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date (1865-11-25) topic_Industry topic_Agriculture_and_Livestock newspaper_issue f LOUISVILLE 



IttetrM a€tr Cwmiraal 

v — j \ . .. 




Devoted to Commerce, Manufactures, Mining, Oil, and Agriculture. 



■ 



LOUISVILLE, KY., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1865. 



Number l. 



I luilitsKrial & (Sommerdal teett* 

W NHMBI EVERY 84TURIAT BT 

J. XXJH3SXEPL Sc CO., 

At Four Dollars per annum, in Advance. 



Office — corner  fain and Bullitt Ste., (up stairs,) 
he Citizens' B^pk 

^OVEB riSING RATES: 

e« or less,) first iAVertion fl; each 
subn-oot-nt iutmrti.rti W cents. A 

1 • irst insertion $0^ch subsequent 

insertion $3.* 

BuaSMMi ud Tt Sessional Cards, not exceeding five 
tines, i»strt«1 at S 20 par yew, or 82 per Booth for a less 
A #h 



Commerce. 




The iulercb .i.ge or mutual change of com- 
modities, ei.. directly by barur or indi- 
rectly ittr^ut ome medium of etchange is 
ahed coc e, and is divided into two 
diMTit, unrlr foreign and inland. The for- 
mer is know- us the trade which me nation 
carries on w another; the latter is the ex- 
change of c aodities between citizens of 
the same natkn or State. 

The precis period when it begin is un- 
known but ; t must have had its origin among 
mankind a v .. very beginning of; civiliza- 
tion. U ng  rethe flood, we readof trans- 
,». .-- v  Li rove that trade was establish- 
ed and g'^ d by certain forms tud fixed 
rules then i ow. For example Ctin buil- 
dedacity. .1 was the j ather of all such as 
handle the bt n . and the organ. Tubal tain was 
,c instruc   every artificer iu bras, or iron 
Abraham pa- * r the field of Machpelah four 
. undred the els of silver money  »at was 
•current with the merchants.'' 
*Ecypl m  ban forty centuries iigo was 
the seat of • great and flourishing iuland 
trade aw joyed ^ high, reputation among 
»ber nuioiiD jot ihe syat^mat o maimer 6: 
conducting it. 

tk, , [sea vfo i.iv '.old were t.«e first 

people tba. ..'"malfuTac^rcs, aud ^ arts, 
united the navigation of the sens. 

In speaking of the epuitnce and splendor 
tf n sJinl Tjre, the Propel Ezekiel *ays: 
. • O .he t thai art situate at the entry of the 
art a merchant for the people of 
iU any isles  by borders are in the midst of 
the «ea. thy builders have perfected thy beau- 
eat wisdom and by thy traffic 
lut  bou in reased thy riches. ' And the 
Prophet Nai-hsays: "Tyre the crowning 
city whose m chants are princes, whose traf- 
ficers are ■* honorable of the earth.'' 

Withe L | og further into detail we may 
tnat up tr— has in all ages exercised 
' moet powc- il influence in the world, and 
in our is regarded as the "chief es- 

iling power, the paramount m- 
nd its comparative ascendency 
, nations of Christendom, might 
Almost be at amed as the type and guage of 
e measures of civilization."— 
it not only ralea the seas but influences to 
iU3h at I t as almost to oontrol the move- 
ments of fv. vy civHixed nation on the earth. 
.» short it is now almost universally admitted 
hat I mmerce is King.*' 



resources, in the shape of raw materia), cheap 
food, facilities for transportatien, and home 
demand, and that they are in point of locali- 
ty, unsurpassed by any place on earth, and 
being thus situated, are determined to come 
in direct (competition with their neighbors, 
for the trade which naturally centers to this 
port. 

And it is gratifying to us to be able to an- 
nounce to our numerous friends in the South 
and South-west, that they are "proving their 
faith by their works," and are prepared to 
extend to them, all the required facilities up- 
on terms in all respects as favorable to their 
interests as they can obtain them elsewhere, 
and with this assurance in advance, all they 
ask of them is to give them a fair trial upon 
" equal terms." 

It will be our purpose from time to time, 
in these columns, to make special mention of 
all the leading branches of trade, and to ad- 
vertise to the world, what we have done, and 
are doing, in the Tobacco, Cotton, Flour, Grain, 
Provision, Grocery, Produce, Bagging and 
Rope, Salt, Dry Goods, Drugs, Hardware, 
Queensware, Saddlery, Boot and Shoe, and 
Hat and Cap business, in order that we may 
not be in the future, as we have been in the 
past, comparatively unknown to the world as 
a great Commercial City, entitled to rank side 
by side with any other iu the West. And in 
furtherance of our object, we cordially in- 
vite our business men, who are engaged ;d 
the various branches of trade above mention- 
ed, as well as all others not enumerated, (ex- 
clusive of Manufactures,) to co-operate with 
us in this mutter, by furnishing u» the requi- 
site information in regard to the nature and 
extern of their business, to the end that our 
statements in respect to tht Ltt4l oi boius. 
Tille, can neither be gainsaeid or contra- 
dicted^ 

All commuiiicanov.8 ou t 
addressed either to the Edits - of th . 
or to Drawer No 103, and they will r»ceive 
careful consideration and prompt mi it;oa; 
for our object is to wake t.  ... .- 
dium of communication betv» • i » usi- 
nesd men of the city and their patrons wher- 
ever they reside. 

We refer our readers to the full and com- 
plete Commercial Reports of our own and 
other markets which have been prepared and 
revised with great care, and can be relied on 
as giving reliable quotations of actual sales, 
up to the time of our going: to press. 

Mercantile Character. 



society demand! tha he should plac* him«elf rality. and other virtues. But the desire of 
upon "an equality win the most cultivated of wealth, for its own sake, is far from being a 
his fellow c'tUens. As a class, the merch- ' virtue. Where money is greedily sought, 
ants are the ttost wealthy men of our coun- ! without regard to the means of acquisition, 
try. In social intertourse they.jpingle with I and without liberality in its expenditure, the 
the most refildd, wih those who are highest 
in intellectusl standing and official position 



There is no place in society, no post in the 
government, from wjich the merchant is ex- 
eluded. On the contrary, his eommand of 
money, and me facilities afforded by his rela 
tions of business place him in a prominent 
position, . gire him the control of the various 
commercial and monejad institutions, and 
render him the fit antf active director and 
agent in the whole circle of public charities, 
and in the numberless endowments for litera- 
ry and liberal purpose?. Having thus open- 
ed to him a wide sptere of usefulness, he 
should enter upon it with a consciousness of 
its dignity and importance, and qualify him- 
self for the discharge of its "various duties, 
by an assiduous and r.liber«l cultivation of 
his mind and morals. 

The merchant shoul be a patron of the 
arts, a prompter of education, a friend to lit- 
erature %nd science, at active agent in all 



passion which directs its pursuit is base and 

sordid. The uiiBer is a wretched man, a bar or the pu i pirj attributable only to the tact 
worthless citizen, a dishonor toth« dignity of , . . . " a v,„ tn . ip , 



human nature 

I am happy to believe that the acquisition 
of wealth does not necessarily, nor as I hope 
useually, blunt the sensibilities, cor destroy 
the manliness of a gfenerous character — that 
it is not always a selfish and mercenary oc- 
cupation. If money be sought with modera- 
tion, by honorable means, and with a due re- 
gard to the public good, no employment af- 
fords exercise to higher or nobler powers of 
mind and heart. And sueh should be the 
character of the merchant. He should guard 
his heart against the seductive influence of 
money ; he should carefully shield his mind 
against the narrow precepts of avarice. — 
Money should be regarded as the agent and 
representative of the good it may be made to 
perform — it should be sought as an instru- 
ment of self-defence against the evils of 



public improvements ; because his habits of poverty ; of parental love, enabling ub to pro- 



business, his wealth. his connection with 
moneyed institution*), nd with fiscal con- 
cernp, enable him to inder efficient aid to 
enterprises of patriotis* and benevolence.— 
He should be forward iijevery good word and 
work, also, as a m?ansj»f blunting that vul- 
gar prpjudice, which steposes that the men 
who possess or control vialth enjoy exclusive 
privilege s; t;nd should iow a wiliinene'-a to 
pay lib-rally for the adWages of his posi- 
tion, r hether renl or imaginary, hy using 
those advantages freely ^r public eood. 

Thero is another poi^, in r-ifard to the 
commoToiiil character, of ereit delicacy, but 
which I do not feel a' liberty to pass un- 
touched, as it is mos  *4ential to the honor 
aud the prosperity of ihqniercan'ile class as 
of the community io whiih thev belong. The 
most precious possession' of t'"« m»Tchant is 
his credit And here allov tie to draw a dis- 



vide for those dependent on us ; of public 
spirit, in affording the means of promoting 
the public good. 

~- 

[For the Industrial and Commercial ,az--t -. 



Counting 



Educati 



l0i 

nd r I 



In looking over the life of Alexandr Ham 
ilton, by Dr. Renwick, we were stnjk with 
a just acknowledgment made by tht distin- 
guished writer respecting the influ-ace of 
counting-room education. It is seldca that 
1 




iterary men have a favorable word tchay of 
the initiaory department of mercanti^ life, 
and all who have read the introducioa to 
Hawthorn's "Scarlet Letter," have met *good 
specimen of the severity with which day- 
tine; ion: th.* credit of the merchant, does not I book and lsdger life can be treated, as t iough 
v ] in hfsj wealth "« bis nV.il  tv I advise to everything dignifying a«4-tte* 
°. I.- . „«- ' | We- Rut in the Life of Hmmilto r, ? Dr 



any means of seeing how a counting-roc « 
education may exert a " favorable influence" 
on any subsequent career. We have frequent- 
ly been struck with the rapid advances made 
by those who hare left mercantile life for the 



to h.- 



his personal 



Louuville and her Future. 

t marks a new era in the his- 
tory of • ■ Metropolis of Kentucky. The 
dark c l wi of war which", for four years, 
hare 4ung oTer it, like a pall, blighting its 
fail i spects, and almoBt crushing its 
. .ve at length rolled away, giving 
vlfnost cloudlees sky — a bright 
lg . - Oiohine, spreading as we fondly 
ientiy.^oy and peace over and 
I a nis wide-fpread land. And as 
,fter another of the accustomed avenues 
.;■ ueu up to us, r. e are mi-i with 
lj grasp of friendship and the ap- 
:c r'mles, of old aud long absent 
frieids s.ud patrons, who have returned to us 
^rTiifi " dove* to their windows," to cheer and 
encourage us. 

• a • rchants and business men of all 
classc, seem to have caught a new inspira- 
tiou. or i j ring our acquaintance with' them, 
extetdiBg as it does, through a period of 
twen'y years, we have never known them to 
liiO same amount of interest, zeal, 
concert of action, and determination, as they 
cow do, te ndvanoe the true interests of the 
j ia which they live. They seem to real- 
ize and fully appreciate, that they are situ- 
ateu ia the Great Valley of the Ohio, (at the 



In an odd No. of the old Merchant's Maga- 
zine, we find an admirable address of Judr.e 
James Hall, before the Young Men's Mercan- 
tile Library Association of a neighboring 
city, in celebration of its eleventh anniversa- 
ry. The topic selected by the author for the 
occasion was " The Dignity aud Usefulness of 
Commerce, as illustrated by the History of 
the Commercial Greatness and Growth of the 
West." At the close of the address the 
speaker touched upon a very important point, 
and one of paramount importance to the 
merchant. It presents itself in the form of 
a question thus: — M What should be the char- 
acter of 'hose who act so important a part in 
the business of the country, who control its 
resources, direct its energies, and in a great 
degree, form the moral standaid which regu- 
lates the transactions of the whole people ? ' 
The kamed judge answers the question brief 
ly, but pertinently, as follows: 

The pursuit of wealth, attracting as it does 
intellects of every grade, includes among its 
votaries many of the mo*t aspiring and most 
capable minds; and gives to them that con- 
scant and healthy exercise which is calcula- 
ted to sharpen the faculties ; and if united 
with reading and reflection, produces a high 
deirree of refinement. The merchant should 
cultivate his mind, and acquire knowledge as 
an element of power. Dealing in the pro- 
ducts of various climes, and of all the arts, 
and engaged in an intercourse, personally .ir 
by correspondents, which extends to all the 
marts of traffic throughout the world, he 
6hou!d bs well acquainted with thegeograph^ 
of the globe, and with the productions, re- 
sources, habits, financial Bystems, and com" 
mercial usages of all nations. He should 
know thoroughly the composition and history, 
the mode of production, cost, and all othet 



'.tny- w? have aji e !:• is ' in c:  U'*i r*- 

age Hamilton's father became embarrassed in 
ais pecuniary matters, .-.nd the Bon look)*) 
about him fur bo 1 1 maintai nance. A situ t 
tion was secured for him in a commercial 
Lou»e m St. C roix, and he entered 'he count- 
ing-rooui oi iiutiu.utu. 

He advanced so rapidly in the acquireiient 
of the knowledge of business aff wirs and the 
tact of good management, that while ejry 
young most important trusts were commifced 
to his keeping. But mercantile affairs did 
not suit him, and those fine abilities whicLhe 
afterwards displayed were permitted to tinl a 
fitting sphere of rapid developement. Means 
to persue classical studies were furnished 
him, and the world knows that one of the 
ablest and most influential minds of Amerija 
was that of Alexander Hamilton. Dr. Ren- 
wick says : 

"We cannot, however, but consider his 
early introduction to the business of a count- 
ing- house as having a favorable influence on 
his subsequent career. The habits of order 
and regularity in a well-conducted commer- 
cial establishment are never forgotten, ani 
are applicable to every possible pursuit. Not 
is the exercise of mercantile correspondence 
without its value in a literary point of view. 
To, those with little previous education, or 
who have not, au opportunity of improving 
themselves af erward, this exercise may com- 
municate no elegtnce of style, but where the 
use of language h is ouce been attained, the 
compression of thought and conciseness of 
expression on which merchants pride them- 
selves, g:ve a terseness and precision of dic- 
tion which those educated in any other pro- 
fession can rarely equal." 

No 

from within the wails of a college. It is a 
broad view of counting room education, and 
suggests many ideas that it would be well to 
dwell upon. Too many minds, especially 
those inclined to literary pursuits, regard the 
countiug-room merely as a sort of magician's 
retreat, where the arr  -  *f changing the dollar 
into a double eagle ia taught, and learned — 
wheie the faculties of the mind are trained 
I into a sort of a dray-horse business, i nd wfcaJ 



ing for its supp^-t Vnt .he possession of 
i rorrataiag rnor ?y. T) s sjradll of a 
merchant depend" main'v on nis character 
for integrity, cupaoit"', f*nd industry. The 
truf merchant is  . ni)«a whole morality is as 
infle xible as therulen'of ariinmetie: his hon- 
esty is as invariable as ib ■? :»su't of a cql-. ect 
balance sheet. He should b« not only honest* 
but s'rictly honorable, so tbtt the confidence 
reposed in him should be unlimited. Such a 
mi.n is trus'ed, not merelv n account of his 
weaitb. but in consideration of " 
character. 

The commercial virtues nre so essential to 
the well being of society, t:»t their cultiva- 
tion should be an object, of sedulous care to 
the whole mercantile body, wlo should exer- 
cise a conservative influetce by frowning 
upon everv infraction ofth* laws of fair 
trading. Punctuality ehoukbe insisted upon 
as an indispensable requisto, and no man 
should be trussed or tolerate who would for- 
feit his word or violate his engagements. So- 
ciety has a right to deman of all its mem- 
bers the observance of goc( faith, and it is 
only by insisting on this ri(ht that a whole- 
some public opinion is established. 

Especially should the m rchants of a city 
like ours endeavor to establsh a high tone of 
commercial character. Th)y should set up a 
standard of strict and eevated morality, 
which every regular dealcrand fair merchant 
would acknowledge to be list, and to which 
all should be requi red to adhere. They should 
patronize those virtue? wh : ch adorn the indi- 
vidual character, which promote success in 
business, while they render its transaction 
sa'e and agreeable, and which are as benefic- 
ial as they are honorable to tae community 
in which they flourish — industry, honesty, 
temperance, and prudent economy; while, by 
inflexible rules, and strict observances, they 
should discountenance fratd, deception, 
trickery, and bad faith. 

^hen we speak of the rapid advancement 
of ou* country to He present high state of 
prosper^-, W e are easily led by national vani- 
ty into Nj e employment of high sounding 
words whi»h do not always lead us to satis- 
factory concisions P*triotU:n, public spirit, 
benevolence, liberty, edu ruion, the freedom 
of the press, our liberal institutions, the be- 
nign and pacific policy of oar government, 
are referred to as causes, it our national 
growth and aggrandizement. I 6hai! not dis- 
pute the happyj nfluence of alt these principles. 
But there is one element in tie nationil char- 
acter, one principle of action anima-ing the 

r ntire mass of our people, »hich is greater I is learned there has to them no moro conn^e 
than atfy other; nay, I will heboid enough to lion w j tn any other portion of life than the 

assert more powerful than all others united. ■ , . . _ Ttic^ 

u i. , . u ii j • ■ * . blotUr has with the praver-boox. mey ^ee 

Whether it be called avarice, or the love of | . . " TT ^ 

mo-.icy, or the desrfe of gai», or the lust of 



by which they were able to sieze opportuni- 
ties promptly — tact developed in the count- 
ing-room, where emergencies sometimes stir 
a man's soul as no college examination or 
trial sermon ever roused up human nature. 

Much of the results of which we have been 
speaking depends on the aims with which the 
counting-room is entered by the young man. 
If the young man goes in as to a tread-mill, 
only a tread-miU he will find. He will shirk 
everything beyond the simplest routine of 
prescribed duties. The boundary of his vis- 
ion will be exceedingly limited ; and instead 
of seeing in him the promise of thg intelli- 
gent, influential and honored merchant, yon 
behold almost certain evidence that he wiU 
never attain to anything hsyond the narrow- 
est conception of mercantile life, and will 
furnish a good model tor the satirist who 
hates everything like Commerce, became it 
suggests the possessio: of money, whiah ke 
has not. 

Ii. is a good sign or the tinier thv 
creased and improved rave became -he 
ties for preparatory commercial education.f- 
Commercial institutes and colleges ar n- 
creasing in all our large cities. We have one 
or two in Louisville which you can safely re~ 
commend to the patronage of your Southern 
readers. In these th » young man Sn - 
ideas of counting-rq/m li'e radically c 
ed. He discovers that ue more accom 
m3nts ho can carry to tie desk, the bet^r 
- a ts A true su  rind : ^*°«'l " r ih * 
}!d nation of confining utent : | 
ke«Mg *ud 



 ■ 



mnnsb 




and lecHfrSps on 

oieroit^ law, political science, ?tc., au» 
au .'dilation is iv » ?d as impress* 
Skudeni triis tht grost taet that no en ■ 

u« ot use to una iu ki.o »«t»g ~- — » 
tile life. We are beginning to bring back 
the ancient idea of the merchant, whin be 
was deemed the paragon of accomplishments 
furnished w th all forms of knowledge) *nd 
holding himself bound to acquit himself no- 
bly, not only in possessing a comprehensive 
knowledge of the little world about hint, b«t 
also of the greater world, with all it*  diver- 
sities, bringing from afar knowledge that 
poured the best light upon things near. 

Every day the idea of the true merchant is 
increasing in dignity and attraction. The 
"almighty dollar" is no symbol of him; but 
treaties, laws, courtesies, and amenities, bind- 
ing discordant nations *nd peoples in bands 
of amity, making the interests of Commerce 
far better for man's regard than the fortunes 
of war. And however we behold the confus- 
ion of war now impeding the progress of 
mankind, it is to the merchant that we owe 
the most potential inflow** to preserve peace 
wheie it is now enjoyed, and to hasten the 
end of wars where they may be raging 

Main Street. 



wealth, or whether it be softened to the ear 
der the more guarded terms, prudence, na- 
iral affection, diligence in business, or the 



wherein area lmcet all the required something more than this. 



incidents connected with every article iB-pcawscientious improvement of time aDd tal 
which he deals; and should be versed espeel- sjhts— it is still money makinj which consti- 
ally in the moneys and measures, the ex- 1 totes the great, business of the majority of 
changes, the commercial laws and regulations oeir people; it is the use of money which con- 
of the various places to which his business trOls and regulates everything, 
relations extend. This much we insist upon, I Whether the propensity for -money getting 
as actually necessary to the respectability of is beneficial or otherwise depends upon cir- 
the mercantile character, and to enable the oumstanoes. Industry is an admirable quali- 
merchant to wield his capital to advantage t . ; xts exeroise is directly useful to the public 
But the intelligent merohsmt should aspire taiZ, well as to individual interests, and it is 



snoula aspiri 
Hia Dositinn 




ce, prudence, mo- 



A Busiksss Gibl —We are well acquaint- 
ed with a young and very handsome girl, says 
the accomplished editor of the " Merchants' 
Ledger " who has the principal managementof 

this is high praise, coming as it did j » JW mercantile «f^'»»»Jj 

i*hing country town, who visits ainerent cit- 
ies alone, stops at hotels, purchases supplies 
of dry goods, ' hardware, china, groceries, 
shoes, nick-nacks, an 1 all multifarious salea- 
bles which make up " a stock " in a miscel- 
laneous store. She gives notes, make* con- 
tracts, all such business as belongs to her; 
aud we have never yet learned that she has 
sacrificed one iota of the dignity, admiration 
and respect, wh-ch are her just due as a 
young, amiable, asd very pretty woman. 

Statistics Chicago. — The whole num- 
ber of manufactories in the connty is 663. — 
The aggregate value of the manufactures 
turned out by these establishments annually 
is $257,710,292.00. 

The aggregate value of live stock iu the 
city is 3 2,858,483.00. That in the whole 
county is estimated at $5,479,826.00. 



