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date (1903-05-02) newspaper_issue H. T. GIBSON 23sesl 



THE LEXINGTON MORNING DEMOCRAT 



VOLUME 4 NUMBER 122 



LEXINGTON, KY., SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1903. 



5 CENTS A COPS 



MACHEN’S 

REMOVAL 

Will Not be Considered by Gen. 
Payne Unless Substantiated 
Evidence is Shown. 



SCOPE OF THE INVESTIGATION 



■Will Be Extended and Include Admin- 
istration of Former Postmaster 
General Smith. 



TOOK REFUGE 
ON THE HILLS 



Italian Burned to Death In Disas- 
trous Saw Mill Fire and People 
Driven From Homes 



Washington, D. C., May 1. — Post- 
master General Payne this afternoon 
authorized the following statement: 

“There has come to me no request 
for the removal or suspension of A. 
W. Machen, superintendent of the 
free deliverer division. Unless the 
request for Mr. Macben’s removal or 
suspension be made by the Fourth 
Assistant Postmaster General, who 
is conducting the investigation, or 
there is brought to me evidence that 
can he substantiated that Mr. Machen 
i3 gailty of some unlawful or im- 
proper acts, I shall not remove or sus- 
pend him.” 

Referring to his order of March 1, 
directing that all contracts for fur- 
nishing supplies of a certain charac- 
ter cease until further notice, pend- 
ing the investigation. Postmaster 
General Payne said this appplied par- 
ticularly to the division of salaries 
and allowances that had been presided 
over by G. W. Beavers and did not 
include the division over which Ma- 
chen is still superintendent, although 
the affairs of the latter division are 
under investigation. 



WILL EXTEND SCOPE 

OF INVESTIGATION. 

Washington, D, C.. May 1. — Post- 
master General Payne, after a lengthy 
conference with Fourth Asssistant 
Postmaster General Bristow and Au- 
ditor Castle to-night, decided upon a 
plan of action that will extend the 
scope of the present investigation 
and include the administration of 
former Postmaster General Charles 
Emory Smith, of Philadelphia, and 
that of former First Assistant Post- 
master General Heath, of Salt Lake 
City. 



WANTS KENTUCKY MILITIA 

TO HELP IN MANOEUVRES 



Frankfort, Ky., May 1. — Governor 
Beckham in response to a letter re- 
ceived by him from Major General H. 
C. Bates, U. S. A., commanding the 
Department of the Lakes, today asked 
that the Kentucky State Guard be al- 
lowed to participate in the maneuvers 
of that department at their summer 
encampment. It is very probable that 
that they will be sent. 

If they are they will receive the 
regular pay allowed the soldiers of 
the army, sustenance and transporta- 
tion to and from the point of encamp- 
ment. Adjutant General Murray left 
tonight for Louisville to meet Major 
W. L. Liack, of the Ninth United 
States , afantry. Major Buck has been 
detailed to inspect the State militia 
of Kentucky. 



Williamsport, Pa, May 1. — The saw 
mill and lumber yard of the Lacka- 
wanna Lumber Company, at Cross 
Fork, Potter County, was destroyed 
by Are today and an Italian burned to 
death. Thirty cars loaded with lum- 
ber for Buffalo and Susquehanna were 
also consumed. People driven from 
their homes by the flames took refuge 
on the hills. 

The plant caught fire from the for- 
est fires. Four hundred men are 
thrown out of work, and the loss will 
reach a million and a half. A terrific 
wind is blowing the blazing boards 
through the air hundreds of yards. 
The fire is still burning and efforts 
are being made to save the immense 
stave works. 



GOD’S RICHEST 
BLESSINGS 

Invoked Upon His School— Beauti- 
ful Ceremonies at Cornerstone 
Laying of Hagerman College. 



THE CITY’S DIVINES PARTICIPATE 



At Launching of a Noble Institution 
of Learning — Prospects For 
a Glorious Future. 



BLOWN TO DEATH. 

Hagerstown, Md„ May 1. — While a 
boat on the Chesapeake and Ohio 
canal was passing through the locks 
near Williamsport today a heavy wind 
swept the boat out into the Potomac 
river. On the boat were Capt. Jos- 
eph Kime, of Cumberland; his wife 
and two daughters, and Harry New- 
kirk. The wind carried the boat over 
a 25-foot dam, drowning the eight- 
year-old daughter of Capt. Kime, fatal- 
ly injuring Kime, and also badly in- 
juring the others. Two mules aboard 
escaped by swimming. 



MAY DAY 



CELEBRATED 



In New York by Strike of 30,000 
Foreign Subway Workers Who 
Demand Uniform Wages. 



New- York. May 1. — May Day was 
ushered in here today with a strike 
of 30,000 laborers in the big New York 
subway, which practically tied up all 
operations and resulted in ithe subway 
contractors announcing that they 
would shut down all operations until 
Monday. The strikers are nearly all 
Italians, who demand a uniform wage 
of $2 a day for skilled and unskilled 
labor. The contractors claim they 
are willing to pay this for skilled, but 
not for unskilled workmen. j- 

THREE FELL TO DEATH 



BY FALLING OF SCAFFOLDING- 
TWO ESCAPED BY HANGING 
TO CROSSES. 



Pittsburg, Pa , May 1. — Three men 
met instant death at rhe Union Sta- 
tion tonight by the falling of scaf- 
folding on which they were working 
Two others had remarkably escapes 
by harging by their hands to the nar- 
row lion crosses 75 feet in the air un- 
til ladders were raised. 



C. F. BROWER & CO. 



Porch Furniture 



A LARGE PORTION OF THE SUMMER IS PASSSED ON THE 
PORCH. IT IS THE GENERAL RENDEZVOUS OF THE FAMILY. ALL 
THE MEMBERS INVADE ITS SHADY SPOTS, MORNING, NOON AND 
NIGHT, TO CHAT, TO READ, TO SEW OR TO SMOKE. NO WONDER 
HOME FURNISHERS BESTOW SO MUCH CARE TO THE SELECTION 
OF PORCH FURNITURE. OUR NEW LINE OF 

Splint, Reed and 
Grass Furniture 

IS NOW VERY COMPLETE IN ARM CHAIRS, ARM ROCKERS, SET- 
TEES AND SIDE CHAIRS. 



WE ASK YOU TO CALL AND SEE THEM. 



See Window Display. 



C. F. Brower & Co., 

Carpets, Draperies, Wall Paper, Furniture, Wood Mantels. 

Main and Broadway, Lexington, Ky 



The ceremonies yesterday incident 
to the laying of the corner stone of 
Prof. B. C. Hagerman's school for 
young ladles were most appropriate 
and well attended. There were pres- 
ent upon this interesting and impor- 
tant occasion many of the best-known 
and leading educators of the Blue 
Grass. 

Lexington should be proud and con- 
gatulate herself that Prof. Hagerman 
decided to locate his school in this 
city. Lexington has a national repu- 
tation as an educational center and 
the addition of another college of the 
higher education, such as the name 
of Hagerman guarantees, is surely one 
of congratulation to the citizens of 
this city. Prof. Hagerman has a right 
to be proud after the many splendid 
tributes paid him by the speakers yes- 
terday afternoon. 

Prof. Hagerman stated at the open- 
ing of the exercises yesterday that 
the industry of the workmen engaged 
in the construction had been some- 
what ahead of the ceremonies, as the 
stone had already been placed in po- 
sition. He said that to other lips and 
other hearts had been left the telling 
of the work which the college was in- 
tended to perform. He had the privi- 
lege of being a listener. He said that 
under the persuasion of many friends 
he had for a few hours allowed the 
college to be named the “Hagermau 
College,” but he felt that if it should 
succeed, that he prayed God that J 
would, this was too great an ..one, 

“im. ?I* Tvati*- 1 to  -h t-i - Le/^t’ - 
[I v the “Campd nrar^dlens!'' 

fim, as a loving courtesy to ha 
shared the cares and duties of its 
conduct — his wife. Then, too, he 
wished by calling it the Campbell-Ha- 
german. to pay a tribute, though it 
might be slight, to that good man and 
educator, Alexander Campbell. Mr. 
Hagerman stated that there had been 
place in the box in the comer stone 
a Bible, that he believed no house 
could stand unless built upon the 
word of God. 

At the close of his talk President 
J. W .McGarvey. of the Kentucky Uni- 
versity Bible College, in a beautiful 
prayer, invoked God’s blessing on the 
new institution and its founder. 

Prof, C. L. Loos, of K. U„ was next 
introduced. He said when Lexington 
was a little town surrounded by woods 
a hundred years ago, she was known 
as a seat of classic education. He 
paid a high tribute to Prof. Hagerman 
as a scholar, as a professor under him 
and a director of educational insti- 
tutes. 

Dr. R. O. Kirkwood, pastor of the 
Second Presbyterian Church, said 
that he had always had a high regard 
for Prof. Hagerman. and now it was 
even higher, as he knew he had good 
taste, because there were so many 
Presbyterians in the crowd, and that 
every man and most women knew that 
a thing could be done well without the 
Presbyterians. He was most happy in 
his remarks and closed by congratu- 
lating Prof. Hagerman and Paying a 
high compliment to his past work, and 
asking God's blessing for his future 
success. 

President J. K. Patterson, of State 
College, was the next speaker. He 
opened by extending congratulations 
to Prof. Hagerman upon his success 
in starting this college. He said that 
he had, in the face of difficulties, mis- 
fortunes and almost disaster been so 
far successful, .that he felt that the 
enterprise would b£ successful. That 
these things would deter many men, 
but it only made great men more de- 
termined to accomplish what they had 
set out to do. He then spoke of the 
educational advantages of Lexington, 
and said that the opening of another 

(Continued on Fourth Page.) 



AROUND THE 
FESTAU0ARD 

Delegates to the “Triology” Con- 
vention Are Lavishly Entertained 
at the Phoenix Hotel. 



NOMINATION OF OFFICERS 



Made and Elections Occur To-day — 
Old Kentucky Barbecue Enjoyed 
at Fair Grounds. 



The second day's meeting of the 
American Larynological, Rhinological 
and Otological Society continued yes- 
terday at the Merrick Lodge Building, 
carrying out in detail the program as 
bad been arranged. All the papers 
read were very instructive, as well as 
entortaining, and this Session was 
very much enjoyed by every one pres- 
ent. The papers and programs were 
as follows: 

“Etiology, Symptommatoiogy and 
Pathology of Otitis Media Euppura- 
tive Acuta.” 

“The Treatment of Otitis Media 
Suppurativa Acuta.” 

“Etiology, Symptomatology and Pa- 
thology of Otitis Media Suppurativa 
Chronic^ ” 

“Treatment of Otitis Medea Suppur- 
ativa Chronica.” 

"Treatment of the Complications of 
Media Otitis Suppurativa.” 

"The Technique of the Radical Op- 
eration for Otitis Media Suppurativa 
Chronica.” 

"The Inefficiency of the Wilde's In- 
cision.” 

“Report of a Case of Recurrent 
Mastoiditis with Complications.” 

"Some Unusual Mastoid Cases.” 

“Two Cases of Thrombosis of the 
Jugular Bulb; Ligation of Interior 
Jugular.” 

“Report of a Case of'iMastoiJ Sup- 
puration, Accompanied with Epithe- 
lioma of the Left Ear.’ 

ricci ,fuljfcses of Aural 



THE HORSE IS 
KING TODAY 



Interest All Over State Centers in 
Running of Kentucky’s Clas- 
sic Derby 




' ' ^Bur -i in a body to 

au.cn ’ ; .time I.ituckv barbe- 
cue and ■ eatfc of the famous bur- 

goo that has given this State such a 
reputation. The display of the fine 
blooded stock as a compliment to the 
visitors was very much enjoyed by 
Item, and on the whole the after- 
noon was very pleasantly passed by 
the delegates who are here in con- 
vention. Later the trolly ride given 
to the ladies to Georgetown over the 
interurban road proved to be very 
enjoyable, and a surprisingly large 
number of the “fellows” left the meet- 
ing to accompany their wives on the 
excursion. 

A very important executive session 
was held during the afternoon and 
the officers for the society for the 
coming year were selected and will 
be placed in nomination to-morrow. 
The "slate" is as follows: 

President — Dr. Norva! H. Pierce, 
Chicago, III. 

Vice Presidents — Redman W. Payne, 
San Francisco; George L. Richards, 
Falls City, Mass.; Dr. Chevalier Jack- 
son, Pittsburg. Pa.; Dr. John T. 
Woodard. Norfolk. Va. 

Secretary — Dr. Wendell C. Phillips, 
New York. 

Treasurer — Dr. Ewing W. Day, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

Last night the delegates met at 
the Phoenix Hotel at one of the grand- 
est banquets that has ever been giv- 
en in this city and gathered about 
the tables were many of the distin- 

(Continued on Fourth Page ) 



Louisville, Ky., May 1. — To-morrow 
will witness the twenty-ninth annual 
running of the Kentucky Derby. 

Following is a list of the candidates, 
with their weights, jockeys and own- 
ers, that will contest for the rich 
event: 

Early 117, Winkfield, Tichenor & 
Newgrass. 

Bourbon 110, Helgerson, T. C. Mc- 
Dowell. 

Woodlake 117, Crowhurst, T. C. 
McDowell. 

Bad News 114. Davis, Woodford & 
Buckner. 

The Picket 110, J. Mathews, Mid- 
dleton & Jungbluth. 

Treacy, 110, Landry, T. H. Stevens. 

Judge Himes 117, H. Booker. C. R. 
Ellison. 

Banter 122, Dale, C. E. Mahone. 

Never before has there been such 
interest in this event or such a di- 
versity of opinion as to the winner 
of this annual event of events In Ken- 
tucky. Everything is in readiness for 
the big race and unless all signs fail 
it will be run over a fast track, with 
beautiful weather and before a crowd 
of at least 25.000 enthusiasts. 

Early is the favored of the hunch 
for first place, as much on account of 
hi s brilliant work as a two-year-old 
as on his splendid condition now. On 
account of the sensational mile in 
1:41%. made by Bad News a day or 
so ago, he is favored by the talent 
to get away with part of the purse. 

Tom McDowell does not say that 
his entry, Woodlake and Bourbon, 
will win the race, but his friends as- 
sert that when they come under the 
wire the horse that beats them will 
have to win the race. Banter is also 
considered a dangerous factor in the 
rate. 

,'o-nlgh 'his city is 
" v»' r  . -M'c'i Tolley 1 Itl- 
ter, 10 to 1; The Picket, 4 to f; Bour- 
bon and Woodlake, 6 to 1; Bad News, 
10 to 1; Tracey, 20 to 1, and Judge 
Himes 15 to 1. 

The town is full of horsemen and 
the advance guard of “bookies” have 
put in their appearance. 

• • • 

Lexington’s population to-day will 
be very materially decreased, ow- 
ing to the running of the Derby at 
Louisville. Many of the horsemen 
have already gone to that city to have 
a look at the “bang tails” before the 
running of the race. Several special 
excursions will be run to Louisville 
and many private parties gill go to 
witness the most interesting annaul 
event In the thoroughbred horse 
world of the “Blue Grass.” 



WANTS A 
QUIETSINDAY 

President Objects to Elaborate 
Preparations Made For His Re- 
ception at Sharon Springs. 



NEWSPAPER PRINTED ON SILK 



Was Presented to Roosevelt By The 
Kansas City World — Lays Y. 

M. C. A. Cornerstone. 



Topeka, Kas., May 2. — The Commer- 
cial Club of Kansas presented Presi- 
dent Roosevelt with their greeting 
engraved on a silver plate. The World, 
the afternoon paper of Kansas City, 
gave him an edition, of its Thursday’s 
issue, printed entire upon white silk. 

A drive through the stock yards of 
Kansas City gave the President an 
opportunity of seeing the packing 
house industry. 

More than 20.000 persons crowded 
into the big hall to listen to him, and 
throughout the time he was speaking 
every word he uttered was distinctly 
i heard in the furthermost corner of 
lie enclosure. 

At Topeka, the President assisted 
in the cornerstone laying of the Y. M. 
C. A. building, and in the evening he 
spoke at the Auditorium before the 
delegates to the eleventh Internationa 
conference of the Railroad Departmen. 
o fthe Y. M. C. A. 

The President’s train will remain 
at Topeka during the night. The first 
stop tomorrow will be at Manhattan. 




5,000 MEN AFFECTED. 

Bedford, Ind., May 1.— Five thousand 
men are affected by ithe strike and 
consequent shutdown in the quarries 
and mills 1 at this place. As far as 
can be learned the men are demand- 
ing a re-adjustment of their wage 
scale. 



OBJECTS TO PLANS FOR 

SPENDING SUNDAY. 

Sharon Springs Kas., May 2. — The 
committee on arrangements has been 
notified that the President does not 
take kindly to the plans that are being 
made for the presidential party, which 
is to spend Sunday here. A delega- 
tion went t,o Kansas City early in the 
week and sVcured the service of a 
metropolitan ,■ Jschnr Ut* teal out ,-n . 
pel to the yftiiy, ana L.en 
the expense of renting a large circus 
tent for the services. 

After making all these arrange- 
ments the committee was notified by 
the President’s secretary that every- 
thing must be “cut out” as the Presi- 
dent must have an absolutely quiet 
day, and if his wishes are not com- 
plied with his car will be sidetracked 
at another station. 



BALLOTS FOR PRIMARY 

SENT TO CHAIRMEN 



Special ito The Democrat. 

Louisville, Ky., May 1. — The ballots 
to be used in the Democratic primary 
on May 9 were sent out from this city 
today to the several county chairmen. 

The names of the different State of- 
fices to be run for are placed on the 
ballot, reading from left to right in 
the following order: Governor, Lieu- 

tenant Governor, Auditor. Treasurer. 
Attorney General, Clek of the Court 
of Appeal, Secretary of State, Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction, and 
Commissioner of Agriculture. 






I Nothing More 
| Appropriate 

| For Bridal Presents 

* than 

Silverware. 

Ours is all one could 
wish. 



Victor Bogaert 

* jeweler and importer 

Wt - HH I I 1 1 1 



LIME, SAND, CEMENT. 

Cement Pavements, 



F. T. JUSTICE £ CO. Spring and Vine. 



If you want to take advantage of the opportunity 
we are offering you to secure 

CARPETS AT COST 

We need not tell you of our handsome and extensive 
stock— the best that money could buy and that a 
life-time of business experience dictate. 

Buyers Will Fi nd It Profitable to Examine Our Spring 
Stock and Get Our Prices. We Handle 
Everything That’s Fit to Sell in 

FURNITURE 

Big Variety, Correct Styles, Exclusive Designs, Best 
Workmanship. Call and examine our line 
of Office Furniture. It will Pay You. 

Our Motto: None But Furniture of Merit, and Prices 

Guaranteed Lower Than Elsewhere. 



J. H. MARCH, 

34 WEST MAIN STREET. 



PAGE ft 



THE LEXINGTON DEMOCRAT. 



SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1903. 



MEXICO. 

THE STORY BRIEFLY TOLD. 

The story of Mexico’s mining is not 
all preaaic — not all made up of sums 
in addition and multiplication. About 
the mining industry of that country 
there clings the romance of a pre- 
historic past; the aroma of stirring 
times in the world’s history making, 
the fascination that goes with the bat- 
tl against the forces of nature; the 
mysticism which hangs over the bar- 
ren barrancas and the magic charm 
that havers around the pursuit of 
wealth that may come and go in a 
single day. The romance of mining 
In Mexico is richer than that of any 
other country, for there are hundreds 
of abandoned and lost mines which 
await rediscovery. Tales of lost 
mines in Mexico are not idle dreams, 
as they are apt to be in the States. 
In that strangely interesting country 
the explorer often comes upon the 
ruins of an ancient church large 
enough to have accommbdated a con- 
gregation of 3,009 or 4,000. Close by 
will be found the remains of old re- 
duction works and large piles of tail- 
ings, which unite in telling of a once 
prosperous mining community. 
Whence came the ore? Search as 
you may and there will not be found 
a trace of tunnel, shaft or beaten 
track. The explanation is simple — 
the enermous rainfall of the rainy 
season. During those four months, 
especially in the tropical regions, the 
deluge which daily rolls and tumbles 
and thunders down the steep sides of 
the mountains is beyond the imagina- 
tion  *f a Northerner. The erosion is 
therefore very great; the topography 
of the country undergoes a complete 
change in a few years. In this way 
many of the old Spanish mines have 
been obliterated by erosion, which has 
also served to uncover new ledges 
and rich deposits. Prospecting in 
Mexico, therefore, has an eletment of 
chance not found elsewhere. 

