step before 
was but a single year, and it strides by 
scores and fifties. 

“Men of thought, men of action, 

Clear the way.” 

And they do clear the way— their 
thoughts become tangible, moving, de 
molshing forces, aud break down and 
crush all opposing barriers, opening a 
pathway of progress, into which the more 
sluggish and timid portion of humanity 
may securely travel. 

But the man of business is what the 
name indicates. His business is always 
on his hands. He does not do it. He 
does not know how to go to work in the 
right way. His thoughts are all meas- 
ured and slow. He weighs self-made 
doubts and supposed contingencies, and 
before he moves, the business man gets 
up and runs away from him, and wins 
the race. 

The man of business won’t go ahead, 
he only eddies around and around— he 
does not progress — his path is a circle. 
He does not find himself at night many 
miles on his journey’s way, but like the 
hour hand of a clock, just where he start 
ed. He is not clear and decided in what 
he does, but ofteu stands hesitating and 
puzzled. He ventures and falls back; 
has a stout heart in fancy, but none in 
fact. 



MEOICAL PREPARATIONS. 








LIVER DISEASE 
and Indigestion pre- 
vail to a greater ex 
tent than probably 
any other malady, 
and relief is always 
anxiously sought af- 
lf theUver isregulated in its action, health is 
almost invariably secured. Indigestion or want of 
action in the Liver, causes Headache, Constipation, 
Jaundice, Pain in the Shoulders, Cough, Dizziness, 
Sour Stomach, bad taste in the mouth, bilious at- 
tacks, palpitation of the heart, depression of spirits 
or the olucs, and a hundred other symptoms. SIM- 
MONS’ LIVER REGULATOR 
edy that has ever been discovgr^f^ a s i mp i c vgtr C - 
It acts mildly, efTectpriil^’,,^ injury in any quantifies 
that it may be taken. It is harmless in every way ; it 
has been for fortv vears, and hundreds of the good 
and great from all parts of the country will vouch 
for its virtues, viz. : lion. Alexander If. Stevens of 
Georgia ; Bishop Pierce of Georgia ; John Gill Shor- 
ter, Ex-Governor of Alabama; Gen. John B. Gor- 
~~ R. L. Mott, of Co- 



LIVER 



don ; _ . 

luinbus, Georgia, are 
mong the hundreds to 
whom we can refer. Ex- 
tract of a letter from Hon. 
Alexander II. Stevens, 
_ dated March 8, 1872 : 44 I 

__ t my condition requires it, Dr. 

Simmons’ l iver Regulator, with good eftect. It is 
mild, and suits me better than more active medicine.’’ 

IMPORTANT CAUTION. 

Buy NorowDERS 
oh Prepared 
SIMMONS’ LIV- 
ER REGULA- 
TOR UNLESS IN 
OUR ENGRAVED 
WRAPPER, 



REGULATOR 



[tor] 

S ; 

TTmTomM 




WITH 

Trade Mark, Stamp, & Signature unbroken. 

J. H. ZEIL1N & CO., 

Macon, Ca., and Philadelphia. 

• Price $1 .00. Sold by all druggists. 

Ayer’s 

Hair Vigor , 

For restoring Gray Hair to 
its natural Vitality and Color. 

A dressing 
which is at once 
agreeable, 
healthy, and ef- 
fectual for pre- 
serving the 
hair. Faded or 
x gray hair is soon 
jfi SSwKr restored to its 
original color, 
with the gloss and freshness of youth. 
Thin hair is thickened, falling hair 
checked, and baldness often, though 
not always, cured by its use. Noth- 
ing can restore the hair where the 
follicles are destroyed, or the glands 
atrophied and decayed. But such as 
remain can be saved for usefulness 
by this application. Instead of foul- 
ing the hair with a pasty sediment, it 
will keep it clean and vigorous. Its 
occasional use will prevent the hair 
from turning gray or falling off; and 
consequently prevent baldness. Free 
from those deleterious substances 
which make some preparations dan- 
gerous, and injurious to the hair, the 
Vigor can only benefit but not harm 
it. If wanted merely for a 

HAIR DRESSING, 

nothing else can be found so desir- 
able. Containing neither oil nor 
dye, it does not soil white cambric, 
and yet lasts long on the hair, giving 
it a rich, glossy lustre and a grateful 
perfume. 

