view raw text

date (1872-06-08) topic_Industry topic_Agriculture_and_Livestock newspaper_issue LOUISVILLE, KY., SATURDAY, JUNE 8. 1871. 



18. 



NOTICE. 

This Paper is sent 
to yon FREE. 



C03SrTE3SrXS. 
SECOND FAOB. 

TtaA PoolWi HaialMU-kgr Omi«» 
aid. 

Othdlo— How Boadnl Wrote tbm 
From th« French of Alexandre 
MiaoeUMiMMia Puasraplia. 



^Mrarof KlndiieMOB AalaMlk 
TiM BavasM «f IBM 
yiiBiiiar«njM«. 



THIRD PAGE. 

Arrival ami riosliig of the Mails. 
Arrival and l partare of Trains. 
IfewKpaper Lawk. 
Foreigu vV'eiKbis and Measures. 
Weights aud Mea^nres nji recogaiaed bgr tbe 
lAWii ol tlie Uuitf i iritate.-. 
United Stat«'^ .stamp Dm ies. 
Memoranda Coucerniug Nails. 
SugKestiousfor Uandllng Tobaeoo. 
Advertiaemente. 
Boot and 8h(M  Quota Jons. 
Wood sad WiUow Ware. 

FOURTH PAGE. 

Miniature Almanac for May. 
To Onr Friends lu the South, 
Time'b ( hangeis. 
Tlie Imiu.slnal Exposition. 
Plug and Cut Tobacco, cigan. Fermented 
Liquonsiiud Di.stilled (jpirfts. 
fc»tock .Sales. I 
Lo.M HouUs Reissued. 
Heavy lUiins. 
I eatii (ii Charles Lever. 
Crop  in Kentucky. 
C rop Pro pecIs of ilie 
Tr e sc ern e of Health. 
Bluegriiaci Wool. 
TolMMn. 

B«v»nae Co 1 leet io u s . 

OiMMEKCIAL.. 

Finance and Trade. 
Kevlew of the Market. 
X^eaf tObMono— Weekly Detailed 
Hpaell Detailed Report. 

riFTU PAGE. 

Dry Goods. 

Cotton— In sight, receipts, &e. 
Provisions, 
ttrooenea. 
F-urs and Peltries. 
Markets by Telegraph. 
Coantr ' Produce. 
Bagdugand Hope. 
Fluurand Grain. 
lihreHtoclc 

Sable of Imjtortfi and £six rts. 
Dross. 

Miscellaneous Paragraptaa. 
AdTertUemeo to. 



BIXTH PAGE. 

The Quantity of Pork to a Boahelof Com. 

Sailing, Packing and Selling Ritter. 
To Make a Sinep Own a Lamb. 
How to Kill Chinch Bugs. 
Applying Manure. 
Fig.-* iu the Open Air. 
ii^Mgia Corn in Fgvpt. 
AdTwrtiaemen t.s. 

SEVENTH PAGE. 



EIGHTH PAGE. 

An Immense Undertaking. 
C i!iioriii:i Tea and .'riili Culture. 
til .-h\s Fust. 
Ilailruail Kreighfs. 
Wixleen Years ol .Success. 
Adverli-semnniv. 

Wh')le.«.ile Pri ;e * Curreut--.\ le and lieer, 
Brooms, IJark, Bags, Cooperace, Cooperslutld, 
Candles and Soap, Cotton \ams, Cnocolate, 
Coal. Cornraeal, Cement, Candies, Canned 
Goo is. Cordage, Fish, Foreign Fruits, Gun- 
powder, Hemp, Hay, Hides, Hops, Iron, 
I.iime, Lanil er. Leather, J^ead, Manulacturea 
Totiacco, Naval Ktores, Nails, Offal, Oils, Pa- 
per, Rags, Rice, Htraw, Steel, Seeds, Spirits, 
Wines and Liquors, Mtareli, Spices, Teas, Tal- 
low and Ureatie, Tin Plate an Tinnets' iitock. 
Twine. V^Mvar, Wood. WoodMi-vare, Wbt- 
dow-glasa. 

NEW ADVERTISEMENTS, 
s. 8. Litbgow & Co., Stoves, page & 
The 8eienoe of Health, page 8. 