Mexico has the greatest gold and 
silver mines in the entire world. Min- 
ers of California frequently point 
with pride to mining properties which 
have produced $5,000,000 or $6,000,000. 
In Mexico such a mine would be 
called a fair pocket. A gold mine is 
one which has produced from $30,000,- 1 
000 to $'50,000,000, while a really big 
mine is one which has a record of | 
$100,900, 009 or more. And there are 
a generous number of the latter. I 
Think of a mine that has paid roy- J 
alties on the production of $1,000,000,- 
000! Such is the Valenciana, the 
greatest mine in Mexico and in the 
world. How California would rave 
over a Guadalupe de los Stsyes, which 
has been w-orked for lift years and 
'ig^stilr pouring out its wealth at the 
rate of $100,000 a month. What 
pride would be felt in Candelarie, 
opened in 1767, paid to the city of Du- 
rango royalty in bullion to the value 
■of $55,900,000 the first ten years, made 
many fortunes off and on since that 
time and was finally abandoned; was 
agam reopened by American capital 
■only to again yield millions upon mill- 
ions, besides disclosing new bodies of 
ore of fabulous wealth and richness. 

Does it pay to invest your savings 
in mining stock? One often hears 
people say what’s the use of buy- 
ing a thousand shares in a miillion- 
dollar company; it doesn't amount to 
anything. 

Tafeen at a time when a company is 
selling its first issue of treasury 
shares it is no trouble at all to look 
back over the field of active mining 
operations and enumerate hundreds 
of companies that to own 1,000 shares 
of Hieir stock would mean an in- 
come of no small amount. 

GET THE CREAM. 

The time to make money in any 
enterprise is between its organization 
and its first dividends. With the 
beginning of dividends the price goes 
up, aai while the one who invests 
thoreafter may make a good income, 
he does not make money. 

The beauty of gold and silver min- 
ing is that your product is money. 
The Mina Grande Consolidated Min- 
ing and Milling Company has equip- 
ped Its property with modern machin- 
ery of the most aproved type and of 
sufficient capacity to handle at least 
200 teas of ore per day, from which 
operations net profits should be de- 
rived ®f not less than $2,000,000 an- 
nually. 

The Mina Grande Company has no 
preferred stock and all stock is fully 
paid and non assessable , and you 
have the positive assurance of a big- 
ger deliar’s worth of dividends mined 
out of the earth for your dollar in- 
vested in the Sonora’s rich field of 
bullion than elsewhere. Just think! 
Six per cent (6 per cent.) Gold Bonds, 
interest paid January and July, with 
equal amount of capital stock given 
yon as a bonus, which will he a source 
of Income to you for a lifetime. If 
yon are interested in mining come 
add nee us. If you are not interested 
in mining it won’t cost you anything 
to talk it over. 

JOHN A 

MINE OPERATOR, 

29 E. Short street, Lexington, Ky 
Phone 286. . . Opp. the Court House. 



WILL OF LATE 
CHAS. H. WOOLLEY 



Was Filed For Probate Yesterday. 
Leaves Majority of Property 
to His Widow. 



The last will and testament of 
Chales H. Wooley, deceased, was on 
yesterday filed for record in the 
Clerk’s office of the county. The in- 
strument was fully proven on the 
oaths of E. B. Hughes and Mrs. Flor- 
ence M. Woolley, to be wholly in the 
proper handwriting of the testator. 

The Security Trust and Safety 
Vault Company is na med in the will 
as executor of the estate. 

The will bears date of April 8, 1902, 
It directs that after the payment of 
all of the just debts ond the funeral 
expenses of the deceased, that the 
house. No. 182 on Limestone street, 
with all of the furniture, fixtures and 
other articles of personal property; 
also all of the live stock, vehicles har- 
ness and all other personal property 
at the said home, be given to his wife, 
Mrs. Flora M. Woolley, during her 
life time. She has power to either self 
or rent the poperty and the proceeds 
of the sale or rent are to be paid to 
her annually by the executors. 

The testator directs that $400 he 
paid to his sister semi-annually in 
equal installments during her life, 
and $300 a year to his grand nephew, 
Lesle R. Magee, during the life time 
of the testators wife. 

The will directs that Mrs. Woolley 
shall have the power to dispose of 
half of the entire estate of the tes- 
tator, by the last will and testament. 
At her death the other half is left to 
his niece, Mrs. Annie M. Magee, if 
she is alive, and if dead to her chil- 
dren. 



$25,000 DAMAGE CASE 

OF DOYLE VS. GILMAN WILL 
PROBABLY GO TO THE 
JURY TUESDAY. 



Just after the convening of Circuit 
Court yesterday morning the grand 
and petit juries for June were drawn, 
and the court clerk and deputies 
were sworn. 

Immediately following the case of 
J. E. Doyle against C. B. Gilman and 
others, a suit for $25,000 for alleged 
conspiracy to injure the oil business 
of the plaintiff. This case tr, 
gun oil Wednesday afternoon 
was expected that it would be finish- 
ed by this evening, but it will hardly 
go to the jury before Tuesday of next 
week. Mr. Doyle, the plaintiff, was 
on the stand most of the day yester- 
day. The ease will be taken up at 
the convening of court at 9 o’clock 
this morning. 



APRIL WEATHER 



R. H. Dean, in charge of the United 
States Weather Bureau at State Col- 
lege, has completed his monthly re- 
port for April. It follows: 

Atmospheric Pressure (reduced to 
sea level, inches and hundredths) — 
Mean, 29.93; highest, 30.40, on 5th; 
lowest 29.42, on 14th. 

Temperature — Highest, 80, on 29th; 
lowest, 25, on 5th; greatest daily, 
range, 37, on 14th; least daily range, 
6, on 16th; mean of this month for 
sixteen years, 55; Average daily ex- 
cess, or deficiency, of this month as 
compared with mean of sixteen years, 
0.1; accumulated excess, or deficiency, 
since January 1, 3.14; average daily 
excess, or deficiency, since January 1, 
2.7. 

Wind — Prevailing direction. South; 
total movement, 9,426 miles; maxi- 
mum velocity (for five minutes), 50 
miles per hour, for monrthwest, on 
8th. 

Precipitation — Average of this month 
for sixteen years, 3.24; excess or de- 
ficiency of this month as compared 
with average of sixteen years, .05; 
accumulated excess or deficiency since 
January 1, .63. 

Sunshine and cloudiness — Number 
of clear days, 5; partly cloudy, 12; 
cloudy, 13; on which .01 inch or more 
of rain fell, 17. 

Frosts — Light, 18th and 27th ; heavy, 
none; killing, none, but freezing tem- 
perature on 4th and 5th during win- 
ter season. 

R. H. DEAN, Observer. 



tucky Stars” on the “Crescents’ ’’ I 
baseball grounds by the score of 10 to 
7. The line-up of the “Crescents’’ was 
as follows: Harry Stough, short stop ; j 
George Weiman, catcher; Ed Owens, 
pitcher; Ross Walters, first base; Lin- 
sey Shea, second base; Everett Slade, 
third base; Herman Stevens, center 
field; Leonard Stough, left field; Jas. 
Gilroy, right field. 



OPERA HOUSE 



The Coming of the All-Star Cast. 

The coming of the all-star cast in 
“Romeo and Juliet” on next Friday, 
May 8, continues to attract attention, 
and from present indications it will 
draw the large and brillian audience 
it deserves. 

The engagement here will be one of 
the important events in the history of 
the Lexington Opera House. Never 
has there been seen upon the local 



ASSOCIATED CHARITIES 



MONTHLY REPORT FOR APRIL 
SHOWS GREAT AMOUNT OF 
GOOD WORK. 



t 




MR. W. H. THOMPSON. 



stage such an aggregation pf stars 
fittingly selected for the parts they 
are to play and the characters they are 
tq impersonate as will be seen with 
the company which is now presenting 
Shakespeare's immortal love tragedy 
under the ranagement of Liebler & 
Company. Kyrle Bellew, who will ap- 
pear as Romeo, is the acknowledged 
best Romeo now living in the world, 
a claim which is fully borne ont by 
his most perfect characterization of 
iths difficult part As for the Juliet of 
Eleanor Robson, it is certainly original 
and everything that Miss Robson has 
ever undertaken has been so delight- 
ful and artistic that nothing will be 
foun 1 wanting in her work. The tour 
opened on Monday at Albany, N. Y., 
and the per^mance has pro- 

tbe^Ki'J 
* .  it n 




MR. EDWIN ARDEN 



CHURCH SERVICES 



The pastor. P.ev, U. G. Foote, will 
preach at Hill street Methodist church 
Sunday at both the morning and ev- 
ening services. The morning serv- 
cie will be at 11 o’clock and the ev- 
ening service a; 8 o’clock; Ep worth 
League at 7 o’clock p. m. 

THE “CRESCENTS” WIN. 

The “Crescents” defeated the “Ken- 



years. It is the opportunity of a life- 
time for the theater-goers of this city 
and the surrounding towns. But 
twenty-four cities are included in the 
tour of this production, and Lexington 
is many times the smallest city that 
will be visited. 

Just where Liebler & Company are 
to profit is matter for guess work. 
The salary list of a company includ- 
ing Kyrle Bellew, Eleanor Robson, W. 
H. Thompson, Eben Plympton, John 
Kellard, Edwin Arden, George Clark, 
Frank C. Bangs, W. J. Ferguson, For- 
rest Robinson, Ada Dwyer, Edmund 
Breese, Mrs. W. G. Jones, etc., must 
be simply enormous, and should keep 
Liebler & Company sitting up nights 
and figuring energetically to make 
any money out of their venture. 

In addition to the necessary art dis- 
crimination required to select such a 
cast, it must have been very difficult 
to secure some of these distinguished 
players to assume the smalle “bits” 
that several are cast for. The fight 
for the center of the stage should 
be a pretty game to the initiated be- 
tween a collection of rivals of this 
calibre. 

It is absurd, however, to consider 
.the managerial difficultes of “hand- 
ling” a group of players like this, as 
insuperable. Fortunately they are la- 
dies and gentlemen and none have j 
more courtesy than dramatic artists 
of this quality. 

The definite date for this city is 
next Friday, May 8. The advance 1 
sale will open at the usual place one 
day in advance of the usual time that 
is next Tuesday morning. 



The following report of the Asso- 
ciated Charities for the month of 
April has been made by Miss Mattie 
Taylor, agent: 

Received with coal *. 8 

Received with groceries 11 

Received with coal and groceries . . 10 

Transportation granted 1 

Employment secured 11 

Sent to County Infirmary (case 

pending l 

Sent to Good Samaritan Hospital . . 1 

Sent ito St. Joseph’s Hospital.... 2 
Sent to Colored Orphans’ Home. . 1 

Sent to out-of-town institutions 

(Convent) 1 

Relieved in other ways (groceries, 

coal and clothes) 1 

Not granted relief (unworthy) ... 15 
Te secure crutches and groceries. . 1 

Total number of applications. ... 82 
Number secured groceries for la- 
bor 2 

Number secured crutches 1 

Number secured groceries for la- 
bor 4 

Groceies for cutting kindling. ..... 2 

Granted transportation and lodg- 
ing 2 

Wayfarers’ room (7 nights) 1 

Doctor sent to visit 1 

Failed to have prescription filled 

(unworthy) l 

Refused shoes (unworthy) 1 

Refused clothing (unworthy), .... 1 

Came for advice l 

Total 17 

MATTIE H. TAYLOR, Agent. 



was due to consumption. He was 
seventy-two years of age. His home 
was at Upton, Hardin county. Mr. 
Hubbs was a member of Company 
H, Sixth Kentucky infantry, and 
served from September, 1861, until 
June, 1863. He was sent to the home 
by Cofer Camp. 



TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAY 
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tab- 
lets. All druggists refund the mon- 
ey If It fails to cure. E. W. Groves’ 
signature Is on each box 25c. 



M. & N, LAUNDRY 
FOR BEST WORK. 



417 and 419 W. Main. 



♦ ♦♦ ' I ' ■!■ ■ ! ' 1' ■!' 44W 444444444** 



TOWN TALK 



The $75,000 issue of school bonds, 
which was awarded to W. J. Hay 
& Son, of Cincinnati, were issued 
yesterday. 

• • • 

The rail laying on the Paris in- 
terurban line began yesterday and it 
is thought wall proceed at the rate of 
about a mile per day. The proposed 
two sub-power stations will be start- 
ed in a short time and will be ready 
in about two months. 

• • • 

The St. John’s Episcopal church on 
East Main street is being razed by 
the L. & E. workmen in preparation 
for building the big freight depot 
tV «re. Much curiosity is felt regard- 
Wjft thp,,gpntents of the^“ fner stone, 
v4nch 'r'- n'.t-i 

renickTsure winner 



PEOPLE’S COLUMN 

Advertisements for work inserted la 
this column free. Others not to ex- 
ceed five lines, 25c first insertion; 
50c for three times and $1 for a week 

MINING. — The beauty of gold and sil- 
ver mining is that your product 
is money. If you are manufactur- 
ing, when your product is com- 
pleted you have to find the buyer 
to turn your product into money. 
Mining stock produces money — see? 
JOHN A. SIMONDS, 29 East Short 
street, Lexington, Ky.; phpne 286. 



SAYS POPULAR CLARK COUNTY 
SHERIFF, A VISITOR HERE 
YESTERDAY. 



Sheriff Woodson McCord, of Clark 
county, was in the city yesterday 
shaking hands with his many friends 
in the interest of Hon. Abe Renick, 
of Clark, for Lieutenant Governor. 
He reports everything in fine shape 
for the popular Winchester candidate 
and feels sure he will win hands 
down. 



TENTH DEATH AT THE 

CONFEDERATE HOME. 

Pewee Valley, Ky., May 1. — The 
tenth death at the Confederate Home 
occurred this morning, when Veteran 
W. H. Hubbs passed away. His death 



FOR SALE — Fresh Jersey cow; first 
class in every particular; good rich 
milker; kind and gentle. E. A. Far- 
ra, Harrodsburg pike; old ’phone 
654X. 


WANTED — A white nurse at No. 430 
West High street. References re- 
quired. 


WANTED — A good solicitor, lady or 
gentleman, to sell gas ranges. Ap- 
plications must be made in writing 
with reference attached. 

Lexington Gas Co. 


BRICK FOR SALE— I have about 
10,000 new brick for sale. Apply to 
W. B. Hawkins, either ’phone. 


FOR RENT — 100 books in our new 
circulating library. See list and 
conditions at McClure & Bain’s 
book store. 


FOR SALE — Bicycle in good repair. 
Dulin Moss, care Th6 Democrat. 


WANTED — To do whitewashing of all 
kinds, ceiling a specialty. Frank 
Cunyers, 28 South Broadway. 


ROOMS FOR RENT — One large un- 
furnished front room up stairs No. 
255 East Short street, few doors 
East of Central Christian cVurch. 
Reference required. 


DESIRABLE ROOMS FOR RENT— 
To gentlemen with or without 
board. 216 E. Hight. 


WANTED — A middle aged white wo- 
man to cook and do general house- 
work; ten miles in the country. Ad- 
dress Box No. 22, Pine Grove. 


SITUATION — By a colored man as 
oook; also do general work. Good 
reference. George Bally, General 
Delivery. 


WANTED — A position as bookkeeper 
to bqgin with low salary and work 
for promotion. Room 521 S. Upper 
street 


NEW CASH REGISTER for sale. Ap- 
ply at Democrat office. 


TYPE STANDS, chairs and stove for 
sale at The Democrat office. 




« a 



Painting Old Surfaces 

will produce the desired effect if the 
right preparation is used. And we can 
supply an article that is unequaled 
for the purposes intended. Masury’s 
paint cannot be improved upon. It is 
easily applied, effective, durable, high- 
ly preservative, and imparts a hand- 
some finish. Weather-proof. Econom- 
ical, too. $1.50 a gallon, ready for 
use. 

J. S. POER & CO. 
Short and Limestone. 



Notice to Contractors. 

Sealed proposals will be received 
by the Board of Education of Lex- 
ington, Ky., for the erection of two 
school buildings for white children 
according to the plans and speeifica- 
tions as prepared by H. L. Rowe, 
architect. 

Proposals will be received for the 
buildings complete and also fer the 
different departments of the work 
seperate; but contractors figuring 
on the building complete must omit 
the heating, plumbing, gasfitting and 
electric light work, as seperate bids 
will he asked for the last four items. 

Plans and specifications can be 
seen at the office of H. L. Rowe, 
architect, Lexington, Ky. 

The successful contractor or con- 
tractors will be expected to give a 
good and solvent bond, equal to 3t 
per cent of the contract price. 

The Board of Education reserve! 
the right to reject any or ail kids. 
All proposals must be delivered to 
R. P. Shryock, Chairman on or be- 
fore May 6, 1903, at 4 p. m. 

By order of the Building Commit- 
tee of the Board of Education of 
Lexington, Ky. 

R. P. SHRYOCK, Chairman. 

C. E. NORMAN. 

ED KINDEAD. 

H. L. ROWE. Architect. 



CLARKE & HOWARD 

Lexington’s Reliable 

Contractors & Builders 

All Kinds of Building Done With 
Excellence and Dispatch. Get Our 
Estimates Before Contracting. 



206-208 



MANSI 



600 MILES 
SEA TRIP 



The Most Attractive Route 
to NEW YORK and 

Northern and Eastern 
Summer Resorts 

Is Via The 

OLD DOMINION LINE 

AND RAIL CONNECTIC NS. 



Express steamships leave Norfolk, 
Va., daily, except Sunday, at T:00 p. 
m., for New York direct, affording 
opportunity for through passengers 
from the South, Southwest and West 
to visit Richmond, Old Point Com- 
fort and Virginia Beach en route. 

For tickets and general informa- 
tion apply to railroad ticket agents, 
or to M. B. Crowell, Genefywpjpjp 
or to M. B. CROWELL, General 
Agent, Norfolk, Va.; J. F. MAYER, 
Agent, Richmond, Va. 

H. B. WALKER, Traffic Manager. 
New York, N. Y. 

J. J. BROWN, General Passenged 
Agent, New York, N. Y- 



$10.40 



-TO- 



St. Lcuis and Return 

— via — 

Southern Railway 

Dedication of the World’s Fair. 



A DELICIOUS GLASS OF BEER. 



PURE, DELICIOUS AND INVIGOR 
ATING, IS AT ONCE AN APPETIZER 
AND SATISFIES THE APPETITE IT 
PROVOKES BECAUSE IT IS NOUR 
ISHING AND BOTH MEAT AND 
DRINK WHEN IT’S PURE. FOR 
LUNCHEON, DINNER, OR AS A 
BRACER AND PLEASANT BEVER 
AGE BETWEEN MEALS, OR AS A 
NIGHT CAP TO QUIET THE 
NERVES, THERE IS NOTHING LIKE 
A GLASS OF LEXINGTON BEER. 




COl'YKisnr. 



LEXINGTON BREWING CO 



Lssas RS292 'Caste? m /■ 

» Cold JnOnc^-.r-^ .-jO Days J: £ 



Round trip tickets will be sold to 
SL Louis and return via the Southern 
Railway on April 29th, 30th and May 
1st, with final limit May 4th for one 
fare for the round trip $10.40. 

For further information apply to 
W. G. MORGAN, D. T. A. 

S. T. SWIFT, C. T. A. 

C. C. STEWART, T. P. A 



Cures i 



SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN EN- 
DEAVOR, DENVER, 1903. 

The Passenger Department of the 
Chicago & North-Western Railway 
has issued a very interesting folder 
on the subject of the Christian En- 
deavor meeting to be held at Denver, 
July 9th to 13th, together with infor- 
mation as to reduced rates and sleep- 
ing car service, as well as a short de- 
scription of the various points of in- 
terest in Colorado usually visited by 
tourists. Send 2-cent stamp to W. B. 
Kniskern, Passenger Traffic Man- 
ager, Chicago, for copy. 




SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1903. 



THE LEXINGTON DEMOCRAT. 



PAGE at 



DUAL MEET 
DECLARED OFF 

State College Athletes Injured and 
Not in Condition and Can- 
cel Event. 

FIELV BAY WILL BE HELD AT K. TJ. 



This Afternoon, for Which a Number 
*f Interesting Events Have 
Been Arranged. 



The dual athletic meet between 
teams from State College and Ken- 
tucky University has been called off, 
•wing, it is said, to the injuries of 
some «f the most prominent members 
of the State College team. The post- 
ponement of this event will be a great 
disappointment to the public general- 
ly, as it was being looked forward to 
with great interest. Capt. Vogt, of the 
State College team, states that the 
cadet team will be ready to meet the 
K. B. hoys in about two weeks, and 
will post a forfeit to that effect. 



The Kentucky University boys 




Have You Seen 
Our Carpets? 



You will be surprised 
when you see the large as- 
sortment we carry. A large 
assortment of mattings and 
rugs in all the latest floral 
designs. Remember a 
small ueposit buys your 
carpet; the rest as it suits 
you. 



WHEELER’S, 

146 N. Limestone. 



Notice to Contractors. 