Prepared by Dr. J. C. Ayer & Co., 

Practical and Analytical Chemists, 

LOWELL, MASS. 

SAMUEL & WARREN, Ag'ts, Danville, Ky. 



T 



OWN 



ORDINANCE. 



I1E IT ORDAINED, By the Board ol Trustees 
of the Town of Danville, that the Hardinsville, 
Harrodsburg, Danville and Crab Orchard Road 
Company be, and they are hereby required on or 
before the 1st day of September next, to repair 
their turnpike road leading through the said 
town, by putting on the said road turnpike rock 
at least six inches in .leptli, the entire width of 
said road-bed, from Fifth Street to the east end oi 
Main Street in said town. 
iv!3.] G. E. WISEMAN, Cli’m. 



T 



HE THOROUGH-BRED JERSEY RULE 

‘THORIffTGIVr,’ 

No. lfifil J. II. I!., will stand on the farm of my 
fattier, 1'. T. Gentry, and will bo permitted to 
serve cows at $:  to insure a call, lie is a thor- 
ough-bred, registered Jersey, and an extra good 
one. 

mar.30.) WILLIAM GENTRY. 



file W A D YERTISEM ENTS. 

WM. BREWER’S 
HARNESS & SADDLERY STORE 

ADJOINING liis Livery Stable, is the place to 
get bargains in 

SADDf.ES, HARNESS , HR HIRES, COL- 
LARS, HALTERS, BLANKETS, LAP 
BUSTERS, HORSE BRUSHES, .Co. 

RUGBY WHIPS A SPECIALTY. 

RUGBY HA RNESS—$l~ SO to S7S. 

Rkjf *' Repairing done in all branches of the 
trade, including Trunks and Valises. 

HIS STABLE 

IS well supplied with the best of stock, and good 
HACKS. BUGGIES, DRUMMER and BAGGAGE 
WAGONS for hire on the most reasonable terms. 

OMNIBUS AND HACK 

to transfer passengers and baggage to and from 
Depot to anv part of Danville. Orders left at my 
Livery Stable or at the “Clemens House” will re- 
ceive prompt attention. Remember the place,— 
Fourth street, South of Main, near “Clemens 
House,” Danville, Ky. WM. BREWER. 

aug.31-tf. 



FI RNITURE. 



JJANVILLE 

FURNITURE 

WARE-ROOMS! 

MAIN STREET, 

DANVILLE, KY. 



A FINK 

NEW STOCK 

— OF- 

J e w elry . 

II. B. Tit l ESI) ALE & 00., 

WILL open, in the house of Harris, Durham & 
Dunlap, on Main street, Danville, Ky., 

SATTTBDAY MORNING, SEPT. 1st, ’77, 

A FINE, WELL SELECTED STOCK OF 

CLOCKS, 

WATCHES, 

JEWELRY, 

SILVERWARE, 

which they will take pleasure in showing to all. 
We have bought all our goods direct from manu- 
facturers anti will sell strictly for cash, and for 
this reason can sell as cheap, or cheaper, than 
you can get the same goods in anv city. 

Mr. Truesdale is an experienced Watch -iiakcr, 
and will pay special attention to the repairing of 
tine watches and jewelry. 

We respectfully invite all to call on Saturday, 
as we will set that day aside for the purpose of 
exhibiting our goods. We will give a written 
guarantee with every watch we sell. 

We remain yours, etc., 

aug 31 tf It. B. TRUESDALE & CO. 



J. I». Ylcli RO RTl’ 



WOULD respectfully announce that he has now 
on hand a very large and elegant assortment of 



CHAMBER, DlMNti-UOOM AM) PARLOR 



Furniture 



and that he is prepared to sell lower than ever be- 
fore. His stock is complete in all departments, 
comprising 



CLOTHING. 



HI K KENTUCKY STOKE. 



8 TO 7 



IS PLAYED OUT. 



Mat trasses and Spring Beds ^ s FOLLOWS: 



OF ALL KINDS; 



BR EA K FA S T TA RLES, 


Suits worth $ 


7 


at 


1 X L EXTENSION TABLES , 
S A EES, S ID E- B O A it DS, 


Suits 


worth 


9 


at 


If Rl TING D ES K S, 

LOOKING GLASSES, 


Suits 


worth 


11 


at 


LOOKING GLASS PLATES, 


Suits 


worth 


14 


at 



REMOVAL! 