The bitnminous coal field about Pittsburg 
covers 8,600,000 acre-, and the upper seam 
alone, estimating the cstol to be worth only 
two dollars per tun, is sufficient to pay a na- 
tional debt twenty-seven times as large ae 
mous as it is. 



the clerk, hi9 pen and ink, his invoices and 
his books, hia, letters, and they deem the 
copying-press a capital invention to brea.k 
up the monotony of the pen-and-ink life of 
the poor drudge. As to the training of the 
faculties, the developments of habits of or- 
der and regularity, the stern discipline of the 
moral powers, the aids afforded to induce a 
ready, clear, concise expression of what must 0 
be said, and kindred matters — *h«se are all 
overlooked, and they must be indebted to 

ve mind for 



.3 appointed 



fifty women to take eharge of post 
States. 





Indust: 



al  Sc Con vme 



♦ 




•hall 
tereat 



As wi promised iu our Prospectus, we 
levols nruch labor and space to the iv 
of the farmer. We afre WAra that 



jaeieious experiments 
ni-osrt.vn, by tk k aid of 
lb* rc; Herioue operatic 

Agricultural prsse wvarjl wee 
with information; »ed ; be 

nals, heretofore exclusively de 
utsms, politics aud g 



»H observation, ot 
f Salytic cbeu is try, 
P oT nature The 
i teeming 
rly jour- 



isville.her ™, t fa . th „ development 

il^ n ^\"^r Cek r7/V hi8 ' ge ° t ,th ^ unfannnatelr exited i prejudice | Agriculture an eflpl. field for nary 

' ^ : farming, hut in the new order of tlrtugs 
ilities, bout m ^ l6ll - u beicg inoup -rated, the wbaje system 
f*orth nr. ■« B-sn'h suggests the propriety of a I 0 f 
bri'-f ailu?ion 



end challenging comparison 
■seats of trade with older 



id out nrst issue to one spec;- 

We pre y 4» among other tluuge, from tiiue 
iC UB«, a thorough and gener:/ investigation 
•ef.ejkeh archil ectuai improvon "^.t or philan- 
thropic undertaking, together with such in- 
vestments as have a direct bearing upon the 
interests of the merchants, manufacturers; 
and mechanic* of our State. Designing at 
the outeet no invidious comparison, yet, with 
a strict sense of justioe toward all, we shall 
avoid the appearance of either ful- 
flattery or unmeaning compliments, 
aiming chiefly at facts, obtained 
most reliable and authentic sources. 



BuiLDIHGS IN CoenSB OF ERECTION 

their Location.— Our renders will re 
ber the destruction by fire about 



AND 

iem- 



ions. L'ac: st« -. .uor :1»J -.rosees the Ailsn 
tic. comes freighted wii the contributions 
of the highi« iutelkc s f Eogiand, France, 
and Germany, to th - now comprehentive 
sci»uee. In laot the watld is waking up to 
the importance, the d 'Ignis and me oom- 
manding interest of tii farmer s calling. — 
ntinue to sleep on ? 
No, gentlemen, let us inmss ourselves, and 
by diffusing the light f general education 
among the peoplo, ajsjsk&fce i_e clouds of ig- 
norance and prejudice, and prepare them fur 
their high destiuy." 



Agriculture must be changed, and (hi? 
prejudice wt hope wii! be overcome, and the 
farmer induced to vitronise the etlorta which 

we are a'o t ' re nv.*:e, in order to deeeminnu And shall Americans 
the kncwl lire wh-.eh our most practical men 
have obta ned by actual experiments and 
daily observation. 

We miut take council vith each other, as 
to the best mode of replacing the labor so re- 
cently destroyed. It is a question of the HP Wo haTe receitiy observed several 
highest interest to our ' farmers, hjw tts. / "° of fine shee P 16 transit to the South, 
shall cultivate their b. ads and how • thai] ial " clloa foutd them to be from the 

manage to make them produo»«*e. The 1 ;l3C *- e of ,Vje *' 1 w " -"Vlin caun- 

scarcity and high price of labor renders it I l J- We k:!0W pf 1 ' i if ,lB . v better breeds 
necessary that the strictest econom- should ' of sheep in the W whe;l  ' for wool or 
be obesrved, the largest result* amst be ex- "S«*te»i tken Mr. Scott's Plaftoeed ' 
pected by the least expenditure w» suust in- tuoky. ' 



m th 



ke the 
lime; 



6-14 A n*»M 

qv 1 ne 

e'erMiitf • »•• 



to.e  %iic 



troduce improved implements 
must ta* e the place of muscle. 

Whilst the most valuable information to the 
~» \ farmer is gained by practical experienoe and 
onths since of the magnificent block of   ob8ervation ^ we raa / lea ^ 

on Main street, north side, between * . . 




and Ninth, with their elaborately 
fronts. Three of these are now 
ly rebuilt, and the rubbish daily 
the adjoining ruinB, bo that in 
at farthest, we shall have one of 
the most massive and imposing specimens of 
architecture in the State. 

Passing up a short distance, we also notice 
several other buildings that are being rapid- 
ly pushed towards completion on the N. 
E. corner of Main an| Eighth, and three near 
the 8. W. corner of 'Main and Seventh, all 
having a depth of 180 feet. 

On Jefferson street, our citizens are aware 
that quite extensive additions have been go- 
ing on for some time paet to Willard's Hotel, 
•o long and favorably known as the Croghnn 
House This building, has a trom of fifty- 
five on .iefferson, runn\pg back two hundred 
feet wi h Centie. ^ t will coi.tair when  :om- 
140 sleeping art mer, t*. ia ci'UD  ction 
with orber 'ute improve n-.c?it^. nil  »' whio^i 
will be Acompliabed by the fin*, .if :,. ji/ian 
U»rr Ac f w t V jr^gr.^rc nc be 
al.  ■ - . ^  e r  pTTT- ▼ iTT^nrca iVuiycc. ~ 

tW fr'iM«r»nn- 1e increaaiU); ^ier butii e^s 
r. • "k ■ :'h the m ist prominent portions of 
thr W it rad Kouth wept, is a fact that can- 
not be denied Financiers snd capitalists of 
Eastern ci'iep, and who control some of the 
largest manure! uring and mechanical estab- 
lishment in the country, are turning their 
iters in  »his direction, convinced of our on- 
ward niftrch, viewed in whatever relation that 
is calculated to promote the prosperity of a 
oity, as one of the powerful links that binds 
together a thriving State. Sustained by a 
proper concert of action, the day is not far 
distant when all classes of honest labor will 
receive a hearty support, commensurate with 
the liberality and enterprise of a great and 
progressive people. 



importaat lessons in the experience of others 
as they are given us in Agricultural journals 
of the day. To obtain a knowledge of farm- 
ing independent of the experiment" and ob- 
servatichs of our ueighbors requires grea 
patienci and much labor. The thousand in 
telligcrt minds engaged in the cultivation of 
the soil, are daily making new and valuable 
discoveries whereby the soil is enriched, the 
produc* increased, and labor saved. It is 
truly ronderful the improvements made in 
machiiiry as applied to agrioukure ; man has 
little ise to do, but to direct machinery 
drivei j by tire horse or steam, in planting, 
cultivating and gathering the crops. In an 
agricjtural district so varied in its produc- 
tions, and so vast in txtent *s ours, with so 
many developments, we can only ke^p pace 
with tho improvements of the age by uvail 
ing ourselves of the experience of ibr- mo*t 
inte'ligent minds. This we may do b» in. 
vesting a few dollars in agricultural papf-r*. 
In ibis view .if the matter, ww hope our 
friec is evvry where will utro.l u  u« a lib- 
ei«l patronage, and thereby eucoura^.- u  in 

» - - «. — ■ »■ ■« ||iuu«uic geceB l gVJfia. 



A Difr EEKBCK. ii theauu.an of 18Cb, a 
( r q{ Berkshire ' gs. from .t ai^ca ef 0. 
M Bement, AlbsT- »*w Ytr wa^ -oid to a 
a gentleman from KaMaakj ti.e snug 
sum of $250. Now tie best Berkshireo aa| 
be obtained at Trom 620 to §25 per pair. The 
Berkshires are one o' the few breeds of hogs 
that have maintaine their reputation for ex- 
cellence through a le g series of years. With 
many farmers the Btkshires are the favorite 
breed of swine. 



i 



The Value of Agricultural Knowledge 
and the Dignity of its Profession. 

A well directed and scientific system of 
Agriculture is the basis of the public pros- 
perity in every other pursuit. It is the foun- 
dation of Commerce and Manufactures, the 
energetic pillars of the community; and 
the value as well as the dignity of the pro- 
fenion is beautifully illustrated by the re- 
marks of Dr. Johnson, the father of English 
li erature, in his "Rambler," that the man 
"who makes two blades of grass to grow 
viiere one grew before, is worth to the state 
pore than the whole tribe of politicians." 

To advance to our proper level as an Ag- 
ricultural community, we need Argicultural 
Inowledge and a just estimate of its digni- 
y as a profession. On this subject we are 
happy in the opportunity to present to our 
readers the very appropriate views of the 
Hon. Willoughby Newton, taken from his ad- 
TLe necessity of improving, if dress before the Maryland State Agricultu- 



Kentucky Land Association. 



Among the institutions recently inaugura- 
ted in our midst, we consider as eminently 
worthy of notice the ''Kentucky Land Aeso 
ciation. 



eotirely rc-constructitg. the labor sys 
of our State, has developed the Jurther 
ity of providing for the expected in- 
flux of emigrants, both from the North and 
Europe. Every one will readily see the 



ral Society : 



li What man of taeta and feeling can esti- 
mate, in dollars and cents, the beautieB of a 
variegated landscape, or the value of that calm 
joy which warms the farmer's heart, as he 
contemplates luxuriant fields for the harvest 
usefulness of an organization, composed of or shady grovee an* green meadows irriga^ 
responsible and influentiaflLneu, whose busi- te( *J*g perennial' streams, teaming with the 
will be both to induce emigratiorf to our liT S* ob j e «» u ' ofjis-bounty-sportive, happy 

and contented, eMpfessing their silent grati- 
tude to their beMctor, and thus reminding 
him of his still gritier obligations to a high- 
or power. I njay be more than commonly im 



and to furnish good locations and 
cbcsp and comfortable homos to emigrants 
when they get here. Such an organization 
is the one recently formed under the title of 
tbe Kentucky Land Association." The of 
ficers aie as follows: Wm. Voght, Preside*!; 
Julius Dorn, General Superintendent; 
Krippenstaple, Secretary ; and Julius Bi 
, boi:se, Treasurer. The cempany has but 
fcfiitiy organized, but they havt^already 
mevt«ed negot:«t ; ons for lands and lots, aud 
— havp cade pofitWe bargains Aw two traotA 
of Ut-i fur the city, vefeich are U be Jet 
as mark' t p»r.?et:p. ' £ W ^ 

Although ty e different organizations 
yet the ■■■ Keutueb* d Aseocia»io'if " »J\ 
the "Kentucky Entferetion Socety will 
act in conjunction. For'her Dof'o» of b..t!i 
institutions w ill begiven r in a future jupnit ei 
of tbia paper. 



t^,Onr office is at the corner of Main and 
Bullitt streets, over the Citizens' Bank, where 
we will be pleased to see friends from oity or 
v, at any and all 



ably 



A Humbdo — Wo otice in one of our ex- 
changes an advertisement of % secret how to 
manufacture honer We waru our readers 
(if warning is ue ^9ary), against patroniz- 
ing this thing. Jfluey cannot be mauufac 
tured by man. Ta» so-called honey is uoth 
ing more than atlick syrup, aud all the 
honey in It is onlj the slight proporion of the 
real article that isput in to give a flavor 

Ca^bmerk Sham. Uoats.— Mr. James H. 
M Nail, of North Star, Pennsylvania, writes 
us thai. Uv iearus Ituoi the ageut ot lue Low- 
ell Mills that the Cashmere wool is tweuty- 
iour shiUiugs per pound in Enguad, ( being 
£ j in gold,) while the finest hVeces bring 
much more wher- shawls are mai uf tciurcd. 

W» M;'^]M dojpjot ^Un-w),^ :hi Low- 
ell ageut ret oris th*.- r^lm.-T- ■■■ . ,. r hiir 
to be worth at Lowell, or wneii.tr there ia 
any demand for it at Lowell or el -where ia 
the Uniteof States. This is a point upon 
which we would like to be posted. Will some 
breeder or importer of Caahmeres give our- 
selves and readers the requisite information ? 

P. S. Since tie abovej was in type, we re- 
ceived the interesting communication from 
Robt. W.Scott .Esq., which covers the ground 
of our enquiry See article headed "Cash^ 
mere Goats." 



' It IB f 

; ed io b 

mals , s '»d % 
aav* as J . 
"8ie j 

vie Hon f ■ . 

' *aiu*bU 
• eujiert i 
i attach. 1. 
j *heep i 
sheer . 
■ ti! n u. 
j hedge v 
\ Hon by 
not so; 
animal 
venir-r 

in the breeding season 

The greatest, if not the only diacourage 
ment to the rapid rropagatiou of them has 
hitherto been the want of * domestic market 
for their wool ; but ^re iu.ght hiv* been as- 
sured that bo lustrious, elastic and do Able a 
material wm M not long seek in vain for a 
demand, at tull prices, in a country where 
wealth and fashion so much abound A frio;w 
of min -ho recently reuirned frosi SHs#l 
travei Europe, brought to one of my 
daught r. a beautiful while muff made of 
the sk f one of these animals, anii. 1 iearr. 
other w » . that, if the material could 
plie.l ■• sutlijit-ot abundanjc', ladie 
tuis, r . ie of cashmere skin*, woul^'rapidiy 
and t« erally become f aahioaabie ; and cer- 
tainly othing would exroi iLem in richness 
an ! he .uty and Suiiuess Two extensive bu- 
■in houses in ITia* York, (Messrs. C. G. 
Grenther and 8onS, and Messrs. Facns iad 



Reitmeyer) have, thin, year, imported m »u7 like * 



hundrt i" of the skins with the wool 
manufactured fur !s,and alj^  f r th  
purpose of cutting off the wool and ■tana 
factoring it into fine frinfrc.-*. tassels. Ac, &c 
to which purpoa«» it is ^dmirabty adapted 
by its duraoility, elaaiiciiy and superior zm 
pacity to reoeive dyes of ac v .v.] 0 r. 




Agricul: 

GALi.ACbS* 

of KeatuoV n ev«ry 

ita hiaiery knziwr, has 
W»r »oo mi I s a a 

ii T. .no, »aave, 
loiemmorio: i t^* three 
bis 8 a'e.  i^u 
ive b^eoome inss^v  y 



■ 



Hoo CHoLEii.— We are sorry to learn that 
this fatal disease has been quite prevalent 
lately in variotB parts of this State. Several 
farmers in Bulitt tell us they have lost 
many of their iost valuable stock and breed - 
iog hogs by thi| disease. Is there no certain 
preventive nor remedy ? 



AGHICCLTCRaTc ILK'-.V" 

The Agricultuiaj College Land Act, passed in 
1862, containedithe provision that all the 
States that wisfed to avail themselves of its 
benefits should |o so within two years after 
its passage. T^ere were good reasons why 
the Southpra St^es oould not accept and lo- 
cate the lar.tl within these two years, and 
now that tht obstacles no longer exist, the 
friends of agriculture at the South are look- 
ing about to see what can be done. We do 
not see that Jiey can be helped, except by act 
of Congress, and we join with the " Ameri- 
can Agriculturist" in the hope that at th  
proper time Ctngresa will pass such au acS as 



Northern States." Let friends of apiculture 
n Congress bear this in mind. 



aginative, but. I must confess that I cannot j eDable He Southern States to enjp? the 
Contemplate such scenes as these, without Denen t8 of tie grant in common \ t^ e 
fnilii g  » love with everything in nature 
nertajfcl reflect upen them without a feeling 
of profound astonishment, that rural life is 
'not moji universally attractive and that se 
many,-6f our young men, urged by feelings of 
avarice and ambition, are willing to fly from 
scenes of real happiness to distant lands; in 
the vain pursuit of wealth, or to waste their 
ialenfs, in the profitless, exciting and degra- 
ding conflicts of the political arena. How 
infinitely more happy would tbey be, if in- 
stead of burning with the wild fever ot am- 
bition or adventure, they would turn their 
energies to the development of the resources 
of tbe count. co'-W» • ti^e «irt»«8 and 
eni.ohur g f e;- , K, . . «o  *e~ 

n.*^t e life . i.  • r • i t, t J 

o.v..,| \, y ..n% i.. |...u vher- 

L' e m«y aeiJ.Q ¥ J,. io„,  4 «m re-^- ,wny. 
No more to aesleM. v.m o^osreb. , i 



Nsano La»or ih Alabama— The editor of 
the Montgomery, (Ala.) Ledger, who has been 
a large slaveholder, publishes in his- paper 
an estimate of the production of his planta- 
tion under fre« labor. He has made a bar- 
gain with thirty negroes, who are to culti- 
vate his land They pay half of the expense 
for rent, and take half of the crop. His cal- 
culations show that on 500 acres he will make 
$13,000, whick is more thau could be made 
on tbe old pla» — Avguxta Constitutionalist 

Whii?- we, as editors of a Btric;ly bus nese 
»*-«r«p*pri .1   ■ - ' iuf  o do with tbO F° 
'iiic .l ■ avoU( ] In tb«i '* nf gro q "S- 
• ion,' : ,«e with giea it.ter V to 'he 



•■ortiuge «f  j« new labor •ysiem? .f i'js 
" A young nan of taste, and f. , such 8 outhe«t 8  *ts, and wul be mu. n pleased to 
asthese, of t: eluget^ie i,ud virt ous r cci , 

pies, has hi* * . : sp] foe*, and f.rtuLi v b , reoe, »* r pounb'- sources, all informa- 
in his font- d on thib nbjoct. Give us faots. !)a« d 

"Science - daily making discovert In nnon oarafu \ cservatiou and persoukl e?- 
lAe aa^of enriching t^ afettb, we a   t Id ( p* ri ence, without any mixture of parth»n 
discard noting, without i tnal, which j. ,.o- ; . . tl 

ises to be ways bearing in miadJ * alo ? T ' r ^ p « " 

that the wise - v easr el; aousisftatiii 

- with the moethnerarejpeAdiiurein por J About 5 H) have been ralse.i \u Ha ford, 
chase of manuref, provided we take oave, bylCt., from itr re b -' ratiun of dogs. 



lie b ' nji ! ne- 
1 onimen^ary an p^ac^es 
r». Noibing i» • fpioti, 

hrou^h some . * Mk~  eo 
lafe, thau to hear u? expres- 
to d«»5'h." applied to fieldemice 
fertile which ar* uo# aban- 
t»  u n- the bUc,kt i ry, ^^d the 
And ev ry one knuws ho^ coa- 
moa a sighfei' i* »•  see the ohildrer. or rrani- 
children, of'ihe barjy r- i .1 : » 

fores's ar' 1 trvt lornc . jp tas of these) 
Belds to thv ligh f and warmth of heaven, 
with their tadhs turneJ upon 

!i, a 'S*^ti« land of th 
and ceekipr tob-t u r iheif cot" 
moval to fire of the newer 8s» 
the just fjjupino Tern ones, 
where theymay. they w»ll find i 
itage thai their f ne^stori fo: 
land whie\ alter the lire t half 



« 3ldj bome- 
nativi'y, 

 n by re- 
- or one of 
' h : U' go 

• i-iefcer ^er- 
: here 
i ten crops, 

wiu yja I noa li nn 'Kc- ild fie ! 'bey have 
iAMrted, undwv well-directed t r-roe to pat 
thpm agw. in good heart, and '.uii«icus and 
systematlk culture 

These Gree fa^ w are well ku . 4 :^«very 
nary iatelUgaaee ii the older 
Kentucky 1st. Tb^.- leretoforo, 
rule, the crops of - rirmers, 
diversi f ' id. 2i, T iai nothint 
us system of roUtica has been 
And, 3u Yh-.ki the s» I fields have 
d to the s*ime iwc d . ar ia and 
for b*'"* - •.utury. it'! of i, j m 
the la "4 -'~\ not produce en. u. u to r.^y for 
• ar or of working 'a in in yca«e"fn : .l- 
ing to re urn the seel sown • i^eyond these 
three fee s, however .a a fourth, uot gencral- 
These enterprising gentlemen would dot ! ly know , or if known, not tb ue.bt of, *h i, 




while nc denying f b • fxh^ustt 
ye' shot 4 that that exhaustion 
tial T' i fact is the .mportant 
tow plats ay. We know what we era writing 
about « itn ws make the averirent, thai in 
much tl ; larger number of Sko old farms in 



spoken of, 
oni/ p*r- 

e of .Uul- 



Keiv.ua v. wtiichart suppose.. 
iioth.r 4 ^ts ever been ouSfce 
the hwrow, or the hoe ^f ihe I 
but thirst five or six inches f 
this, «es. tbe exhaustion has 
such a  it i* , and it is to this • 
tion of the cultivator mu«  
underi -V-* to pu; in h, r* 
beea  t )nsed and iir .eri«l   



I e worn out, 
the plow, 
i-bandman, 
^e top. To 
l confined, 
H the atten- 
um »d, who 
what hm  
And th 



whole process of r*j*evena uo* a ugh for ■ 
time ( uiring labor and patien v, is aim 
and  r rtain, as we think we I'ja'.l be aWe to 
deiuo« trate in successive noa. Mrs of thi* 



buy all ot the cashmere skins whica eould be 
property offered with the long and fiua wool 
on them. One of them informa me that tad 
wool should be washed in clear ruuing water 
on tbe animal's back, and while yet adire; in 
orderjto avoid, I presume, felting the wojI, a 
quality which it has in a hurher . cree, than 
sheep's wool. The skins may be taken off 
and dressed with alum, &c , and thus kept 
or sent "i market. 