Sealed proposals will be received 
by the Board of Education of Lexing- 
ton, Ky., for the erection of a school 
building for the colored children ac- 
cording to the plans and specifica- 
tions as prepared by J. R. Scott, archi- 
tect. Proposals will be received for 
the building complete and also for 
the different departments of the 
work seperate, omitting the heating, 
plumbing, gas fitting and electric 
light work. Plans and specifications 
can he seen at the office of J. R 
Scott, architect, Lexington, Ky. 

The successful contractors will be 
expected to give a good solvent bond 
equal to 30 per cent, of the contract 
price. 

The Board of Education reserves 
the right to reject any or all bids. 
All proposals must be delivered to 
R. P. Shryock, Chairman, on or be- 
fore May 6, 1903, at 4 p. m. 

By order of the building commit- 
tee of the Board of Education, Lex- 
in gtoB, Ky. 

R. P. SHRYOCK, Chairman. 

C. E. NORMAN. 

ED' KINKEAD. 

J. R. SCOTT. Architect 



HALF RATES 
HALF RATES 
HALF RATES 

—TO— 

NEW ORLEANS AND RETURN 
NEW ORLEANS AND RETURN 
NEW ORLEANS AND RETURN 

—VIA— 

QUEEN & CRESCENT ROUTE. 
QUEEN & CRESCENT ROUTE. 
QUEEN & CRESCENT ROUTE. 

Tickets on sale May 1-2-3-4, good rt 
turning until ten days from date  t 
sale, with privilege of extension. A»‘ 
Ticket Agents for particulars, or 

S. T. SWIFT, 

P. &. T. A., Lexingtor 



claim that it is simply a case of back- 
down on the part of State College. 
They are very “sore," and say that 
they would have won tbe events easily 
and that State College, knowing this, 
pulled out. 

A prominent member of the K. U. 
team, in discussing the refusal of 
State College to meet the K. U. ath- 
letes, said: 

“When State College cancelled the 
track meet scheduled with K. U. for 
this afternoon, she broke the fourth 
date during this year with her sister 
institution. State College says she be- 
lieves in keeping every date she has 
scheduled, still if every college in the 
country should follow the pace that 
she has set, athletics would die out 
within six months. They claim that 
several of ther men are injured, but 
I saw the majority of the “reported” 
injured and they said that they were 
ready for the meet. John Vogt, cap- 
tain of State College track team, said 
that his team could not meet the K. 
U. track team because K. U. would 
have such a walkover that the meet 
-would be a farce. The K. U. manager 
offered ito give State College three 
other dates, still State College re- 
fused. 

“Prof. Mustaine said that the physi- 
cal condition of his men would not 
stand the strain of such a meet and 
he would be censured by the public 
wor allowing them to participate in 
the games. 

Field Hay is one of the most im- 
portant athletic events of the year. 
The public is desirous of seeing track 
athletics taken up again and this fact 
alone should be enough to cause State 
College to meet K. U., even if defeat 
is staring her in the face. State Col- 
lege has shown her lack of pluck and 
grit and has backed down to keep the 
crimson from floating over the blue 
and white again. The public, as well 
as the other colleges, will not stand 
sue treatment long, for it will sure- 
ly disgust the patrons of athletic 
games.” 

Kentucky University will held a 
work meet at the Fourth street park 
this afternoon, beginning at 2:30. The 
men are in fairly good condition and a 
large crowd is expected out to see the 
thin-clad athletes do their best to 
carry off honors. Following is a sum- 
mary of the events to be contested 
and the contestants: 

100-yard dash — Campbell, Allison. 
Wilson, Spears, Lord and H. Yancey. 

220-yard dash — Fieber, Scott, *t- oche, 
W. Yancey, Allison, Campbell. 

120-yard low hurdles — Campbell, 
By son. H. Yancey, W. Yancey and 
Lord. 

Shot-put — W. Yancey, Woodard, 
Cantrill, Nichol and Wilking. 

Hammer throw — Woodard, W. Yan- 
cey, Nichol and H. Yancey, Cantrill. 

Pole vault — Darnall, Lord, W. Yan- 
cey and H. Yancey. 

High jump — Bryson, Nichol, W. 
W. Yancey, and Cossaboom. 

Broad jump— Nichol, Campbell, Bry- 
son, H. Yancey, Simpson and Lord. 

Half mile — Cossaboom, Lord, Alli- 
son, Bryson, Guyn, Cook, Goodwin and 
Daingerfield. 

Mile run — Cossaboom, Lord, Guyn, 
Cook, Goodwin,, Swain and Karygio- 
zion. 

Potato race — Fieber, Campbell, Lord 
and Bryson. 

Three-legged race — Fieber and Nich- 
ol vs. Wilking and Turner. 

Class relay race — Seniors, Allison, 
Buck, Gibson and Robert Hamilton. 
Juniors, W. Yancey, Goodwin, Clarke 
and H. Yancey. Sophomores, Cook, 
Cossaboom, Harbison, Nichol. Fresh- 
man. Bryson, Campbell, Guyn and Wil- 
son. Preps, Daingerfield, Jett, Will- 
mott and Waggoner. Sub-preps, Trip- 
lett, Hackney, Turner and Gayle Spen- 
cer. 

The latter event will create great 
excitement and much interest is being 
taken in the race. Bach team lias been 
hard at work. The several classes 
have been practicing yells and songs, 
and have selected flags with which 
they will try to wave their respective 
teams on to victory. A small admis- 
sion fee of 15 cents will be charged. 



ALL-STAR ADVANCE MAN HERE 



Robert Hunter, in advance of the 
all-star cast in “Romeo and Juliet,” 
was in the city last night. He came 
from Cincinnati and leaves this morn- 
ing for Chicago, arranging the final 
details for the engagements of this 
sumptuous attraction. There will he 
over sixty peopple in the company 
and the production will he the largest 
of a dramatic character ever seeen in 
this country. 



MOTION FOR APPEAL IN 

THE JIM HOWARD CASE 



Frankfort, Ky., May 1. — The formal 
motion for a new trial for Jim How- 
ard was not made at to-day’s session 
of the Circuit Court. Attorneys Scott, 
Smith and Violett are in conference 
to-day regarding the appeal to be tak- 
en to the Court of Appeals. Attor- 
ney Scott states now that the motion 
will be made to-morrow and the ap- 
peal taken at once. 



CRIMSON BIRDS 
WIN AGAIN. 

Kentucky University Ball Team De- 
feats Georgetown College Mak- 
ing Fourth Straight Victory, 

Kentucky University's base ball 
team met and defeated the crack 
Georgetown College team yesterday 
afternoon at the former’s ball park 
on West Fourth street. The game 
was a rattling good one, creating 
much excitement and enthusiasm. 

The Red Birds had their usual bad 
first inning, allowing Georgetown Col- 
lege to score two runs. But after 
the first inning they got down to 
work and played a great game. Their 
stick work was especially good and 
shows that the team Is made up of 
a good hunch of hitters. The George- 
town College pitcher is one of the best 
college slab men in Kentucky. Still 
the K. U. Boys lined out fourteen 
hits, including three two-baggers, a 
three bagger and a home run. 

Two double plays were the result 
of fast work by H. Yancey on second, 
Craft and W. Yancey. The score was 
tied in the third inning by the K. 
U. boys, the score standing two to 
two for three more innings. The 
Georgetown boys then took the lead, 
but the K. U. boys were right after 
them and the score at the end of ! 
the seventh inning was six to five I 
in favor of Georgetown. 

They could not score in their half 
of the eighth, but singles by Mont- 
gomery, Roche, and a home run by 
Hogan Yancey, coupled with errors 
on the part of Georgetown College, 
put K. U. to the good by the score of 
eleven to six, the same being the re- 
sult of the game as Georgetown 
could not connect with Burdett’s 
benders to any advantage. Roch 
has gotten into the game and showed 
up well, getting two hits and making 
two runs. 

The Georgetown College boiys 
fought hard to save the day, but met 
their conquerors. Florence, catcher 
for the Georgtown team, played a star 
game and batted well. He is one of 
the best all-around amateurs in the 
State and very popular in Lexington. 

This makes the fourth straight vic- 
tory for the K. U. team and if they 
succeed in getting a second game 
with State College the public may ex- 
pect to see a hard-fought contest, as 
both 4“nws •• HgtU 

present. / ” 

The K. U. team tew/es on its north, 
ern trip next Thursday morning and 
will he gone about two weeks. They 
are desirous of playing State College 
before they leave and firmly believe 
that they can defeat them if given a 
show. 

LOUISVILLE BOXER 



WHO WILL MEET BRUTUS CLAY,, 
ARRIVES AND WILL TRAIN 
HERE. 



Henry Rice, the colored scrapper 
of Louisville, who is to meet Brutus 
Clay, of this city, in a fifteen-round 
bout at Ladles’ Hall on the night of 
the 11th of this month, arrived in the 
city yesterday and will begin train- 
ing at once. Both pugilists will train 
in private and promise to he in the 
best of condition. James Singleton, 
formerly manager of the Hanover 
Club, wdll bo in Clay’s corner and 
watch his Interests. 



BOSSES REFUSED TO 

SIGN NEW WAGE SCALE. 

Bloomington, 111., May 1. — Bloom- 
ington witnessed the most extensive 
strike among trades unions to-day 
| that has been inaugurated in many 
years. Every member of the Carpen- 
ters’ Union, Horseshoers’ Union and 
several other minor organizations 
laid down their tools this morning 
when the bosses refused to sign the 
new- scale of increased wages. 

NOTICE. 

The public will take notice that 
hereafter I will not be responsible for 
debt® created by my son John Stevens. 

MRS. P. B. STEVENS. 

(4-29-10t) 



*|“HE NEW 

Naven Laundry, 

Cor. Broadway and Church. 

Everything New and Complete. 

The Beet Work Guaranteed 
P. F. NAVEN, 

Formerly of the M. & N. 

Phone 260. 



J. H. Hostetter, 

HAULING OF ALL KINDS FREIGHT 
BAGGAGE. WORK OF ALL KIND 
PROMPTLY DONE. ’PHONE 584. 
RESIDENCE 283 

EAST HIGH STREET. 



WHEEL HORSE OF 

DEMOCRACY. 



Senator McCreary Regards Parker 
or Gorman as Acceptable Demo- 
cratic Presidential Candidates 



Senator James B. McCreary was 
in the city yesterday en route to Lou- 
isville, where he went to meet his 
associates in the land and coal busi- 
ness, In which he is largely inter- 
ested. He will also incidentally take 
in the Derby. 

The Senator was in fine health and 
spirits and spoke very hopefully of 
the Democratic future. He Is certain 
that Roosevelt will he nominated by 
his party, but thinks if the Democrats 
will put up a man upon whom the 
whole party can unite they can win. 
Such men as Cleveland, Bryan and 
Hill he regards as out of the question, 
but thinks either Parker of New York, 
or Gorman, of Maryland, will prove 
acceptable to all classes of Democrats. 
‘If I had the power to name the Pres- 
it ent of the -United States,” said he, 
i would without hestitation name 
Senator Gorman for he is as fully 
equipped as any man for the high po- 
sition; but I suspect from what 1 can 
hear that Parker is the most avail 
alio man. Leading New Yorkers say 
he can carry that State over Rooso 
velt or any one else,, and he is an. 
excellent man. With either of them 
and a plaform in opposition to trusts 
for a thorough tariff reform and 
for an economical administration 
of the government, we can and I be- 
lieve will win.” 

The Senator said he was taking no 
part in the State races, though very 
warm for his countyman, John B. 
Chenault, for Auditor. He always 
supports the ticket and will, in the 
proper time, make a number of 
speeches for 1L 



-- - - - - — 

Remodeling Sale 

Extended Until May II. 



Through the kindness of our contractors we have 
succeeded in getting the time extended until May u, 
at which time they will be here ready to begin work 
and say that the work must positively commence at 
that time, and as 

We Still Have 27 of the 80 Lot of 
High Grade Pianos Unsold, 

We will make another big 

REDUCTION OF $20 ON EVERY PIANO 

In addition to the already low prices. 



SPECIAL— One Handsome New 

Upright Mahogany Piano 



$117 



GOOD LIVING 

Quite often results in bad health, because 
what is termed "good living” is usually 
the gratification of the palate without 
reference to the nutrition of the body. 
When the good liver is a business man 
and rises from a 
full meal to plunge 
at once into work 
requiring mental 
effort the result is 
almost sure to be 
disastrous, because 
digestion draws 
upon the same 
neivous forces 
which are era- 
I oloved in thought. 
1:. time ihc stom- 
ach becomes dis- 
eased , the pro- 
cesses of digestion 
and nutrition are 
imperfectly per- 
formed and there 
is a physical 
breakdown. 

Dr. Pierce’s 
Golden Medical 
Discovery cures 
diseases of the 
stomach and other 
organs of digestion and nutrition. It 
eliminates the effete poisonous matter 
which originates in the system as a con- 
sequence of imperfect digestion. It gives 
sound health to the whole body. 

” I wish to say to the world that Dr. Pierce’* 
Golden Medical Discovery has proved a great 
blessing to me.” writes Mrs. Ellen E. Bacon, of 
Shutesbury, Franklin Co.. Mass. ’'Prior to 
September. 1897. I had doctored for mv stomach 
trouble for several years, going through a course 
‘ jit he ' 




of treatment without anv real benefit. 



In 



September, 1896, I had very sick spells and grew 
worse; could cat but little. I commenced in 
September, 1897, to take Dr. Pierce's medicine, 
and in a short time I could eat and work. I 
have gained twenty pounds in two months .” 

Free. Dr. Pierce’s Common Sense 
Medical Adviser is sent free on receipt 
of stamps to pay expense of mailing only . 
Send 21 one-cent stamps for the book in 
paper covers, or 31 stamps for the cloth- 
Dound volume. Address Dr. R. V. Pierce, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



Half Rates 

TO 

St. L.ouis 



ANR RETURN 
VIA 

Big Four Route 

ACCOUNT DEDICATION OF 

World’s Fair 

(Louisiana Purchase Exposition) 

April 30-May 2, 1903. 

Tickets to SL Louis and return will 
be on sale April 29 and 30, and May 1, 
1903, from all points on the “Big 
Four,” Cincinnati Northern and D. & 
U. R. R., at half rates. (Also on May 
2, from points within 150 miles of St 
Louis.) 

Tickets will he good going on date 
of sale, and good for return to leave 
St. Louis to and including May 4, 1903, 
when executed by Joint AgenL 

For full information and particulars 
as to rates, tickets, limits, call on 
Agents “Big Four Route,” ’or address 
the undersigned. 

WARREN J. LYNCH. 

General Pass. & Ticket Agt. 
W. P. DEPPE, Asst. G. P. & T. A. 

Cincinnati, O. 

J. E. REEVES, Gen. Southern Agt 



This lot of 27 Pianos contains about ten of the 
best makes, including the Hazelton, Kingsbury, 
Schubert, etc., to select from. This is the greatest 
opportunity ever offered to Piano buyers of this sec- 
tion, and if you happen to miss one of this 27 lot it 
will mean an actual loss to you of $150. Why not 
come and see us before they are ali sold? 

TERMS: CASH OR EASY PAYMENTS. 



Montenegro-Riehm Music Co. 



161 E. Main. 



J. S. REED, M’g’r. 



Grand Sunday Excursion 

Louisville 



-VIA- 




Sunday, May 3. 

Great Base Ball Game, 

Indianapolis vs. Louisville 

Round Trip  1*1 pc 

From Lexington, w*'*^*' 



Leave Lexington 7:50 a. m.; arrive 
Louisville 10:30 a. m; returning leave 
Louisville at 6:00 p. m. 

A la carte dining car service. No 
local stops en route. Cheaper to go 
than to stay at home. 

For full Information call on or 
write, 

JOHN D. POTTS, A. G. P. A. 

Cincinnati, O. 

GEO. W. BARNEY, D. P. A., 
Lexington, Ky. 



CHEAP RATES 

WEST 

VIA 

WABASH 

RAILWAY 

The Wabash Railroad has very 
cheap rates to all points In Okla 
homa and Indian Territory and othe; 
points in the West, both one way 
and r round trip, on sale the 1st and 
3d Tuesdays of the month. 

Have also very cheap rates, one 
way, to all California, Oregon., Wash 
ington and other Western points, 
tickets on sale until April 30th. 

For further information or full par 
tlculars, address 

ED 8WIFT, 

G. P. A. Wabash R. R., 
No. 30 Carew Building, Cincinnati. O 



Cheap Rates 

VIA 

SOUTHERN R’Y 

TO 

Arkansas, 

Colorado, 

Indian Territory, 
Oklahoma Tenitorv. 

•r 

Kansas, 

Missouri, 

New Mexico, 

Texas, and Other States. 

The Southern. Railway sells extreme- 
ly low rate tickets to the above terri- 
tory both one way and round trip, en 
the first and third Tuesday* of each 
month. Leave Lexington  :0B or 6: St 
P. M. and arrive SL Louis next morn- 
ing at 7:30, making connection with 
all trains for the West and Southwest. 

For rates, stop-over privileges, etc., 
write or call on W. G. Morgan, D. T. 
A., S. T. Swift, a T. A., C. C. Stewart, 
T. P. A., Lexington, Ky. 



Queen & Crescent Route 



$2.40 



20 



Trips Between 
Lexington and 
Georgetown.... 



20 



VIA 



FREE! FREEI FREEI 

Subscribe to the Morning Democrat 
for six months or a year and get • 
beautiful and valuable Wall Chart 
free. See ad. 



Queen & Crescent Route 

Limit sixty days from date of sale. 
Ask ticket agents for particulars. 
Yours truly, 

W. C. RINEARSON, Jr., 

G. P. A 

Tt. LOUIS, M0. 

AND RETURN 

$ 10 . 4-0 

VIA 

L. & N. R. R. 

And Connections. 

On sale April 29th, 30th and. May 
1st Limited to May 4th, 1903. Ac- 
count Dedication Ceremonies Leaisi- 
ana Purchase Exposition. 

J. P. MOORE, Gen. Agt 
W. H. HARRISON, Trav. Pass. Agt 



PAGE 4. 



THE LEXINGTON DEMOCPAT. 



SATURDAY,. MAY 2, 1903. 



TUI LEXINflTON DEMOCRAT 

Established September 23, 1900. 



Published Ever/ Day In the Year. 



W. P. WALTON. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES. 
Out-of-Town. 

Du year (by mall) $5.00 

Kx months (by mall) $.00 

One month (by mall) 59 

In Town. 

On* week (by carrier) 15 

Pttlee — No. 125 N. Limestone Street, 
Lexington, Ky., both 'Phones 9$. 



JXmtered at the Lexington Postoffice 
as second-class matter.) 



LOCK BOX 144— LOCK DRAWERS 
808-809. 







DEMOCRATIC TICKET 

For Circuit Judge: 

WATTS PARKER. 

Wot Commonwealth’s Attorney: 
JOHN R. ALLEN. 

For Circuit Clerk: 

JAMES C. ROGERS. 

For State Senator. 

J. EMBRY ALLEN. 

for Representative from Lexlngten: 
WM. F. KLAIR. 

Eor Representative From the County: 
W. I. HUGHES. 

For Mayor: 

THOMAS A. COMBS. 

For City Clerk: 

  J. ERNEST CASSIDY. 

For City Solicitor: 

W. ROGERS CLAY. 

For City Attorney: 

GEORGE C. MORGAN. 

For Treasurer. 

P. J. GARLAND. 

For City Engineer: 

P. P. O’NEIL. 

For City Jailer: 

JOHN W. MASNER. 

For Assessor: 

JOHN F. DOYLE. 



Kentucky, signed pardons were found 
in the pockets of prospective murder- 
ers, and twice did a partisan Republi- 
con Court of Appeals undo the work of 
the Scott and Franklin Circuit Courts 
because the "appellants" were of the 
Republican faith and not for the legal 
merit of the case. What is bred in 
the bene must perforce make its ap- 
pearance in the flesh and in the views 
expressed by the Leader the people 
are given to understand just what to 
expect should the Republican machine 
again hold sway in Kentucky. 

Irrespective of the Leader's feelings 
in the matter, The Democrat reaf- 
firms that the verdict was unsatisfac- 
tory, to Democrats and Republicans 
alike. The crime of which Howard 
has thrice been adjudged guilty forms 
the blackest page in the history of 
the Commonwealth. The crime is of 
such a nature that no half-way ground, 
no halting place, no compromise, 
possible. If he is guilty then to mere- 
ly confine him in the penitentiary is a 
violation of the law of God and man. 
There can be no begging ithe question. 
The jury voting him guilty, Howard 
should have been hanged, otherwise 
have said by their verdict "Not guil- 
ty.’’ and he should be set at liberty. 

If the header can, for a moment, 
divest itself of the partisan idea as 
applied to our system of trials by 
juries, it will in every truth be com- 
pelled to accept and admit the truth 
of the interpretation herein expressed. 
The only hypothesis upon which our 
contemporary can approve of the ver- 
dict is for the reason that Howard’s 
neck is not to be broken and the cul- 
prit permitted to die a natural death, 
j that which he denied to Governor 
Goebel. 