E. II. de Rootle, 

JEWELER, 

IIAS removed to Main street, is the 

“CLEMENS II OISE,” 

(the new Hotel building of Mr. McJames’) where 
everything in the 

JEWELRY LINE 

can be had at REASONABLE PRICES. A large 
stock of entirely 

NEW GOODS 

will be on exhibition during the week of the Fair. 
aug.3-tf. E. II. de BOO DE. 

PEARSON, ROBERTS & CO., 

(SUCCESSORS TO JOE CLARK.) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

— AND— 

DEALERS IN LIQUORS, 

14 WEST MAIN STREET, 

LEXINCTON, KENTUCKY. 



MOULDINGS 

for Window Cornices and Picture Frames. 

CHROMOS, 

BRACKETS, 

and all other articles properly belonging to the 
Furniture business. Uncap Picture Frames al- 
ways on hand, aud all kinds made to order. 

Repairing and Upholstering 

done by a first-class workman, at tlie lowest liv- 
ing rates. 



UNDERTAKING. 

litics for doing business in this 1 
unrivalled. He has the 

Finest Hearse in Central Kentucky, 



anti keeps constantly on hand a complete stock of 
Metallic Burial Cases ami Caskets, Walnut and 
Rose wood Collins, Collin Trimmings and Under- 
taker’s Material of all kinds. 

alls promptly attended to on the most 
reasonable terms. (mar.30. 



NE W AI  VERT1SMEXTS. 



WE call the attention of dealers to ov 
well assorted stock of Groceries and 
to our lately improved Railroad fa  
aiding us to compete successfully wii 
kets— at wholesale exclusively. Ordc 
with promotuess ami care. Would be 
send sa moles and prices. 
ang.l7-2m. 



FIPST DOS 

ON A BOSTON POLICE OFT™ 

Boston, Nov. 15, 1871. 

H. R. Stevens: 

Dear Sir— In the spring of 1860 I was stricken 
down with fever, which had a long and almost 
hopeless run. The beet medical advice being in 
attendance, I was taken through the fever; but 
it left me terribly reduced and weak, with ex- 
cruciating pains in my side, hack and hips. I 
was completely prostrated with Kidney Com- 
plaint, and no medicine seemed to reach my case. 

In this condition I was persuaded to try Veo- 
ktink by a friend whom it cured of the sanio 
disease, and it seemed as though I could feel the 
etfect of the first dose through my whole system; 
and from that moment 1 began io mend, gradu- 
ally growing better from day to day; and 1 fol- 
lowed on with the Vegetixe, until it completely 
restored me to health, since which time I have 
been able to perform my duties as a police 
officer, enjoying good health; and there ih no 
doubt about the great value of Veoetinb in 
Kidney Complaint and similar diseases. 

1 am, sir, respectfully, 

LAFAYETTE FORD, 501 Broadway. 

All Diseases of the Blood. 

If Vegetixe will relievo pain, cleanse, purify 
and cure such diseases, restoring the natient to 
perfect health after trying dilTerent physicians, 
many remedies, suffering for years, is it not 
conclusive proof, if you are a sufferer, you can 
bo cured? Why is this medicine performing 
such great cures? It works in the blood, in the 
circulating fluid. It can truly be called the 
GREAT BLOOD PURIFIER. The great source 
of disease originates in the blood; and no med- 
icine that does not act directly upon it, to purify 
4nd renovate, has any just claim upon public 
attention. 

Seventy-one Years of Age. 

East Marshfield, Aug. 22, 1870. 
Mr. Stevens : 

Dear Sir— I am seventy-one years of age ; have 
suffered many years with l’vidney Complaint, 
weakness in my hack and stomach. 1 was in- 
duced by friends to try your Vegetine, and I 
think it the best medicine for weakness of the 
kidneys I ever used. I have tried many reme- 
dies for this complaint, and never found io much 
relief as from the Vegetine. It strengthens and 
Invigorates the whole system. Many of my ac- 
quaintances have taken it, and I believe It to he 
good for all the complaints for which it is re- 
commended. 

Yours truly, JOSIAII II. SHERMAN. 

Would Cive a Dollar for a Dose. 

Boston, May 30, B71. 