As only males less than full blood can he 
afforded to the shambles, the number of skins 
prodm." 4 : r tbi« country and oTered to the 
market ctu not be la.ge for a few years, but 
will be rapidly increased. j 

The ekius of * or   blood wetters aresse i 
and colored, or tanned, make most beautiful 
and ceai'ortab'.e mats and rugs fcr doors aud 
hearths, and also for the saddle, carriage. 

cradle, bnggy, k? T«ree ir f*ar . i 

tastefu; I y put together would make a robe for ' A f-w simple prrnclpreh lie it b  
a buggy tqualling in beauty and comfort su- '* -'''I Agriculture, withou » f»ir under- 
those made of the skins of any other ant- • staD.* jg of shleh it is useless u, le%n upon 
mats For i»ll of those aud otl-r pttrposea tne the f d^ iJ. supi IMP 4 : *  *efl*Jfc h .- 
skins of rrade weteers must aiways bring to vegetation ; chaago Q req U . : e lo f r , qUl ,', 
reswaeratiVe prices. Tho auimtUa maybe cropping, rest, or its equiva a , r«u$kut-^ 
slaughtered at any time when the length of easeuiis. to all ?oila. But fere culti*nted 
the wool ib such as best to adapt it to tho pur -"ops if or y, have strength e -...ugh to pu-h 
pose for which the market demand* it their root! when the plowjrar- ias n«t bat* 
The great mass of ihe wool musu be ehaves P us ^ ea be jre tl.eai, and if inr/ had laey 
in early spring from the ha .ks or tbe breef "v»' i b- cuilled ins'ead of nour; hei; for t ft 
ing animals, whileyet alivs ind it ia 'or 'tis soil hM ° Jen opeaed to the -naia' 
wool that a market is tldeflj wanted in this [ en * e of ihv 9U l *» J the storm Without ro- 
country. To develop this market it ia necee- '*9 ( n of crops the   :- t ianu 
aary to obtain a proper uadersi/tuding be- * ' ev exhaust 
twean tfi* Tr.anufaoturers or m^r. hanta, and "Spta that it enter in»- »b# 
the goat raiaers 'n this country. The manu- P'knts grov/n upon it, and hi. 
raeturer must know how mu.;". i ool ho rau P» w « r { o j.'«ld fh«m austenac 
obtain before he will adapt his ai .chmery to H* 0 * * n,i P" daoa. But even * ';..ide~ep plow- 
its manufacture . ir.d knowing no tetter mci-'  - judioines obangtne -ro; - 

land muat "ooner or hater gi»o ami, nuleas 
wed It Tot " i"»rj. « of recuper* 



Je course of 

oi tha slaa 

g no longor 
they f-»il to 



moat 
r*at be aH 

a^ing Lis exhaujtcd enetgite 
etimulauts b« applied to keep 
f aosrf etc pie pric iplaa, a ;J I 
then u.. • v : , . ^e sial! hv 
|nd enforce as successive a. 
journal xake their ap^eavanc 
lieua t 



»rtifi"iial 
art. 



o elucid 
-ra jar 



of eliciting that information, I offer my assi 
tance in obtaining it. If the Cashmere breed- 
ers will inform iae by letter how many skins, 
and how many Heccee, aad of what grades, 
they can furnish annually, I wiil embody and 
publish the information, and coinmanicate 
with those wno wuh to buy it; in 1 tbu t | 
manufacture will be established, » nd a mar- 
ket opened. | The nf.ueucu el jusicious i ."ma of til 
As the manufacture of the w at in thiR -l*** up'^tbe ^p- oBperily of ar o!e, has been 
country will be to some extent et ^rimental for « bl y t' .^traUd in Belg ■», England, 
and hazardous, it may be necedair? -.nd pro- . Bnd °' her u E-*°pe»t touniru »nd also m 
per that by way of encourag* me-.t to them ,Vp ° Wpr ^ l * ,e8 in 0 " own ua'iotj, 
the Cha?hmere breeders shot: i I. for or* reas h*a toadmii njw of no deniaL Wealrh ia no 
on, contribute gratuitously al! or » pan 0 f jmorepow^r. CJuoeAiof is no mere euiightea- 
their fleeces to those manufacturer- wfaj will l meu '; Chiurre- y a uo max -'igion, thae 
undertako it s :n ^gricuuu  ■. 

It 18 highly desirable ilso t L it • h . je mereh-l ~j~ m 

ants and those manufacturers  tf all kiadaJ Crops in 8outkerii £.  
who wish to purchase the r"tins or tho Woo, 



ahould give partieular informa't^t; »a to ho 
they desire the i»»n3 and the wool to bo p 
pared, so as oest to adapt them to their 
propria.** nsw ; asd if they also will in 
masJfcr letter, I will em. 
it to tbe breeders. 

Aa the subjects of this article are aoirc- 
what novel, and the Birg^eetious in it may he 
considered somewhat gratuitous, it is big' ly 
desirable that it should reoeive through .he 
agricul iural papers some response from the 
principal Cashmere breeders in the Un:(ed 
States, and Ireqnest thai Ihe- -w ;i ! •'- 
goon aa convenient. 

On some future occasion I may desire to 
■ay something as to Ihe proper name of thase 
beautiful animals, and also aa to whether 
their Invariant fleeces should b? callrd wool 
or Mir Boijt. W. 8corr. 

Near Frankfort, Ky., Nov. 1866. 



■l.t 



Or, 

lC'1 



-ucky. 

1 county, t Sn? 



a but tee* I • i 

A id ir-.-w . 




M.. W. M r .ubiy, . ' 
writes to the ' Tom. v 
The tobficco crop i 
and which. n»- be 
viona to l«vst year 
ge as it was in 1 J 
large as last year As to cole ^nd qaality, 
it' is far inferior to Is.- year*, crop. Two*. 

-?'\« tuteu if'er the . o^ 
of June, and * largo j-rvporoo.. of it was cut 
green. The early ebacco * hich did sot 
" fire," and was not raten up y tho wermr. 

r. ry jootl , tut most all oi tr.o early tobac- 
co in the flat land fired badly tnd had la e 
cut greet: and to ;om up tb«. who!* ...ere 
was but one-third of a orop , .anted ; one- 
half of this was Met green, nd in conse- 
quence of the wet fail mueb. c it is mo tided 
in the barn. ..era is a er'- ^ 
best for three . ears past- W beat a average 
crop, but not aa fiae grain as last year. 



Rye 

_ splendid crop. Oats fine vield, but .ittla*~ 
fteptraiton* for th^ Paris exhibition of ; , tnv . Pota-oee, (Irish/, fair yield; Sweet 
18fl7 are g.i^s «a. Taapai k whv.'h is to aur- . 4 t4 , y 6ni yiel( j of ^ rRe p 0 t at0€s M £l 
rood the oentral biding is to be laid out in , wgisjking as muoh as five pouada Applea I 
the iJngi^h sty's, and will contain an later- j ntl ^ 8aiv M eomloe iB my U/ QOf A^.. 
national tlwstre, and a lawn where ihe jamea ; abua l ant— thousands of basken was* 
Of all aaticna wiB be pUyed. There will j Bto brandy. Pears, r : mbs, airiewan. 

else be a leotnre ^i_*I^ »jkbTa;ery. for \ M Jteri naa cherries, Ac., are sryinik ne- 
glected, though they sueoead w 11 when .nant- 



the use of any forolgr. savant who m%y have 
a new theory to prepose The exterior circle 
oi the park wii! contain the agricult jral ex- 
hibition, with model farms, dome.- ic aai- 
mala, and exhibitions of horticulture and 
pisciculture There are to be twenty mtrau- 
oaa, and it is proposed to establish a  ^rc-nn 
ah. at ion by railway betwe*' 1 .^.* cjfarent 
pdrte. 

the bank of the Seine. 



eel 



Farmers are making extensive prepara- 
tions fer uiother!year ; % lege- crop of wheat 
and rye a being sown 
pas-- 



sown thin fo several /ears 



c\ saTiaawsans.— Wc par leulariy invite 
MehXaea "wi l^'asl ^^ation to our advertising .agea,i«w*^. : 
sahek useful information will ' **&± 






=== 



JF„r •• i • minercial Gazette. 

1 at Huckstering. 



rat 



 ur people are paying from fifty to seventy- 
ve per centum more than necessary for the 
ndiapensable articles of butter, eggs, poul- 
try, fruit and vegetables ; and the excess paid 
doet not go into the poekett of the producers, but 
into those of a managing clique of huckster- 
ing speculators, combined together for the 
purpose of forestalling the market for their 
own benefit. Those men have their runners 
out on every road leading to the city, whose 



• r.e ih veil known, the govern* 
- ui j |»rJoe, the quality, and th^ 
-' til irekd O at ;s sold to the jxopW 
1 American ilia may at first sight haw 
a] i ea  »nc if undue interference with 
\lerty c' thj in iividual. But it is ioi business it is to buy up the articles we have 
in so fat as .ibeity, it not Hoeti- named before resi-'ent coneumets can have 
any rate inconsistent with whit | any opportunity fo ltheir purchase. The re 
bt by ail regiried as the general g«od suit is the consumer h'ta *p pay whatever 
,ect of all government should b« to-.j price the bucklers may clioo^- to a*k for 
, ^ ..c . *all from impo.-ure each and every one of tbea* necessary aj- 
iitr ^rattiw which at me hied* ncles 



through which I have passed and in *bic! 
I have sojourned, at least in those sections 
where high hills or knobs abound. The 
exact locality where the mineral was found," 




„Jn has been earned en for 
many years inlouisvllle, under the general 
superintendent of the City Missionary sta- 
tioned in this Jty and superintended month 
ly by Mrs. L. Jnderson. It is now in opera- 



seems entirely unknown by the present gen- tion on Mark* street, between 7 and 8, un- 
der the imme iate superintendence or Mrs. 
C. G. 8add an J Miss McDowell, assisted us- v 



:cep. 
is a 



eration, the secret, in all cases which have 
come to my knowledge, having died with its 

possessor, if I may except the one instanoe 
mentioned of Bullitt county. Do you no- 
think. Messrs. Editorp, that I am right in my 
views ? If you do, lend a helpirg hand in 

this important development, to 

Hard Fist, Jr. 



THOS. E. JENKINS, M. 

Analytical and Consul 

CHEMIST, 



CORHRR THIRD A»» WAlfBT 8TRRRTS, 

L0UI3VILLE, K.Y. 




3:Uicipied and n^shmen tend to 'oi 
i the oatBitapity, as from absol  ely 
.•rsju or proper fy- — 
pof.ulatica in *ery 
we who t*e coojpell 
.rii. t  owi supp-irt ftUd \fl*l of 
g ihe case, whoever 
- to rend-, r this p -j ir 
irt ! u i happy, is the trn| gov 
nwentat polioy In tcrbidding spveJation 
: Mdi»peusai le article of frJd, the 
. rntr»n' i as deserved wel'of its 
■ o p- v »c 1 it example wrftby of 

.tatif .• - " • ' other nation^. 

,o mor »ti i lus matter of ntereet 



[For the Industrial and Cominerci.il Gazette. 
J Am Iksufkicraklk ii uisaxck. — Many of the 
W - " cartuifii employed ia removing filth from 

^'he ceutr-^. pa^tie* of the city, in view of 

[For the Iudostral and Commercial Gazjkte. iRe approfceh Dt onoiera, tare in the u.»btl 0? 
McssRe. Editors:— Whilst traveling on !h» ■ aeposi.mg i^-ims vac*ut lota in the «ub 
Bir.tstown Ai-cnmmvjitioa train a few wcke urb*. i'hia M l mi w to.e--.t t^rum- 
Aucn. I fell in con vea»UuU With a fellow- ' "»»h frvm one naa's door and dwnpmg it 



tention thitherward Lead may \ 
unit] 1 M which will tend to v^iaahle and extensivdy nnefu 

ing dot. for the lenefit "of its forking er metals, yet nevertheless, it 

in a commercial poiu 
one in dollars and cents at t ha 



,ittg 
OBbart- 



«r .-•*» of prime nee^Bity to 
^iinnni coat, in this connexion we 
u of our reajers, and 

j of t. - I licipal officials, to a 
• avi!. and one which Us arrived 
$ mwml at as to reqa're prompt 
i rf fzr its abatement. We allude to 
■ *m of m»r°*«i uuokstering, by which 
t by combining together, 
. it t*l to MihabM the prices to the con- 
ef »ifenas; ^rj article '* ed for fool 



feil in con vefta:inTi wiltS 
traveler upon ton tupic I raintrals- in gen 

d Petroieu u iu particular* During 
chat, he showed me so'tte ba^iutiful epecimetis 
of Lead ore. whu-h he mated came from the 
hills ot Bullitt count.?. If this be true, (and 
I have not the shadow of a doubt of it,) 
would it not be well to examine in 
tor? It might pay some of ou 
seekers well if they would turned ti"  



po-ir and ucs it H' 

it wn at his ttatgfch  t .it iUe o%»moa er-^ If a larye U 
jiense of bokh, m»  *^* r 
pitbha- spiri -ea an 
iiag to. ''he tar 



ually by about^ doien faithful and devoted 
ladiajs. 

This school is opened every 8aturday 
morning at. te^ o'clock, and continues from 
two to three boirs. The exercises are singing 
children's hyrjns,— rehearsing solemnly to 
gether the L  nl»s prayer, cutting out and dis- 
tributing the'frork to the children by the 
teachers, kind Words about good habitsof in- 
dustry and cfennliness, the proper fear of 
God, and the [importance of atten 'in* tht 
Sabbath school The c osing -♦xeroses are 
ubuallv singing. 

Tne members usually attending are from 
7.!) to 100 duriug the fall and winter seaiou 
Too teachers manifest a deep interest, and 
make great 8 *crificeso! time and money, for 
. ecuricg iusiruoti»u and materials i or car 
rjiag ou thie work of benevolence for thx 



("see 



pvtiiaewortny 
hML the l*** 



be 



tool, »n 1 the miasion 



C.P.BARNES" 

GOtoptN 



I 



uihyV'ties 
a not a ■ 
the mat- 'tjo p- 
mini ral 



school on the S 0 U.h, a far gr«a*er degree ol , 

" rosperity would . tend them As it is, th^ 
Cefiw already seured to th usaad. of poor 
9 f | and destitute chiUKn of th* 
It 1 prpi 



the i iii- 
leanlinesB and l 



y -his evil at 1 i ^ oi lbj r hopefu' P ro "P« c " °* n 

J y i! admit Of elav. It . «J»a 3 t ^ J M feaDD, 

.f attend 16-it promptly, j not well City Missionary. 



ilaiy 




1 1 1 U U| . 

purpoi 



thn w out 

4hosse suggestions for the purpose of eliciting J^JJJ , !ie iVlusVJ ^nd cl 

enquiry in that direction that it. may tend to 1 and lekitaU ehil '-en. 

the development of  he Lead 'Meads" wnioh 

I in my own mimd am convinced abound h 

Kentucky. Since my boyhood, I have hear 

of farmers long years back, supplying then 

•elves with lead, for hunting and other pur 
[ p'oees, from "float galena." found among the 
'hills of their neighborhood This I have 
I heard in different portions of the State 



'pdustrial and Corner J (iaz«Ue. 

tagged Sphool 

V^utriaCSatKn, is *o 

ed some yearstinoe, for the 
ting the goo|to ora ' 8 and 
tess of poor 




Tbe American and Foreign Clristian Un- 
ion BatiVy, whioh sustains onevr more mis- 
sionaries in very m .nv of our large oities, 
have Rdorxcd theIiagK«cl School * one of their 
means oi Ho ng good Their missionary, b y 
'he visiiaucn of famii ?s, gathers these chil- 
bi at some suitable room, where 
they are u^uht every week by »enevoleat la- 
dies. r 1 1 



Poor Flocr.— Families Bometimes have the 
misfortune to «et a barrel of poor flour. Tht 



year. 

Such flour when used for bread-making with 
yeast, will bout before it is ready for baking. 
A lady correspondent says this difficulty may 
be remedied by mixing a little finely pulver- 
iied saleratus with the dry flour, and then 
mix the yeast, and it will make sweet bread. 
This is a fact certainly worth knowing, and 
we thank our lady friend for the information. 



mim •c. r. »ARJI"» ** T a*» 

IMV. K^. for which I *»va .vtared th« com ai ' 

*re wa»wnci) e*»---. *»*1S?» of material y« wo ™f 
.- lvuUi v  ta. ^_ • • ihttliXcture, aad ai» 

,htr rt SA5'^'- 

... price *D'l aF.rv'RN caaiOM, (if by mall, at my 
when 20 cenU ia added for registry,) write yoar 
name and address plainly. 

Poatage on aingle pen tb«h cww, wUhj .ny caa^. 
or holder and box, she centa. Old P^m repaired toe 
Fifty cenU (and atamp) each. 

Clergymen supplied at half price. 
Address, C P. BARNES, 

Gold Pel. Manufacturer, and 
a Agentfor American Watches, 

Cor. 6ft A Main Louisville, Ky. 



It is said that $1,020,000,000 have been 
paid to the army alone .since tbe commence- 
ment of the war. 



Premium Pigs, 

FROM the largest Sow hi Kentucky, 
for sale at «20 per pair . «n thia office. 

Sov. 25-tt. 



?hr . Wurhcts. 



■ - EC, KY: 



?r 25, 1865. 



ia the Jffferson- 
e a* follows : 



ak d 




4«;'e  »' 

f,.r atiKtly 
ddeiicy. 

o»a" • 

■ t»1 

t-iice I- . 
. i tili eu, 




He«h 

OOTtv   
WRhM 

w Erf 

f .llfS 

CiK.i i 
at &r U i 

i k-k haU 
i .».  

ttc 

tm box* 

Al*  A - 

 J*rmui - 
oomrr i 
« «! 

i 

'■' ■ 

an -ii 

r^OO *'• 
6c. 1. - 

I , 

U3 U 



...41 M 

.... 1 75 
.... 1 55 

1 15 

2 30 

 wing to the scar- 
number of manu- 
»taples have be- 
i «ohanced. Hie 
 een a£tiv^j|rf+K 
iBxat • iu '» c 
P^-^h-Jce power 

v hiirli- w ' tu ^lea 
at l.'i't® 160 for 
 r ua^bilM rope. 

 25^250 per ton. 
5 ti'ns of second 
| es choice at $250. 
t , if lower with 
Minnd In lots, and 
we quote at 40c 
■en pretty firm all 
a jiast have been 
lg,,.t European ad- 
far an advance, 
of holders here, 
v Uml- *d »*les at 45 »® 

onward 

itr stocks of West- 
)ots at 2US22-J. . 
( and dairy 24c. 
ovuntry; feathers 
drrexl peaches, un- 
ers akid halves, and 
I i apples lU®12c 
, per bbl $3 10® 

t ..... I :  i,#2 " 

» V   INS— Cult 'l yams very firm 
at 41 inlc**. No. 600 at 
■ jer dozen. Small 



IB oi at 
t f 5« I. 
Taivo  

. No i .i 
fancy at.d 



• Baa 

5 i| ! 



iii. 



d- «, 

have o^oat 
fit A »i ry k uv* a 
wit . ■ ' i'. .» of it 




the factory, in lots, 
  ■ ment battels. 75c; 
1 1 ham tieraRS, $1- 
-\V e note considerable 
U oz sur candles at 
2oc, with no charge 
. »s or mare; small 
.uidles at 18® 19c; 
c and No 2 at 13c, 
-astile 22®25c per 

tare been heavy, in- 
m of beev»s and sheep 
c choice beeves 0® 
ri lJ,(Snc for rough 
decli» »- in 
and clio;ce 
range from »  t @ 
The receipts were 
ri635hons. 
tei hiiB iicen more 
  at. J a fair business 
ato Holders have 
i et/ock and buyers 
4c'late tale at a pro- 
ion is expected this 
■if: J be sufficient for 
prices of most fab- 
ler considerations, 
airwgs the market 
. i. ,-.i ,. »-ith' but  t!iall d '- 
•vh.ch has led to an in- 
at»4s. Standard* are 
while Southern and 
at U i aanie rates. 32®Xic. 
irwi ight are offered 
li iv»' been m.ide at a 
yard. In bleached 
'era K'tadea has been sub- 
qualities have sold 
.(•»&■ 1 v former quotaUons. 

. dnl  .- raited, and the few 
2 an pnticpally heavy goods. 

' light ttock with steady de- 
  i j w eir RBrtained. Cotton flan- 
-jades have been re- 
,: ry. In stripes and 

t^-t atliii. * lolui; «d the ratesi 
l.e prices oa ot 14 have beet 
mtHy grades v . ly a limited dema 

■ ttled. yet a conces- 
  ' •• ■ •!• made. Ginghams 

with moderate demand. 
i.iv  and prices well 
jtfered are attractive 
Shawls, new styles 
i -ices, and prices of all 
veek. bahnoral skins 
demand: fine goods, 
dy purchasers. The 




range is $36®75 per dozen. Clolhsare less 
active with little effort to press sales. Cassi- 
wers. demand limited. Satinets, unchanged. 
Limeys are active and stocks are much re- 
duced. Flannels and linens show no change. 

FLOUR AM) GRAIN— The market is some- 
whnt easier with a steady demand however, 
and sales of »75bbls superfine, in lots, at $7.50 
©7.75. and $xOO for f.ivorite brands; sales of 
StK) bbls plain extra, and extra family at $9 00 
®9.50 for the former, and $10,00^11.00 for 
the latter : aUo sales in'dray load and car load 
lots of choice brands at $t ,50, #9,50. »11,25, 
and $12,00. 

Wheat very scarce at $1 50®2 for new, 
with a sale of 400 bushels old white at $2 10® 
2 15. and 250 bushels choice at #2 30; and a 
sale of 600 bushels red at $2 05. A sale of » 
tons of bran at $13, 10 tons of shorts at $20, 
and 10 tons shtpstuff at $30. A sale of a car 
load of red w heat, old. at $2. New corn, from 
( wagons, in ear, 50c : old corn 65®75c. with a 

1 (Jtfii'fr ^irE PJ 'i'n ( i" t 000 busbels al 80 i 

1 at 56c. delivered. A sale irfa ea»4o*d"of oarley 
I malt at $1 50. Shelled white coru in sacks, 85 
j ® 7c, Including bags : and sales of choice at 
90c delivered. 