The rise is attributed in part to the 
purchases by our government for the 
Philippne coinage and in part to a 
more active demand outside of the 
United States. Inasmuch as the- pur- 
chases for the Philippine coinage, are 
not to exceed ’$2,000,000 per month,’ 
the rise must be due mainly ,to out- 
side demand. What this demand is 
for does not clearly appear, but it 
may be that the recent unprecendent- 
ed cheapness of silver has led to a 
freer use of that metal for other than 
monetary purposes. 



The Louisville Post is to go into 
liquidation and be sold. Mr. Richard 
W. Knott was appointed general man- 
ager by the Columbia Finance and 
Trust Company, and the affairs of the 
paper will go on as usual. Under the 
law a new company will be formed 
to conduct the paper when the decree 
of sale is entered. At the meeting of 
the stockholders it was found that W. 
N. Haldeman owned an eighth interest 
in the Post, which was a great sur- 
prise to most people. It is claimed 
that the paper is not a money maker. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



T. T. HEDGER. 

Di Scott county, as a candidate for 
Commissioner of Agriculture, subject 
to the will of the Democratic party 
primary, election Saturdav, May 9. 



HENRY M. BOSWORTH 

I* a candidate for State Treasurer, 
■object to the primary election, May 
E, 1903, and solicits the support of all 
Democrats. 



THE REPUBLICAN IDEA. 

After reproducing a portion of the 
editorial comment made by The Dem- 
ocrat yesterday, our afternoon con- 
temporary, the Lexington Leader, has 
the following to say: 

"If the Howard verdict is unsatis- 
factory to The Morning Democat, it 
has only its own people to blame; the 
jury was a Democratic jury to the 
bone and could have given Howard 
the death sentence if it had desired 
to do so, even in spite of the remark- 
able testimony of Henry Youtsey. We 
are deeply sorry that this is another 
one of those instances in which our 
esteemed Democratic contemporary 
finds it necessary to find fault with 
its own people.” 

This remarkable effusion is but an- 
other instance of the ever-prevalent 
thought dominating the minds of Re- 
publican politicians that our entire 
judicial system is contaminated by po- 
■ litical influences and that all juries 



THE DEMOCRATIC TRIUMPH. 

If a just comparison could be made 
with the conditions that now surround 
our form of government, as interpret- 
ed and administered by the Republi- 
can taskmasters at Washington, and 
the conditions that prevail in mon- 
archical government, it would not 
take long to understand that the Fed- 
eral machinery is rapidly growing 
more and more complex, drifting fur- 
ther away from the simplicity inaugu- 
rated by our fathers, and that repre- 
sentative government in America, as 
at present applied, is in danger of 
breaking down under its owp weight. 

Democracy would simplify it in all 
things and first dispense with expen- 
sive and unnecessary offices created 
by the mere will of the Republican 
powers that be instead of following 
their example of creating more to pro- 
vide a soft snap for some partisan 
worker. The great army of tax-eaters 
that are now hanging on the Federal 
government,' like barnacles to a ship, 
are constantly increasing, and consti- 
tute a vast, non-productive army for 
whose support of continuous drain is 
made upon American indusrty. There 
is too much red-tape that injures 
rather than assists Justice in the ma- 
nipulation of her sword and scales. 

All governments, whether they be 
municipal, state or national, are vast 
corporations, in which every citizen 
is a stockholder, sharing the public 
gains or losses. If the government of 
our fathers is to be preserved it needs 
simplification and a reduction to a 
business basis in the conduct of its 
affairs. The primary doctrine of the 
Republican party, and which has per- 
meated its root and branches, is that 
public treasure is legitimate spoil, and 
the doctrine must be weeded out of 
American political life. In Kentucky 
this very principle has been applied 
and from it the Democracy represent- 
ed by Governor Beckham has been 
strengthened. 



FOR STATE TREASURER. 

It is gratifying to know that the 
Democracy of Fayette county is now 
actively espousing the cause of Hen- 
ry M. Bosworth, ex-Sheriff, and a Dem- 
ocrat of the most pronounced type and 
a sterling character, in his candidacy 
for State Treasurer. 

From now on until the polls, are 
closed no effort should be spared to 
bring him that success which he so 
richly deserves. The services he has 
rendered to the party, to the State, to 



The Lexington Leader is still doing 
business "resenting” at the same old 
stand. It “resents” when it reads of 
"greatness in youth” as being “fierce 
ridicule” in it partisan eyes. It would 
resent the truth if antagonistic 
.to its own political interests. 
But facts are facts, and if 
our esteemed contemporary would 
do more “repenting” for its political 
wickedness and less “resenting" there 
might be hope for its redemption. 



He said that Lexington had the repu- 
tation of training the finest horses in 
the world. He knew that she trained 
the minds of the most splendid men 
and women in the world. He under- 
stood that the man who had started 
the investigation ino the rottenness 
of politics in Missouri was a graduate 
of K. U. “Lexington should be con- 
gratulated that Prof. Hagerman has 
decided to remain here. I have not 
only known him for a number of 
years, but the woman who has had 
the patience ito put up with me and 
manage me for the past twelve years 
was one of his pupils, and if he is 
going to turn out such women, the 
young ladies of his college wdll be 
greatly in deman.” He closed with 
congratuations to Prof, and Mrs. Ha- 
german. 

The interesting ceremonies of the 
laying of the corner stone and of the 
christening of the Campbell-Hagerman 
College were then closed with the 
benediction. 



AROUND THE 

FESTAL BOARD 



General Miles' Philippine report 
probably will accomplish little in the 
way of correcting the abuses com- 
plained of, but it will greatly advan- 
tage numerous patriots who are begin- 
ning to rush into print with denuncia- 
tions of the General. The publicity 
and promotion thus attained could 
hardly be secured otherwise under $1 
per line. 



The Louisville Post was 25 years 
old yesterday, thus disproving the 
theory of the survival of the fittest. 



GOD’S RICH- 
EST BLESSINGS 



(Continued From First Page.) 

college for young women was one 
upon which the city should be con- 
gratulated. He said that in Kentucky 
and her sister State, Tennessee, 
there was more pure Anglo-Saxon 
blood than in any^UtiTer "Stated of file 
Union Turning to Prof. Hagerman, 
he said: “In placing the Bible in the 

corner stone of this building you have 
started right, and if you go on as you 
have started you must succeed, but 
if you should turn from the word of 
God, the sagacity of man is unable to 
tell what the end will be.” 

President Patterson further said: 
“As the representative of State Col- 
lege, of which institution I have the 
honor to be president, I tender to you 
Its hearty support and co-operation 
and if you go on as you have started, 
every one will say come forward, my 
brother, do your best, and wish you 
God speed.” 

Prof. S. M. Jefferson, of the K. U. 
Bible College, then spoke for a few 
minutes. He advised against numbers 
of pupils, but rather for quality. 

Dr. Edwin Muller, of the First Pres- 
byterian Church, made a short a h 
dress, closing by asking God's blessing 
on the institution, its president and 
his co-workers and those who are to 
receive their education within its 
walls 

Rev. Preston Blake, of the First 
Baptist Church, was the last speaker. 



(Continued From First Page.) 

guished eye, throat and nose special- 
ists of the country. Ten of the lo- 
cal physicians and Judge James Mul- 
ligan, the only “outsiders,” were al- 
so in attendance and responded to 
toasts. All of the responses were de- 
lightful and many of them replete 
with wit, but the one that created 
the most laughter was “Why did the 
elephant allow Noah to vaccinate 
him?” Judge Mulligan talked on 
’“Kentucky’s Contribution Advancing 
Medical Science Through the Tran- 
sylvania University. Drs. Duly, Mc- 
Dowell, and the Greatest of Them 
All, Dr. Peters; Its Sentiments and 
Traditions.” 

The feasting lasted until the wee 
hours of the morning and the banquet 
closed with the following song, sung 
to the tune of “Mr. Dooley.” The 
poem w r as written by one of the dele- 
gates of the meeting: 

There was a Rhinotologlst, 

Who lived in Lexington, 

He’s cut off all the turbinates 
And of tonsils left not one. 

A barrel full of adenoids 
He’s got in alcohol, 

And if you don’t know who he is 
You’ve only got to call — on 

O. Dr. Stucky. a dear old Stucky 
You’re the finest man the Bluegrass 
ever knew, 

Yoii’re sympathetic, and most mag- 
netic. 

You dear old Stucky, Stuckydoo- 
dledo. 

A lot of laryngologists 
With nothing else to do, 

Thought they’d invade Kentucky 
And taste the native brew. 

So now fill our glasses up. 

If you can't guess who to 
Wife’ll tell you, there is only one, 
The magic Stucky who — is — 
Chorus. 



and 



his 



Our president’s name is Stucky, 

And we love him through 
through; 

We’ve came down to Kentucky 
To express our love so true. 

For many years we've known 
worth, 

Too great it is to tell, 

So we’ve named him for our president, 
He’s earned his title well. — 

Chorus. 

No North, no South, no East, no West, 
But brothers all are we. 

And Stucky finds us here to share 
His hospitality. 

With barbecues and races. 



Others 

Cannot 

Hold 

A Candle 




to us either in price or quality. We have the largest and best se- 
lected stock of 



Depot Wagons, 
Carriages, 
Phaetons, 
Runabouts, etc. 



ever brought together under one roof. We handle only those goods 
which the makers are willing to guarantee. We carry al| grades, 
and each is the best at its price. We want your trade and believe 
we are entitled to it by the divine right of superior goods. 



Smith, Watkins & Co., 

6i and 63 East Short Street. 



Administrator’s Public Sale of City Property 

Tuesday, May 5, 1903. 

I will, as administrator of the estate of C. Y. Bean, deceased, sell at 
public outcry to the highest bidder on the above date on the premises at 
the hour of 11 o’clock, a. m., the residence and grounds In the City of Lex- 
ington, Ky., on North Limestone street, near the crossing of Third street, 
Said property fronts Limestone street about 180 feet by about 140 feet to 
a wide alley. On it is a two-story brick dwelling and outhouses. This 
property will first be offered In separate parcels, or lots, and then as a 
whole, accepting the highest amount bid, as the result may determl , 
parately or as a whole. Terms of sale will be one-third cash the re- 
mainder in equal payments in one and two years from date of sale. 
Notes to bear 6 per cent. Interest from date until paid, and a lien °- 
tained on property conveyed. This is possibly the last chance to buy 
building lots in this popular section of the city. 

CHAS. W. BEAN, Administrator. 

JERRY DELPH, Auctioneer. 



And a hostess true and kind. 

And a “nippie” of old Bourbon, 

Makes us leave dull care behind. 

Chorus. 

The election of officers will be held 
to-day and ^ the remainder. of the pro- 
gram will be carried out as has been 
arranged. During the afternooon 
conveyances will be secured and the 
delegates will be driven to many of 
the places of interest in this communi- 
ty. “Ashland,” the old home of the 
immortal Henry Clay will be visited 
and many of the stock farms. The 
meeting will close this afternoon and 
a number of the specialists will leave 
with their wives for Mammoth Cave. 



tion of names were taken from the 
lists submitted by the Mclnerney and 
the Pugh factions, and many repre- 
sentative men are in the 1st, insur- 
ing a fair election qnd an honest 
count. The action of the committee 
is regarded as tending to reunite the 
factions in Kenton county. 



mmmmnmfDmmmvFfm 



NELSON— CUNNINGHAM. 

Harrodsburg, Ky., May 1. — W. C. 
Nelson and Mr. Merit Cuuningham, 
of this county, were married at Law- 
renceburg, Ky. They are both well 
known through this county. The 
groom has for a number of years been 
Deputy County Clerk and is one of 
the best-known business men at Sal- 
visa, this county. 



FAIR ELECTION ASSURED. 

Covington, Ky., May 1. — The Ken- 
ton County Democratic Executive 
Committee selected the officers to 
serve at the coming primary for the 
selection of State nominees. Two 
hundred and fifty-eight sheriffs, clerks 
and judges are required. In the elec- 




IMPOUND. 



Has Wonderful power over disease, 
curing the worst cases of Constipa- 
tion, Rheumatism, Kidney and Liver 
troubles, Female ailments, Nervous- 
ness and diseases of the Blood, such 
as Catarrh, Malaria and Erysipelas. 
8,756,000 cases were treated last year, 
80 per cent, of which were cured. All 
druggists. 



EUGENE BUCHIGNANI 



Fish, Oysters, Olive Oil 
and Weinerwurst. 

Phone 235 120 N. Broadway. 



his home county, and the people at 
are drawn, not in accordance with law, j large, are never forgotten. They were 
but because of the political affiliations j given willingly, unsparingly, without ' 
of the individual juror. When The . hope of reward or monetary gain, and 
Democrat affirmed that the verdict in to give him the office to which he now 
the Howard case was unsatisfactory . aspires is but a poor compensation for 
it was without thought of party in- his labors. 

Alienees, and reference thereto was : At all times and in all places he 

made with the view to demonstrating i s a gentleman of the purest type, 
that politics cut no figure in the ver- with the courage of his convictions. 



diet as the only Republican on the jury 
and who might have been expected to 
cause a mistrial in Howard’s behalf, 
voted him guilty of murder on the first 
ballot and in a similar manner voted 
to inflict the death penalty. 

Like all Republican partisan organs, 



absolute honesty in all business af- 
fairs, whose word is as good as Ills 
bond, and altogether a man peculiar- 
ly fitted for the position of trust he is 
r,ow seeking at the hands of .the peo- 
ple of Kentucky. 

Too much cannot be said or done 



the Leader is ever ready to attribute in hi3 behalf and The Democrat urges 
to others its own inherent vices. Re- j his nomination as being an honor t.  
publican politics has warped the entire .the party to have him on the ticket, a 
roof of the judicial system of the Fed- j credit to Fayette county, and a we’.l- 
eral government by its appointments deserved reward, 
to the bench, ever ready to sacrifice 
the best interests of the people in the 
hope of obtaining therefrom a parti- 
san decision. During the brief though 



The pree of silver bullion has ad- 
vanced about 3 cents per ounce dur- 
ing the last three months, and dealers 
spurious regime of W. S. Taylor in ' are looking for a still further advance. 




Irregularities 



Chicago, III., 5902 Indiana Avenue, Sept. 25, 1902. 

r -ior to anything I have ever tried for irregularities. Three years ago I noticed 
paid little attention to it. Gradually the trouble became serious and affected 
my general healthr The flow became scanty and very gainful and. I sought the doctor’s aid. I soon found. 



Wine of Cardui is snperii 
.1 pa 

scame scanty and very pa . . , 

however, that his prescriptions did not have the desired effect and when a friend recommended Wine of Cardui 









I decided to try it and procured a bottle. It helped me at once and I felt greatly encouraged when I noticed 
the change for the better. At my next menstrual period the pain was less and the flow better and within 
four months I was perfectly well, regular and without pain. 

This is over a year ago 
and I have not suffered any 
pains or trouble since. Ac- 
cept my sincere thanks for 
your efficient remedy. 

Because Wine of Cardui cures women so simply, so quickly and so effectively it is the favorite medi- 
cine of women today. This medicine brings women health and freedom from sickness by the most simple 
process — Nature's own way. 

While physicians examine and operate, Wine of Cardui works a cure without the humiliating pub- 
licity of an operation or the danger of the use of a knife. 

Wine of Cardui strikes at the root of female trouble. It regulates the menstrual flow, making the 
function regular and healthy, an aid to health instead of a menace. A profuse flow weakens the blood and 
suppression poisons it. Wine of Cardui, by regulating the flow, gives life and strength to all the generative 
organs. Bearing down pains disappear and ovarian pains and weakness give way to health. 

If you are suffering female weakness you should look after your case at once. All the organs are in 
sympathy and you cannot tell what a simple case of irregularity will run into if you let it alone. 

Go to your druggist today and secure a $1.00 bottle of Wine of Cardui. Take it in your home, in 
private, and you will thank Miss Adams for her advice. 

For advice in cases requiring special directions, address, giving symptoms, The Ladies’ Ad- 
visory Department, The 
Chattanooga Medicine Co. 

Chattanooga, Tennessee. 



K tj 0 N E^CARDUI 




SATURDAY, MaV 2, 1903. 



THE LEXINGTON DEMO.AT. 



PAGE K. 



JULIA M. 
METDEFEAT 

At the Overwhelming Odds of I to 
5~ Cameron Won Newton 
Stakes. 



FAV0SU1S TAKES ANOTHER RACE, 



AH Raetog Interest Now Centers in 
R«mr.ing of Derby at Lou- 
isville To-day. 



AT JAMAICA. 

Jamaica, R. I., May 1. — The feature 
event et  the card to-day was the New- 
ton Ktahes, which Cameron, at the top- 
heavy *dds of X to 2, took easily. 
King Paine, the crac kselling plater, 
added another race to his credit to- 
day. One of the greatest surprises 
of the day was the defeat of Julia M. 



KENTUCKY’S 

ARTIST 

No. 1455, Vol. IV., A. S. H. R. 

The premium saddle stalllion will 
mako the present season at my sta- 
ble, No. 123 East Short Streeet, Lex 
Ington, Ky., and will serve mares at 
the low price of $35.00 to insure a 
living colt. Lien retained on colt un- 
til money is paid; 

KENTUCKY'S ARTIST. 

Is a beautiful chestnut, eight years 
old, with three white feet, 15 % hand 
high, a perfect model in form, with 
great style and action. 

Kentucky’s Artist was sired by 
'Artist Montrose, No. 51, winner of the 
great Sweepstakes prize at the 
World’s Fair, he by Artist, No. 75, he 
by King William, 67, he by Washing- 
ton Denmark, 64, by Gaines Denmark, 
61, Denmark foundation stock. Ken- 
tucky Artist’s first dam Julia Thom- 
as, by Pat Denmark, he by Sumpter 
Denmark; second dam Lucy Thomas 
by Nero, he by Thompson’s Morgan; 
third dam Cooper, by Patrick's Copper 
Bottom; fourth dam Dovey. by 
Barnes' Whip, of Howard county, 
Missouri, he by Blackburn’s Whip, of 
Kentucky. 

Winner of more blue ties than any 
stalliou in Kentucky. 

Winning the blue tie at Kentucky 
State Fair, Louisville, in 1902, also 
the Missouri State Fa : r at St Louis. 

As a breeder it is wonderful the 
satisfaction of my patrons, for every 
one having a living colt by Kentucky’s 
Artist is breeding back without ex- 
ception. 

This horse will not be peddled at 
•tud shows. I will be glad to show 
him to any one at my stable and in- 
vite lovers of fine stock to come and 
see him before breeding. 

Kentucky’s Artist is surely regard- 
ed by the best judges in the Blue- 
grass country as the most perfect 
gaited stallion in the State. 

Mare® kept at reasonable prices, 
either grazed or grain fed. 



at the odds of 1 to 5 in the two-year 
old event. Summaries: 

First Race — Five-eighths mile; sell 
ing; two-year-olds: 

Silent Water (Parson) 3 to 1 1 

Moorhen (Callahan) 2 to 1 2 

Eleta (Walkerson) 8 to 1 ....3 

Time, 1:02. 

Second Race — Three-fourths mile; 
handicap: 

Saccharometer (Sharr) even 1 

Futurita (Gannon) 6 to 1 2 

Illyria (Odom) 2 to 1 3 

Time, 1:14 3-5. 

Third Race — Three-fourths mile»« 
Newton stakes: 

Cameron (O’Neill) 7 to 10 1 

Demurrer (Odom) 3 to 2.. ,..2 

Ascension (Rice) 9 to 2 . 3 

Time, 1:13 4-5. 

Fourth Race — Nine-sixteenths mile; 
two-year-old fillies: 

Contentious (Martin) 6 to 1 1 

Mordella (Bullman) 6 to 1 2 

Julia M. (Cochran) 1 to 5 3 

Time, 0: 55. 

Fifth Race — Mile and seventy 
yards; selling: 

Kingraine (Lewis) 3 to 2 ..1 

Ernest Parham (Cochran) 25 to 1 ... 2 
Barbara Freitchie (Haack) 26 to 1..3 
Sixth Race — Three-fourths mile; 
maidens: 

The Guardsman (Boisen) 3 to 2....1 

Black Hussar (Martin) 2 to 1 2 

Mart Muller (Beauchamp) 2 to 1..3 
Time. 1:15. ' 



Loca (Dean) 2 to 1...— 2 

Silver Fringe (Higggins) 6 to 1 3 

Time, 1:08. 

Third Race — Three-fourths mile; 
handicap : 

Maltster (Sayers) 6 to 1 1 

Father Wjentker (Boland) 3 to 1 2 

Bridge (Dean) even --3 

Time, 1:14%. 