H. R. Stevens, Esq. : 

Dear Sir— I have been badly afflicted with Kid- 
ney Complaint for ten years ; have suffered 
great pain in my hack, hips and side, with p-eat 
difficulty in passing urine, which was often and 
in very small quantities, frequently accompaiied 
with blood and excruciating pain. I have faith- 
fully tried most of the popular remedies rec m- 
mended for my complaint; I have been under tho 
treatment of some of the most skilful physi- 
cians in Boston, all of whom pronounced mr case 
incurable. This was my condition when 2 was 
advised by a Mend t - try the V BGBTIKK Jwnd • 
could see the good effects from the first dose I 
took, and from that moment 1 kept on improving* 
until I was entirely cured, taking in all, 1 should 
think, about six bottles. 

It is indeed a valuable medicine, and if I 




wlcbratc 



NT 

IMPLEMENTS, AN’O 
FACTORY PRICES: 

o. Wagon, 



should be afflicted again in the game way 1 voubl 
give a dollar for a dose, if I could not jet it 
without. 

Respectfully, J. M. GILE, 

3G1 Third St., South Boslon. 

Life a Burden. 

Boston, Not. 2, B73. 

H. R. Stevens, Esq. : 

Dear Sir— From a poor, emaciated sufferer, tho 
Vegetine has restored me to perfect health 

I have for years been a terrible sufferer from 
Canker and Dyspepsia, at times rendering life 
almost a burden to me. I am now ftfteei (If.) 
pounds heavier than when I commenced tin use 
of Vegetine. 

I will make mention that I was also a great 
sufferer from Kidney Complaint, causing «cru- 
ciating pain through the small of the back 
nearly all of the time. This, too, Veoetini has 
cured, and lam now' a perfect picture of hsilth, 
and I will add, happiness — all caused frou the 
use of a few bottles of Vegetine. 

Respectfully, H. G. HUGHES, 

1 Union place, Boston, Mass. 

Vegetine is composed of Roots, Barks atd 
Herbs. It is very pleasant to take ; every chid 
likes it. 

Vegetine is sold by all Druggist!. 



STOCK j FOR SALE. 
pUR£-BR£D 

Alderney Cows for Sale. 

I HAVE for sale several head of No. 1 Alderiev 
Cows, with young heifer calves. These cows , r 'e 
fine milkers, and just in their prime, from 3 to 5 



years old. 
oct.fi.) 



Apply to 



JAS. E. COWAN, 
Danville, Ky. 



^QOK1-UOKM8 

FOR SALE. 

WE ARE BREEDING ANI) HAVE FOR 
sale SHOUT-HORN CATTLE ol - the purest 
and most fashionable strains ol - blood, including 
Victoria Cows in calf to our Bull, 2.1 Duke of Ox- 
ford, Yearlings, (both sexes,) Calves, Ac., bv same 
bull. Also, Southdown Sheep, of Jonas Webb It 
Lugar stock. Terms reasonable. Address. 
Danville, Ky., 

■an.l.j I. P. FISHER Jk SON. 



Smiy 

Superio^sootoiin Drill, 

*** « 

Walton Blow, Meiklc Blow, 
Hamilton Plow, 

John (iill Plow, Extra Points 
for (iill Plow. 

“The Hocking Valley Fan,” 

THE be9t in use for cleaning grain for seed. 
Will clean Wheat, Barley, Timothy, Clover and 
Orchard Grass Seed better than any Fan I ever 
saw. If ordered in lots of 5 will give special flg- 
gures. 

GUM AND LEATHER BELTING 
AND HOSE 

CAN be bought from mo at Factory prices, hav- 
ing made special arrangements. Orders solicited 
and piomptly tilled. Any of the above articles 
will he exchanged for Grain of any description. 

WHEAT, 

BARLEY, 
It YE, 
WAMTED 

AT MARKET PRICES. 

C. H. LTJCAS. 



WE HAVE SUITS 



FROM $4 TO $1«. 



ICES 



CARRIAGE MAKING. 



^GAIN AT WORK. 

MANWARING BROTHERS’ 

CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY! 

DANVILLE, KY. 

THE undersigned arc pleased to announce that 
they are now at work again on their own respon- 
sibility, and can he found at their old stand, on 

Corner of Second and Main, 

and they arc now prepared to receive orders, and 
will keep on hand 

Carriages and Buggies 

of their own make only. With the heat of mate- 
rial and workmen, they feel confident they can 
offer a better article at 

MORE FAVORABLE PRICES 

than ever before sold in this vicinity. They will 
neither deal in or manufacture any county court 
auction work. Having left the business w ith a 
good reputation among their customers, they now 
resume with the determination to sustain it, ami 
with additional facilities. 