GROCERIES. — The market has been quiet 
this week, with fine slocks on hand, and sales 
of 75 bags inferior Rio coffee at 2s@28  a c ; 
sales of 100 bags fair Rio at 30®31\c. and 
sales of strictly prime at 32c. Sales by the 
single bag ' at 33c. Java coffee 51c. Raw 
sugars are scarce, with limited sales in hhds at 
15^®l6 4c for Cuba, and 16 i©l»c for fair to 
choice Torto Rico. A sale of 100 bbls hard 
standard at 21c. and smaller lot* at 31  »®22c. 
Considerable sales of yellow sugar at 16®17c ; 
sales of C sugar at 17K®17i a c, and coffee 
sugar in bbls, three grades, ranges frm 1S}£ 
to 20 l icin jobbing lots. Carolina rice in casks 
ll i®12c. Torto Rico plantation molasses, iu 
bbls $1 10®1 15. Eastern sirup in bbls ran- 
ges from 9.V: to $1 30, in half bbls $1®1 35, 
and kegs $1 10®1 45, with small sales of crys- 
tal syrup at $1 75. 

HAY— A sale on the wharf of 53 bales hard 
pressed timothy at $15 50 per ton. 

IRON Ac. — Our quotations are fully main- 
tained with an advance on castings to 6 £c. 
Pig iron firm with a light supply of Ohio, and 
a sale of 50 tons cold blast at $75. 

PROVISIONS AN'U LARD — The market for 
mess pork has been extremely quiet wuh a 
few retail sales at $323*33 per bbl. Bulk 
meats are in moderate supply, and bulk shoul- 
(U rs have been offered at 15 »c. Bacon con- 
tinues in good request with heavy sales during 
the week at 17®17 »c. and 18c for shoulders, 
and 21  «®22c for clear sides at the first of the 
■week, with sales yesterday and to-day of 45 000 
lbs, packed in threes, at 22i,c. the markets 
having advanced. New lard, in tierces, ranges 
from 27 to 2t c, and prime leaf, in kegs 29®*ic. 
A sale of 2600 green lams to a packer at 17) c* 
WUOUEX WAKE— Manufacturers quote at 
the following prices, with small sales at the 
usual advance, subject to changes in market 
\\ :Ui. m notice : Backets or pails, painted, 2 
hoops, $350®4 00 per dozen;tubs No. 1, per 
dozen, $15, tubs No. 2 per doz.$14. No. 3 $13; 
washboards $3 75 per dozen; nest tubs of 3 
in nest $8 25 ; tubs f  in nest $4 75. 

WHISKY— Raw advanced early In the week, 
with sales of about 250 bbls at $2 29®2 30, 
and subsequent sales at $2 27®2 2S for new, 
and ■ sale to-dav of 50 bbls at 2 25. A sale of 
BO bbl» at $2 J7®2 28 iter old. A sale of 25 
bbls steam copper at $3 40. 

WOOL— Dull t.—ony at 30 "1 M." c, as to qual- 
ity and condition, for unwashed, and «0®65c 

TOBACCO— The sales stnee oitr last- includ- 
ing review*, -hare amounted to 492 hlnls. The 
market has been rattienlull i-nd drooping ow- 
ing chiefly to the inferior grades i fferitig; fine 
leiif and selections are well sustained, and 
common light lug* to-day Closed at $4®5. 
The offerings amounted to 90 hhds, and the 
rejections of prices bid were on 19 hhds. 
Sales included 1 hbd at $2 90, 7 at $3®3 90, 13 
$4®4 95, 10 at $. * .-  95, 8 at $6®« 90. 12 at 
$7®7 90. 3 ;it #»a 9 30. 8 at $10® 10 75, 5 
at $11.4 at $12® 12 T5. 5 at $!3 fc®13 75. 6 
at$14&l4 75. 3 at ei5®15 25, 2 at $16^,10 75. 
1 at $17. 2 at $1* 25®1«0, 1 at $20. 

Ttkmiay. Nov. . al— T!h  ofleruiirs to-day 
amount eil to 19$ hhds. and the rejections of 
prices bid were on 26 hhds. The market was 
drooping to-day. though fine leaf and selec- 
tions commanded full rates. Sales of 7 hhds at 
$2 75®3 90. 11 at $4®4 90. 20 at $5®5 95, 
5 at $ ; 25^6 60, 4 at $7® 7 90, 4 at $8@8 65, 
" 60. 10 at $10®1075. 4 at $11® 11 75, 
12 75. 12 at*13®1375. 12 at $14® 
$16®1C 75, 3 at $17 25®17 75, 
t 75. 'I at $2G 25®29 25 
November*)— The breaks 

tiering 3S hhds, with the 
bid on 2 hhds. Th« 
made no sales to-day. 
market was about the same as Saturday, 
however, better gl■ade^ offered, which brought 
Higher prices than at tbe close of last week. 
Sales include 10 hhds at $4 90®5 75, 2 at $u 90 
®7 90, 1 at »s 4 at $9 00®9 60, 2 at $10. 4 



LUUISVIL.i 

For th* V 



SALE PB1 \ CAREFULLY CORRECTED AND REVISED. 

Saturday, Nov. 25, 1865 



.In filling sn.all of- 
lers. higher prices are 
asked. 

BAGGING & ROPE. 

P'rloom«  yd 
Hand do 
Ma'neRope»B  16. 
Common 15)*al 
BAGS. 

2 bush gunnies 29a 
Seamless *°a: • 

BEANS, 9 bosh |1.1 

BEESWAX, i? tt, 
Yellow 40a42 

BROOMS, 9 *«■ 
Shaker, *«-2o 
Louisville, $5 75 

fi«nn on $4.50a$5.50 

BUTTER, ffitT^o 
CANDLES. ¥ B  

Star, 13 oz 25a25'j 
Light weight 24 
Adamantine 25a26 
Tallow laa20 

CANDIES, f % 
Assorted, 30a.T2 
French. 40a45 

CEMENT, Lou. 
Hyd'c 9 bbl $2.75a$3.00 

CHEESE, P ft  
West. Reserve, 22a23 
Hamburg 2:ia24 
English Dairy 25a26 
Pine Apple 36 

CIDER, 9 bbl. $12.00 

COAL, 9 bush. 
Pittsburg, 19a20 
Pomeroy. 16al7 

COFFEE, «• B  
Rio 28 ja32i, 
LaguyTa 32a34 
Java , 50a52 

CORN M E AL, 
Unbolted 
Bolted 9 bush. 

CORDAGE, 9 8  
Manilla, 

American Hemp, 
Jute, 

COOPERAGE, 

Pork bbls. 
Whisky bbls 
Flour bbls 
Ham Tierces, 
Slack hhds 
Lard kegs 
Lard tierces 
COTTON, 9 1 
Inferior 
Ordinary, 
1.0W Middling, 
Middling 
Good Middling 
COTTON YARNS. 
No 500 9 doz 41a42 
No 600 38a39 
No 700 35a36 
Batting 9 B  40a60 
Candlewick 65a80 
DRUGS & DYES. 
Alum, P ft, 5 aa6 i 
Assafoetida iiia.io 
Blue Mass 7" a-.o 
Balsam Copari.$1.80al .30 
Borax refined 38a40 | 
Blue Vitriol 18a20 
Krimstone, roll 7aS 
Brimstone, flour 8 »a9 
Copperas 3   
Citsic Acid $1.00a$1.10 
C Ammonia, $■ Eb 40 
Cream Tartar 5- *a62 
Cochineal tT.55a$1.65 
Camp'r refi'd $1.40a$1.50 



DR\ GOODS, &C, 

EKO\q  !t'Ki" ■ 

Ore* Western 33 
Jxurl Hilt O 
vSt.ind, d, Eart'n 

I « M 

dA O 31 
dot S 5» 
tr '„• • -.iRrfr-.v., a rP-'C   



N \ 



•atnir.? 



IRCN 

Pig, 9 ton 
Bar 9 % 
Hoop, Coopers 
Sheet 
Boiler 
Nail-rod, 
Castings 
Pulleys, 
LARD, 9 % 
Tierce 



$56.00a75.00 

5^a7 
7a8 

7 i 

S^alO  4 
llal3 

10 1-2 

26a27 

30 



SOAP, 9 lb 

Palm 

German, No.l, 
Do No. 2, 

Castile, 



Linoskeag\\ C A 

do la 
do \ 
do a 

do 1\ 



STK'. I I . 

Shirtings IMP ' 

CHBCKS. 

Aecordinn toi».- ; eht »t« ' 
quality ItMU 

MTf 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY RIVER AN VILROAI^ 

From Jf*^rmf**Clj 



50a60 

75a»5 

26a27 

18a20 

$1.60 
$2.00 
60 
$1.00 
$2.15 
75a85 
1.60 

30a33 



44a45 

46a47 



24»r. 



Bam 

V..-.TJ 

;tA"V 

At 



36 

S0a42 V l 

35j^) 



Cotton ad es 

PKINT- 

Stam! 
Merriiii'f 

London Mourn in if 

Duchest- B, 

Wamsut'a 
noMKsTn ' OMR USS. 

Lancaster 

Glasgow 
PRLAinia. 

Hamilton 

Manchest. - 

Pacific 

COBSKT JKAll I 

Standard 
jka.ns, ky 9 yd 

SHOWN DRILLS 

Standard 
"Amoskeag fine 

TWIU.K1) SILKSIAK 

Standard 

CAMBB1C8. 

Paper 

Colored 25 

Sr-OOL COTTOIt. 

Coats' 9 dos tl.15 
Clarke's do $11.' 
FEATHERS, I? ft 
FISH, Mackerel. N, 
large 9 bbl 
do mea'm $jK.'.oo 
do do half hbl $1. 
do do Kitts $3 00*., lfl 
do No 2 large bbl 120 
do medium new $\  
do do half tlO.i 
do do Kitts new $2.6 
do Noli large bbl$l( . Hi 
do do half bbl $S.25 
do do Kit;- $2.50 
Cod, 9 d'm 9 ft 10 
Herring, 9 box 75aS0 
Sard'es X bx »100$31a:« 
FLAX seed, Vbu $2.60 
FRUIT, 

Apples 9 bbl $5.00a6.0C 
Dried 9 % ».i ; 2 

Peaches dried 16a32 
Figs, 9 B  '35 
Currants Zante 9 ft 20 
Raisins M R 9 box $6.00 



Il ial2ii 
Ur 15 
leet 15 
ATHER, 9 ft 

k sole, city tan 4fia51 
nl'JcksoU 3aa40 
"ess *^ 
ing « 
tins city feSal.10 
dty $1.75 
 sdoz$48.00a$55.00 
f '• $44.00a$5tl.00 
calf $42.00a$60.00 
alf $45.00a$o5.00 
I V bbl $1.75a$2.00 

R, 9 M 
, plar, t28.00 
p tnon, $;15.00 

MOLASSES, 9 g»' 

$1.10al.20 
tp ft')S$l .30 
« 1.00a$1.75 
NAVa. ,-ORES. 
Tart 9 k   doa fLOO 
. e $s.oo 
hosln 9 "bl ««UWal6.'(M 
al $1.50 

NAILS, 9 % 

$7.75 

OFFAL.   U n 
Bran $ U OOaU.OO 

i • H)a22.00 
*- 0a24.00 

■Mtddhnc '.i3o.oo 
OILS fit PAINTS. 

Lard 9 g*l 

i Coal 2a.- 

I Taasisd i i.5o 
Kaatar $. 
Jtrauners* Bank 
V'.ibricating * 
1 -nitiii 
"| 'ait, 9 gal 



lla!2 
14 
12al3 
221-2a25 

SPICES, 9 ft 

Cloves, 60a65 
Nutmegs, $l,40a$1.60 
Pepper, 37a40 
Hmento, 31ar 3 

Ginger 25a26 

STRAW.Vton. 
Baled, 15.00 

SKINS. 

Raccoons, each 50a60 
Mink $3.00a4.00 
Sheep, wool on $1.00a2.00 
SEED, « bush 
Clover, red $8.75a9.00 
BauAa . . at *rxmA nal 
arrmrtt ■ 



Hemp 
Blue Grass 



1.40al.75 



Orchard 




Barley 




Spring Wheat 
SUGAR, 9 % 






N. O. fair 18alS , 


Do prime 




Refined Yellow 


17a20 


Island 


15al8 


Hard Standard 


21a22 


Havana White 


18al9 


STARCH, 9 % 




Madison 


7a7^4 


STEEL, *  ft 




Cast 


30 


American 


llaU 


German 


25 


SPIRITS, -Pgal. 




Alcohol $4,55a$5.00 


i Neutral Spirits, 


$2.50 


Schrceder's Bitters, 




9 box 


$12 


Brandy, 9 gal $19-*;. 


Do America^ 




Gin. W. 




T  vmerfean 




Hum. Jamaca 





Po Amuricail, 
TALLOW, 9 



"EAS 



. 2.90; 
8a»'. 



1.- 



lai u 
ijt 



CAKE, 



$2.00a4 

16 



T 3BACCO, *» 

ufS $4 



L«M$J 1 



$j , 

$3.' 



Raisins, Layer 
Pnnies 9 ft 
Lemons 9 box 
Oranges 
ifailea f  ft 
Citron 

GINSENG. 9 ft 



Kpsom Salts 
Gum Arabtc 
Gum MyiTh 
Glue 
Ipecac 
Indigo 
Iodine resub 
Logwood, extract 
Liquorice 
Madder 



5#a6 
60aS5 
55aS5 
llal6 
$5.50 
$1.10a$1.55 
$6.0lta6.75 
15al9 
30a56 
17al8 




at $11 all 75. 4$l:i 25s 14 75. 1 at $16, 4 at 
|17®17 75, and 2 at $19 75®20. 



Morphia 9oz $9.00a9.25 
Magnesia Carb 50 
Opium $9,50 
Putty, 9 100 ft $8.00aH.50 
Potash Hydri $4.75a5.00 
Potash Chlorate 60a65 
Sugar Lead 55a60 
Soda, Ash 6  4 a6  4 ' 
Sal Soda 7 « 
Soda Hi Carb 12 ,al5 
Quinine Sulph $2-70a2.s5 

EGGS. 
Limed 9 doz 
Fresh 27a28 

FLOUR. 9 bbl. 
Superfine, $7.50aS.00 
Extra Family$10 U0all.25 
Plain, Extra $9.00a9.50 



$6.2.'; 

28 
$11.00 
$13.00 

24 
45 
72a75 

i GLASS, 9 box with dis. 

tSxlO $5.40a$5.75 
! 10\12 $5.75a$6.10 
12\ls $7.20 
GRAIN, 9 bush. 
Barley $1.05al.30 
do Malt $1.35al.60 
Wheat $1.50a$2.35 
Corn shelled 70aS7 
Com ear 45a 55 

Oats 45ao0 
Rve 75.i-o 
GUNPOWDER, 
Dupout's $10.00al('.«) 
Indian $9.00ada50 
lil.i-ting, $8^0a900 
HAY. 9 ton. 
Timothy, baled 
do loose 
HEMP, ?ton. 
Ky rough 
Ky dressed 
HIDES, 9 B  
Green 
Dry salted 
Flint 

HOPS, 9 % 

Eastern, new, 
Eastern, old, 



$47 



l: aM 



HSR0C 
$13.oo 

$l-5a2 



8 

10all 
13al4 

6oa60 
25a35 



ONIONS, 

* bbl 
PAP. R, »bdle. 
Cr. n apping, 
Medii i, 
DouM :'r., 

PLAT S. 9 bos 

Tin I'la I C 

do 1 X 

do L roofing $17 50 I 

do I \ r,. 0 flr.g $20.60 I 
do [ X $2100 1 
d. 1C 11 .'t.ib ght$ls.00 \ 
Copper sb i IP ft 55 | 
CCflper byttomt 65 { 

Met. :'' b»*nmt 32*, j 
Hoi. WS) . -it: v 7 j 
Block Tih b. l'ig 60 , 
Lead 

POTATO E t 

Nesiia .-. . . 
Northc 

PROVioior 

Pork.M. 

Pork, Pr 

Pork, fjmp 

baco», 9 ft 

Hams. Plain 

Canrassed 

Sugar curet 

S* gg's 

Bib sides 

Clear sides 

Shoulders 

Beef, Mess 9 bbi 

Beef, dried 9 ft 
RAGS, 9 ft 

Cotton 

Soft Woolen 

Hard Woolea 
RICE. 9 ft 
SALT, 9 Bush 

Ohio, 

Kauaivha. 
Do bbi» 180 lb 

Dairy, t 

Turk's Is ,i id. 



!/  il 

iiedlam " . 

I ,ud " 
Fine " 
Selections 
Keavy. 
1 'om. Lugs 
• ood 
'm. Leaf 
dium " 
h1 



i la T Ou 
Ma 9.00 
$10.0Oal4 00 
$1S 00a22.O0 
$23 00a25.00 
$30.00a65.00 



$6.50a 7 75 
8S.OOalO.00 

$i0.O0a 13.00 
$'.4,00al7.00 
$l8.O0a2:S.0O 
$24 00a25.50 
$26.50a30.00 
ACTCREn Tobacco. 
Sweet 
■ft Mt 



•tlOIH 



otmds 
pounds 
ne — 

ids $l,30a$l,50 

i right— 

$1.00a$1.20 
ight— 

nds 85a90 



SHOT, 9 

Patent, 
Buck 




Alcohol, bbls 

Apples, green ; bbls. 
Apples, dried ; pkgs 
Ale & Beer, bbls &c 

Bacon, tierces 

Bacon, lbs 

Bags; bales 

Butter; pkgs 

Beans, bbls 

Barley, sacks 

Barley malt, sacks. . 

Brooms, doz 

Bagging, pieces 

Bale Rope, coils 

Cotton, bales 

Cotton Tarns, bales . 
Coffee, bags'. 
Coffee, Essence, pkgs 

Cheese, pkgs 

Candles, boxes . . . 

Cider, bbls 

Cement, bbls 

Corn, sacks 

Cattle, head 

Drugs, pkgs 

Express pkgs 

Eggs, bbls 

Flour, bbla 

Fruit, pkgs 

Furniture, pkgs.. 

Fish, pkga 

Flaxseed, sacks. . . 
Feathers, sacks. . . 

Glass, pkgs 

Hides, bdU 

Hemp, bales 

Hardware, pkgs.. 

Hogs, No 

Hay, bales 

Hollow-are, pieces. 
Hoop Poles, No. . . 

Hominy, bbls 

Horses No 

Hops, bales 

-on A^teel, pes bdls 

I on, Pig, tons. 

plements. No 

flber, feet 

i lor, pkgs 

, Tcs 

kegs 

er, rolls 

. . bbls 

ies4| pigs ; 

Merchandise, pkgs.. . 

Mules, No 

Molasses, bbls 

Molasses, h'f bbls — 

Mackerel, pkgs. 

Meal, sacks 

Nails, kegs 

Offal, bags 

Oil, bbls 

Oysters, 
Oats, 
Oakum, 

Pork, bbls 

Pork, bulk, pieces . . . 

Potatoes, bbls 

Paper, bundles 

Queensware, pkgs..- 

Kye, sacks 

Rope, Manilla, coils'. . 

lta*rs, bales 

Bye Klour. bbls . 

Rosin, bbls 

Bed Lead, pkgs 

Rice, casks 

Sugar, hhds 

Sugar, bx.-iibbls. . . 

Salt, bbls 

Skins, bales 

Seed, cloVfcr & grass 

Soda Ash, casks 

Soda, kegs 

Sirup, bbls ... 

Sirup, kegs 

Sundries, pkgs 

Soap, boxes 

Starch, boxes 

Spices, bags 

Sheep, No 

Tobacco, hhds 

Tobacco, boxes 

pkgs, 

Twine,' bales 

Tin, boxes Ac 

Tea, pkgs 

Varnish, bbls 

Vinegar, bbls 

Vitrol, carboys. 

Whisky, bbls 

Wheat, sacks 

Wool, bags 

en Ware, pkgs. 
te Lead, kegs. . . . 
Pkga 



,TO\AL. 



70a73 
70a72 
68a70 
70a73 



$8 



784 

MM 
• 448) 
80150 
2132 
6577 
1964 
30028 
18900 
12712 
9608 
10529 
36510 
7756 

29600 
9699 

1574 
923 
180069 
15310 
21107 
95764 
3949 
14787 | 
5136*1 
22792' 
14660, 
7230| 
2458 
370911 
423S6 
89H2I 
240*9 
136601 
60312 
10765 
671185 
625 
5389 
651 
4797 
147339 
6736 
664l| 
2735101 
7061 
1995 
2089 
4668 
6495 

323721 
2603 
2763 
1123 
13009 
2326 
26192 
24» 4 



9s 92 
1596 
979 
180169 
15431 
21713 
97410 
3968 
19077 
62583 
23591, 
14888 
8038 
2507 
3£SU 
42939! 
9165 
25946 
16040 
bi'77 
11002 
589135 



51 1 

5233 
15201 
21102 
36299 

57U 
30487 
SOUS 

1470 
14466 
16696 
118 



108 
2236 
74049 
2146 

20356 



2246 

76108 
2146 
23149 



12S2049 1400999 



19 



(o 0 



* I ' yjt' 



ia 




V 




3033n 
49453 
69o5o 



1083 



I2S049 
1363a 
10051 1 
1-.75 
4734! 