Fourth Race — Two miles; selling: 

Compass (Bridewell) 5 to 1 1 

Ledaea (Wapshire) 15 to 1 2 

Bank Street (Wood) 3 to 2 3 

Time, 3:34. 

Fifth Race — Mile and twenty yards: 

Al. F. Dewey (Hall) 3 to 1 2 

Chamblee (Wood) even.... 3 

Time, 1:42%. 

Sixth Race— Mile and one-sixteenth; 
hurdles; gentlemen riders: 

Mrs. Grannan (Van Phul) 2 to 1 1 

Itacatara (Bartle) 2 to 1 2 

Helen Paxton (Capt. Turner) even. .3 
Time, 2:00%. 



AT NASHVILLE. 

Nashville, Tenn., May 1. — To-mor- 
row will be getaway day at the local 
track and one of the best meetings of 
ever held by the Cumberland Associa- 
tion will end in a blaze of glory. 
Many of the prominent stables had 
left before tp-day’s racing and there 
was not much class to any of the 
races. Summary: 

First Race — One mile: 

The Wizard (Crowhurst) 8 to 5..|. .1 

Kim (Austin) 6 to 1 2 

Postman (Castro) 12 to-1.... 3 

| Time 1:44%. 

Second Race — Four and one-half 
furlongs: 

Bird Pond (Shilling) 6 to 1 1 

Katie Powers (Castro) 7 to 1 2 

Angelee (Booker) 3 to 2.... 3 

Fifth Race — Eleven-sixteenths of a 
mile; selling: 

Gov. Sayers (Crowhurst) 3 to 2....1 

Golden Prince (Castro) 20- to 1 2 

Kentucky Fox (Booker) 15 to 1 3 

Time 1:08%. t 

'Sixth Race — Eleven-sixteenths of a 
mile; selling: 

Vogue (Johnson) 15 to 1....1 1 

Khaki (Crowhurst) 2 to 1 ..2 

Little Duchess (Scully) 6 to 1 3 

Third Race— Thirteen-sixteenths of 

a mile: 

Chas. Thompson (Meade) 10 to 1..1 

Grand Marias (Houbee) 6 to 5 2 

Bummer I. (Shilling) 6 to 5 ....3 

Time 1:21. 

Fourth Race — One and one-sixteenth 
mile; 'selling: 

Discus (Johnson) 7 to 1 

Flaneur (Castro) even.... 2 

Handcuff (Boland) 3 to 1 3 

Tme, 1:49%. 



ALSO SADDLERS, ROADSTERS, 
HARNESS HORSES AND TEAMS 



FOR SALE. 






HORSES HANDLED AND SOLD 
ON COMMISIQ-tf. 

J. T/ CRENSHAW. 

» 



OU CAM GET THE 

Of Everything 

EAT •""DRINK 

AT THE rn , 

iteriohCafe 

||7 H. LIMESTONE ST. 

hAS. KEARNS & CO. 



The Manhattan 



The B«st Line of Liquors and 
Cigars Constantly Kept 
Oh Hand. 



the Manhattan, 

12 N. LIMESTONE STREET. 
(JOHN SPAIN, PROPRIETOR. 



AT WORTH. 

Chicago, May 1. — Favonius, from 
Hildreth’s barn _ won the seven- 
eighths ’"tile, handicap to-day from 
such good ones as Autimn Leaves, 
pa”. McKenna, Rolling Boer and oth- 
ers. The weather was clear and the 
track fast. Summaries:! 

First Race — Nine-sixteenths mile; 
two year-olds : 

Milk Irk (Dominick) 1 to 2 1 

Trapsetter (Birkenruth) 6 to 1...-2 

Jim Ferrin (Kelly) 12 to 1 3 

Time, 0:56 3-5. 

Second Race — Eleven-sixteenths 
mile; selling: 

Harvester (Dominick) 8 to 1 1 

Howendobler (Majors) 5 to 2 2 

j Manzano (Kelly) 10 to 1 3 

Time, 1:09 4-5. 

Third Race — Mile; selling: 

Cornwall (Henry) 2 to 1 1 

Moroni (Phillips) 6 to 1 ...... .r. ... 2 

Pyrrho (Sinclair) 5 to 1.. 3 

j 'Time, 1:43 2-5. 

Fourth Race — Seven-eighths mile: 

Favonius (Dominick) 3 to 5 1 

Mimo (Booker) 15 to 1.. 2 

Dan McKenna (Phillips) 12 to 1....3 
Time, 1:29 3-5. 

Fifth Race — Eleven-sixteenths 
mile; selling: 

.Toe Martin (Phillips) 3 to 1 1 

Miss Hume (Henry) even 2 

Fake (Dominick) 5 to l..i 3 

Time, 1:08 4-15. 

Sixth Race — Gone-half mile; two- 
year-olds: 

Lady Freeknight (Dominick 3 to 2 . . 1 

Shaitan (Phillips) 4 to 1... 2 

Maggie Leeber (Majors) 3 to 1 3 

Time, 0:51%. 



LOUISVILLE ENTRIES. 

First Race — Five and one-half fur- 
longs; first purse: Jake Greenberg 

95, Rheta 95, Mint Bed 102, Harlem 
Lane 105, Skillful 105, Wain-a-Mo- 
rien 112, Whisky King 117. 

Second Race — Four furlongs; two- 
year-oids: Ban well 105, Ross King 

105, Barney Dreifus 105, Sol Smith 
105, Prince of Pilson 105, Prince Sil- 
ver Wing 108, Dickens 108. 

Third Race — Three-fourths mile: 
Goo Goo 88, Banana Cream 91, Lamp 
Shade 91, Poor Boy 95, Hide and 
Seek 95, Our Sally 95, Trial More ! 
102, Wjedding March 102, Lysbeth 103, 
Jane Oaker 103, Sen or 106, Ranco 
107, Lutes Fonso 107, Eddie Busch 
107. Altona 112. 

Fourth Race — Mile and one-fourth; 
Kentucky Derby: The Picket 110, 

Woodlake 117, Treacy 110, Bad News 
114, Early 117, Judge Hines 117, Dan 
McKe'nna 117. 

Fifth Race — Mile: Fair lass 91, 

Lampoon 95, Insolence 101, Prof. Ne- 
ville 110, Lowbre 104, Farady Jr. 105, 
Beau 105, Ben Ethelia 105, Harry 106, 
Not Wisely 106, Adelante 106, Love’s 
Labor 111. Cogswell 111, Red Hook 
112 . 

Sixth Race — Four furlongs; fillies: 
Pure Favor 100, Oneta 110, Viona 110, 
Sweetie 110, Morning Star 100, Nettie 
E. 100, Gold Piece 100, Schwana 105, 
White Plume 105. 



m o e: ?sn 



o 



AFB 



A new first-class cafe for ladies ant. 
gen iemen has been opened in tbs 
Phoenix Hotel Annex, opposite the 
C. a O. Depot, where all the del 
lc»' " h of the season are served It 
ftr - Ass style. Ladles especially Id 

Til 



JAMAICA ENTRIES. 

First race 1 — Three-quarters of a 
mile; three-year-olds; selling: Right 

and True 96, Explorer 96, Alan 95, 
Pageant 105, Petit Bleu 91, Scoffer 

101, Wlax Candle 101, Orliff 107, Pitti- 
cus 107. 

second race — One mile  uii 70 
yards: Zoroaster 120, Youi, fc Henry 

119, Injunction 115, Andy Williams 
114, Bela 107, Hunter Raine 111, 
Locket 98, Alan 93, Bar Le Due 89. 

Third race — Four and a half fur- 
longs; Suffolk Stakes: Nine-pin 105, 

Fickle 99, Bronx 112, Race King 106, 
Woodshade 96, Wizard 105, Figent 99, 
Fair Order 102, Chocolate 94. 

Fourth race — Three quarters of a 
mile; Kings County Handicap: The 

Musketeer 120, Yellow Tail 107, In- 
vincible’ 103, Ahumada 100. Himself 
abecUquipneerechmrdf mfw fwwyqyy 

102, Wealth 100, Gold Money 97, Du- 
elist 97, Schoharie 97, Ancke 85, Ti- 
oga 85. 

Fifth Race — Four and one-half fur- 
longs; maiden two-year-olds: Hoof 

Beat 109, Wolan 112, Crown Prince 
112, Sprin 112, Sterling Belle 109, Tim 
Payne 112, Careless 112, Mazedo 110. 

Sixth Race — Selling; mile and sev- 
enty yards: Arden 110, Dr. Riddle 

112, Lee King 106, Meistersinger 101, 
Drummond 97. Sqanto 84, Lady Al- 
berta 96, Faranlass 111, Animosity 
99, Dark Planet 96, Ivernia 103, Sa- 
tire 104, Oclawaha 103, Justice 106, 
Torchlight 109, McWilliams 106, Past 
96. Rosanco 91. 




102, Goldaga 102. Little Elkin 102, 
Dutch Carter 98, Bonnie Lissak 96. 

NASHVILLE ENTRIES. 

First Race — Six Furlongs; three- 
year-olds: Louis Wagner 103, Jack 

Ratlin 103, Charles Thompson 100, 
Englesea 99, Gloria Mundi 83, High 
Chancellor. 91, Sidney Walker 91, Jas. 
F. 88, Lala S. 86, Princess Olga 83. 

•Second Race — Four and one-half 
furlongs: Empress of India 110, Huck- 
leberry 110, Silver Spencer 107, Mon- 
dor 107, Easter Walters 107, Walnut 
Hill 105, Allen H. Fuke 100, Miss 
Hartness 100, Fanter 107. 

Third Race — One and one-sixths 

mile: Ecome 108, Damsir 103, Invic- 

ters 99, Little Duchess II. 97, Annie 
Lauretta 97, Lady of the West 96, 
Sarplans 94, Irresitible 93, Hattie Da- 
vis ’ .- Tl. j j 

•■’our lit ..... -One mil- « icizen 
handicap; $1,500 added: Jack Rat- 
lin 113, Simple Simon 92, Lady 

Strathmore 107, Lovable 110; Buelare 
104, Chas. Thompson 104, Barco 95. 
Reservation 95, Postmaster Wright 92. 

Fifth Race— Four and one-half fur- 
longs: Council 111, Brookwood Belle 

108, Katie Powers 108, Mafalda 108, 
Cordina 100. 

Sixth Race — Five-eighths of a mile: 
Lithum 108, Afghan 108, The Black 
Scot 106, Ed L. 102, Versifer 101, Gov. 
Sayers 132, Carrie J. 100, Stuart 
Young 99, Dolly Gray 97, Golden Cot- 
tage 97, Velasquez 97, Sub ueen 93, 
Sweet Billie 92, Ice Water 11. 



At Indianapolis — Louisvlle, 4; Indi- 
apolis, 5. 

At Toledo — Columbus, 4; Toledo, 6. 
At Minneapolis — Milwaukee, 4; Min- 
neapolis, 2. 



George Williamson Crawford, of 
Birmingham, Ala., a negro, won an 
oratorical prize at Yale. 



BASE BALL 



NATIONAL LEAGUE STANDING 



AT ST. LOUIS. 

St. Louis, May 1. — Weather clear; 
track fast. Summaries: 

First Race — Eleven-sixteenths 
mile; selling: 

Mike Strauss (Denn) 5 to 1 1 

Chorus Boy (Romanelli) 7 to 1 2 

Parnassus (Higgins) 7 to 1 3 

Time, 0:08. 

Second Race — Eleven-sixteenth 
mile: 

Hieaway (Irvin) 3 to 1 1 



WORTH ENTRIES. 

First Race — Six furlongs; selling. 
Au Revoir 112, Linguist 112, Hedera 
107, Prodigal Son 105, Reeves 105, | 
Crucero 102, Irene Mac 100, Febru- 
ary Blue! 10O, Our Bessie 100, Lady 
Matchless 100. 

Second Race — Six and onehalf fur- 
longs; selling: Tayan 119, Vulcan 

114, Algaretta 111, Ed Adack 11, St. 
Cuthbert 106, Zyra 106, Ohagen 106, 
Barnacle 102, The Caxton 101, J. J. 
Regan 99, Miss Manners 99, Uranium 
95, Safeguard 94, Oronte 90, Double 
O 87. 

Third Race — Mile and one-sixteenth 
handicap: 

Thane 112„ C. B. Campbell 107, Fly- 
ing Torpedo 109, Omdurman 102, Fe- 
lix Bard 102, Huzzah 95, Eighar 90. 

Fourth Race — Flying handicap; % 
minutes: Golden Rule 117, The Lady 

105, Beau Ormande 114, Scorpio 113, 
Burnie Bunton 112, If You Dare 111, 
Au Revoir 103, Automaton 102, W. J. 
Deboe 102, Gregory 100, The Don 99, 
Stem Winder 98. 

Fifth Race — Four furlongs; two- 
year-olds: Arnold K. 116, Beneficent j 

113, Peter Paul 113, Don Domo 110, 
Sanctum 108, Tribune 100, J. W. 
O’Neill 100. 

Sixth Race — Mile and one-fourth; 
selling: Barrack 113, Pothean 107, 

Aloe 104, False Lead 103, Alma Girl, 



Clubs. Won. Lost. P.C. 

New York 9 3 .750 

Pittsburg 9 4 .692 

Chicago 7 5 .583 

Boston 7 7 .500 

Brooklyn 6 6 .500 

St. Louis 6 7 .462 

Philadelphia . . ., 4 10 .286 

Cincinnati 3 9 .250 



RESULTS OF YESTERDAY’S GAMES 



National League. 

At Cincinnati — R. H. E. 

Chicago 0 3 4 

Cncinnati 6 10 1 

Batteries — Cincinnati, Sutthoff and 
Peitz; Chicago, Wicker, Hardy and 
Kling. 

At Philadelphia — R. H. E. 

New York 11 11 0 

Philadelphia 3 7 1 

Batteries — New York, Mathewson 
and Bowerman; Philadelphia, Frazer 
and Roth. 

At Brooklyn 

Boston 5 

Brooklyn 9 



SUNDAY LEAGUE BASE BALL CLUB 

SUNDAY, MAY 3. 

Belt Line Park. 
LEXINGTON 

vs. 

CINCINNATI ADMIRALS. 

Admittance 25c; Ladies Free. 
Ladies will be charged an admission 
of 10 cents in the grand stand. 




FIT FOR A KING 

is our Bread, Pies and Cakes. When 
company drops in unexpectedly and 
there Is nothing dainty in the house 
send or telephone to the 

DELICATESSEN BAKERY 

for some of our delicious production!* 
There’s always something fresh and 
nice ready; and of course, you knon 
that the quality of our goods can be 
relied upon. 

Our Bread is Sold by all Grocers 



H.W. RANSOM, 

No. 123 East Main Street, Telephone 
No. 245, Represents 

THE UNITED ST4TES 

HEALTH and ACCIDENT 
INSURANCE CO. 



Which issues the most POPULAR 
and LIBERAL POLICY covering all 
frrms of ACCIDENTS and all kind* 
of ILLNESSES at the LOWfiST 
COST. 

YOU i~ay the next to get HURT 
or become SICK. 

SEE HIM TODAY. 



THE INTERURBAN 

NEW BAR AND CAFE, 

105 N. Limestone. 

PRES. T. PULLEN, Proprietor, 
Best live If Liquors and Cigars Con 
stantly on hand. 



American League. 

At Washington — Washington, 3; 

New York, 8. 

At Boston— Philadelphia, 2; Boston, 
4. 

At Cleveland — St. Louis, 9; Cleve- 
land, 8. 

At Chicago— Detroit! 1; Chicago, 5. 



American Association. 

At St. Paul— Kansas City, 0; St. 
Paul, 4. 



The New Navarre 

The Best of Liquors and Cigars Con- 
stantly Kept On Hand. 



KLA!R & MOONEY, Proprietors. 

'orner Limestone and Wstsr Streets 



DR. D. BELL., 

Veterinary Surgeon and Dentist 
Twenty-five Years' Experience. 
(Formerly of Toronto, Canada), 
Office — Z. T. Smiley’s Sale Stable. 
527 West Short street Office ’phones 
new and old, 158. All calls promptly 
attended. Residence (new No.) 450 
North Limestone. 



BASE PALL 
And Sporting Goods. 
TYPEWRITERS 

Sold and rented on easy terms. 
BICYCLES. 

C. ORA UPDIKE, 

145 East Main Street, near Postoffive. 



Good Agents Wanted in F'ayette, 
Scott, Harrison, Robertson, Nicholas, 
Bourbon, Wolfe, Clark, Montgomery, 
Jessamine, Madison, Estill, Powell, 
Garrard and Lee. 

The Talk of 
the Town. 

Every lady Is talking of the famous 
Bohn Odorless Refrigerator and that 
she is coming to us to buy It 

Paul Bailor is the only man who 
can lay you in the shade with his low- 
priced awnings. 

Prepare for flies and mosquitoes by 
arming yourself with our screen doors 
and windows. We are also selling El- 
wood Field and Lawn Fences at aston. 
ishing low prices. 

Our fishing tackle is a full line and 
of the best quality. Let us repair your 
fishing rods. 

Our line of Carrara paint, which is 
guaranteed for eight years, is also on 
the low-price list. 

Carpenters, remember when you 
make an estimate on a job you need 
first class tools that are guaranteed. 
Come to us and get them. 

See our splendid line of Yale and 
Towne and Russell Irwin Builders' 
Hardware and be satisfied with your 
house. 

Hudson=Pohlman 

HARDWARE CO., 

No. 3 East Main street. 



NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION 

OF PARTNERSHIP. 

The partnership beretofotre exist- 
ing between Mike Connelly and El- 
roy Taylor is this Jay dissolved by 
mutual consent, Connelly taking the 
business and assuming alll debts 
prior to this date. 

MIKE CONNELLY, 
ELROY TAYLOR. 

GARDEN SEEDS FREE. 

A few more garden seeds can be 
had by calling at The Democrat office. 
They are sent by Congressman South 
Trimble. 





PACW * 



THE LEXINGTON DEMOCRAT, 



SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1IH. '"I 



T'O'irnrnr^ YTTTrr Yxrrnnr ^ 

: GOSSIP FROM ^ * J 
: * SOCIAL CIRCLES 

CsLJUUUL JLOJUUUULOJIJL. 



DERBY DAY. 

A®d so to-day is Derby day, the 
great day in the calendar of Kentucky 
sports!. For weeks the event has 
been talked of and looked forward to; 
the weather man has been besieged 
with questions, and bribes of money 
and *f emiles have been offered to him 
galore, if he will only promise sun- 
shine. Dressmakers and milliners 
throughout the State have sat up 
nights that some sweet maid may look 
her best for this, Kentucky’s great 
event. Have you never been to a 
Louisville Derby? Then, for goodness 
sake, be one of the merry throng to- 
day. It is such a good natured throng, 
no discomforts worry; you may be- 
gin by holding on to the bell rope of 
a crowded car and end by holding on 
in a crowded car, but you will not 
mind; you are out on the greatest 
holiday of the year and you mean to 

We Ask You to Use 

“CREAM FLOUR," 

’Tis the Best We Make. 

LEXINGTON ROLLER MILLS CO. 



enjoy it all. Early this morning, along 
about 4 o’clock, if you should have 
rooms near Churchill Downs, you will 
begin, to hear the rumbling of wheels 
and if you should peep out you would 
see the country people coming to the 
raoes. There is something quite pa- 
thetic in it — but what hasn’t its pa- 
thetic side? The infield is free on 
Derby Day and to secure good places, 
one must come early, and all the fam- 
ily finery is aired today, taken indi- 
vRMnally, the glaring greens and reds 
are beautiful, but the bright bits later 
go to help out in the great kaleido- 
scope of color at the races. Later in 
the day the coaches and carriages 
with their aristocratic occupants go 
by. The prettiest women in this State 
noted for its beautiful women, are 
wearing toilettes that might grace the 
New York Horse Show, the English 
Derby or the Grand Prix at Long 
Champs. At first they will look lan- 
guidly on at the "passing show’’ from 
ui«"tops of the coaches, from their 
boxes, or from the club house veran- 



PAPER 
and PAINT 

High Art Work at Moderate 

Prices.' 

First-class Exterior and Inter- 
ior Decorating. 

Only skilled workmen sent to 

YOUR 

RESIDENCE, CHURCH, BANK 
CR OFFICE. 

Now is the time, before the 
rush, to have your work done 
on the 

HOUSE 

- 

Our Motto— The Best. 



das; but when the races are on the 
current of excitement sweeps all class 
distinctions away and the pretty girl 
in the box whom you had looked at 
with the admiration of the moth for 
the star will nod her approval at you 
when you toss your hat in the air and 
yell for the horse she is backing also. 
All great- race meetings look - much 
alike. There Is the beautful green of 
the turf winding like a broad white 
ribbon around it, the great grand stand 
crowded with eager people scarcely 
a space seemingly between the lowest 
step and the sky line where there is 
not a human being; the miles of 
coaches and carriages the hurry and 
bustle around the betting sl\eds; the 
kings of the day, the pretty thorough- 
breds, are stalking around in the pad- 
docks, waiting for the bell when they 
may throw aside their blankets and 
carry the colors that will perhaps be 
world-famous from this race. Oh! it 
is a great day, and one that will be 
talked about for months to come, and 
even if you have to count the ties com- 
ing home, I am sure you’ve had the 
race for your money, and what do 
you care? 