To their old friends in the counties of Boyle, 
Lincoln, Garrard and Mercer, they say. call on 
them, for they are determined to give satis! action 
in price and quality. 

REPAIRING of all kinds done on short notice, 
and on reasonable terms. 



They will apply their Imnrored Patent Shalt 
Duplin?, which is pronounced safer and more du- 
rable than any in use, and can easily he changed 



nnv goods. 




OFFIC1A L PUBLICATIONS. 



rjtowN 

ORDINANCE. 

BE IT ORDAINED. By the Board of Trustees 
of the Town of Danville, that the owners of the 
following described lots and fractions of lots, sit- 
uated in the Town of Danville, ami having a 
boundary on the streets hereinafter named, he 
and they are hereby required on or betoro the 1st 
DAY OF OCTOBER, 1877, to pave with new 
bricks and curb with substantial stone curbing 
the sidewalks in front of their said property on 
said streets, at the width aud elevation herein- 
after designated, to- wit: 

1st. The lot of Jos. II. Thomas, on West side of 
Harrodsburg street, beginning at a point in the 
line of said lot, opposite the Western terminus of 
the side-walk on the North side of Main street, 
and running South the entire line of said proper- 
ty,— the side-walk to he eight feet wide ami of an 
elevation six inches higher than the grade of the 
street upon which said lot is situated. 

2nd. The lot owned by the heirs of Roht. Rus- 
sel, dcc’d., on the corner of Harrodsburg and 
Walnut streets.— the entire line of said property, 
having a boundary on either of said streets,— the 
side-walk to he eight feet wide and of an eleva- 
tion six inches higher than the grade of the 
streets upon which said property is situated. 

And the owners of tho above described property 
are hereby notified to construct said side-walks 
in the manner und time aforesaid; and if they 
neglect or refuse to do so, the town will cause the 
same to he done at the expense of the lots adjoin- 
ing said walk. 

AUG. 6th, ’77. G. W. WELSH, Jr., 

Chairman, Pro. Tetn. 



Prince Albert Suits worth $18 at 13. 
Prince Albert Suits worth 22 at 16. 



Just received, the largest and best stock of 



Boys’ and Youths’ Clothing! CO- OPERATIVE STORE! 



ever brought to this market. Also, fine stock 

BOOTS, SHOES, IIATS 

And Gents’ Furnishing Goods. 



DON’T FORGET THE PLACE, 



NEXT DOOR TO E. B. LINNET 



KENTUCKY STORE. 



mar.23.) 



F. KAUFMAN. 



RAILROADS . 



1JAKE THE 

INDIANAPOLIS 

—AND— 

VANDALIA ROUTE 



TO ALL POINTS 



THE ONLY LINE RUNNING 

PALACE PARLOR CAPS 

On Morning Trains, and 

PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS 

On Evening Trains from 

Louis vi 11^ to St. Louis 

—MAKING— 

QUICKER TIME 

THAN ANY OTHER ROUTE. 



from shafts to pole. 
apl,l&l MANWARING BROTHERS. 



Mi SC ELL A NEO US. 



I LADY FOB BUSINESS. 



THE BOYLE COUNTY 



Through Cars to Chicago, 

CLEVELAND AND NEW YORK. 



Ex. Sund. Daily. Daily. 

.Leave Louisville 7.30 a. m. 4.00 r. m. 7.00 p. i. 

Ar. Indianapolis. . .12.00 m. 8.10 P. m. 11.10 p. M. 

Ar. St. Louis 8.45 P. M. 8.30 x. M. 

Ar. Chicago 7.50 r. ji. 7.30 a . m. 

Ar. Cleveland 7.05 a. m. 2.50 p. a. 

Ar. New York H.30 A. M. 12.27 P. M. 

l’alace Parlor Cars on 7:30 a. m. train, Louisville 
to St. Louis without change. Sleeping car on 4.00 
P. M. train to Cleveland and New York, and on 
7.00 P. M. train to St. Louis and Chicago without 
change. 

Emigrants will find this the mostdcsirable route 
to all part* of the YVest. All letters of inquiry 
cheerfully and promptly answered. Address 

A. ANDERSON, 

General Ticket Agent, Louisville, Ky. 
G. If. MCKINNEY, 
Passenger Agent, Stanford, Ky. 

jan.5-*77-tf.) 