:;M-ui 



■400 

■m 

f 1033 
2263 
1493 
17969 
1365.-* 



114 



4767 




107902 
14S6 
5426 
431 
7186 
1401 
1596 

132363 
1081* 
6915 



34832 
P.7-.S 
2673 
1120 



3500 
385 
15975 
27638 

1657 




gita trial &y mwtrtik ttarffi 



! 



wmmei'cial Grazette. 



U it Needed* 



In commencing an enterprise Ike the pres- 



The Manufacturing Interest* of Lou- 
isville. 



'  A TiTY } Bj|n*)BS. em, it Is wetf te be iatisrkd tajt there ie a 
****** ^U,, tb# r« 1 ^ 5fr i d «*" d fot ,h « ^ttflie-that ie thing ie 

^ " ' * M UuiBvilleisaeiiyofeomeoneiuudred and 

*ATlifRfil^ IST7 ! Tj ^' : ?« 13 n,ar,iet ' for oert iin ah \%bor for the realisation of our hopes. We 

"Phi _J " *^ ' 1 trade. Various town-, at ! eitiM | m r the 

8outh aod Waai look to ..liiisvlie a- their 



It is an old axiom that taya: ' 
is the mother of Invention. Ii 



Neoes9ity 
we would 



ten thousand people, having a | wide-spread ; have Louisville te become a great and pros- 

commerre. and being the chief, 'f not the on- | peruus city, the necessity is now upon tu to 



ii the shape of material advantage*, and 
many things in addition, of which they are 
defioieut. What we need is well directed and 
yenevtring enterprise — not the enterprise of 
charlatans, which has impudence for its cap- 
ital aud Href upon public credulity, but the 
enterprise of honest men, at all times regard-; 
fnlof those thing* wbnh make f : r the general ics of Louisville de*e»ve 
happiness and prosperity of the people among j every encouragement and 
whom their lot ha? been cast. Neithf r do we , jug that they are far in ad 



connected in their conitr 
• symmetry of proportion 
aid beauty of finish in 1 
»^d  -x'*rrnl arrr.ng^mea - 'hat mi 
ohtl!enge competition with other par 
de«d such splendid develops mH 
aa«l skill of the tnanufactcu- b Aod B 




km 



Gl 



?nt 



OUR PAPEE, 



fora^pmper. The trno* s«p W^^fcJ ! ^'f* 1 Mefpolis; they eject , find 

•cripti n. received through i, ***** h " bcr im * uot oul * 8 "* krt for * 11 

| their wares, 1 at .--.so a depot whence the; can 

' Ti their   f-j, cti. Itisovideai, taen, that 

fvr Mag ..hk» cat. ; -ud ■   fae;li'»le or to . 

j fur h«r Lbis cemmeree, is a want. Other and 

i^dor eommawttie* haw foun I that a Com 

jmer^ia wmi i, , ..str:... * -paper d^es tec » 

• i p Denote this en-*   nd v la only a fair de- 

m»m .heeepi mi«es -o con. lude that 



Ho to-day fret 
number *f a papei 
rest ecu, "rem ;hc 
bat one pr-ibebiy i 



ti ro tb« pnUc the f.rst 
wrocb. ie arf^rent it itu,- 

tne» iiiKm %t j&# njty 

i much deniaii led by the 



wants of the community and the exigencies 
of the times. There are now published in 
this city, ten or twelve weekly papers ; some 
political, seme religious, and one commercial, 
to the extent of being an accurate and reli- 
able Prices Current — but none especially de- 
voted to the interests we propose to subserve. 

The Industrial and Commbrctal G uette 
i b intended as the org an and advo cate of th* 
Commercial and Mi^BMPlffffg'interests of 
the city of LouTsViIie, and of the Mining, Oil 
and Agricultural interests of Kentucky, the 
South and South-west. It is to be published 
weekly, and etfery issue will contain a care- 
fully corrected Pricea Current, accompanied 
by such remarks on the bunness of the week 
and the state of trade in *U its departments, 
as the oc«k8ion may re«uire., or as may in 
any degree subserve the Mercantile and Me- 
oanical interests of tie city. It will also be 
the aim of the cditom to collect all the sta- 
tistical informatior. in any way bearing upon 
the interests of the city, and to furnish it to 
their readers in a condensed and useful form 
for preservatijn and reference* jtMif "ma- 
king the Gazsttb* the basi** pf a  ?emmercial 
History of the city. Tr-wfll contain the latest 
.Commercial intelligence fMdi sSlpirls of. the 
country, and will discuss-al! 'sjityfCUi involv- 
ing the interests of the Mercbsm. nn^'. lloji- 



such a press is a desiueratunnx-o. Ww^s^-V-f^, 
hp/vever, other and more cog«nt reasons for 
tylieving that a paper of theiort we propose 
is needed in this community. 

Some ten years ago the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Chamber of Ccnmerce made a 
special report in fcvor of thetstablishment of 
i paper of the arAnow p^posea, and urged 
  vt'*y strong terms the necessity for its 
publication. The report of the committee oc- 
cupied nearly a column of one of the daily 
papers, and was devoted exclusively to the 
discussion and recommendation of a Commer- 
cial and Industrial paper. This report was 
adopted by the Chamber of Commerce, and 
the enterprise waB undertaken by Mfssrs. 
Ben. Casseday and L. Woodbury Fiske. It 
was conducted with zeal, energy aud talent, 
and so highly was it appreciated by the pub 
lie, that its circulation went up to several 
thousand copies in a few weeks. Why it was 
discontinued we do not know, but discontin- 
ued it was — Mr. FiBke removing to another 
city, and Mr. Cassedy engaging in mercan 
tile pursuits, which probably required most 
of his time and attention. 

The rei»dous offered in favor of establish- 
ing bucb a journal lifla, apply with equal if 



have every thi%j$ to stimulate us to exertion — 
not a s ngle cause for despon leucy. But it 
'.he a loci we have quoted ' e true, and there 
ca^aot hi a doubt of it, it is equally true 
that, however necessity may stimulate the 
inventive capacities of meu, no valuable re- 
sult is to be derived 'he-efrom, out by the 
appreciative pat-onage of n liscerning pub- 
ic. Inventors, or skilful artizinfl, a a a class, 
are at once modest and retiring. Seld*m too. 
are they poaaeesed of the ri?ee : - adequate to 
'.-is.. i ic^.zuc. li-i- prides from 



want the emerprise of the the -ner? snecula- 
t or —the gambler in stocks and 'vans I id com- 
modities. Such men caa be well Fpai-; ! from 
any community. However, each may oeca- 
sionally enrich tr*Mii jelfe* thrcugh success- 
iul "peculations, their example bj pernicious. 



oalities which claim more 

on 'he part of maoufactui 

sftfe .', speed •iu'-a' ,; ty an   up 

"floving pallet*, tiat ba 

«ouw* of gre*t profit to fialr Q*nt' 

'luildtrs, but have also c i insfd t. 



v the cirocmsiaBce that such or such \ building up a flouri" v :ig in : :«t-j •; 



uiaciur^r The great ol),jec^nt.lhf^apet «w»lt 

b?, ad . l'iv ti diaplay to pt.-r(«i« { 8bro ;d, bu f 
to each r-'hfi it ho!/;e, "i.f Bdvifgin whioli 
our ci«v rt-il'y prs^^^en; »u l  -Verylhing 
wbic*-. will »»-!id 'o this, comes within the 
Bjbope ." • ur  ?o!omnF. It is nM, however, 



not greater force now ; and if such a pu'  icu- 
t'on h«.i »rom two to five, thousand Hibaeri- 
ber j in 185o, can WO not reason itily expect a 
1 irgrer li-t i n lBMio ? The city   considetHbly 
Inrjior, its bcUSBMM evcrv «lep irtme:.' BB  r - 
fuily developed, astd new avenues of irfl di 
i pcurd up. It would Beem, tnen, that there 
can be no doubt of the fact that such a paper 



ealth are not in the 

*»Mt of placi™^ •M 11 * P08iti ° n 10 

becomeexpe^t ^ iCalSr,a - A9 
a n'il« mechaent in the same 

in order to bemade of practical use. We are 
not of those bat believe that there are not 



the parp iM of the editors to deal in fancied | »s we propose publishing is wanted here. 



prtbabjUtie- or pr.«*ibilities ; they prefer 
ndherine to -acts nod fip«-.o. n^A *l.-*r ^nr^n 

by etric persistence in this course, to ac- 
quire the confidtnee of all their readers. 

No pains will ba spared, and no labor ne- 
gWed io maki* the Gazette, in tim-, indis- 
pensable to every Merchant, Mechanic, Miner 
and Farmer in the Siata. 

We hope tho?e who approve the enterprise 
will lend it their support 



\ 



H^-Agriculture, Commerce, and Manufac- 
tures, though developed successively at dif- 
ferent periods in the progress of a people, 
are yet, (as once remarked by a distinguish- 
ed writer of this neighborhood,) kindred in 
tereste, closely allied, and mutually depend- 
ent on each other. To Agricul ture, therefore, 
a considerable portion of our space to be 
devoted, although the primary object of this 
jourra*, as it* wme indicates, is the further- 
ance of the interests of Manufactures and 
Commerce-especially of the ciij of Louis- 
ville. 

The war being ever, Agriculture is strug- 
gling to regain its position as one of the most 
preminent, if not the supreme interest of our 
country. Happily the sabre and bayonet are 
yielding eway to the plow and the reaping- 
hook, and the thunders of artillery are being 
changed to the whirring and buzzing of pat- 
ent labor-saving machinery. An earnest ef- 
fort is being made by the leading agricallu r 
ists of the South and Weet to reorganize old 
asBocietions, and systematize new theories. 
This is deemed a proper nnd propitioue time 
for the establishment of a journal that is at 
leist partially devoted to this great interest, 
(in the • l ?ence of any exclusively Agricul- 
tural publication »* f ^e South,) and one 
whicV.wh:'* cousirrutire ciuughto hold onto 
all wh ' roved go-»d ii  (he pas*, wi 

yet be; vag MBBtM enough to tair'.y test ail that 
may be o;'er I At* improvem^nte for the fu- 
ture. 

Oar Agricaltural defwrUBODt It un-ler tb  
gupervisioa of a gen'U *« n ■ v. t , v.- -j i t i 
fied or •v.e t* '-. l»po»ed upon fa n -.t.it »i 
expect eeattflNBB^BM f ri ni ?i3i * •  ti:„e, riom 
W. D. Gallagher, Robui W. -cott, the Hreok • 
inridge«», Clays, WarfieMs and others who aie 
not only experienced, practical agriculturist* 
and Btock-raieers, but who have the gifth and 
graces of composition which enable them to 
cotnmunicate to others, in a clear and pleas- 
infWanner, what they eo well understand 
themselves. 



But to these reasons we have to add anot.h- 
rT .1^, . . - • — — ■ ' ' 

which is final. Previous to starting the pa- 
per, one of the editors spent some weeks in 
canvassing the citv, and the result was the 
obtaining of over three pages of advertise- 
ments, (only a portion of which were ready 
for this issue,) and near three thousand sub- 
scribers — in the city of Louisville alone. The 
principal business firms of the city, with 
scarcely an exception, responded cheerfully to 
our call — encouraged U3 to go ahead — and 
gave substantial evidences of their sincerity. 
The result is, that we have a patronage that 
we think will warrant us in assuring our 
friends and the public, that the Gazette 
is established upon a permanent basis. 

The Trade of Louisville at this time is 
seriously affected by want of a mail contract 
for the carrying of letters, papers, &c, over 
the Lebanon Branch Rail Mbad. The Post 
Office Department and the President of the 
Rail Road could not agree as to terms, and 
! j- Department declined to make any con- 
tract. We learn that Mr. Guthrie has been 
willing to do anything that was fair and reas- 
onable in the premises, and that the compen- 
sation he asked for carrying the mails of this 
road is below what is paid by the Post Office 
Department on similar lines in the Eastern 
States. As the difficulty originated not with 
Mr. Dennison, (the present able and efficient 
P. M. General), but with his predecessor,and 
as our business men arc n*w about sending 
on n numerously signed petition to Mr. Den- 
nison, representing the extent of their in- 
convenience and injury on account of the 
lack of mail facilitieson this road.it iB hoped 
that the grievance will shortly be reme- 
died 

flBlU Our firat No. is not exactly up to our 

expect %tionj , either in variety aud excelleoc- 
of ■ubtAer  r iu typographical execution — 
But "Rome was not built in » day, ' aud we 
b*ve found it impossible to complete our cdi- 
Mi I BMoJlMieal arrangem-nt* iu time 

■ • Ul -   n.: 

On. new ij i.e toil i :.•« i b¥ 'ti'uisted u 'j «h« 

routittrt iii time I .. Kikk u :psue, ow'cg 
io the numerous orders from nc Scuth, and 
two or three 'e+dicg article* intended fov 
i his No are delayed in order Io gather Jdl- 
lioaa! sUitintic »l data. 




Ail commutjicstion8 must be accom- 
panied with the author's name, not necessari- 
ly for publication, but as an evidence of good 
faith. 



men in every ?o:nmunity who are both wil- 
ling and able o render efficient aid in the de- 
velopment of whatever of latent or active 
mechanieal skil may have existence within 
its limits. Th\reat difficulty, everywhere, 
lies in the bringing together of the two for- 
ces indicated— capital and skill. Thes* two 
forc-s are mutually dependent upon each 
other, for applicable direction and profitable 
result. Their r»presentatives ofteu lbe upon 
the same square, jostle against each other on 
the street, or pwpapg WO rship in ibe same 
church building, and yet they are ntuu&lly 
ignorant of the iact that the " I ffinity " for 
whom they are seeking has daily patsed their 
doors for moiiths, or probably for years. One 
of the principal objects we have hid in view 
in publishing the Industrial and Commer 
cial Gazette, is to diacuss the question of 
means whereby these two classesof men may 
be brought together. 

It will naturaliy follow that bo-e w! o take 
mi intnvest in any particular »bj et, deemed 
by |l r 'n ; mpovt'-:it, will have a be ;er chance 
to .ive j, lMi'cir.v to their viiws by consult- 
ing those who mak-; th »l objett the -pcciality 
of their researches. Our p f r h » been es 
tablished in the interests o' the m ■iuufac»tu-- 
ers and businesa-men of fcuisville, and it is 
our design to labor, witr whatever of zeal 
and industry we possess,and to the best of 
our ability, to subserve .hose interests. In 
connection with our office, we expect to have 
a consultation room, for the special accommo- 
dation of those who arc interested in any of 
those questions whicl touch the material 
prosperity of the city. Here can meet the 
industrious artisan, who needB capital to car- 
ry out his designs, and the man of means, 
who is seeking safj and profitable invest- 
ments for his monej. Here the inventor can 
lay his design before intelligent patrons, and 
both be given opp#rtunities to prosecute suc- 
cessfully business undertakings, conducive 
alike to their own and the city's interest. 
Here, too, can \e discussed any questions 
that may arise in regard to labor and its 
legitimate reward, and the many other points 
of detail incident to the subject of manufac- 
tures. 

One of the great drawbacks to the success- 
ful prosecution of individual undertakings 
in the South and West, has heretofore arisen 
from a mistaken idea formed in the public 
mind, that wo are unable to compete in re- 
gard to priee and quality with the older and 
more perfectly arranged manufacturing es- 
tablishments of the East. There can be noth- 
ing more baseless than this idea. Our facil- 
ities for making Louisville a great manufac- 
turing city are unsurpassed and unsurpass- 
able. We have a contiguous market, to 
which ihere is easy access by water and rail, 
which will absorb everything of common use- 
that we can make. Wehave inourmines and 
forrests of Kentucky, supplies of nw mate- 
rial iut of which to manufacture the greater 
part of the most essential articles of common 
necessity. Our fields and meadows are of 
ample extent and ferlility to support a popu- 
ln/ on of twice our present numbers, and to 
h-ive them a surplus for exportation. We 
«re near enough to the roM   u of the South, 
to V * ah 1 ", in rfwii to the cost of the article 

e i'- v.- i it the fliiUi, io compete with New 
. : lafcd i i furr.ish\ag the products of the 

i  ple. We have undeveloped waier power, 
*hieh Massachusetts would consider of more 
value thaa a diamond rii:ie. We have 
grounds o J sufficient extent around the city, 
upon which to erect teuemeuts for a million 
of inhabitants. Weha/e a system ef Com- 
mon aud Congregation - ! Schools, equal to 
the wan"s of the people tar educational pur- 
poses. We have everything that the great 
Manufacturing a1shAg)fQthj North possess, 



entire course of 
rivers \nd their 



the Mil 
tributari* 



Stiff JTU; 



a one has mado a fortune in a single tranf ac- 
tion, and not being able to perceive that this 
••an be but the result of mere chance, the 
joung and the inexperienced are too often in- 
duced to become Ih imitator, and thus is given 
impetus to that wild and reckless species of 
trading, from which so many evils take their 
rise. Where one me*re speculator succeeds in 
realizing a fortune, he will have ten imitators 
to realize nothing but disaster and ruin. 

The enterprise which we need in Louisville 
is altogether of a different kind. It is the 
steady, clear-sighted, and persevering enter- 
prise of those who would seek to build up 
permanent interests, beneficial as well to the 
entire community as to themselves and the"" 
posterity. Though all enterprise must par- 
take in a certain Jegree of tho character of 
selfishness, since by the law of man's nature, 
regard must be had for his temporal wants, 
yet no enterprise is valuable to a city or com- 
munity, as none can ordinarily bring to its 
possessor a certain and lasting reward, which 
has not for its object interests beyond those 
which pertain to the mere individual. The 
man who inaugurates a means whereby 
employment is given to those who need it for 
the support of their families, is a real bene- 
factor of his kind. He lives in the conscious- 
ness of having given opportunities to others 
to better their condition. This, of itself, to 
those who have in theif hearts a spark of 
philanthropy, to say nothing of that brother- 
hood of feeling which should bind together 
all those who profess to be Christians, ought 
to be motive enough to induce them to labor 
to - he end of the general welfare of the whole 

community. I^By law of Congress newspapers 

Without claiming any commission to in- i culate through tho mails, free it postafe&By 
struct mankind in mortils, we may be allowed i where in the counties whei. .blisht L Cos 
io say, what history teaches, no leas than sequently, persons living near any of the fo 
one's experience, that the standard of content lowing Post Offices (in Jefferson count 



Our .\dvertiske9. — W«8.« gratified at tl 
large ntmber of advertise men a which arl 
pressingupon us, not only becauee of the p* 
ouniary tid it givea us at the outset of ou 
enterpria, but also because u manifests a 
wide^awhe spirit on the part of our mer- 
chants, aid a diposition to i our»»ge every 
instrumertality that is calculated to build up 
th« busing* of ibe city. Among the adver- 
tisers in this, our initial numb:r will be 
found the leading firms in most departments j 
of LoulavUe trade— men well and favorably S 
known to cmntry dealers, and equally wei! j 
and favorably known "on change.' ' They * 
are all doinj well now, hut They wish to do ? 
better, and (Venoe are increasing their stocks A 
and adding to their f»iHtl - fee doiag a " 
more extensire trade Ihere is uoi oue of i 
them who will not duplicate 
Cincinnati, and without tldition of 

freight Let our Southern -aders bear this 
-i.et in mind. 




Thanks to the ' Kentucky Sentinel* 
for a favorable notice of ouc proxpeetufl. The 
"Sentinel" is a sprightly v 'r' r recently es- 
tablished at ML Sterling, by Wm. T. Htaly, 
and has a respectable circulation in portion* 
of Northern Kentucky, v. . nnice in its 
columns advertisements of se veral Cincinna- 
ti houses, but none of LouIsviMa houses. 



one's abili- 
mutuany de- 



in li'e, depends very much, upon 
■ . j iu icuuva uiucro BMiwv*  »e 

pend upon each other, for almost everything 
we enjoy. The man that isolates himself 
from whatever is kind and neighborly, is 
never a contented man, and in depriving him- 
self of opportunities to benefit others, he but 
punishes himself. As our happiness, there- 
fore, depends upon others, we should make 
use of all the means at our command to ren- 
der others happy. As no sense of misery can 
be greater, than in knowing thai it is out of 
our power to provide for the wants of tbo?e 
dependent upon us, so no sense of happiness 
can be greater than in possessing the contra- 
ry knowledge. This sense of gratification, 
however, is susceptible of being greatly en- 
larged and intensified in those having means 
and influence, through the knowledge that 
they have it also in their power to place oth- 
ers in the way of becoming equally independ- 
ent of that poverty and those necessities to 
which so many are subject, on account of 
their inability to procure employment. , 

Having extended this article to a much 
greater length than we intended, wo shall 
have to defer for future numbers of our paper, 
some thoughts and suggestions on the sub- 
ject of Manufactures, which we think worthy 
of consideration. 



entitled *n ■■■■ » ■»* oar pap a* free o 
via: Louisville, D ep0 sit, 
Creek, Fiaherville, Jeffersontown 
Long Run, Middleto 



t, Fern 
Lacona, 

wn, O Bann  : 
Station, Portland, Ri Ter View, .\uttnews. 
Salina. 



Indian Cav.._A corresponden 
that this beautiful care is sits»4ed 
ately on the road leading fnm  ^r* Lite to 
the Mammouth Cave. He say. that the very- 
recent discovery and development " will in- 
sure to it 9 patronaan e*a m ! nwt i 0 u 0 f some of 
the most beautiful and lovely specimens of 
the stalactite and stalagrr. • te ever fashioned 
by the hand of nature." He advi.es vijitor. 
who desire to explore this really K 
place to take it in their way . l8 Mam- 
mouth Cave— for by so doing 
time, and it is impossible t . 
ration on the return trip »nd make the con- 
nection at Cave City with the c # 

We shall probably do ourselves the pleas- 
ure, at some convenient time, of verifying 
the accounts we are receiving of the beauties 
of this Cave. 




•cy lose no 
B t.he expio- 



Louisville Steamboat Statistics. 