♦ 

CALENDAR. 

Col. and Mrs. James E. Pepper, will 
entertain at luncheon today in honor 
of the Larynological, Rhinological anil 
Otological Society, who are here for 
their annual convention. 

On account of the illness of Mrs. 
Charles Short the open meeting and 
tea at the Woman’s Club, which was 
to have been this afternoon, has been 
postponed. 

The Lexington Chapter, Daughters 
of the Confederacy, will give a silver 



Flowers, 

See us for Cut Flowers, Bedding 
Plants, Seeds and Bulbs. 

Our stock and prices will suit you. 

JOHN A. KELLER, 

Phone 354. FLORIST. 



INTERIOR DECORATIONS, 

EWALL PAPER. FRAMES. 
ARTIST MATERIALS, Etc 



We wisa to announce that 

Theodore F. Tracy 

Interior Decorator, of Louisville, 
Ky., is now in charge of our Wall 
Paper and Decorative Department, 
and parties wishing to make no 
mistake in beautifying their homes 
should call and see his sketches, 
designs, etc 

"Beauty waits on Good Taste. 
"Good Taste waits on Oppor- 
tunity. 

“Beauty and Good Taste abide 
here while Opportunity waits on 
you.” 

CUNNINGHAM, 

141 N. Broadway. 

21 West Short St. 



tea this afternoon, beginning at 4 
o’clock, at the residence of the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Avery S. Winston, on North 
Broadway. Everything is being done 
to make the event an attractive one. 
There will be home candies and cakes 
for sale. Ten cents admission will be 
charged and refreshments will be 
served. All are cordially invited. 

♦ 

HALL-VAN ARSDALL WEDDING. 

The wedding of Miss Annie Hopple 
Hall, of Franklin count and Mr. David 
Praig Van Arsdall, of Harrodsburg, 
took place at the Christian Church in 
Frankfort Thursday evening at 6 
o’clock. The ceremony was performed 
by Dr. Gano Buckner, of Harrodsburg, 
assisted by the Rev. George Darsie, 
of Frankfort. The bride wore white 
satin, trimmed in duchess lace, and 
carried a shower bouquet of liles of 
the valley. Miss Laura Hall, sister 
of the bride, was maid of honor, and 
Mr. Edward M. Breen, of Louisville, 
was best man. The bridesmaids were 
Misses Maud Marcum, of Catlettsburg; 
Edna Shed, of Cincinnati; Neva Wil- 
iams and Florence Van Arsdall, of 
Harrodsburg; Hattie Scott and Katie 
Mayhall, of Fankfort The grooms- 
men were: Messrs. Ellie Gaines, 

Cecil Farmer, of Frankfort; Paul God- 
dard, Garnett Sullivan, Gaither Van 
Arsdall, of Harrodsburg, and Cronley 
Elliott, of Lexington. 

Miss Jessie Neely, of this city, as- 
sisted with the wedding music, play- 
ing on her violin several selections. 

Mrs. George Whitfield Hall, the 
bride’s mother, entertained the bridal 
party and a few relatives and friends 
at the Capital Hotel after the recep- 
tion. Mr. and Mrs. Van Arsdall left 
for a trip South, after which the will 
reside in Harrodsburg. 

♦ 

THEATRE PARTIES. 

Among the theatre parties for "Old 
King Cole” were Mrs. F. A. Dainger- 
field’s box party, the guests of which 
were: Misses Henderson, Bessie and 
Elizabeth Daingerfield, Dean and Mrs. 
Baker P. Lee, Miss Anderson of Vir- 
ginia. Miss Stevens, Mr. Hogan Yan- 
cey, Mr. Henry, of Arizona. 

In Mrs. George Draper Kelly’s box 
were: Mrs. Henry Martyn Skillmali, 
Mrs. Jack McCormick of St. Louis. 
Mr., little Miss Angeline McCormick 
and Master Winston Skillman. 

Mrs. Burris A. Jenkins and children 
occupied a box. With them were Mr. 
Selin, Miss Fannie Webb, Miss Lottie 
Webb, Miss Mildred Love and Miss 
Walb.v were in a theatre party. 

♦ 

LOVELACE-HARRISON WEDDING. 

Mr. Charles B. Harrison, of Coving 
ton, Ky., son of Mr. Joseph Harrison, 
of this cty, and Miss Nonie Lovelace, 



of Greenwood, Ky., were married 
Tuesday at Greenwood. The wed- 
ding was a pretty one, witnessed by 
a large crowd of relatives and friends 
Their only attendants were Miss Josle 
Lovelace and Mr. Julian Sargent. 
After the ceremony the bride and 
bridegroom left for Covington, where 
they will reside. The bridegroom is 
■well known here, where he has many 
friends who will be interested in his 
happiness and will congratulate him. 
He is fiilling the position of passen- 
ger brakeman on the L. & N. railroad. 
♦ 

Just received, a new shipment of 
the Phipps & Atchison and Gage 
Brothers Hats. They are the swellest 
goods every shown in the South. Re- 
member, Miss Throndsen, of Chicago, 
has charge of the Hair Dressing and 
Manicuring Department 



CATERING 

A Specialty. 

McGurk & Co. 

Phones 47Q. 



LADIES’ BAZAAR. 

♦ 

PERSONALS. 

Miss Julia Daingerfield and Miss 
Jay Daingerfield are expected home 
Sunday from Hendersonville, N. C., 
where they have had a delightful 
visit. 

Mrs. Dwight Ripley, of Brooklyn, N. 
Y„ who has been the guest of Mrs. 
William K. Massie for a short visit, 
is now the guest of Mrs. William 
Rodes. 

Miss Lettie Wood, of Louisville, is 
expected today to he the guest of 
Miss Anne Pickett. 

Hon. and Mrs. Claude M. Johnson 
are expected Tuesday to he guests 
of their daughters, Mrs. Lewis F. 
Brown and Mrs. R. Craig Falconer. 
They have just returned from London, 
England, and come at once to Lexing- 
ton, only stopping tn New York for 
Miss Rosa Vertner Johnson’s wed- 
ding. 

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Scott Briggs, of 
Frankfort, are expected today to be 
guests of Mrs. Brggs’ father, Mr. Jos- 
eph Scott. 

One of the brightest and most at- 
tractive visitors in the city is little 
Miss Angelin McCormick, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack McCormick, and 
granddaughter of Mrs. Anna Bridge, 
of St. Louis, who are guests of Mrs. 
Avery Wins^op and. Mrs. H'_jk Mar- 
tyn Skillifian, Jr. Besides haring an 
unusually bright intellect, this little 
four-year-old maiden is very dainty 
and lovely, with brown eyes, bronze 
red hair and the creamiest of complex- 
ions. She is quite talented, and her 
performane on the pianola will be one 
of the musical feautres of the enter- 
tainment to be given by the Daugh- 
ters of the Confederacy this afternoon. 

Mrs. George Baker Long, of Buffalo, 
N. Y„ who has been the guest of her 
mother, Mrs. Magee, returned home 
yesterday. 

Mrs. C. L. Carpenter, of Paris; Mrs. 
Mrs. Finley, Miss Ida May Finley, 
Miss Florence Sinclair, of George- 



town; Mrs. William Miller, Mrs. Wash- 
ington Miller, of Winchester, were 
guests her Friday. 

Mrs. George W. Barney returned 
Thursday from a short visit to Louis- 
ville. 

Miss Beuice Scott has returned 
from Mt. Sterling, where she went 
to attend the Turner-Geene wedding. 

Mss Annie Steele, of Midway, an-i 
her guest. Miss Mary Breckinridge, 
of Arkansas, were guests here yes- 
terday. 

Mrs. T. A. Adams and little daugh- 
ter, Gladys, are guests of Mrs. and 
Mrs. W. A. Searcy. 

Mrs. O. P. Clay, of Paris; Mrs. Van 
Shipp, of Midwa, were with friends 
here Friday. 

Mr. H. W. Fuller, general passenger 
agent of the C. & O. railroad, who 
was the guest of his sister, Mrs. Geo. 
W. Barney, yesterday, left last even- 
ing for Washington, D. C. 

Miss Jennie Speyer reached home 
Thursday evening from a delightful 
trip to Chicago, 111., and other West- 
ern points. 

Mrs. David Prewitt, of “Dunreath,” 
is the guest of Miss Belle Pearson. 

Miss Dove Embry and Mr. Wiliam 
R. Embry are in Lancaster, where 
they went to attend the dance given 
in honor of Miss Christine Bradley. 

Mrs. Thos. Combs and daughter, 
Miss May Combs, have returned from 
Mt. Sterling, where they went to at- 
tend the wedding of Miss Rilda Hor- 
ton and Mr. H. Bruce Duff, which 
took place Thursday at the bride’s 
home, Rev. Lee performing the cere- 
mony. 

Mr. Oscar Mitchell, of Cincinnati, 
was a guest here yesterday. 

Dr. Chas. W, Richardson, of Wash- 
ington, D. C., a distinguished guest to 
the convention held here, will leave 
today for his home. 

Mr. R. H. Halley, of Cincinnati, a 
prominent railroad official of the 
Union Pacific road, was a guest here 
Friday. 



I 



Cut Prices 

on all styles 
of • « • • 



* fir*.* 



Fnotograpns 

at 

The 

Schaeffer ii 
Studio, 

137 w. Main, Lexington, Ky 
Opp. Graves, Cox & Co. 

1 .fr.fr.fr.fr.fr.fr-fr-fr-fr-l-H-fr.fr.fr. ; .  I. .fr.fr  • ■» 




-;V 

^ '*«■; *V* / 



CLARENCE E. WOODS. 

The above is a good likeness of 
Senator McCreary’s assistant secre- 
tary, who on yesterday entered upon 
his new duties. The Senator did 
himself proud in making this appoint- 
ment, for he never had a more loyal 
supporter in his political ambitions 
or a more faithful and constant friend. 
Mr. Woods is a polished gentleman, 
a writer of recognized ability, and 
will prove a capable and valuable aid 
to his chief. 

Mr. Woods is now Grand Recorder 
of the Greek College Society of the 
Sigma Nu and editor of the Delta, 
the official organ of that society. 



MISS THRONDSEN, FORMERLY OF 
HAMILL & THRONDSEN, OF CHI 
CAGO, HAS ARRIVED AND WILL 
HAVE CHARGE OF THE HAIR 
DRESSING AND MANICURING DE 
PARTMENT AT THE 

Ladies’ Bazar. 



Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken 
Lenses Replaced, Repairing Done 
WHILE YOU WAIT. 

rvi . x. arinj £-] — j- 

206 West Main Street, Opposite 
Court House. 

Eyes Examined Free. Work Guar 
a meed. 



KENTUCKY FAIR DATES. 

Kirksville, July 17 and 18. 

Crab Orchard, July 22, 4 days, 
Georgetown, July 21, 4 days. 
Cynthiana, July 29, 4 days. 
Guthrie, July Z9 3 days 
Hustonville, July 29, three days. 
Danville, August 4, 4days. 
Madisonville, August 4, 4 adys. 
LEXINGTON, AUG. 10, 6 DAYS. 
Fern Creek, August 18, 4 days. 
Lawrenceburg, August 18, 4 days 
Shepherdsville, Aug. 18, 4 days. 
Maysville, August 19, 4 days. 
Shelbyville, August 25, 4 days. 
London, Aug. 26, three days. 
Bardstown, September 1, 5 days. 
Nicholas ville, Sep. 1, 3 days. 
Somerset, September 1,4 days. 
Elizabethtown, Sept. 8, 4 days. 
Bowling Green, Sept. 15, 4days. 
Kentucky State Fail , Owensboro, 
S  ptember 21, 6 day*. 







G real Ma jesticR ange 



EXHIBIT 

One Whole Week, 

Hay 4th=pth Inclusive. 

Set Majestic Ware, $7.50, free with each stove. 

Don’t fait to call and get good cup of coffee 
and hot biscuits and see the working of the best 
Malleable Iron Range on earth. Will cook with 
half fuel you are using and last life time. 



REMEMBER XH EL DATE. 



BROCK & CO„ 

20 West Main Street. 



vensly in Logan county last February, 
has made a confession. The Ballard 
woman says she was jealous and the 
man she loved was infatuated with 
the Ravensly girl and she killed her 
to get her out of the way. 

On the 15th of last February the 
Ballard woman went to the Ravensly 
girl’s home with a Winchester rifle, 
and calling the girl out, marched her 
to a lonely place in the wooods and 
blew out her brains. 



GREATLY REDUCED RATES 



-TO- 



CALIFORNIA 



-VIA- 



Missouri Pacific R’y. 



$56.50 for the round trip from Cin- 
cinnati. Proportionally low rates 
from all points. Tickets on sale May 
2nd and May 11th to lTtib 1903, in- 
clusive; final return limit July 15th. 

Choice of any direct route going" 
and returning with liberal stop-over 
privileges to enable visiting principal 
points of interest en route. 

Through daily service from St 
Souis. Superb dining cars, meals 
served a la carte. 

One-way tickets at unusually low 
rates on sale daily up to June 15th, 
1903. 

For full information address A. A. 
GALLAGHER, D. P. A., 419 Walnut 
street, Cincinnati, O. 



Cheap Rates 

—to the:— 

West and Southwest 



-FOR- 



Home=Seekers and Settlers. 



On the first and third Tuesdays of 
May, June, July, August and Septem- 
ber, 1903, the Missouri Pacific Rail- 
way and Iron Mountain route will 
sell one-way and round trip tickets 
to various points in the West and 
Southwest at greatly reduced rates. 
The round trip tickets will bear finaS 
return limit of 21 days from date of 
sale, with liberal stop-over privileges. 
Advise me your objective point, th® 
number of tickets required, whether 
one-way or round trip, and l will 
cheerfully quote rates and mall, fre® 
of charge, interesting printed natter 
and maps. 

A. A. GALLAGHER. 

D. P. A., 419 Walnut street, Cin- 
cinnati, O. 



RATES 

'N 

Louisville a fid Return 

Account Races, v ^ 



NOTED EXPLORER STRICK- 
EN AT ST. PETERSBURG. 

St. Petersburg, May 1. — Paul du 
Chaillu, the Ami 1 , ican author and ex- 
plorer, who was stricken with par- 
tial paralysis yesterday, died at mid- 
night. 

A brother of Verestchagiu, the Rus- 
sian painter, will arrange for the 
burial of the body in the Literatears' 
cemeierv. if it is desiied that the 
interment take place here. 



May 1 to li, 

VIA 

Southern Railway 

On account of meeting of New Lou- 
| Isville Jockey Club, May 1st to 16th, 
the Southern railway will sen round 
trip tickets as hown below: 

May 1st and 2d $3 20 round trip 
! limit May 20th. 

May 3d to 19th inclusive^ round 
[ trip $3.20, limit 3 days. 

May 2d $2.40 round trip, limit May 
j 4th. 

L. & N. R. R. May 9th $2.40 round trip, limit May 

REGARDLESS OF THE WEATHER, May 16th $2.40 round trip, limit May 

1 18th. 

Trains leave Lexington 7:30 a. m., 
3:05 and 5:30 p. m. Returning leave 
Louisville 7:40 a. m., 3:50 and 7:26 
p m. 

W. G. MORGAN, D. T. A 
S. T. SWIFT, C. T. A- 
C. C. STEWART. T. P. A 



$ 1.25 $ 1.25 

GRAND EXCURSION 

TO 

CINCINNATI 

AND RETURN 
SPECIAL TRAIN 
VIA 



a 



CONFESSES TO KILLING 

HER RIVAL. 

Logan, W. Va., May 1. — Maud 
Ballard, who murdered Jennnie Ra- 



Sunday, May 3. 

Zoo Garden, Matinee at Theatres, 
Trolly Rides to the Hill Tops, Na 
tional League Baseball Game, Cincin- 
nati vs. St. Louis. 

Train leaves Lexington at 7:00 
m„ arrives at Cincinnati at 9:45 a 
m. Returning, train leaves Cincinnati 
at 8 p. m.. Fourth street Station. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE — Special 
Trains arrive and depart from Fourth 
Street Station, Between John and 
Smith streets. 

EXCURSION TICKETS 
ONLY ON SPECIAL TRAINS. 

J. P. MOORE, General Agent, Lex 
Ington, Ky.; W. H. HARRISON, 
Traveling Passenger Agent, Lexing- 
ton, Ky.; C. L. STONE, General 
Passenger Agent, Louisville, Ky.; F. 
D. BUSH, 

Cincinnati, O. 



We are showing 

BEAUTIFUL AND STYLISH MILL- 
ENERY. 

Up to date goods. Your careful in- 
spection is solicited before purchasing 
GOOD your spring Millinery. For low price® 
and up-to-date work give us a call. 

MISS ROSE DODD, 

551^ East Main street. 



THE SAVINGS BANK 
Of Lexington, 

Division Passenger Agent. I Pays 4 per cent, interest on time de- 
posits. 49 East Short stree. 



SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1903. 



THE LEXINGTON DEMOCRAT. 



*Tge 7. "j 



DERBY DAY_ 

SPECIAL 

TO LOUISVILLE 

Saturday, May 2, 



■!'  ■ ■!■ H ' 



THE 



Chesapeake & Ohio 

RAILWAY 

Will run a Special Limited Train to leave Lexington at 7:30 o’clock a. m. 
•harp, on Saturday, May 2d, that will be due in Louisville at 10 a. m. Re- 
turning, it will leave Louisville from the Seventh Street Station at 7:30 p. 
m. Tickets will be good to return on regular train at 6 o'clock p. m. if 
■desired. *. .waUMAalifefli / 

SPECIAL ROUND TRIP RATE OF 

$ 2.40 

Has Been Made, Good Returning 
May 4th. 

Remember, this special train will start from Lexington and will be run 
In addition to our regular train and arrive in Louisville ahead of that 
train. Make your arrangements to go via the Chesapeake & Ohio, as you 
will make no local stops, have a nice clean ride, plenty of time to get break, 
fast before starting, and get home in good time. 

GEORGE W. BARNEY, 

Division Passenger Agent. 



GENERAL NEWS 
OF THE COURTS 



County Court. 

The liquor license of John Richard- 
son, at 700 North Broadway, was on 
yesterday transferred to I. N. and F 1 . 
M. Cropper, they having purchased 
the stock of goods. 

J. F. Jolly & Brother were granted 
a renewal of their liquor license at 
the Palace Hotel. 

E. B. Hayman, J. Wilson Berry and 
W. R. Smith were appointed as ap- 
praisers of the estate of Charles H. 
Woolley, deceased. 

• • • 

Rea| Estate Transfers. 

Mike Carroll and. wife to the Blue 
Grass Tracton Company, for valuable 
consideration, a tract of land on the 
Lexington and Maysville pike, about 
two miles from Lexington, as a right 
of way for the Electric Railway Com- 
pany. 

E. S. Prous to R. R. Prous, for $1 
cash and other valuable considera- 
tions, a lot 24 by 66 feet on Coleman 
street. 

Ed Lawrence, Jr., to Annie C. Clay, 
for $250 cash, a lot 23 by 100 feet on 
Rose street. 



ly effect. Both tli id shortly after- 
ward. 



FIRE IN BOYLE. 

Danville, Ky., May 1. — Three large 
barns belonging to R. A. Evans were 
burned during a violent windstorm. A 
quantity of farming implements and 
feed, with 41,000 pounds of hemp seed 
that had just been stored were also 
destroyed. W|. F. Delong also lost 
about $300 worth of hemp seed. The 
total loss to Mr. Evans will proba- 
bly be about $4,000, with $600 Insur- 
ance, while that of Mr. Delong will 
be in the neighborhood of $1,000. 



COURT OF APPEALS 



' Lexington Business Directory 

AND READY REFERENCE GUIDE OF RELIABLE BUSINE88 FIRMS. 
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY BY CONSULTING THIS COLUMN WHE*  
IN NEED. 



OMNIBUS OO. 

Rubber Tire Coupe Service 

Per Hour $1-00 

Additional hrs. Shopping or 
Calling 50 

Day parties of Theatres .... 1.50 

Night 2.00 

W. B. WILKERSON, 8ecy. 

M. J. WHITE— Finisher of Furniture, 
•Planes, Old Mahogany, etc. First 
class work done. No. 42 West Short 
Street. Phones 158, old and new. 



MILTON & IRVING— Plumbers, *&s 
and Steam Fitters, 36 West Main SL 
Phene 697. A11 work guaranteed. 