ONDENSED TIME. 



c 

LOUISVILLE 1 GREAT SOUTHERN 

RAILROAD LINE. 

MAY 14, 18 76. 

TRAINS GOING SOUTH. 

No. 15 
Daily, 
exc. Sun. 

Leave Louisville 10:45 a m 

44 Cin. A Lex. Junction 11 :00 a m 

Arrive Lebanon Junction 12:20 p m 

Leave Lebanon Junction 12:28 p m 

Arrive Lebanon (dine) 2:10 p m 

44 Mitchellsburg 3:28 p m 

44 Danville Station 4:00 p m 

44 Stanford 4:25 p m 

44 Richmond Junction 4:30 pm 

44 Lancaster 5:05 pm 

44 Richmond 6:25 p m 

CONNECTIONS.— Passengers on L., C. A L. R. 
R. (‘‘Short Line’V) J., M. A 1. R. R., O. A M. Ky., 
ami U. S. Mail Line Steamers connect at Louis- 
ville with Train No. 1. 

TRAIN No. 1 connects at Lebanon Junction 
with Train No. 15 for all points ou Knoxville and 
Richmond Branches. 

TRAIN No. 15 connects at Lebanon Junction 
with Train No. 2 from all points on the Memphis 
and Montgomery Lines; at Lebanon with stages 
to and from Springfield, Campbellsville, Columbia 
and Greens burg; at Mitchellshnrg with stages to 
and from Perry ville and Harrodsburg; at Dan- 
ville Station With stages to and from Danville 
City; at Stanford with stages to ami from Somer- 
set; at Richmond Junction to ami from points be- 
tween there and Livingston; at Richmond with 
stages to Irvine, etc. 



TRAINS GOING NORTH. 





No. 


16 




Daily 


» 




exc. Stin. 


Richmond 


. .. 6:50 


a 


m 


Lancaster 


... 8:13 


a 


m 


• Richmond Junction . . 


. .. 8:25 


a 


m 


Richmond J unction . 


. .. 8:35 


a 


Ml 


Stanford 


... 8:40 


a 


m 


Danville station 




a 


in 


Mitchellshnrg 


. .. 9:32 


a 


in 


Lebanon 


...10:35 


tt 


in 


; Lebanon Junction... 


...12:10 


P 


m 



No. 0 
Daily. 



Leave Lebanon Junction 12:28 p m 9:30 a m 

Arrive Cin. A Lex. Junction 1 :45 p m 10:35 a m 

44 Louisville 2:00 p in 10:60 a in 

TRAIN No. 16 connects at Richmond Junction 
to and from points between there and Livingston; 
at Stanford with stages to aud from Somerset; at 
Danville Station witn stages to and from Danville 
City; at Mitchellslnirg with stages to and from 
Perry ville aud Harrodsburg; at Lebanon with 
stages to and from Springfield, Campbellsville, 
Columbia, and Grecnsburg; at Lebanon Junction 
with trains leaving at 7:20 ti m and 1:50 a in for 
Memphis, Montgomery, and intermediate points. 
Passengers going to points North, East, and West 
from Louisville are transferred to Train No. 6 at 
Lebanon Junction. 

TRAIN No. 6 connects at Cincinnati Junction 
with L., C. A L. R. R. for the North and East; at 
Louisville, in Union Depot, with O. A M. and J., 
M. A I. R. R. for the North, East, and West, ami 
with U. S. Mail Line steamers for Cincinnati and 
the Easi. 

Pullman Palace Cars 

YVithout change arc run between 

Louisville and New Orleans, 

Via Montgomery. 

Louisville and New Orleans, 

Via Milan. 

Louisville and Little Rock 

Via Memphis. 