As a matter of interest to the community in 
general, we have taken especial pains to as- 
certain the number and names of Steamers 
built in Louisville and vicinity, including 
their tonnage, elnc? January 1st, 1865, up to 
the present month, and which have been duly 
inspected by Capt. John S. Crane, Local In- 
spector of Steamboats for the Sixth district, 
as follows : 

Alire M 185 G5-100 tons burthen, 

Belle of Milton 220 21-100 « " 

Cnrrie Poole 156 63-100 " « 

Indiana 1955 2-100 " 

Montana 231 97-100 " « 

Robert Fultou 211 38-100 " « 

Ruth 1681 5-100 " " 

Spray 38 33-100 " « 

William White 14041-100 - 

Warren Bel] 2-12 23-100 " " 

Now on the stocks and rapidly near'ng 
completion we notice the Virginia, of 1000 
ions burthen, to ply hctweeu this port and 
New Orleans ; the Tempest, 350 tons, as a 
regular Louisville and Nashville packet ; and 
the St. Louis, designed for the Cincinnati 
and Portsmouth trade, of 760 tons. 

All of these boats have reflected much 
credit upon the skill of the various parties 



Some friend sends us copies 1 ( tbe 
"Mercantile Mirror and iLailroad Guide," 
published at Macon, Ga. It is a good paper 
and gives evidences of enjoyiDg a liberal 
patronage. Wenotlue » column or BO -f Lou- 
isville advertisements among : * c 



Agents WANTED^-Some en, rgetic an 1 re- 
liable man wanted as agent for this paper iu 
every county in Kentucky, and eight or ten 
agents wanted in each of 1 tiern States. 

Liberal commissions will \ 1 al.01 " 



Persons wanting Bgri cultural imple- 
ments, oil machinery, borLs. g ins, pistols, 
blooded stock, or any article ma ie or for sale 
in this city, or raised by the farmers and 
stock-breeders of Kentucky can have their or- 
ders filled on application te thi^ office. One 
of the gentlemen connected with this paper 
ba« facilities for obtainio^ - ich things on 
terms that will be entire!, fail tictory to 
purchasers. The commissi; 0. charged will be 
but trifling. 




fc*L.In order to insure in. Ajveriisc- 
ers will please hand in thrir favors early in 
the week. On the eve o: publication our 
hands are busy with cei ercial reports, 
editorials, etc. Advertisements and cota&iu- 
nications may be left at the Mioation Office, 
(over the Citizens' Bank,) c - Mat tbroagh the 
Post Office. • 



■ 



'4? 



\ i 



Industrial &c Comn 



Mineral 



of Kentucky. 



I A 



At the ;rosent time there does not appear 
to be a more important euVject to which the 
people of :his country should turn their at- 
tention, ihan the consideration of the Mine- 
ral resources'of the State of Kentucky ; for 
the unusual ichness of this State in a vari- 
ety of most useful minerals and metals, is 
only to be compared to the proverbial fertil- 
ity ot her soil. This element in the almost 
unbound-' J natural wealth of our country 
should, and will, soon be so apparent, that 
only those who choose not to see, will shut 
their eyes to its utilitarian and vast na- 
tional importance. 

The broad coal fields, the inexhaustable 
beds of rich iron ores, the numerous and 
promising deposites of Petroleum, are a few 
cf the mines which are destined to furnish 
us with the means for the advancement of 
civilisation, wealth and power. But these 
great interests are but little understood by 
the world, and perhaps still less appreciated 
by our own people, and it behooves ns to ex- 
ercise a .it'Ie more foresight and energy than 
has b?en our wont, lest the shrewd "and more 
enterprising stranger may step in and secure 
the priceless treasures which we tread under 
our feet. 

One of ;be principal reasons why the Min- 
eral and Mining interests of the State of 
Kentucky have been neglected by her citi- 
zens is owing to the fact that there is a large 
body of :and within her borders, which is 
no doubt DM of the most fertile spots on the 
surface of the globe, and yields to the agri- 
cultural:?', with little labor or attention, the 
most abundant harvests, and where the pro- 
ducts of tne soil are furnished in boundless 
profuson, :t is easily understood why men 
do not \mk further for an unkiown and 
doubtful source of wealth and comfort We 
are convinced that agriculture ha-  een Ken- 
tucky's largest iuterest, and the cultivation of 
her lan;i her greatest source of wealth, and 
so long a? her lands yield abundaut products 
for the support of her inhabitants, or for ex- 
portation, wiH this continue, and not until 
they bec m» worn out or unprofitable, so 
that the narvest no longer repa\s the labor 
spent "pon the soil, will her people look 
around tor other and more profitable employ- 
ment and investments. That the soil will 
become impoverished and unprofitable in the 
course of time, cannot be denied, far, in the 
history of the older States of the Union, the 
fact is exemplified; the large bodies ot fertile 
.ands whi.a enriched Lfca early settlers of 
Ibis country by tneir luxuriant crops o: to- 
bacco, aiid .urge aarvests of wheat m~d corn, 
are low, even after a luug season of reft, too 
poor io rej -v the laborer tti? nus , ■•mLmuo. 
and hopelessly steriie, without the applica- 
tion to tuem of imported manures ; and it is 
still more clearly exemplified in Europe &ua 
Africa, where txteusivo regious, now worth- 
less wastes, yielded in ancient times abuu- 
dant harvests of grain for exportation. 

With this inevitable result beiore our eyes, 
together with the fact that our country ib 
.rapidly iuci easing its population, wisdom 
fcwould dictate that we should turn our aiten- 
)n, more and more to the development of 
Mineral resources of the State. 
Ve propose, therefore, 10 call attention to 
of the many prominent and important 
in connection whh the Mineral and 
interests ol this a:ate. 
three minerals waich occupy the up 
 8t place in the minds of the people, and 
deterve our first attention, are CW, 
tnd l\lroUum. Coal aud Iron navi 
pie gieat. stepping stonej to greatneeo 
 wer of the ruling nations of the earth ; 
lopie pay tribute to these two element*, 
'now, i'eiroleum aspires to a high place 
in the economy of civilization, and isdtatin- 
ed :o shed a vaut amount of light, literally 
and figuratively, among men. 

Tnese substances abound in our State; 
there is Com in aimoat every county, Iron 
ores of the best qualities, in great profusion 
and Petroleum is spouting out of the earth in 
all direc ions. 

The ex. eat of tiie Coal measures in Ken- 
cky is immense, ihe aiea of the Eastern 
 al field being nearly niue thousand square 
iles, and o: ttie Western, nearly four thou- 
sand, making a total of nearly thirteen 
thousand square miles underlaid with Coals 
if various qualities. "When compared with 
m^'oal area of Great Britain we find that 
thir single State has over four thousand 
square mi\-a n^nre than that kio / iom, while 
in number and thicknssB of beds of workable 
Coal, ours «.re fully equal to the average, in 
the most productive regions of that country. 

Great Britain owes to her Mineral resour- 
ces, and mainly to her Coal fields, so produc- 
tive both in Coal and Iron, more than to any 
other cause her present greatness. Notwith- 
standing we have Coal and Iron of the best 
i inexhaustable quantities through- 



out our land, our country pays England over 
thirty millions of dollars annually for Iron 
alone, and her Iron manufacturers can raise 
their millions with a« much ease as we our 
thousands. 

The quality of the Coals of this State is as 
good, on an average, as that o' any other 
country, but it is variable: in one locality it 
is very good, in another bad, one stratum in 
the same county furnishing superior Coal, 
while o ber s'ratn above or below. give infe- 
rior qualities. Taking a fair sample of Pitts- 
burg, (the beet western Coal for general use,) 
I for the purpose of comparison, it can be 
i shown that Bome of the Kentucky Coals are 
equal to, if not superior in som * respects to 
that from Western Pensylvania, while others 
fall below that standard. 

Pit'sburg Coal, when entirely deprived of 
moisture, consists of 

Volatile combustible matter, 30 per ct. 

Coke, :::::: 70 «' 

In this coke there is 4-3 per ct. or ashes 3 
per ct. in the Coal. 

In good specimens the amount of sulphur 
does not amount to more than ,06 per ct. 

A Coal from Greenup county, Kentucky 
yielded on analysis: 

Volatile combustible matter : 36 per ct 
Coke ::.;:: 64 " 
Ashes in Coal nearly, : : 4 '« 

This Coal, it will he 6een, has nearly the 
same quantitative composition as Pittsburg 
Coal. and is a ? good a fuel for household pur- 
poses an ! for the blacksmith and founder as 
it, and for gas making H is better adapted 
than the best Western Pennsylvania article. 

A Coal from Owsley county gave 
Volatile combustible matter, : 34 per ct 
Coke, : : : : : 66 « 
Ashes in Coal ! : : 6.1 " 

From Elmonson county, Coal has been an- 
alysed, and yielded the following results: 
Volatile combustible matter, : 37 per ct. 
Moisture, : : : : 3 it 

Coke, : : : : 60 " 

Ashes in Coal, : : : 20 " 

In the neighborhood of the Coal, there oc- 
curs Mineral pitch, or inspissated Petroleum. 

A Henderson connty Coal, furnished the 
following : 

Moisture. p, per ct. 

Volatile combustible matter, 30 « 

Coke, : : : : : 55 " 

Ashes in Coal, : : : 10 " 

A Coal from Muhlenburg county, has the 
following composition : 

Moisture, : : : : : 5 per ct 
Volatile combustible matter, : 36-5 " 
Coke, :::::: 58-5 " 
Ashe* in Coal, : : 3? " 

Carter county Cannel Coal yielded the'fol- 
lowing results on analysis : 
Moisture, : : : 2. per ct. 

Volatile combustible matter, : 57. ■ 
Coke, : : : : : 41. « 
Ashes in coal, . . : : 6J, « 

The Breckinridge Coal is of the variety 
termed Cannel Coal, and is very similar in 
its composition to the celebrated Boghead 
Coal of Scotland, which is thought by some to 
be a bitumen, or a highly bituminous shale. 

A specimen of the Breckinridge Coal 
yielded : 

Moisture, : : : I   per ct. 

Volatile combustible matter, 54.5 u 
Carbon, fixed, : 32. ■ 

Ashes, : : 6 12. « 

This Coal is especially adapted to the man- 
ufacture of Coal Oil, and had Petroleum not 
heen discovered in such abundance, Coal of 
this quality would have commanded a high 
price. 

A glance at these figures is sufficient to 
convince any one, that Kentucky has within 
her borders Coals of every quality and adapt- 
ed to every purpose. 

[to be continued.] 



New Is^i'ect jb-Gf.nbbal or Kentucky. — Col. W. U. 
Haj» has resigned the office of I n-j . etor-Geni-rsl of 
Kentucky, and DM. James T. BraniU-tte has been appoin- 
ted in his place. Col. Hays wa« a faithful and eflkent 
officer, and the warmest praise of the people will accom- 
pany him in retirement. — Journal. 

Col. Hays does not exactly go into retire- 
ment. Although he leaves the service of the 
State, he continues in business, and in a 
branch of it that will probably result in as 
much good to the public as any political or 
military ofiice he could now hold. We are 
pleased to learn that he has accepted the 
place of Superintendent of the Creelsboro 
and Kentucky National Petroleum Compan- 
ies. He has gone to Russell and Clinton 
counties to superintend the operations 0 f 
those companies aud he promises to keep us 
posted in the progress of oil matters in those 
regions. All who know Col. nays know that 
what he writes may be relied upon as strict- 
ly accurate. 



Nevada. — A Virginia City paper says:— 
A company is engaged in boring for Petro- 
leum near Mud Lake. They are now down 
200 feet and have struck a strong stream of 
water highly impregnated with sulphur.— 
The water rushes out of the mouth of the well 



KENTUCKY OIL COMPANIES. 

We are in receipt of prospectuses and com- 
munications from the following organiza- 
tions : 

The "Evansville Petroleum Company of 
Louisville, ' with a Geological Report on the 
lands of the company, by J S. Newberry, 
M. D. The capital stock is $500,000, in 50 - 
000 shares of $10 eaoh. J. M. Bryant is 
President, and J. T. Boyle. Secretary. The 
lands of this com ^uy emit nice 5 036 acres, 
faituated in the valley of Green River, in Ca- 
sey and Adair counties, all lying within the 
"oil belt." as it is called. 

The Columbia Oil Company,' incorpora- 
ted January, I860. The officers are: Hon. 
B. S Coffee, President, W. B Kleessondorf, 
Secretary, A. O. Durland, Treasurer. The 
property owned by the company is situated 
near the Cumberland river, in Russell and 
Wayne counties. Two wells have been put 
down on M'Farland's Branch of Wolf cteek, 
emptying into the Cumberlaud river about 
five miles from the wells. The well No. 1 is 
one hundred and seventy feet deep and pro- 
duces two barrels per day. Well No. 2 struck 
recently at depth of one hundred and sixty 
feet. They are now making preparations to 
pump. The Secretary thinks it, will produce 
about thirty barrels per day. 

The "Glasgow Petroleum Company," was 
incorporated in March, 1865. Gen. J. T. 
Boyle is President, with W. A Klees?ondorf 
as Secretary, and H. W. Wilkes as Treasurer. 
The territory of the company amounts to 
about 2,525 acres in Barren and Metcalf 
counties, the greater rtion of which lies on 
Boyd's creek and in that vicinity. They aie 
putting down one well on Boyd's creek — 
down about five hundred feet with gas and 
salt water; and arc making preparations to 
put down two more wells, one on Peter's 
Creek and one on Bovd's creek. 



Boyd's Creek Oil Company. 

A notice of this Company is interesting, 
both from the fact that it was among the ear- 
liest organisation, for the development of the 
oil interest of central Kentucky, and that a 
greater degree of success has attended its 
operations to this time, than of any other 
company in the State. The company was or- 
ganized in February, I860, under a charter 
granted by the Legislature of Kentucky, and 
at the first meeting of stockholders an elec- 
tion was held for directors, which resulted 
in the choice of J. H. Lindeaberger, E. S. 
Graham, Jno. H. Thomas, W. Geo. Anderson 
and Jno. B. Smith, who subsequently elected 
J II. Lindenbergor, Prasident, and Jno. H. 
Thomas, Secretary. 

The capital stock of the company is $500,- 
000. in shares of $20 each, which was sold at 
$4 per share, free from further assessment, 
and was all taken within about a week from 
the time it was first offered. 

Its property consists of about 1500 acres 
of land, in Barren connty, on Boyd's and 
Skegg's creek and south fork of Barren 
county, held underlease for thirty-five years, 
with provision of one-tenth royalty to the 
lessor. A vigorous development was at once 
determined on, and three engineers immedi- 
ately put to work, two of them on Boyd's, 
and one on Skegg's creek. In both instances 
on Boyd's creek, producing wells were ob- 
tained; one on the farm of Edward Wilkin- 
son, has been bored to the depth of 105 feet, 
and is now being pumped, yielding 15 barrels 
of oil per day — the other on the farm of 
Stephen Kinslow, is 146 feet deep: was at 
first pumped, but in a few hours commenced 
flowing, and has since continued without in- 
terruption, yielding 30 barrels per day. Re- 
cently it has been reported that the flow ap- 
peals stronger and the yield somewhat larg- 
er. The well on Skegg's creek was bored 
over 500 feet, with large show of oil at dif- 
ferent depths ; but on being pumped, did not 
yield oil in paying quantity, and the work 
there for the present has been discontinued. 
Two new wells have been commenced, one on 
Skegg's creek on the Ellis' farm, and the oth- 
er on the farm of Stephen Kinslow near the 
flowing well. Two months since, the com- 
pany leased to the Barren River Company, 
the right to bore on a portion of the farm of 
J. M. Scrivener on Boyd's creek, and they 
have obtained a good paying well at a depth 
of 108 feet, the first test by pumping pro- 
ducing at the rate of three barrels per hour. 
The interest of the Boyd's Creek Company in 
this well is one fourth free of land owners, 
royalty. It will be seen, therefore, that of 
four wells bored on the property of this com- 
pany, three have given remunerative yield, 
with flattering promise of permanency— a 
success, much beyond the history of oil de- 
velopments in other sections, and gives as- 
surance of very great value, which the stock 
must attain when the company make availa- 
ble the vast wealth which unquestionably 
underlies their extensive property. As jit 
they have made no dividend to their stock- 
holders, but have been carefully husbanding 
their reserve of available cash resources, and 
appropriating their earnings to the purchase 



is*ry nioteab^property, and to ihe 
expense of having the two near wells in pro- 
gress. The stock is s'rong y held, but occa- 
sionally changes hands, »nd ttie sales repor- 
ted to have been at $10 to $12 per share. As 
(be pioneers in a busue 3 aUended always 
with many annoyances and discouragements, 
the company have labored uuder many dim 
cultits; but their energy and perseverance 
are over-cominfc ihem all, while there is 
abundant good reasoti'to helievethat the san- 
guine expectations of ih? stockholders will 
be more than re lized. 



Germania Oil Company. 

The above named company was organized 
last February, having for its President, Mr. 
Geo. P. Doern, of the Louisville Auieiger, Mr 
G W. Buford, Superintendent, and Mr. Nich- 
olas Miller, Secretary. Through the courtesy 
of the latter gentleman we have learned the 
following facto: The Germania has a capi- 
tal of $300,000 working capital, $40,000 with 
twenty-five thousand shares at $20, par value, 
commencing with four wells, the most prolific 
of which has yielded 30 barrels per day. — 
Latterly, however, but one of those wells has 
been in constant operation; the remaining 
three have yiolded 750 barrels in the aggre- 
gate, but their operations has been tempora- 
rily suspended. 

The latest intelligence from Mr. Buford, 
gives a flattering* account of the territory in 
question, presenting strong assurance} that 
this company will ultimately reap » rich har- 
vest. 

The oil obtained from this section of the 
State, has commanded, as we are informed, a 
ready sale to dealers in the city ; but the high 
rates of transportation to other places, and 
the lack of a more convenient mode of trans- 
portation from the oil region itself to connect 
by rail (at present confined to wagons for a 
distance of only fi f teen miles), have materi- 
ally lessened the profits. 

Falls City Company. 

This company was organized uuder favor- 
able auspice", having a well near the well- 
known farm of the Boyd's Creek Oil Com- 
pany ; and about half a mile distant, the 
Louisville and IndiannpMis Company have a 
well, which is being pumped, and yields 25 
| barrels per day. Other weils higher up Boyd s 
i creek have a good show \ in short, enough has 
already been developed in Barren emmty, to 
| fully establish the fact that extensive reser- 
I voirs of oil are beneath the surface of the 
greater part of tha» county. 

i Geological Progress of the Glasgow 
Petroleum Company. 

The Glasgow Company oommenced to build 
a derrick on the 24th of July, 1865, and were 
ready for boring by the 3d of August fol- 
lowing. Tne first fifty feet disclosed a stra- 
ta of gray limestone, very hard. The next 
forty feet wer? through black shale, striking 
small quantities of oi', at a depth of ninety 
feet, passing thence through a small strata of 
sandstone about four feet thick ; after which 
disclosing a layer of soap-stone fifteen feet 
thick; further borings up to the 1st of Sept., 
and at a depth of one hundred and seventy - 
five feet, ran through the same character of 
sandstone as when at ninety feet 

On the 6th of September, at a depth of 
two hundred feet, black shale was again en- 
countered with salt water and gas. At three 
hundred and fifty feet, another strata of blue 
sandstone ; and up to 300 feet ranging from 
soap-stone to sandstone, with indications of 
abundance of gas. 



Kentucky Oil News. 

Oil matters in this State are somewhat ac- 
tive, and a growing interest is being mani- 
fested. The Crocus well is said t • be still 
flowing finely. It is situated in Cumberland 
county, which is going to prove an Oil re- 
gion of great importance. Every -. ij we see 
strangers going to or returning from that 
county, and property even at a distance of 
several miles from the wells is -elling at 
rates considerably in advance 1. former 
figures A correspondent of an exchange 
says : 

The English well is located on he north 
bank of the Cumberland River, a -hort dis- 
tance below the mouth of Crocus Creak, and 
is the point of interest first visits i by the 
oil pilgrims. It was struck on iNe 8th of 
September, at which time it produced very 
largely, and created great excitem-nt by its 
manifestations. 

The well is six to seven miles from Burks- 
ville, the shortest approach being by way of 
a bridle path for half a mile along the face of 
a high and almost perpendicular bluff. It is 
in the centre of what seems to have been an 
j old sinkhole that had gradually become near- 
ly filled up, a basin being left twenty yards 
in diameter and perhaps three feet deep. At 
some twenty yards from the well the rocky 
bank or cliff begins a descent, almost perpen- 
dicularly, some fifty or sixty feet to low wa- 
ter, the edges of the roek strata cropping 
out for a considerable distance above and 
below A pit was dug through the soil to 
the rook, twenty-five feet in depth, and five 
feet square. The oil was struck at a depth 
of one hundred and ninety-three feet, there 



being an eight-inch square conductor twen- 
ty five feet long, a five-inch hole in the rock 
for one hundred and sixty-four feet, and a 
four inch hole for four feet at the bottom. 

The oil is of a dark gre*n celor, and the 
gravity is 34° Beaunie at 60° Fahr 

And one who will thoroughly examine the 
country and take pains to properly inform 
themsef, cannot fail to become convinced that 
this section is oleagenous to the cor», and 
that it must soon rival Oil Creek in its pal- 
miest ' iys. 

Correspondents report great activity on 
Boyd's and Beaver Creeks, in Barren county, 
and lenses have been taken rapidly during 
the* past fortnight. To those not acquainted 
with these localities we will say that Boyd's 
Creek is to the South of G'a*gow, two and a 
half miles, and runs from North-east to South- 
west, intoSkeggs Creek. On Boyd's Creek 
three wells were commenced in May last, 
about one mil* apart. The first put down 
by the Boys's Creek Oil Company, known as 
the Kinslow well, 146 feet in ten days, struck 
oil which has been flowing through an inch 
pipe daily for three months The " Wilkin- 
son Well, ' three-tourtha of a mile further 
down the creek, struck oil in paying quanti- 
ties. The " Trigg Well," one mile still 
and near the mouth of Boyd's Creek, 
proved a paying well. 