L M'CORMICK & CO. — Dealers ie 
Scrap Iron, Metals, Rags, Hides, 
.Wool, Fur, etc. Office 56 West Main 
Street, Lexington, Ky. Telephone 
1471. Yards 64-66-58-60 Water SL 



American Bonding Co. 

S 



TRENGTH 

SECURITY 

OLIDITY 



J. M. HOCKER & SON, Agta, 

149 N. Mill 8t 

We will make your bond. 

Local Board. “Make bonds, no delay.' 

J. T. Shaw, Cashier, Second Natl 
Bank, V. Pres’t, Geo. C. Webb, Atty., 
V. Pres’t, J. M. Hocker, T. Logan 
Hocker, Insurance, As*’t Sec’ys. 



J. C. SHERIDAN & SON— Funeral dt 
rectors and embalmera, 416 Wesl 
8hort street, Lexington Ky., Reel 
dence phone 430; office phones 18. 



Frankfort, Ky., May 1. — Present: 
Chief Justice Burnam and Judges 
O’Rear, Nunn and Settle. 

Eades vs. Owens, Wayne, affirmed. 

Sparks vs. Deposit Bank of Paris, 
etc., Harrison ; affirmed. 

Town of Fredonia vs. Rice, etc., 
Harrison; affirmed. 

Sparks, etc., vs. Roberson, etc., Ma- 
rion; affirmed. 

Louisville and Nashville Railroad 
Company vs. Vrady, Bullitt; affirmed 
with damages. 

R. T. Harper, by etc., vs. Kopp, Jef- 
ferson Court of Common Pleas, First 
division; reversed. 

Sullivan vs. Louisville and Nash- 
ville Railroad Company, Jefferson 
Court of Common Pleas; affirmed. 

Dieckman vs. Weirich, Campbell; 
affirmed. 

Nichols vs. I. C. R. R. Co., and Ste- 
phenson’s admr. vs. I. C. R. R. Co., 
etc., McCracken; agreement filed, 
cases ordered heard together, and 
time to file brief extended forty days. 

Wklker vs. Commonwealth, Graves; 
appellee given thirty days’ time to 
file brief. 

McConathy, etc. vs. Lanham, etc., 
Crittenden; time to file brief extend- 
ed thirty days on appellant’s mo- 
tion. 

Stone, etc. vs. Burge, Warren; ap- 
pellee’s brief filed. 

Nelson County vs. Bardstown and 
Louisville Turnpike Company, Nels- 
on; appellant given five days’ fur- 
ther time to file reply, etc., and ap- 
pellee filed amended answer to peti- 
tion for rehearing. 

Morrison vs. The Commonwealth, 
Franklin; argued by M. R. Todd for 
appellee and J. A Scott for appellant, 
and submitted. 

Ordered that court be adjourned un- 
til Tuesday morning at 11 o’clock. 



M ARKET S 

Reported by Green, Emery & Co., 
Live Stock Commission Merchants, 
Cincinnati, O. 

Cincinnati, O., May 1. — Cattle — Re- 
ceipts 1 .000; market slow and shade 
lower. 

Heavy steers, choice...... 5 io@5 35 

Fair to good 4 50@5 10 

Butcher steers, extra .... 5 10 @5 25 
Butcher steers, good to 

choice 4 60@5 10 

Butcher steers, common to 

fair 3 65@4 35 

Oxen 2 25@4 50 

Heifers, extra ..( 4 85@5 00 

Heifers, good to choice.... 4 60@4 85 
Heifers, common to fair.. 3 25@4 25 
Cows, good to extra...... 3 85@4 35 

Cows, fair to good 2 85@3 85 

Common rough steers, 

cows and scalawags.... 1 50@2 25 

Stockers and feeders 3 00@4 85 

Bull market steady. 

Thin and light 2 50@3 50 

Bolognas 3 65@4 10 

Butcher Bulls 4 00 @4 25 

Calf maket steady: 

Common to good.. 3 00@5 50 

Good to extra 5 75@6 25 

Hogs — Receipts 3,000; market slow. 

Choice heavy hogs 6 80 @6 90 

Packers 6 60@6 80 

Lights, 130-150 av 6 60@6 65 

Pigs, 100-120 av 6 00@6 60 

Sheep and lambs — Receipts 3,000. 
market steady. 

Best sheep, clipped 4 25 @4 50 

Fair to good, clipped 3 75@4 25 

Common sheep 2 00@3 00 

Best lambs 5 25@6 00 

Fair to good lambs 5 00@5 60 

Sprin lambs , 5 50@7 75 



New Orleans, La. 

' AND RETURN T 

$iA.95 

VIA 

L. & N. R. R. 

On sale May 16th to 21st, Inclusive, 
ttmlted to May 24th, with privilege of 
•xtension until June 15th. Account 
United Confederate Veterans Reunion. 
Call ea agents. 

J. P. MOORE, Gen. Agt 
W. H. HARRISON, Tray. Pass. Agt 

If you want your 

PLUMBING 

done in the best manner 
possible, at the lowest pos- 
sible price, call up 

W. C MOORE 

Twenty years’ experience 
on Windmills, Gasolene 
Engines, Gas Machines 
Steam, Hot Water, or Hoi 
Air Heating. 

New Phone 1175. 

40 SOUTH BR0ADWA1 



New Orleans, La. 

AND RETURN 

$19.80 

VIA 

L. & N. R. R. 

On sale May 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th. 
Limited to 10 days from date of sale, 
with privilege of extension until May 
30th. Account American Medical As- 
sociation. 

J. P. MOORE, Gen. Agt 
W. H. HARRISON, Trav. Pass. Agt 



U. C. V. 

REUNION 

NEW ORLEANS. 

May 19-22, ’03. 

THE 

Queen & Crescent 

ROUTE 

has made a Special Low Rate for the 
benefit of the Veterans and their 
friends, who anticipate attending this 
meeting. 

Tickets will be on sale May 16-21 
good returning until May 24th, 1903 
Privilege of extension until June 15 
Ask your nearest ticket agent for par 
tlculars, or write to 

W. C. RINEARSON, 

G. P. A. 



FCUR INDICTMENTS 



RETURNED AGAINST LAKELAND 
ATTENDANTS FOR CRUELTY 
TO PATIENTS. 



Louisville, May 1. — The grand ju- 
ry to-day retured four indictments 
charging asylum attendants with as- 
sault and battery. The offense is said 
to have been committed on patients 
at Central Kentucky Asylum for the 
Insane at Lakeland. 

F. C. Addis is accused of assault- 
ing E. A. Barler; Walter Black is 
charged with assaulting Isaac Mill- 
er; William Wfaller is charged with 
assaulting Hugh Kennedy; Steve 
Helm is charged with assaulting Isaac 
Miller. 



CHICAGO LIVE STOCK. 

Chicago, May 1. — Cattle — Receipts 
1,500 head, including 600 Texans; 
market steady; good to prime steers 
$5@5.50; poor to medium $4.25@5; 
Stockers and feeders $3 @4.90; cows 
$1.50@4.90; heifers $2.50@5.25; can- 
ners $1.50@2.80; bulls $2.50@4.50; 
calves $2.50 @6- Te xas fed steers $4 
•-•tai-reeeipts for 
to-day 16,000 head, tomorrow, 10,000 ; 
left over, 3,609; market steady; mixed 
and butchers $6.80@7; good to choice 
heavy $7@7.15; rough heavy $6.80@ 
6.95; light $6.60@6.90; bulk of sales 
at $6.80@7.05; Sheep — Receipts 3,- 
000 head; sheep and lambs steady; 
good to choice wethers $'4.75@5.50; 
fair to choice mixed $3.75@4.60; west- 
ern sheep $4.60@5.35; native lambs 
$4.50@6.75. 



RAILROAD 

TIME TABLES 

QUEEN & CRESCENT ROUTE. 

(Cincinnati Southern Railway.) 
Lve. Lex. Northbound. Arr. Cln. 

• 6:00am.. Q. & C.Speclal. . 8:15am 
7:30 am. .Blue Grass Vest..l0:16 am 

• 3:00 pm.. Local Express .. 6:15 pm 

• 5:20 pm.. Florida & N. O... 7:30 pm 
Lve, Lex. Southbound. Lve. Cln. 

*9:60 am. . Local Express . .6:50 am 
•10:60 am.. Florida & N. O. 8:30am 
6:45 pm.. Blue Grass Vest 4:00pm 
10:25 pm.. Q. & C. Special 8:05 pm 
Trains marked (*) run dally; oth- 
ers dally except Sunday. Finest train 
service In the South. Vestlbuled 
trains, free reclining chair cars and 
observation parlor cars, cafe dining 
cars and Pullman palace sleeping 
cars. 

W. G. MORGAN, Depot Ticket Agent 
S. T. SWIFT, City Ticket Agent 
W. C. Rlnearson, G.P.A., Cincinnati 



THE GEORGETOWN A LEXINGTON 
TRACTION CO. 



LOUISVILLE & NASHVLLE. 
CINCINNATI DIVISION. 

Lve. Lex. Departure. Arr. Cln. 

•4:40 am... Fast Mall ... 7:30 am 
7:05 am. Accommodation. 10: 30 am 
•2:50 pm.... Express ....6:00 pm 
Arr. Lex. Arrivals. Lve. Cln. 

•11:45 am.... Fast Mall ....8:05 pm 
6:20 pm. Accommodation. 2:55 pm 
•10:20 pm.... Express ....7:30 pm 



LOUISVILLB DIVISION. 



Lve. Lex. 
8:35 am. 
2:10 pm. 
Arr. Lex. 
10:50 am . 
5:22 pm 



Departures 
. . Express . 
. Fast Mall 
Arrivals. 

. .Fast Mall 
...Express 



Arr. Lou. 
.12:05 pm 
. 5:30 pm 
Lve. Lorn 
..7:20 am 
..2:00 pm 



MAYSVILLE DIVISION. 

Lve. Lex. Departures-. Arr. Mays. 

7:05 am Express ....9:45 am 

6:25 pm. Accommodation. .8:15 pm 
Arr. Lex. Arrivals. Lve. Mays. 

6:20 pm ....Express ....1:16 pm 
Trains marked (•) run dally; oth- 
ers dally except Sunday. For Infor- 
mation, tickets or slepplng car res- 
ervations call on or telephone: 

W. M. YENT, Phoenix Hotel Depot 
E. C. Moore, L. & N. Depot, Phone 82. 
John P. Moore, General Agent 
W. H. Harrison, Trav. Pass. Agent. 



ANOTHER NEGRO WINS AN 

ORhTJRICAL PRIZE AT YALE 



New Haven, Conn., May 1. — George 
Williamson Crawford, of Birmingham, 
Ala., a negro, is one of the winners in 
the Francis Wayland prize debate at 
Yale. The competition was establish- 
ed several years ago by Dean Francis 
Wayland, of the law school. First 
prize, $50, was awarded to J. H. Sears, 
of St. Louis. 



BOTH PARTICIPANTS IN 

A DUEL KILLED. ? 9 - 47 ^ 
Florence, Ala., May 1. — News has 
just reached here of a fatal duel with 
Tennessee line from Lamb’s Ferry 
pistols, which occurred across the 
Tennessee line from Lamb’s Ferry, 
as a result of which J. R. Mefford, a 
farmer, and F. Osborne are dead. 

Words passed between the men ov- 
er some nails. Osborne went Into 
his home near by and returned with a 
pistol, which he emptied. He turned 
to run, but Mefford, mortally wound- 
ed, fired at the fleeing man with dead- 



CHICAGO PROVISIONS. 

Chicago, May 1.— Wheat opened 
steady to-day along with the cables, 
with July unchanged to a shade high- 
er at 72%@72y 4 c to 72%c. Sellers 
by locrt 1 traders on favorable weath- 
er report's rmped sc easier tone 
early, July selling off to 72c, but lat- 
er, on covering by shorts, the price 
advanced to 72%c. Minneapolis and 
Duluth reported receipts of 163 cars, 
which, with local receipts of thirty- 
two cars (none of contract grade), 
made a total for the three points 
of 195 cars, against 167 last week and 
202 a ye'ar ago. 

The corn market was steady to a 
trifle easier early, with July unchang- 
ed to %c lower at 45c to 45%c. Sell- 
ing by local traders, influenced by 
god weather reports, developed fur- 
ther weakness and July went off to 
44%c. There was only a light trade 
and no feature to the market Local 
receipts were 201 cars, with six of 
contract grade. 

Oats opened easier on Improved 
weather and increased receipts, July 
being unchanged to a shade lower at 
31%@31%c to 31%c, and on scatter- 
ing selling with light demand, the 
price held steady at 3194c. Local re- 
ceipts were 171 cars. 

Provisions were irregular, with com- 
mission houses inclined to sell on 
increased hog receipts. There was 
fair trade at the opening, with all 
July products offi 2%c, pork being 
$17.12%c, with lard $9.37%c, and ribs 



CHESAPEAKE & OHIO. 

EASTERN DIVISION. 

Departures. 

8:15 am — Local Express; arr. Wash- 
ington 7:30 am. 

•11:20 am — F. F. V., arrives Wash- 
ington 6:30 a. m„ New York 
11:15 a. m. 

5:60 pm — ML Sterling Accommoda- 
tion, arrive ML Sterling at 
7:05 p. m. 

8:45 pm — Eastern Express, arrive 
Washington 3:46 p. m., New 
York 9:08 p. m. 

Arrivals. 

7:00 am — ML Sterling Accommoda- 
tion, leave ML Sterling 5:50 
a. m. 

•7:46 am — Eastern Express, leaves 
New York 8:00 am., Wash- 
ington 2 p. m 

3:30 pm — Ix  cal Express, lve. N. Y. 
12:56 p. m., Washington at 
6:30 p. m. 

•6:10 pm — F. F. V., leaves New York, 
6:00 p. m., Washington l^fio 
p. m. S' 

^ 



TIME TABLE 

In Effect October 1, 1902. 

Cars leave Main and Broadway 
Lexington, for Georgetown at 7 a. m. 
and every hour np to and at 11 p. m. 

Cars leave Georgetown for Lexing- 
ton at 6 a. m., and every hoar up U 
and at 10 p. m. 

Car No. 14, which hauls baggage, 
parcel express and freight leaves Lea 
lngton for Georgetown every tws 
hours, beginning at 8 a. m. np to aa# 
at 4 p. m. 

Arrangements and* Information fog 
freight, excursions, special can, pie 
nice and trolley parties can be mad( 
at the office of the company, 40/ 
West Main Street, Lextngton, ivy. 
Fayette Phone No. 1274. 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

(St Louls-Lonlevllla Linos.)' 

All Trains Run Dally. 

No. 10 No. I Ne.l 
Leave A M. P. M. P. It 

Lexington 7:30 3:05 

Arrive 

Versailles 7:5* 3:30 

La wrencebnrg 8:20 3:56 

Shelby vltle ...9:05 4:45 

Louisville 10:36 8:15 

Leave A. M. P. M. 

Louisville 8:30 10:1S 

Arrive P. M. A M. 

3t Louis 6:88 7:12 

Leave L1L P.H. 

Louisville 8:30 8:84 

Arrive P. M. P. It • 

Evansville 1:06 10:10 

Train No. 2 leaving Lexington 5:30 
M„ carries Pullman sleeper through 
to Chicago via Louisville and Penn- 
sylvania R. R. without change arriv- 
ing Chicago 7:30 a. m. 

Train leaving I-oulsvllle 8:30 A It 
carries parlor cafe cars through Ui St 
Louis without change. Meals a Is 
sarta. 

W. G. MORGAN; 

D. T. A, Lexington, Ky. 
S. T. SWIFT, 

C. T. A, Lexington, Ky. 
C. C. STEWART. 

T. P. A., Lexington, Ky. 
C. H. HUNGERFORD, 

D. P. A., Louisville, Ky 
O. B. ALLEN, 

A G. P. A., St Louis, Mat 
H. B. SPENCER, 

Gen Man., St Louis, Lie. 



5:80 

5:88 

8:14 

6:50 

8 : 1 * 



LEXINGTON & EASTERN. 
EASTBOUND. 

No. 2 No. I. 
P. M. 

Lve. Lexington 2:25 

Lve. Winchester 3:10 

Lve. Beattyvllle June.... 5: 11 

Arr. Jackson 6:16 

Arr. Cannel City... 

WHSTBOUN 



Cannel City 

Jackson -..yr 6:25 

Beattyvllle /j unc 7:26 




Lve. 

Lve. 

Lve. 

Lve. Winchester g.jj 

Arr. LexlngtoJ 10:10  :0S 

All trains/ except Sunday. 

Nos. - 



Lamb Woven 

Wire Fence 

Made at- Adrian, Mich. 

D. C. Layard, Agt. for Ky. 

527 West Short St. Lexington Ky. 

WANTED — A good driving horse 1  
exchange for Wire Fence. 



LOUTSVILLlJ'JjiviSION. 

— — -Departures. 

•7: 50 am — Eastern Express arrives 
Louisville 10:30 a. m. 

•5:20 pm — F. F. V., Limited, arrives 
Louisville 8:26 p. m. 

Arrivals. 

•11:10 am- F. F. V., Limited, leaves 
Louisville 8:30 a. m. 

•8:40 pm — Eastern Express, leaves 
Louisville 6:00 p. m. 

Trains marked (•) run dally; oth- 
ers dally except Sunday. Meals serv- 
ed in dining car a la carte on all 
through trains to and from Lexington. 
Tickets on sale only at Phoenix Hotel 
deket office and C. & O. Depot All 
trains start from depot in rear of 
Phoenix HoteL 

P. L. SLOAN, City Ticket Agent 
WM. M. YENT, Depot Ticket Agent 
G. W. BARNEY, D. P. A, Lexington. 
City ticket office telephone, 157. 



 Snd 4 make close connection 
at O.L, junction for Cannel City 
ar 1 points on Ohio and Kentucky 

ra ’.lway. 

Nos. land 2 connect at L A ■. 
Junction with Chesapeake & Ohio for 
Mt Sterling and local points. 

Nos. 1 and 2 connect dally except 
Sunday at Beattyvllle Junction with 
L & A. railway at Beattyvllle. 

J. R. BARR, General Manager. 

CHAS. SCOTT, General Pass. Agent 

LOUISVILLE & ATLANTIC R. R. 

Going East (Except Sunday.) 

Lv Lex. ( Q. & C.).. 9:50&m S:46pm 
Vr Nlcholasvllle. . . 10: 13am 
Lv. Nlcholasvllle ...10:56am 

Lv Richmond 11:64am 

Ar. Irvine 12:65pm 

Going West (Except Sunday.) 

Lv. Irvine 2: tips 

Lv. Richmond 6:05am S:45pai 

Ar. Nlchlasvllle 6:53am 

Lv. Nich. (Q. & C.).. 7: 00am 
Ar. Lex. (Q. & C.)... 7: 25am 
C. M. BROWNING, Gen. 

Versatile*, Ky. 

R. A WOOLTTMS, S. A, Richmond. 



FRANKFORT  fc CINCINNATI RAIL- 
WAY. 

In Effect January 26, 1903. 



heave 


A M. 


P. M. 


Frankfort 




2:00 


Stamping Ground .... 




2:29 


Georgetown 




2:47 


C. S. Depot 




2:51 


Centreviile 




2:07 




8:30 


3:26 


Arrive 


A M. 


P.U. 


Frankfort 




7:16 


Stamping Ground . . . 




8:42 


Georgetown 


..10:32 


6:22 


C. S. Depot 




1:12 


Centreviile 


... 9:46 


5:69 


Paris 




6:42 



Connects at Georgtown Union De- 
pot with Q. & C. 

Connects at Paris Union Depot with 
Kentucky Central. 

Connects at Frankfort Un'jn De- 
po. with L. & N. 

GEO. B. HARPER, 

Pres, and Gen. Bup. 
D. W. LINDSEY, Jr., G. P. A, 



7:07pm 

7:16pm 

8:10pm 



4:41»m 

4:84pm 

5:15pm 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY’S 



New Sleeping Car Line From Lexlnf- 
ton to Chicago via Loulsvlll* and 
Pennsylvania R. R. 

The Southern Railway has put om 
a new sleeping car line between Chf 
cage and St Auguslne, Fla., via 
Louisville and Lexington. A very 
handsome line of Pullman Sleeping 
cars have been put Into this servloa. 
Passengers can leave over the South- 
ern Railway at 6:30 p. m. via Louis- 
ville and Pennsylvania Railway, reach- 
ing Chlcaao 7:30 a m., returning leave 
Chicago -1:00 p. m., arrive LexlnctoM 
10:40 a m. 

a C. STEWART, 

T. P. A. Southern Ry. 



Make your wants 
known through 
the Want Column 
of The Democrat. 



■AGE It. 



THE LEXINGTON DEMOCRAT. 



SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1905, 



WEATHER 



Washington, May 2. — Indications for 
Kentucky and the Blue Grass'. 

FAIR AND WARMER SATURDAY; 
SUNDAY INCREASING CLOUDI- 
NESS. 



YESTERDAY’S WEATHER. 
The following weather data was re- 
corded at the United States weather 
bureau at the State College yesterday: 
Maximum temperature, 48. 

Minimum temperature, 34. 

Mean aemperature, 40. 

Below normal, 20. 

Precipitation, .00. 

Deficiency since January 1, .75. 

R. H. DEAN. Observer. 



AT POINT OF DEATH 



At 3 o’clock this morning reports 
from the bedside of Mrs. Mary D. 
Short, at St. Joseph’s Hospital, are to 
the effect .that she is sinking rapidly 
and her condition is such that she is 
not expected that she will survive 
until daylight. Several days ago Mrs. 
Short was successfully operated on for 
appendicitis, but later peritonitis set 
in, since which time grave doubts 
as to her recovery have been felt 
by her physicians and family. 



ANOTHER SCHORR PURCHASE 



John W. Schorr, of Memphis, pur- 
chased of J. N. Camden, of Hartland 
Stud, the yearlng chestnut filly by 
Handsome, dam Ernani, by Enquirer, 
and the yearling bay filly, by Hand- 
some, dam Klondike, by Longstreet. 
Price, $2,000. 

Theee purchases give Mr. Schorr a 
total of eighteen head purchased dur- 
ing his present trip to the Blue Grass. 
The number cost him about $18,000. 



STRANGE 

DISAPPEARANCE 

0f.Ten-Year-0ld Daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. J. Hoal Baffles 
Police 



NO CLEW TO HER WHEREABOUTS 



Was Forced Against Her Will *o At- 
tend School— May Be With Sister 
Pennsylvania. 



in 



EVEN THE POSTOFFICE 

WOULDN’T TAKE IT. 

Col. Urey Woodson, let us introduce 
the Hon. J. C. W. Beckham, the pres- 
ent and prospective Governor of Ken- 
tucky. Gov. Beckham, Col. Woodson; 
Col. Woodson, Gov. Beckham.” And 
now what yer got to say you little 
rascal, you? — Lexington Democrat. 

Wjhat does the Governor say. If you 
can’t prirtt it, mail it. — Glasgow 
Times. 



SECOND DAY 






Of Dedication Exercises at St. Louis 
Marked by Decrease In 
attendance. 



fay 1. — “International 
{ of the trio devoted 
of the Louisiana 
broke fair with 
than that 



\ ot ' 
i\° f 

pit 



ither 



St. Louis. K 
Day,” the secon 
to the dedicatlo: 

Purchase Exposition^ 
promise of better we; 
of yesterday. 

The day was devoted ti 
to and responses by repre 
of foreign nations which wi , 
buildings at the fair, the proceeds 8 
constituting the dedication of £l 
foreign section. 

The Liberal Arts building, where the 



greetings 
^.entatives 
have 



“Wlhat has become of little Leona 
Hoal?’ is on the tongue of every res- 
ident of the southwestern part of the 
city who are acquainted with the 
beautiful little ten-year-old daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. William J. Hoal. who 
live on Patterson street, extended. 
The child disappeared last Wednes- 
day, just after she left her home for 
school and nothing has been heard of 
her since that time. 

The disappearance of the child and 
her whereabouts has puzzled the po- 
lice department more than any case 
that has been presented to them to 
work up since the “Hawkins mur- 
der,” for they can find absolutely no 
trace of her and have no clew what- 
ever to work on. Although unsuccess- 
ful, they have not despaired of find- 
ing the little girl, for her heart-broken 
parents. Yet they were just as much 
in the dark last night concerning her 
whereabouts as they have beeen since 
she disappeared three days ago. 

Last night at 12 o’clock the Dem- 
ocrat reporter called upon Mr. Hoal 
at his home to ascertain if he had 
heard anything concerning the miss- 
ing child. The representative was 
greeted by a father sick with grief, 
and the broken-hearted mother anx- 
iously waiting for some news, good 
or bad from their lost one. The only 
information they could give was that 
they had not heard one word from 
their child since last Wednesday, and 
in tears told to the reporter the sad 
story of her disappearance. 



told was merely a piling up of proof 
conclusive. — Frankfort Journal. 



A CRUEL SLANDER. 

Walton, the Lexington editor, has 
been confounded by a reporter with 
Walton, the president of a brick mak- 
ing company. As the one makes 
bricks and the other is a past mas- 
ter in the art of throwing them, the 
mistake is excusable. — Glasgow 

Times. 



DUDLEY SCHOOL CHORUS 

PLEASES LARGE AUDIENCE BY 
PUBLIC REHEARSAL LAST 
EVENING. 

One of the most delightful occasions 
ever given during the progress of the 
school year was the public rehearsal 
of the Dudley School Chorus in the 
chapel last evening. 

A large audience composed of pa- 
trons and friends of the school and 
music lovers attracted by the quiet 
“tip” that some excellent choral work 
would be heard, enjoyed the excel- 
lent program which had been pre- 
pared, and which was so thoroughly 
and artistically rendered by the cho- 
rus. 

Prof. C. F. Croxton, musical direc- 
tor of the city schools, has had this 
youthful chorus under his careful 
training for some weeks and that his 
hard and earnest endeavors are fully 
rewarded was evidenced by the ex- 
cellent renditions given the various 
numbers which made up the even- 
ing’s entertainment. 

Prof. Croxton was ably assisted in 
the preparation of the chorus work by 
Miss Tevis Carpenter, the accompan- 
ist. Miss Carpenter is one of the 
most advanced students at the Con- 
servatory of Music and it was due in 
great part to her thorough musical 
attainments and sympathetic handling 
of the parts that such a great suc- 
cess was achieved. Miss Naomi Hot- 
tes, the orchestra, accompanist, also 
assisted- greatly in making the even- 
ing a most delightful one. 

It is to he sincerely hoped that 
henceforth more of these public re- 
hearsals will be given during the» 
school term. The pupils are greatly 
benefitted by public rendition of their 



Last Wednesday morning she left j W and choruses, in that they ac 
home as usual for school, but she left a confidence In themselves that 

her books at the house of a neighbor j will stand them in good stead in after 
and went away, where no one knows, •   ife - That more of these attractions 
but she has gone and no trace of will be heartily welcomed by the pub- 
her has been found,” was Mr. Hoal’s He in general was manifested by the 
That was all the zest and enthusiasm of the encores 



unvarnished story, 
parents could tell about her disappear- 
ance, as that was all there was to 
tell. 

The police would give out no infor- 
mation about her, but it was learned 
from the Humane Society that she had 
once been under their surveillance sev 
eral weeks ago. At that time she was 
employed by Mrs. McGrath, of West 
Main street, to work for her of even- 
ings after school. While thus employ- 
ed she was reported to the Humane 
Society as being a wayward child, and 
not attending school. The society 
took up her case and visited her par- 
ents, who were found to be people of 
.erate means and they gladly per- 
Agent Cook to place her in 



which followed the selections. 



J^oisosa 



CASE AT LOUISVILLE RESULTS 
IN ACQUITTAL OF DEFEND- 
ANT COOPER. 



exercises took place, still wore Its mitte , 

dress of yesterday-the mingled colors j school a X k ^ f h ° r th ® r ®. ™ J' 
of Spain, France and the United promise was carried out and 



Louisville, Ky., May 1. — The jury 
in the case of Birch Cooper, charged 
with the attempted poisoning of his 
grandmother, Mrs. Nancy Birch, in 
January of this year, after being out 
forty-five minutes, returned a verdict 
acquitting him of the charge. The 
first ballot taken by the jury result- 
ed in a vote of 11 to 1 for acquit- 
tal. Juror R. J. Lawrence voted 
“guilty.” He finally came over t;o the 



States — and in the speeches the trin- 1 since .that time she hSS-been attending j majority. The verdict was rec eived 
ity of interests in the exposition was ! school regularly. Little Leona, ho«- \vuh appi-use. Commouw aVh s At 



Ity 
noted 



A Panhandle train was ditched at 
Columbus, Ohio, and several persons 
were Injured. 



Carpenters, horseshoers and num- 
bers of minor union organizations are 
on strike at Bloomington, 111. 



Fire at West Point, Va., destroyed 
property worth $125,000, wiping out 
the business section of the town. 



R. A. DOWNING, 

FINE LIVERY. 

"Silver and gold have I none, but 
such as I have give I unto thee." 

But if you want to feel rich and 
look rich go get one of R. A. Down- 
ing’s fine rigs and make the other 
fellow look like thirty cents. If you 
want to marry or are compelled to 
die get the finest carriages in Lexing- 
ton from R. A. Downing. Ladies look- 
ing for safe and gentle horses and 
to combine style with safety see 
Downing. Finest and best of every- 
thing in the livery line. Go see R. 
A. Downing, Vine st., opposite police 
headquarters. 



torney Huffaker announced after the 
verdict had been rendered that an- 
other indictment would he found 
against Cooper, and that though it 
would be necessary to charge him 
with administering poison to some one 
other than Mrs. Birch, the prosecution 
would have a much stronger case 
than the one just tried. Cooper was 
the only witness for the defense. 



H0LMESSWANN 



Ping Pong 

Photos 

17 for 25 c. 



ever, went to school under protest and 
has been heard to remark by a num- 
ber of her playmates, “I will kill my- 
self rather than go to school,” hut 
her parents do not think that she 
would dare to carry out her threat. 

On the day the child disappeared Mrs. 

Clunker, who lives on West Main 
street, claims to have missed $20, and 
reported to the police that she was 
of the opinion that little Leona, who 
was at her house the day before, took 
the money, but this story is not given   

any credence by her parents, for she The editor of The Democrat is in 
was never known to take any money, receipt of the following: 
although she has many opportunities Colonel and Mrs. James Singleton 
to do so. Swann announce the marriage of their 

She has a married sister living in - daughter, Azele, to Dr. Anderson 
Pennsylvania, and it is thought she ! Mansfield Holmes, Saturday, April 25, 
may have gon there ,to keep from go- 1903, Denver Colorado, 
ing to school, hut no trace of her pur- 1 The beautiful bride is well known 
chasing a ticket at any of the railroad j here, where she has often visited, the 
stations could be found and this theory ! guest of Mrs. Bishop Clay and of the 
is generally discredited by those look- j Misses Spurr at “Leafland.” She is 
ing for her. j a graduate of Beaumont College, Har- 

The tender age of the child would rodsburg, and is as accomplished as 
make her easy prey for some vicious she is charming in every way. 
creatures, but such a thing as her ah- 1 
duction does not seem reasonable, as 
she is so well known in the part of j 
the city in which she lived. She would 
have been certainly apprehended if j 
she had gone to any of the large cities | 
as the police departments thoughout 
country have been notified to look \ 
out for her. j 



HANDSOME 
OFFICE BUILDING 



Of Five Stories or More to be Erect- 
ed at Short and Mill by 
S. T. & S. V. Co. 



Several months ago the Security 
Trust and Safety Vault Company pur- 
chased of the Southern Mutual Xn-t 
vestment Company the Sayre Bank 
property at the corner of Milll and 
Short streets, at a cost of $26,000. 
At a meeting of the* directors of the 
Trust Company, held Thursday, it 
was decided to erect on the proper- 
ty a handsome and modern office and 
business block. 

The structure will cost in the 
neighborhood of $100,000. It will be 
up to date in every particular and 
will be five stories high and so con- 
structed that it can be increased to 
eight if requirements demand it. 

The new building is intended for 
business and office purposes. It will 
front sixty-eight feet on Short street 
and will run back on Mill Istreeet 
a distance of 120 feet. The Trust 
Company will occupy the first floor 
at Short and Mill streets as its of- 
fices. 

The building is to be entirely fire- 
proof, constructed of stone, steel and 
ornamental brick. There is to be a 
basement under the entire building, 
to be used as shops and for the large 
storage vaults of the Trust Company, 
which are to be used to store silver 
and other packages and articles of 
value. The burglar-proof vaults of 
the company will bet in the rear of 
the office at the corner of Short and 
Mill streets. 

A twenty-ftve-foot light shaft will 
be constructed in the center of the 
building to furnish light to the in- 
side office rooms. 

There will be nearly- a hundred 
rooms in the upper stories of the 
building and the two store rooms, 
with warerooms in the rear, will front 
on Short street. The building will 
be modern in all its appointments. 
There will be a double elevator, a 
special heating and lighting plant, ad- 
equate to accommodate whatever size 
building may be decided upon. Hard 
wood will be used in the interior fin- 
ishings, with marble wainscoting. 

The building will be a credit and 
an ornament to the city. It will also 
prove to be a paying investment, as 
the demand for up-to-date office and 
business rooms in Lexington is great- 
er than the supply. Both the city and 
the Trust Company should be com 
gratulated on the erection of such 
a building. 



OPERA HOUSE™?.:,"'.'. 8 , 

“Eg,, ROMEO AND JULIET 

Presented by Lfebltr & Co.’s Great 

ALL-STAR CAST, 

Including Kyrle Bellew, Eleanor Robson, Eberlee Plympton, W. H. Thomp- 
son, John E. Kellard, Edwin Arden, Forrest Robinson, W. T. Ferguson, 
George Clarke, Frank C. Bangs, Edmund Breese. Ada Dwyer, Mrs. W. G. 
Jones. 

PRICES— Lower floor, $2.50 and $3.00; Balcony, $1.00, $1.50 an* $2.00; 
Gallery, 75c. 



DON’T BE IN A HURRY. 1"^ 

on L. P. Young; or if you want to do your own painting use 

‘YOUNGS READY-MIXED PAINTS,” 

$1,50 Per Gallon, larger . * 

quantities cheaper. . . . L. P. YOUNG, 17 W. Short St 



TOTAL DESTRUCTION 

OF HOUSE AVERTED ONLY BY 
QUICK PLAY OF STREAM 
ON FIRE. 



A fire broke out last night at 10 
o'clock in the frame cottage. No. 374 
East Main street. For a time it 
looked as though the house with Its 
contents would be totally destroyed, 
but as soon as the fire department got 
a stream on the flames they were 
quickly extinguished. 

The roof of the house was almost 
totally destroyed and the furniture 
was badly affected by the water. 

The house was occupied by Mr. W. 
N. Dodson with his family. Mr. Dod- 
son is employed by the Chesapeake 
and Ohio railway as a fireman. None 
of the family were present when the 
fire started. It is supposed that the 
fire originated in the kitchen of the 
house from a fire that had beeen left 
in the cooking stove. The house is 
the property of Mr. Charles Bowyer 
and is probably fully insured. It is 
not known whether Mr. Dodson had 
any insurance on his household goods 
or not. 



GUN CLUB SHOOT 



LOCAL OFFICE 0. K. 



GENERAL MANAGER OF POSTAL 
TELEGRAPH COMPANY HERE 
ON TOUR OF INSPECTION. 



Mr. S. A. Duncan, general manager 
of the Postal Telegraph Company, 
with headquarters at Atlanta, togeth- 
er with Mr. W. S. Slater, manager 
of the Louisville office, was in the 
city yesterday on a trip of inspection. 
He found the local office of the com- 
pany in excellent condition and high- 
ly complimented Manager Kellly on 
his able management of affairs. The 
office here will be completely over- 
hauled and treated to a new coat of 
paint and paper. 



ZACHARY FORMING A 
NATIONAL REFORM FEDERATION 



NEXT WEEK WILL BE ATTENDED 
BY ALL PROMINENT 
MARKSMEN. 



The Lexington Gun Club received 
yesterday 5,444 clay pigeons, to be 
used in their tournament here next 
Tuesday and Wednesday, May 5 
and 6. 

Trap shooting is a splendid sport 
and those interested will have an op- 
portunity of seeing here some of the 
most famous live-bird and target shots 
in the United States. When such 
men as Crosby', Heikes, Gilbert, Clay 
and our own Jake Gay enter in an 
event some fine shooting will be seen. 

These and many more will be con- 
testants in the events programmed 
by the Lexington Gun Club for the 
biggest tournament ever held in Ken- 
tucky. 

Manager Robert Skinner says every- 
thing will be in ship-shape for the 
opening gun next Tuesday. 



JUDGE IRA JULIAN IS 

CONFIDENT OF ELECTION. 

Judge Ira Julian, of Frankfort, who 
is a candidate for the Democratic 
nomination for Attorney General, was 
In the city yesterday, mixing up with 
his many friends. He reports his 
chances for success very bright. 



NEW ELKS 



RANKS OF ANTLERED TRUBE ARE 
SWELLED BY INITIATION tVF 
NEW MEMBERS. 



The local lodge of Elks held their 
regular meeting last night  tt. their 
lodge rooms. The meeting nil well 
attended as it was known that a. num- 
ber of additions would be made to the 
order and fun would be had at. their 
initiation. 

Following is a list of ’hone who 
braved the mysteries of (■Itiatlon 
and are now full-fledged members of 
the “antlered tribe:” Charles Staples, 
Gus Price, Angus Allmond, Gw* Lang, 
Thomas H. Dudley, Ben Boeworth, 
Henry Chick. G. H. Keene, D W. Bas- 
tin and Roger Harp. 



HANDSOME NEW SIGN 

PLACED OVER CAFE ROYAL, 



Mr. Geoqge B. Strader, »r»#rietor 
of the popular Cafe Royal, iiaa placed 
over the entrance to his mMorium 
a very handsome jewel sign. The de- 
sign is of French plate, beret-edge 
mirror of the latest pattern with the 
words “Cafe Royal” on either side, 
and is lighted with sixteen-candle 
power electric lights, nine fights to 
each side, each light being thrown 
against a reflector. The sign was 
ordered through L. H. Ramsey & Co. 
from a Chicago firm and is the only 
one of its kind in the state and is 
guaranteed for twenty-five yearn. 



We are 
successfully 
catering 
to the needs 
of the 

entire household 
when 

Pure Drugs 
are needed. 



Smith= 

Me Kenney 
Company, 

(Incorporated). 

McClelland Bulldipg, 

Lexington, Ky. 



Prescriptions 
filled day or 
night 



Evangelist James W. Zachary re- 
turned from St. Louis Thursday, and 
left yesterday for Lynchburg, O., 
where he will preach on Sunday. 

He and a number of other promi- 
nent national temperance workers are 
organizing the National Reform Fed- 
eration, founded upon the following 
principles: Municipal, State and na- 
tional prohibition; abolition of the so- 
cial evil; woman suffrage. Mr. Zach- 
ary reports that the Federation, is 
meeting with great success. 



PLUMBING 



R. JOHNSON 
STEAM AND 
HOT WATER HEATING 



Both Phones 500. 



109 North Broadway. 



rfUM '-.frv—J..- I- 






H. L Saunders 

Qasfitttr, Sanitary Plu»r,b2f. 

REPAIRING WORK NEATLY DONE 
IN FIRST-CLASS ORDER. PUMPS, 
TANKS, GASOLINE ENGINES, ETC. 
256 W. Vine St. Phone 745. 



10 Large Photos 50c 

CASH PHOTO CO. 

Cver Kidd’s China Store, Main Street. 



HALF BROTHER TO 

KINLEY MACK. 

At James B. Haggin’s Elmendorf 
i Stud, the good mare Songstress, by 
Luke Blackburn, dropped a chestnut 
filly by Imp. Bathampton. Songstress 
is the dam of the grand young sire 
Kinley Mack, and the only horse to 
win both the Brooklyn and Suburban 
Handicaps. 



* Carriages, | A lT ^ * 



H Station Wagons, Phaetons, 



New classes in Bookkeeping, Short- 



YOUTSEY ONLY CORROBORATED. 

Ore of the jurors, in talking to a 
Jourral reporter yesterday, said that hand Writing and Telegraphy will he 
while all the jurors believed Hen- formed each day this week at the 
ry Youtsey had told the truth, they Commercial College 0 f| Kentucky Uni- 
had not based their verdict upon his versity for th e morning, afternoon 
testimony alone. “We thought,” said and night sessions. For particulars 
he, “that there was an abundance of visit the college, southwest corner of 
evidence of Howard’s guilt outside of Main and Mill streets, or address Wil- 
Youtsey’s evidence, and what he bur R. Smith. 



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u 

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L ft 
ft 

Runabouts, Buggies Sc. ft 



Our New Repository 

Is filled with a line of vehicles 
unexcelled in Quality, Style and 
Finish. Our stock is ’free from 
“leftovers.” What you will see 
is all new work — the latest fac- 
tory fancies. Why not call and 
see what we have. 

DAVID C. FROST, 



^ Short St., opp. Court House. ^ 






The Lexington morning democrat, 1903-05-02

8 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt75qf8jdx3r
 Local Identifier: lmd1903050201
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Location
  Published in Lexington, Ky., Kentucky by [s.n.]
   Fayette County (The Bluegrass Region)