Also between Louisville and principal 
points North, East aud West. 

tar For information about Tickets, ami Emi- 
grant Rates to Florida, or to points in Tennes- 
see, Alabama, Georgia, Arkansas and Texas, ad- 
dress 

C. P. ATMORK, 
Gun’l Pass, ami Ticket Agent, 
je6-tf.) Louisville, Ky. 



JN0. METCALF, Manager, 



AT WELSH'S OLD STAND, 



DANVILLE, 



YVE HAVE RECEIVED AN ENTIRE 



NEW STOCK 



SPRING & SUMMER 



G OODS, 



Which are now open for inspection, consisting of 
everything kept in a 



First-Class Dry (lOoU&Hottser 



We call especial attention to our stock of Notions 
and Fancy Goods, Ladies’ and Childrens’ Ready- 
made Linen Suits, Parasols; an elegant stock of 
Kid and Thread Gloves, two and three buttons; 
White Goods, Hamburg Edging and Inserting, 
Tonshon Laco, Handkerchiefs— Plain, Hem- 
stitched, and Fancy, in Linen and Silk; Hosiery 
—Ladles’, Misses’ and Childrens’, Ladles’ Under- 
wear. Gents’ Furnishing Goods,— Cassimeres, 
Shirts, Collars, Cuffs, Neck-Tics, Gloves, &c., Ac. 
A splendid stock of 



DOMESTIC GOODS. 



These Goods were all bought from first hands for 
cash, at the lowest prices Goods have ever reach- 
ed, and we propose to sell them at corresponding 
low prices for cash, our motto being quick sales 
and small profits for cash. 



IS NOYV 
sup 
tuc' 



IN 



OPERALION, AND READY TO 
pply the wants of the people of Central Ken- 
kv. The plan of organization, and the ar- 
rangements for purchasing goods from the w hole- 
ale houses for cash, enables this establishment to 
ell at correspondingly low rates for cash. 



Every customer of this house, no matter wheth- 
er he is a member of tho Patrons of Husbandry or 
not, has the same advantages as Grangers. There 
is no discrimination whatever. The house is well 
supplied with a full and complete stock of 



FAMILY GROCERIES 



embracing every article under this heading that 
may he called for. 



CIGARS AND TOBACCOS! 



HARDWARE, 



— O U R— 



DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT 



wo make a specialty, and are prepared to offer an 
unequalled, large and rare selection of Fine and 
Cheap Dress Goods, tho production of the best 
French, English and American Mills. YVe have 
made preparations for a large Spring trade, and 
don’t propose to he disappointed. We have 
studied your wants carefully, and made it a point 
to select just such goods as wo know you need, 
and at such prices that you can’t refuse to buy. 
We respectfully ask you not to make any pur- 
chases until you see our goods and know the pri- 
ces wo are selling them for. All are invited, for 
we have Goods enough to go around two or throe 
times, and an excellent place to get more from of 
the same kind, at the sarno uniform low prices. 



THE MANTUA - MAKING 



DEPARTMENT 






WAGON AND HARNESS, COLLARS, 

BACK-BANDS, IIAMES, Ac. 



GJUIN AND SEEDS 



OF ALL KINDS, 



including now ji superior lot of WHITE OATS, 
lor seed. Garden Seeds off all kinds. 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS GILCHER & BRO.’S 



will be kept in stoc k, and in thill ine we ran offer 
special inducements. 



We cordially invite the people to call and see 
us. We hope, by close attention to business, aud 
selling our goods at very small profits for cash, to 
receive a liberal share off the public patronage. 



JNO. METCALF, Manager. 

ter Mr. Metcalf is the Agent for the Celebr 
ted Climax Machines. 
feb.23.) 



44 



kLD KENTUCK” 



O 1 

POULTRY 



YARDS! 



_______ 

LIGHT BRAHMA CHICKS 

FOR SALE. 



HAVING had good luck in breeding this sea- 
son from my select pens off Light Brahma Fowls. 
I can no iv furnish some nice young Chicks, mated 
in pairs or trios, to parties who would like to get 
a start with this really excellent (I think best) 
variety of Fowls. Prices according to size and 



fanc\ points, 
get the best, aud I can afford to sell them now at 
lowe 



er rates than after they are matured. Also, a 
few hens from my select breeding stock for sale 
at low rates. 

JAS. R. MARRS, 

je6-tf.) Danville, Ky. 



N 



OTICK 



IS HEREBY GIVEN 



UNTIL August 1st that wc will offer great in- 
ducements to those in need of 

COAL 

for the coming season. Having recently opened 
a new vein of Coal free from sulphur and rotten- 
top coal, we are now loading the same on the cars 
at Pine llill lower than inferior coal has ever 
been bought before. The same will he offered 
through dealers everywhere this season. Ask 
for A. P. Rickets & Co.’s Spring Valley Coal, and 
buy no other. It has no equal. 
je22-tf.) A. P. RICKETTS A CO. 