Beaver Creek lies to the Notth of Glasgow, 
and runs from North-east to South-west, 
parallel to Boyd's Creek, some three to six 
miles distant at various points, having the 
same geological stratific»tion, oil springs and 
general features of Boyd's Creek. Several 
wells are in preparation to be put down by 
West Virgiwia partiea, and it is believed by 
those posted in oil regions, that it promises a 
fair development 

The Boston well, thirty miles below Cincin- 
nati, on the Kentucky side, is down 180 feet. 

The Kentucky Coal Mining and Trinspor- 
lation Company, in which Evansvllle, Ind., 
parties are heavily interested have two wells 
on Greeen River twelive miles below Calhoun, 
with good signs of success. There are said 
to be|25 wells '• going down ' on Green River. 

The Garvin Oil Company, of Louisville, 
have an engine at work near Ashbysburg, 
on Green River. Two engines owned by 
Kvansville companies are boring near the 
mouth of Mason Creek and Wrightsburg, on 
Green River. The McLean County Oil and 
Mining Company have an engine at work on 
the Ayer Farm, on Long Fall creek. They 
expect a flowing well. They have fine ma- 
chinery ;u:d the very best article of tools. 
The impression of practical oil men is, that 
they will reach the thhd sandstone at a 
depth of 350 feet Mr Strawbridge of the 
Pioneer Wells, at the Mayo Farm, is sinking 
two more wells on other tracts near by. An 
Evansville company s»rnckoil on the Calhoun 
Farm, near Calhoun, on Long Fall Creek, at 
the depth of 175 feet, 1a*i week. The Frost 
Pony Petroleum Company, organized in 
Owensborc, Ky , are abou' sinking a well on 
the Morely Farm. They have prospected to 
to the first sandstone or oil- rock and found 
oil in small quantities. St.. Louis men are 
investing in this section. 

The intelligence from Hendorson is favor- 
able. The "Henderson News " says: 

"He" has been siruck in this county with- 
out a doubt. The boring has been in pro- 
gress for seyeral months, on the farm of Mr. 
Elisha Williams, nine miles from this city, 
and about .two miles from Green -River, by 
' the Rose Hill Company. The precious fluid 
was struck st the depth of 358 feet from the 
surface, and is pronounced a very superior 
article. The necessary machinery will soon 
be put up for pumping, when it is confidently 
expected the enterprising proprietors will be 
rewarded with a large yield. They will soon 
commence boring a second well near the one 
named on the creek. 

The Bullit County Petroleum Company, 
(composed in the ma n of resident citizens,) 
have commenced operations some three miles 
from Shepherdsville. 

Metcalf and Green counties, each have 
what we call oil springs and old salt wells, 
which the old citizens say produced oil many 
years ago, and several wells are being "put 
down" in the hope of ultimate success. 



Gold on Lake £cpekiok. — Specimens of 
gold-bearing quartz from the Vermillion 
mines, at Lake Superior, are indicating a 
value of eighty dollars to the ton, so much 
richer are they than those first discovered 
and pronounced worth thirty dollars by the 
Government Assayer at New York. Prof. 
Eames has returned, and reports that he fol- 
lowed one vein seven miles, and 1,200 aores 
of the land have been entered with half- 
breed scrip. 

Minnesota.— The St. Peters "Tribune 
says that a Petroleum excitement has broken 
out in that part of Minnesota. We under- 
stand that a company is being formed at Le 
Seur, but whether it is intended to bore for 
oil, or to purchase lands for speculation we 
are not informed. At Red Wing a company 
has already been fermed, intending to ope- 
rate for individual profit. * 



Safett of Peteoleum. — A patent has been 
granted to two Buffalo men for the invention 
of an absolutely fire proof tank for the re- 
ception of oil at wells or its storage at places 
of shipment The principle is that of her- 
metically sealing the tanks. It has some 
other features which, it is said, commend if 1 
strongly to oil men. 




6 - 



v 





25. 



cultural Ware- JL'LIl'S BARBAK"UX 
house*. I Flovd A Wash- 

 ITKIN, WIARD k Co. -^on 
96 Mam St., betweenlg NEAD A CO j Market 
3d & 4th, Math Bide. het 8tb A - 9th  
J. D/ BON PI RANT A ,. ka r S OX, AIKIN k. 
Co., 1 05 Main St. bet.: c0 4g0 Main  be - 
3d  fc 4th, north Bide.! mh k 1Jth ^ n gide  
BRIN L Y. DmPGK i DENNI8 LONG, Main, 
HARDY 112 Mam bet . 9th & 10th. 
St., bet 3d k 4th. p.„it«r«. 
Auction CommlB- johN M. STOKE8 k 

THOS. ANDERSON J 80X ' Maiu ' 2d * 
Co., Main bet. 5th A- 
6th 



Sheet Iron Workers, 

WM, "WEIR, Main bet, 
12th and 13th, n. Bide. 




DAVID LANE, 473 and 
n bet. 12th and 



Architects. 

BRADSHAW k BRO., 
64 Main, bet. 3d k 
4th. 

STANCLIFFE A- VOG- 
DES, Hamilton block, 
cor. Main k 6th. 
Boots & Shoes. 

INGALLS k 00., 165 
Main Jit., bet. 4th A 
5th. 

PIATT k ALLEN, 154 
W. Main, bet. 5th k 
6th. 

LOW k WHITNEY. 

140 W. Main, be*. 5th 

k 6th. 
L. L. WARREN k CO.. 

610 Main, bet. Cth k 

7th. 

LI SHY, WHITE A 

COCHRAN. 214 W. 

Main, next eor. 6thj 
M. C. BUXBAUM if 

CO., Main, bet. 5th t 

6th. 

SUTCL1FF, OWEN k 

WOOD, 189 north aidi 

Main. 
Boiler Makers. 
JOHN PEARCE, tain, 

bet. 11th k 12th. 
JOStPH MITCHELL 

Main, bet. 12th k 1 Mi 

south Bide. 
Cement Majftufact'r* 
SCOWDEN, RHORER 

k CO., 4th, bet. Main 

and river. 
Coal Dealers. 
CHARLES MILLER, 

4th bet. Main k river. 
Crockery. 
GODSHAW, FLEX- 

NER k CO., W. Main 

bet. 6th k 7th. 
Carpets, Oil Cloths. 
W. It . MoKNIGHT, 114 

Main, bet. 3d k 4th. 
T.y}. MATHKR8 k Co.! 

106 Mit(n, bet. 3d k\ 

4th 

C nrriages 



3d. 

JOHN SIMM, Main, 
br t. 8th A- 9th. 
Groceries, 4b e. 

JACOB F. W£LLER, 
.'9 West Main, bet. 3d 
k 4th. 

GARDNER 4- CO., 196 

Mam. ^ 
A. H. k. W. O. GARD- 
NER, 14  Main, bet. 
4th k 5th. 
PUCK, DAVIS k CO., 
:12J Main, bet. 8th A 
t»th. 

iEO. . MORRIS, 36 
3d l et. Mnin k river. 
D0RI, BARK HOUSE 
k fO , 157 W. Main. 
lEflKY A SMITH, 243 
Mam. bet. 6th k 7th. 
!L BURKHARDT, 
Main, bet. 5th k 6th. 
/01IN SNYDER k CO., 
89 Main, bet. 3d A 5th. 
MOORE, BREMAKER 
A CO., Main bet. 7th 
A 8th 

MURRELL, CASTLE- 
MAN A CO., Main, 
bet. 5th A 6th. 
BROWN k BRO., Main, 

bet. 8th k 9th. 
A ENGELHARD A Co. 

Main, bet. 2d A 3d. 
TAYLOR CRANE, 
Main, bet. 7th A 8th, 
north aide. 
JOHNSTON, MITCH- 
ELL A CO, 637 Main. 
Glass Works. 
J. A. KRACK * CO., 
117 Main, bet. 3d A 
4th. 

Gold Pens. 

0. P. BARNES, 208 
Main. 
Hats and Caps. 

PRATHER A SMITH, 

160 Mnin. 
Li EETER A CHAU- 
DOIN, 108 Main, bet. 
5tb and 6th. 
C. DOHONEY A CO., 
2-V' Main. 



C. BRADLEY, Main,!CRAIG, TRUMAN A 

\A. l'rvston A Jack'n.j CO., 218 Mian. 
L F. -TONE, Main btt.lTHOMPSON A EDLEN 
Brook A Flovd. I 189 Main, bet. 5th A 
BAR KH A RUBEL.I 6th. 



Main bet. 
Floyd. 



Brook A 



W. F. OS BORN, 72 
Mfain, bet. 2d and 3d, 



HORACE GOOCH, Jef flERSC H A FLEX- 
feraon, bet. 3d A 4th. i NER, n. W. cor. Main 
C lothing. and 5th. 

SCOTT, DAVIDSON A J OH ANBROECH A 
CO., b. nfcor. Main; BRO, Main bet. 5th 
A 6th. and ( th, n. side, ur 

JONES A TAPP, 200 stair*. 

Main St. Hardware dfcCutlery 

KAHN A WOLF, n. e A. McBRIDE, 75, 3d. 

cor. Main A 5th. G. BAURMANN, Maia, 
HARRIS, NAHM A 
ROSEN AU, n. w. cor 



Main A 5th. 

Dry ( nodk, 

T. A R. 8LE VIN A 

CAIN, 217 W. Main. 
J. M. ROBINSON A 

CO., 185 W. Main, 

bet. 5th A 6th. 
BAMBERGER, Bloom 

A Co., 193 Main St. 
TAPP, KENNEDY A 

WALSH, 265 West 

Main. bet. 5th A 6th. 
CARTER A BRO., a. e 

cor. 6th A Main. 
JOS. T. TOMPKINS, 

6th St., bet. Main A 

Market.   
D. B. LEIGHT k CO., 

253 Main 



bat. 6th and 7t'h. 
Iron Merchants. 

W. B. BELKNAP k 
CO., n. e. cor. Main 
and 3d. 
NAUTS A r REAMER, 
247 W. Main. 
Lamps, Oil, 4tc. 
V. B. EVARTS, 129 
Main, bet. 4th A 5th. 
MONTGOMERY A CO. 
133 Main bet. 4th and 
5th. 

Liquors, fee. 

COCHRANE   A FUL- 
TON, 33* Main. 
WELI.ER A, BUCK- 

NER, 223 W. Main. 
J. MONK A COBB, 287 
Main, bet. 7th A 8th. 
BRANDIES A CRAW- 
FORD, a. W. cor. 1st 
and Main. 

*"ain 



ANDERSON, Mc- 
CAMPBELL A ' CO, 

Main. bet. »th A 6th. H. BLOCK A CO., M 
WM. K REGSHABER bet. 8th and 9th. 

Main, bet. 5th A 6th. 
S.ULMANA CO., Main 

bet. 5th A 6th. 
A VON BORIES A CO., 

163 Main, bet. 5th A 

6lh. 

D. HELLMAN  SONS 

Main, bet. 5th A 6th. 
SMITH A WADE, 271 

Main, north side. 
Drug* Chemicals. 
R. A. ROBINSON A 

CO., 515 Main, bet. 

5th A 6th. 
EDWIN MORRIS A 

CO., 197. W. Main. 
J. S. MORRIS A SON8, 

154 Main, bet. 4th A 

5th. 



HENRY 

A CO., Main, bet. Id 

A 4th. 
WILSON A PETER, 

141 Main, bet. 4th A 

5th. 

EkpreKh Companies 

ADAMS' EXPRESS. 
6th, bet. Main A Mar- 
ket. 

Fancy Goods, No- 
tions, &.C. 

H. L. BUCRNER, Main 

bet. 5th A 6th. 
PORTER A FAIRFAX. 

190 MRin. 
R. BR   WN A CO 

Main. 



C. HENRY FINK, 
Market, bet. 1st and 

II ^HERMAN A CO 
' 1 M^rkfa.et'^h A ?th'. 
F. J.SCHAFFER, Mar- 
ket bet. 6th and 7th. 
W. H. WALKER A Co. 
Main bet. 2d and 3d. 
Millinery Goods. 
OTIS A CO., 185 Main. 
L. A G. BRONNER A 
CO., 173 Main, up 
stairs. 
CANNON A BYERS, 
Main bet. 5th and f.th. 
Must*. Pianos, fee. 

D. P. F AU L D S, 70 
Main, bet. 2d and 3d, 



475 Main 
15th. 

Steamboat Agents. 

MOREHEAD, 4th, bet 

Ma n and river. 
S'HIRLEY, WOOL 
■ FOLK A Co., 4th, bet 

Main and river. 

Spokes fe Hubs. 
CLARK A FULTON, 

Main bet 9th and 10th 
Stoves, fee. 
BEACH, FASSETT A 

CO., 62 Main bet. 2d 

and 3d. 
J. 8. L1THGOW A CO. 

n. w. cor. 3d and Main 



Saddlery, fee. 

SMITH A 



CO., 



d  t. 

220 Main. 
JOHN CROSS Main, 

bet. 5ih and 6th. 
WM. H. 8TO 
CO., 178 M 
and 6th. 
Tobacco fe Cotton 

Factor. 
GEO. W. WICKS, 102 
Main, bet. 3d and 4th. 
Tobacco. 
If. LEOPOLD A CO., 
Main, bet. 3d and 4th. 
D. SPALDING A SON, 
Chapel, bet. Main and 
Market. 
FRAN CKEY, ETTER 
A CO , 159 Main. 



(nothing. 



CHAS. c. jonss. 



JONES 



PR... 



H. TAPP. 




LOW * WHITNEY' 



iUisccUancou*. 



HAM L. RAKKK. 



JOSEPH W. MORRILL. 



J. T. SMITH & CO., 

No. 220, (Old No. 609.) Main St., 

Louisville, Ky., 

(Next door above Louisville Hotel.) 
Manufacturers, Importers, and Wholesale Dealers in 

Harness, Saddlery Hardware, 
Bags and Valises. 

Oar stock comprises a complets assortment of SAD- 
DLES, BKIDLES, FILLINGS and MARTINGALES, 
GIRTH and BEIX WEB, RIDING and DRIVING 
WHIPS, BITS snd Saddlery Hardware. 

In oar Trunk Department will be found all kinds of 
LADIES andGNNTS TRUNKS, TRAVELING BAGS, 
VALISES, SATCHELS, and FRENCH MOROCCO 
SACS. 

IMPORTED GOODS of 



Our own Importation, 

r a lar^e stock of STEEL »nd SILVER FLA' 
DON'S, SNAFFLES, snd PELHAM'8 

STIRRUPS, 



IVORY RINGS, ENGLISH HEADS and REINS, 
and MARTINGALES, snd 

French Morocco Sacs. 



GEO. W. WICKS 

(Successor to Nock, Wicks & Co.) 




FACTOR, 



BAGGING AND ROPE, 

AWD all KINDS OP 

Manufactured Tobacco, Cotton 
Yarns, &c. 

102 Main Street, bet. Third and Fourth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Game Fowls ! Game Fowls ! 

THE FOLLOWING VARIETIES OF 
Fowls are bred true to name, from the purest Ameri- 
can snd English stock, and warranted dead game : 

Prince Charles, Warriors, 
Tartars, Mud-Jacks, 
Counterfeits, Grey Eagles, 

Rattlers, Irish Slashers, 

English Champions, Clippers. 

My Fowls have been repeatedly tested, and in point of 
courage, ferotity, and celerity of action, haTe no superiors. 

All purchasers guarantied satisfaction- For further 
particulars, adareea D. R MASON, 

Nov. 25— 2t Webster Groves, St. Loois Co., Mo. 



CHAMBERS HIXZEN k ROSEN, 
Market bet. 6th k 7..h. 
Machine Supplies, 
li. V. WILKES, JR., 
131 Main, north siee. 
Oil Henneries. 
WM. SKENE k CO., 
Bullitt, bet. Main and 
river. 

Oil Works. 
WATERS k FOX, Main 
bet. 9th and 10th. 
Paper, 4tc. 
WM. CROMEY, Main, 
bet. 7th an.l sth. 
loo FA&LS CITY MILLS, 
' 13, 15 and 17 Wash- 

E. KLAUBER k CO.: '^agUm si. above 1st. 
77, 5th. bet. Main k L UPONT * CO,,. ]* 
Market, j Main, bet. 3d and 4th 

J. II. WltlGHT k CO.,' Porlc Packers. 

186, s. side Main. A. PETER A- CO., Main 
HAINES, NEAL k CO. bet. 1st and 2d. 
Main. beL 7th k Mb. Pattern Makers. 
Foundries. FERGUSON k LEW- 
DA VIES A 'CO., 336, ERS, 447 Main, bet. 

cor. tfth k Main. 9th and 10th. 

LOCISVILLE ROLL- Plow Manufacture- 
ING MILL Co., Main BENJ. F. AVER'ruCor. 



For Sale. 

10TSWOLD SHEEP 



ESSEX 

Black Spanish Fowls, and Ayletbury Ducks— all 
from imiKjrted stock. Address E. C. ARMSTRONG, 
Nov. 25— tf Florida, Orange Co., New York. 



FINE CATTLE, 
SHEEP, HOGS 



AND 



bet. 5th k Bullitt. 



15th and Main. 



Cashmere Goats, 



BRED AND FOR SALE BY 



ROBERT W. SCOTT, 



Has been in the same 

over 



business and on 
-r thirty yea** 



on the same farm for 



All Animals carefully selected. 

Cattle under good halters, and oth- 
er Stock in cages, with feed, &c. 



CLOTHIERS, 



NO. SOO, 



nvc^iisr STREET, 



Louisville, Ky. 



§t$n |1 ealcv s. 



LOUISVILLE 



Rollins Hill Co. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



T. C. 




MANTFACTCBER8 OF 

Bar, Boiler, Sheet & Hoop 

IRON. 

Importers axd dealers in all kijtds of 

English, German, Swede and 
American Steels. 

All WARRANTED of the very BEST QUALITY 
Highest prices paid for Wrought and Caet Scrap 
, 



Wants & Reamer 

No. 247 WEST MAIN STREET, 

Between Sixth and Seventh, opposite Louisville Hotel, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

IRON MERCHANTS, 

Agents for 

The New Albany Rolling Mill, 
and 'Duquesne' Nails & Spikes. 



loots and £hoe& 



ANDREW LOW. 



ROLAND WHITNEY. 



KEEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND, 
and sell at lowest market rate*, all sizes of manu- 
factured 

IRON,NAILS,SPIKES,STBELS 

'Peter Wright's' English Anvils. 
1 Burden's' Horse & Mule Shoes 
and Boiler Rivets. 

STEELS. 

Wm. Jesse p & Sons English Cast Steel. 

» " German « 

■ " Sheet " 

« Blister " 

» « Toe-Calk " 

u u Spring " 

Tire 

Mill Pick " 

Best Eastern & Pittsburg 
Steel Springs. 



CORDAGE. 

All sizes Manilla and Oil Well Rope. 

OAKUM. 



Blacksmith's Tools, all descriptions 
Split & Sawed Plow Handles. 

Best Pittsburg Steel Plow Slabs, and 
Brinly Pattern Steel Plow and Shovel 
Plates. Steel Cultivator Teeth, 

BOLTS, NUTS,WASHERS,WAGON- 
Boxes. Rasps, Files, Tweer-Irons, Fire-Drills; Fire- 
Benders, Pipe-Boxes, (Steamboat Fenders, Anchors, Safes, 
Scales, Vises, Stocks and Die*. 

Hollow- ware Castings, 

Every description. 

Best Swede Nail Rods. 
Steel Broadcast Mould Boards 
Best Pittsburg Coal in hhds. 



MANUFACTURERS , 



AND DEALERS IN 




190 Main Street, 



Between Fifth and Sixth, South Side, 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



J. D. 



ran £ ALLEN, 



WHOLESALE DEALERS 



IN 



BOOTS I SHOES 



No. 195 



WEST MAIN STREET, 

Between Fifth and Sixth, 

Louisville, Ky. 



JNO. 
Of 



R. 1. WHITI, J50. COCH«AH*V 

A Co., IM* of Borton 



iisDV.nin&niifE, 



BOOTS s SHOES, 



J. 8. LITHOOW, 
VI5CEMT COX, 



J. S. Li 



C. O. •1UTH, 

J. L. ; 



8 





Castings, Tin, Copper and 
SHEET IRON WARE. 

And Importers and Dealers in 

Tin Plate, Sheet Iron, Wire, 

BLOCK TIN, 
TINNERS' MACHINES 

Hand Tools,  fec. 
$5 & S7 Jiorth-WKt MM Third and Main Strafe. 

AlwajB in stock the most complete aasortment of 

Manufactured Tin Ware, 



ATI U 

House Furnishing 



TO BE FOUND IN THE WEST. 



BEACH, FASSETT & CO. 



GENERAL AGENT8 FOR 



Stewart's Celebrated 

COOKING ? PiRLOR STOVES 

FOR WOOD OR CO Alt, 



Stoves, Tin Ware, 

Japaned Ware, 8l House 
Furnishing 



GKNKRALLT. 



NO. 62 MAIN STREET, 

BET. SECOND k THIRD, 

Louisville, Ky., 
And 21 & 23 N. Fifth St., St. Louis, Mo. 



AND AGENTS FOR 



Eastern Manufacturers, 

No. 214 MAIN Street, 



(Old No. 603,) 

NEXT TO CORNER SIXTH, 



LOUISVILLE. KY. 



KG ALLS & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BOOTS & SHOES 

No. 165 MAIN STREET, 

Between Fourth and Fifth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



girchUertss. 



Highest Market price paid for 

Cast and Wrought Iron Scraps. | 



BRADSHAW & BRO, 
ARCHITECTS, 

Office, 64 Main Street, 
Between Second and Third, South side, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



HI O IP IB 

INSURANCE C0Klr n .v 

215 Fourth Street, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, 

$200,000. 

INSURES AGAINST 

DAMAGE BY FIRE, 

LIGHTNING&TORNAerj 



T. T. SHREVE, President. 
D. G. BLY, Vice Pres. k Treaaui 
S. H. SOUTHWICK, Secretary. 
D. B. DEWEY, General Agent. 



D. P. FAULDS" 

SOUTHERN 




70 MAIN STREET, 



BET. SECOND k THIRD. 

SOUTHERN AGENTS #OR 

Steinwav & Son, 

Chickering & Son, and 
Ernest Gabler 

ANTD OTHER FIRST CLASH 

piano port: 

for Cb.urcb.ei, Sunday &ch & and Terh 
and Martin's Celebrated GUITAR^, 
Dealer* and other purchasers surprint »r.u the 
Italian Violin, Guitar, Banjo and Cello Strion, *• 
MUSICAL INSTKI lTENTs very d*eer»|.::.. n . ^ ! 
1 1 have always *a 
Music and Musical' 



ips. 



t *KKTS of erery deeeriptioa. 
, hand the largest and beet stock 
Wrrks In the South and We«t 
Largest Discounts made to Dealers, Schools ami T«fe ,„{iZT~ 

era. » . " 



era 

Any Music published 
charge on receipt of 

catalogue, "il 

Publuher of 
Dealer in Piano F. 
and Third, Louisri 



BJSJ eoan- 



V 





4 



s 




~-  BBBBBsl 




Industrial & Commercial Grazette. 



T. SLXTIH, R. D. 8L1TIK. T. P. CAIK. 

T. &R. Slevin&Cain, 

IMPORTERS AND 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 




Drn ©cobs. 



W. J. Tapp, 

of Florence, Ala. 
TH08. J. Tapp, 
late of Chamberhn & Tapp. 



E. W. Kbnwedy, 

of Florence, Ala. 
Ed. P. Walbh, 
of Kentucky. 



Old No. 606 Main Street, New No. 217 
Main Street, 

Nearly opposite Louisville notel, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



NOW RECEIVING, LARGE 8DPPLIE8 
OF SEASONABLE 

FANCY & STAPLE 

GroocLs, 



J. A. CAKTKll. 



j. o. carter. 



CARTER & BROTHER, 

JOBBERS Of 

Staple and Fancy 

DRY GOODS, 



Cor. Sixth & Main Sts., 



J. M. MM| C. T. 8CTFI1LD. B F. 



•j.M: ROBINSON & CO., 



WHOLESALE DXALBU3 llf 



TiPP, KENNEDY i WALSH, 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS 

OP 

DRY GOODS, 

NOTIONS, 

265 WEST (old No, 712) MAIN ST. 

Between Seventh and Eighth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



©loccvics. 



GEO. W. MORRIS, 
WHOLESALE 

GROCER, 

AND 

DEALER IN 

Foreign Fruits, 



West side Third Street, 

BELOW MAIN, 
Z.OUiSVTZ.1,1;. Cf, 



TUCK, DAVIS & CO. 

Foreign aad Domestic ^ R Q Q fi R g 

DRY GOODS! 



Notions, &c. 

mat 

i  I . 



Th 



waici 

Iron, ,r TW EEN FIFTH k SIXTH, 

been 

and p * 

al1 r UTSVILLE, KY 

— 

P BKBGKR. N. BLOOM, J Loui8vil l e . 

  i-^York. L. BAMBERGER, J 

BAMBERGER, BLOOM & CO., 



WH0LS3A1.K DEALERS IS 



FOREIGN 

AND 



AND GENERBL 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

322 MAIN STREET, 
Between Eighth and Ninth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

R. W. Turk, 
J. G. Davis, 
A. 1'. Tuck, 




St.. north side, 

(OLD NO. 514,) 



A. H, & W. 0. GARDNER, 

WHOLESALE GROCERS 

AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

143 HVL^IISr STREET 

Between Fourth and Fifth. 

LOUISVILLE, KY 

Nov. 18— ly 

1 A a BAGS RIO COFFEE ; 

L\j\j 35 htads. Cuba and P. B. Sugar ; 
50 bbls. Ex. C. do. 
60 bbls. Crushed and Gran. do. 
30 casks I. Soda; 
850 kegg Nails, assorted ; 
850 packages Mackerel ; 

30 boxes Codfish; 
100 packages Syrup. 
For sale by 

A. H. & W. 0. GARDNER. 

Nov. 25— ly 



(Broccrics. 



JACOB F. WELLER. 

WHOLESALE 

GROCER, 

No. 99 West Main Street, 

Betwcon Third and Fourth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

E. A. Gaedsf.r. C. H. Gardner. 

GARDNER&Co. 

GROCERS 

AND 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 



Agricultural. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Coffee, Sugar, Syrups, Teas, To- 
bacco, Fish, Nails, Cordage, 

Shot, Lead, Paper, Wood- 
en Ware, &c. 

196 MAIN STREET, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



United States Bonded 

WAREHOUSE. 



-7TTT 

WE ARE NOW PREPARED TO 

I™ furnish the fi.liowinit Goods at the lowest cash 
prices : 

The bes Two and Four Horse 
Wagons made. 



i r oim5rics. 



Dorn, Barkhouse & Co. 

GENERAL 

COMMISSION & FORWARDING 
ERCHAWTS, 

157 West Main Street, 

Louisville, Ky. 



AGENTS FOR 



Distilleries, Flouring, Cotton & 

Flax Mills; Tobacco, Cigar, Soap and 
Candle Manufactories ; Malt, Hops & 
Barley; Imported and Domestic Wines 
and Liquors. 



Particular attention paid U the 
all kinds of 



GROCERIES, LIQUORS & PRODUCE 

We make liberal advances on consignments, and 81 
orders promptly. 



H. W. WILKES, Jr. 

506 MAIN ST., North side, near Fourth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Machine Belting, 
Bolting Cloth, 
Cotton Warps, 
Machine Cards, 
Hose and Packing. 

Mill, Factory, Railroad and Oil 
Well Supplies of all kinds. 



Catalogues sent free by mail. 
^©"Factory discount to dealers. 
LOUISVILLE 



TNDIGO, MADDER, ALUM, EP! 

JL Salts, Copperas, Ext. Logwood, Pepper, Spice, 
en Ware, Brooms, Tea, Tobacco, Glass, Cordage, ' 



EPSOM 

, Wood, 
j Twine, 

dm, Pepper Sauce, Catsup, Ground 

A. fif. & W. O. GARDNER. 

Not. ly 18 | 



CLASS WORKS. 

J. A. KRACK & CO., 

GLASS MANUFACTURERS, 

Office No. 117 Main St., 
Between Third & Fourth, 

Old No. 337^.) 
Factories cor. Clay and Franklin Sts. 
■VAU articles of Green and Black Glassware on han 
for Druggists, Orocers, Confectioners and Families 



(Casr and Steel.) 

STRAW CUTTERS, 

CORN SHELTERS, 
Sugar Mills, Burr Mills, Cider 
Mills, Corn Mills, Threshers 
and Mowers, all sizes. 
Mendenhall's Looms, Washing Machines 
Riding Cultivators, Cotton Gins, Spin- 
ning Jennys, Wait's Patent Spinning 
Wheels and Reels. 
Cement, Plaster, White Sand, Lime. 
J. D. BONDURANT & CO. 

Maih, between Third k Fourth Sts. 
Louisville, Nov. 25— tf 



PITKIN, WIARD & GO. 

Louisville, Ky. 



WASHING 

m 




Corner Ninth and Main Streets, 

DAVIES & CO. 

Manufacturer* of 

Marine, Stationary and Portable 

Utilise 



OIL WELL, 

Tobacco, Grist & Saw Mill 

MACHINERY 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Boiler, Sheet-Iron, Copper 



WE HAVE NOW IN STORE, AND 
are offering to pure' 
tail, al the very lowest M 



Grass Seeds. 

5000 bushels Red Clover, 
3000 bushels Timothy, 
3000 bushels Blue Grass, 
3000 bushels Orchard Grass, 
3000 bushels Red Top or Herds 
Grass. 

1000 bushels Hungarian, 
1000 bushels Millet, 
1000 bushels Hemp Seed, 



Garden Seeds. 

We have a large stock of gen- 
uine Garden Seeds, growth of 
1865, which we are offering in 
bulk or neatly put up in papers, 
at low prices. 

l®*We have also a large stock 
of Landretk's Garden Seeds, which 
we are selling at regular prices. 
Send for a Catalogue. 



IMPLEMENTS. 



w 



E HAVE A LARGE ASSORT- 

ment of Implements in store, embracing nearly 
every thing required for cultivating the soil. VVe have 
been engaged in selling Farm Implements ami Machinery 
fur the last IS years, and buyers can always rely on get- 
ting those which have proven themselves the most suc- 
cessful after the most thorough trials. 
Our stock consists in part of the following : 

B. F. Avery's Cast Iron Plows, 
Indianapolis Steel Plows, Cincinnati 
Steel Plows, Cast Steel Plows, Cotton 
Scrapers, Harrows, Cultivators, Rid- 
ing Cultivators. 

Cummings ; Cutting Box, Sand- 
ford' s Cutting Box, Flour City Cutting 
Box, Rochester Cutting Box, 

Virginia Corn Sheller, Box or 
Western Sheller, Hominy Mills, Cot- 
ton Gins, 

Portahle Drag Saws (the best), &c. 

^5©-Send for Descriptive Catalogue. "OS^ 

LIME, CEMENT, &c. 

We offer the following at tM lowest r.ish prices: 
1000 bbls Cement, 5000 bbls. White 
. Lime, 1000 bbls. Calcined Plaster, 
500 bbls. White Sand. 

PITKIN, WIARD ,fc CO. 



JULIUS BARBAROUX, 

Mkxcfactvrir ok 

STEAMBOAT. STATIONARY AND 
PORTABLE 

STEAM ENGINES, 

BOILERS, SHEET-IRON, 

Brass and Copper Work, CIRCULAR 
SAW MILLS, Sorghum Sugar Mills. 
Mill Machinery, Cast and Wrought 
Iron Screw Pipes, Force & Lift Pumps 
of various kinds. 

Hydraulic Presses & Machinery 

FOR MANUFACTURING TOBACCO. 

. 

Tobacco Screws and Presses. 

Cast and Wrought Iron Railing and 
A'erandah*. 








- 


1 







y7, 1861, and July 4, 
at 

Fair, 



This Press consists of hut lew parts, all 
and substantial. 



Cashmere Shawl Goats. 
A FEW HALF and Three Quarter 

A bloods for sale cheap. Knquire at this office. 
Not. *.5*tr. 



BRUIT, DODGE & MM, 

SUCCESSORS TO 
J. G. Dodge & Co. and Brinly, Dodge & Co. 

SOLE MAN OF ACTURERS OF 

BRiiaLY'S PATENT 

PLOWS, 

(MIVlTORimtlPLHim 

THE KENTUCKY WASHER 

AND WRINGER, 
GOODRICH'S . PATENT SOR- 
GHUM EVAPORATOR, 

AND 

J. G. Dodge's Kentucky 

mm luis. 

DIALIKS IK 

Hardware, Farm Implement*, &c. 

Agents for Louis' Oil Stone Works, Forsyth's 
Scales, Warehouse Trucks, Ac, Huron Grind- 
stones, Alum Patent Firs and Burglar Proof 
Safes, Cowing's PunM, fctsja Richmond Straw 
and Fodder Cutter, Brown'* Cotton Gins, the 
best Reapers, Mowert, C«4ar Mills, Sugar 
Mills, etc., etc. 

112 West Maik , bit. Thim k Focbth stiiiti, 
(SIGN OF THE G0I £^JJj 0   W jj ry 



Oil Well Tools and Ma- 

chinery. 

Special attention given to the manufacture of 

Engines, Boring Tools, 

AND OTHER MACHINERY 

USED IN BORING FOR OIL & SALT. 

V full stock of the best 'description of Tools alwajs on 
hand, such aa 

Centre Bits, Reamers, Jars, Joints, Tem- 
per Screws, Rope Sockets, Sand Pump3, 
Rope Sheaves, Beam Plates, &c, &c. 

Orders for any of the above articles, accompanied by 
the money, promptly atten ded to. 

Corner Floyd and Washington 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



MARKET STREET 




FOUNDRY 

AND 

Iron Works. 

SNEAD & CO. 

MARKET STREET, 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



^L. M'BRIDE, 

WHOLESALE a RSTAfL DB A LIB IM 

Hardware & Cutlery 

ODL & MINING IMPLEMENTS. 

MAXUf ACTCR1R OF 

Planes & Mechanics' Tools, 

No. 75 Third Stmt, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



8 



Industrie 



Commercial Graze tte, 



#n\p m& |ttctimnc$. 



EDWIN MORRIS. 



C. M. MORRIS. 



EDWIN MORRIS & CO, 

WHOLESALE 

DRUGGISTS 

No. 197 West Main St., 

(OLD NO. 528,) 

BETWEEN FIFTH & SIXTH. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



 f anrg ©ooite ami ^totion^ 



J. J. PORTER. 



C. K. FAIRFAX. 



WHOLESALE 




E. A. BOBIKSON, 

W. WALLACE FOWEES, 



CBAS. H. FETTET, 
• VM. A. BOBIKSON. 



R. A. ROBINSON & CO. 

WHOLESALE 

DKN.UMS, 

No. 515 Main Street, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

J. s. iobmbT 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IS 



AND 



Fancy Goods, 

154 MAIN STREET, 

Between Fourth & Fifth, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Henry Chambers & Co. 

WHOLESALE 

MAIN STREET, 

Between Third and Fourth. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Notions, 
Hosiery. 
Gloves, 

FANCY GOODS, 

 ScC_  3cC. 
No. 190 MAIN STREET, 

SOUTH SIDE, Bet. FIFTH & SIXTH 

L©U!SV!LLi 5 MY. 



AND 

WHOLESALE 

Cloak Manufactory! 



OTIS & CO. 



R. BROWN & Co. 

IMPORTERS 

AND 

"Wholesale Dealers 

Of 

Hosiery, 
Gloves, 
Laces, 



0 



B 



Y CAREFUL ATTENTION TO 

onr business — by being prompt and careful in filling 
Orders — and by using every effort to have our customer. 

Feel an interest in our welfare, 

we have succeeded in establishing one of the largest 

Wholesale Millinery Es- 
tablishments 



'apev. 



FILLS CITY PIPER MILLS, 

Noa. 13, 15 and 17 Washington St., abeve First, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



MOORE, BREMAKER & CO. 

Makcpactubers of 

Plate, Collar, Fine Book, 
Music and News Paper. 



Highest cash price paid for Bags, Rope, Cotton Waste, 
Old Docks, Pamphlets, Newspapers, Ac, Ac. 
P. S.— Address all communications to Fall. City Pap e 
Mills. 



New Wholesale 

PAPER WAREHOUSE, 

290 MAIN STREET, 

South side, between Seventh and Eighth 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Jtots audi daps. 



HATS. CAPS, 



AND 



Straw Goods! 



THOMPSON & EDELEN 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

HATS, CAPS 



AND 



STRAW GOODS, 

189 WEST MAIN STREET, 



T 



AND 



J.Monks&Cobb 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN TURE 

Bourbon, Nelson, and Marion County 

COPPER DISTILLED 

Whiskies, 

NO. 287 M*IN STREET, 

eon Seventh and Eighth, 

Louisville, Ky. 



G. H. COCHRAN. 



DW D FULTON. 



FANCY GOODS, 

NO, 199 MAIN Street, 

(OLD NO. *528,) 

Eetween Fifth and Sixth, 

(DP STAIRS.) 



THIS SIDE OF NEW YORK ! 

Having ft House in New York, and one of the firm 
being constantly in that city, enables ns to be 

FIRST I MARKET 



William Cromey, 

WHOLESALE DEALER IN 

PAPER 

OF ALL KINDS. 

BONNET BOARDS 

Binder's Boards, Card Boards, 

ENVELOPES, 

Printing Inks, &c. 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Hats, Caps, 



: 3 



For any thing desirable; and the Large Increase 
of our Sale* ; - Mi rHhn that "iir stock Is de-ir;i- 
ble and our prices reasonable. All of «'iir 



H 



AVING HAD NEARLY TWENTY 

years experience in this branch of business, I feel 
confident I can make it t«  tbe interest of all persons 
buying Taper to examine my stock before making their 
purchases. 

»y Orders by mail or otherwise shall receiTc prompt 
attention. 

Highest market price ii) Cash paid for 
Rags, Hemp and Grass Rope, &c. 



BUFFALO ROBES, 

AND 

Silk and Cassimere Hats, 

AT 

Prather & Smith's, 

160 MAIN STREET, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Trimmed Hats «Ii@Wlli s 



MILLINERY GOODS! 



CANNON & BYERS, 

MAIN STREET, 



Are manufactured on the upper floor of our establish- 
ment, and made in quantity   r stjle to suit the wishes at 
customers. In addition to a full catalogue of 



s 



MILLINERY GOODS, 

We keep a full line of 

Between Fifth and Sixth, I Buttons and Dress Trimmings, 

Jobbers of VAILS, 



COCHRAN & FULTON, 

i ucceeson to Jno. Cochran A Son.) 

WHOLESALE 

Liquor Dealers 

NO. 330 MAIN STREET, 

Between Tliii- 1 & Fourth, 



Til. L. WELLER. 



JAS. P. BVCKXER. 



WELLER & BUCKHER, 

DEALERS IN 

FUSE COFFER DISTILLED 

BOURBON 



MILLINERY 

AND 

DRESS-MAKERS' SUPPLIES 



Baring a resident buyer in New York, are constantly 
supplied with every novelty in their line, as it appeals 
in that market. 

They fill orders promptly and carefully, and buy what 
they do not have in their own stock. 

Louisville, Rot, — tf 






9 



WEST MAIN STREET, 

(Opposite Louisville Hotel,) 

LOUISVILLE, KY« 



L. & 6. BRONNER & CO. 

89 Franklin Street, New York— 49 Genesse Street, 
Syracuse, N. Y. 

173 Main Street, (up stairs,) 
LOUISVILLE, IK""Sr_ 

"Wholesale Deallrs p 

Ribbons, Silks. 

Flowers, Feathers, 
STRAW GOODS, LACES, 

Pattern Bonnets, Trimmings, 
Hats, Head Netts, and 



We can guarantee the 

Latest and best styles of Goods 
AT THE LOWEST PRICES. 



And many other desirable varieties, such a. 



WILLIAM CROMEY, 

Agkxt PM the sale of 

iMiBtM m mm 

G-TJIISrilPO'WIDIEIR., 

No. 290 MAIN STREET, 

B.t. Seventh and Eighth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



A full supply i f 

Sporting, Rifle and Blasting Pow- 
der and Safety-Fuse 

ALWAYS ON HAND & FOR SALE. 



§tot* awl (tap. 



J. C. BoHONEY, 
Kentucky. 



MILLIXERS1MERCHAXTS 

Are invariably in search of Besides wo have one of tho 
largesf 

CLOAK FACTORIES 

In the South-west, and is the only Cloak House in Ken- 
tucky which sells exclusively at wholesale. Our Factory 



is on the 



c 



Corner of Seventh and Main Streets, 

But the Salesroom* for Cloaks and Milsinery Goods are 
together at 

185 Main Street, bet Fifth and Sixth. 



No Goods at Retail ! 



0 



WInviting all in the TRADE to call and see us, 
ifore or after purchasing e sewhere, wo are, 
Very respectfully, 

OTIS & CO. 

185 Main Street 



C. W. Hitchcock, 
Tennessee, 

J. C. Dohoney & Co. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

HATS, CAPSiSTRAW GOODS 

255 MAIN STREET, 

(Korth side, Second Door below Seventh, Up Stairs,) 

Louisville, Ky. 



ALEX. CRAIG. H. P. TrUMAX. T. M. SWANN. 

CRAIG, TRUMAN & CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

HATS, CAPS, 
Straw Goods, 



AND 



LADIES' IU1S 

218 Main Street, 
2d door East of Louisville Hotel, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Win. F. Osborn, 

72 Main St., between Second and Third, 

WHOLES ALU * RETAIL DEALER IN 

HATS and CAPS, 

Men's Furnishing Goods, 



T HAVE A SPECIAL DEPART- 

1 ment fitted np expressly for tbe display (J Furs. My 
stock is very lar-. embracing the finest Minks, Fitch, 
Squirrel, Martin, and all th« medium grades. Ahw, 



Ladies' Fur Trimmed Hoods, 
Carriage and Lap Robes. 

ALL AT THE 

LOWEST MARKET PRICES, AT WHOLE- 
SALE OR RETAIL. 

W1L F. OSBORN. 

72 Main Street, between Second Jc Third. 



J. W. HF.ETER. 



T. C. CBALDOIjr. 



HEETER & CHAUDOIN 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

HITS, UPS, STRAW GOODS 



c 



AND 

LADIES' FURS. 

ALL ATTENTION OF 1 

chants generally to their large stock el 

Mens' Fur and Cassimere Hats 
Mens' Wvo\ Hats, 
Boys' " / V| 
Men's Cloth, Velvet fed   
Mens' Fur Caps, 
Boys' Cloth, Cassimere ani 
Ladies' and Misses Trima 
And a good assortment oi 

INDIES' d 

W. buy our good, directly frvmj 
and believe \»s can sell you ail the J. 
cheap as yon can buy them in any PJ 
try. Call and see u. when you conT^pj 
we will satisfy you that you can mak^U* 
your goods of 

HEETER £ CHAl 

198 Main St., bet. Fifth A Sixth, Sou»| 
LOUISVILLX, KY. 



Louisville industrial and commercial gazette, 1865-11-25

8 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt76hd7nrk1w
 Local Identifier: lic1865112501
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Location
  Published in Louisville, Kentucky by J.H. Turner & Co.
   Jefferson County (The Bluegrass Region)