P. A. MARKS 

NEEDS MONEY 

To Start After His Fall Stock 

BY THE TENTH OF AUGUST. 
jyS7-tl.) 



•^"OTICK TO 

TRAVELERS! 

WE have Hacks and Baggage Wagons running 
to trains, and will transfer passengers and bag- 
gage to and from any part of Danville, at as low 
rates as any ’bus or other vehicle. I/eave orders 
at any of the Hotels, or at our new stables, on 
Fourth street, near the “Clemens House.” Also, 

Haeka, Buggies, Wagons, and Saddle Horses for 

hire on very reasonable terms. 
aug.3-tf. K A USN ER A COLLINS. 



will he under the supervision of Mrs. M. J. Bar- 
bee, who is too well-known to need any comment. 
Also a full line of MILLINERY in the same 
house. Come and see us ofteu. 

Store-Room on Main Street, 

A. S. ROBERTSON’S OLD STAND. 



HARRIS, DURHAM A DUNLAP. 



apr.fi.) 



RUSINESS CARDS. 



ANI) CONFECTIONERY, 

Corner Main and Third Streets, 

DANVILLE, KY. 

EVERYTHING in a first-class establishment al- 
ways kept ou hands. Special attention given to 

WEDDINGS & PARTIES 

and tables for same prepared in tho best manner. 

ICE CREAM SALOON 

will be in full blast for the season on and after 
23rd of April, when lee Cream, Sherbet, Jte., will 
he served up to individuals or parties. 

Orders from families for Ice Cream and Sher- 
bet, in any quantity, filled promptly at reduced 
and Tubs rented at reasonable 



rates. 

rates. 



Freezers 



( apr.2U. 



W. E. GRUBBS, 
ARCHITECT and BUILDER. 

DANVILLE, ICY. 



PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS 

For all kinds of Buildings made out, and contracts 
for erecting same made on tho most reasonable 
terms. Also, 



BUILDING MATERIAL 

of every description furnished on short notice, 
such as Sash, Doors, Blinds, Molding, Yellow 
Pine and Poplar Flooring, Weather-Boarding, 
Shingles, Laths, and Dressed Lumber of all kinds. 
Odd-size Sash and Doors a specialty. Window 
and Door Frames made to order at the very low- 
est prices. Also, 

id I can afford to sell them now at I SCROLL SAWING OF EVERY KIND 



done upon the most reasonable terms. 'Will fur- 
nish all kinds of 

BUILDERS’ HARDWARE: 

Marbleized Iron Mantels and Grates, Sash-weights 
and Cord, Air-Grates, Iron-Fronts for business 
houses, Iron Porches and Verandahs, Street 
Grates, Lime, Cement, Plaster Paris, and in fact 
material of every description for building nurpo- 
ses. TerraCotta and Galvanized Iron window 
and Door Caps furnished at the lowest cash prices. 
apr.97.) 



rjIUE BEST IN MARKET. 

SCIIIITTLER EARN WAGON 

IS NOW offered to the people of Central Ken- 
tucky, with the absolute guarantee that if is the 
best for all practical purposes for farmers’ use. 
For the past thirty years in the west it has stood 
at the head of the list, because it has more points 
of merit than any other. An examination of it is 
respectfully asked by tho Agent, who has them in 
ehnrgc of J. L. Minor, in the roar of the Court 
House, and will show them in mv absence. 

mar.2. | THUS. J. HUDSON, Agent. 

We have examined the Schuttler Wagon sold by 
T. J. Hudson, of Danville, Ky.,and think they are 
the best gotten up of any wagon we have seen iu 
this market. W. L. CALDWELL, 

PETER T. GENTRY, 

H. L. MOCK. 

Wc regard the Schuttler Wagon as one of the 
best we have ever seen. We are now using one of 
them, and it runs lighter aud stands up under 
more than any wagon, in our judgment, that is 
now in use. ROBT. 1. MOORE, 

HENRY COHEN. 

This is to certify that the Schuttler Wagon is 
one of the best, according to my judgment, now 
in use. I have known aud used them for years; 
they run easy and light. s. D. MOORE. 



Kentucky advocate (Danville, Ky. : Daily), 1877-09-14

4 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt71zc7rnp0n
 Local Identifier: ked1877091401
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/ked/xt71zc7rnp0n.json
Location
  Published in Danville, Ky., Kentucky by J.R. Marrs
   Boyle County (The Bluegrass Region)