Dr. Shaw utates that the diamonds 
of South Africa origiually belonged to 
some metamorpbic rock, probably a 
talcose slate, which occupied the 
heights daring the upheaval of the trap 
which has given to the ooantiy ito 
phTsical features. This upheaval was 
followed by a period of lakes, the 
traccvj of which still exist, and it is in 
the soil of these dried up lakes that 
the diamonds are found. Prof. T. B. 
Jones, on the contrary, thinks that the 
ittaaaoDds are supi^ied both from me- 
tamorpbic aad tgneooBzookiii, aqd.^t 
the gravel la irWfli thij mn fand 
has been ooavejsd by ^Mial setfoo 
ftom very remote moohtains. 



Preiidentukl Soiu&atioA. 

The Bepublioan conventi Hi at Phil- 
adelphia, on the 6th, nominated U. S. 
Grant and Henry "Wilson for President 
and Vice-President of the United 
States, the former without opposition 
MAtha kUtaroo the fint ballot. 



Rev. £. £. H&Ie expects to lecture 
m&xt wintar on UvU teranb" 



CONGRESSIONAL SUMMA&T. 

• Satubday, {iiae 1,' 
The Senate passed the tariff and tax 

bill at 2:25 Friday morning. On re- 
assembling at noon tiumner introduced 
a resolution in regard to the settlement 
of international differences by arbi- 
tration, and delivered a lengthy .-speech 
severely as.eailiug the aduiinistratiou 
of President Grant. At night Senator 
Sebon leviewed the report of the in- 
veetigatlon of the sale of arms to the 
French. The conference reports on 
the postal code and on the army ap- 
propriation bill were pa.«sed, as was 
also the Hou.'^e bill for the restoration 
of the Buell court-martial records. 
The House ordered the consideration 
of better accommodation in the cham- 
ber for the members; fixed the pay of 
witnesses before committees at $4 per 
day and five cents mileage, and passed 
the following bills: Granting the right 
of way to a railroad from 8t. Mary's 
river to Key "West, Florida; refunding 
extra duties on iron to the Southern 
qaarentine bill, Indian and private 
Mils; the conference report on the bill 
revising and codifying the poatKirfBce 
laws; Senate bill relanve to the entry 
and clearance of ferryboats and bonded 
cars passing from one State to another 
through contiguous foreign territory; 
to pay $5,000 to the widow of Com- 
mander Wood for bis invention in 
naval gun carriages; granting the right 
of way to the Denver and Bio Grande 
railroad, narrow gange. 

Monday, June 3. 
The Senate parsed several bills re- 
lating to the Teritories, also relating 
to limiting steam pressure on towing 
and freight boats on tha Mississippi 
river; and a large numWsr of private 
land claims, including one relating to 
Connecticut and other States, and one 
for the payment of awards by the 
Southern Claims Commission, and one 
allowing Theo, Adams $."9,342 for the 
construction of mortar boats for Gen. 
Fremont, the original claim being 
$llf;740.- The House passed blllH 
making La Crosse, Wis., a port of de- 
livery to pay Eldridcre Gerry, of Col- 
orado, S13.LH)0 for . tock taken by the 
8ionx Indians; repealing the prohibi- 
tion (j( promotion in the staff of the 
army; and to extend the bankrupt act 
to the Southern States after 1871. 



Old Stock Bourbon. ' 
(Md Pet Bourbon. 
Diana Bourbon. 
Old Book Boturbon. 
Gait House Bourboi 
Challenge Bye. 
Choice Rye. 
Favoriti Bye,, 
Diana Bye. 



TI K.SDAV, Jnne 4, 
The Senate pa.-^sed bill for the pre- 
veuti'jn of ciuelty to animals in trau- 
sit by rail, etc., and debated the sun- 
dry civil appropriation bill. The 
House passed a bill to distribute to the 
Southern States their quotas of arms 
and equipments from 1862 to 1869, and 
adjourned to meet next Friday. Both 
houses agreed to the conference report 
on the tariff" and tax bill, which makes 
the aggregate reduction of about fifty- 
three million dollars. The tax on 
whisky is seventy esnts per gallon, 
which iodades averthlng except the 
ton eant slaasp on each barrel of rec- 
tified. 



"Wednesday, June 5. 
The Senate eoneonred in the House 
amendments to the bill to provide for 

the redemption and sale of lands held 
by the United States under the several 
acts levying direct taxes. The House 
bill gianting the rieht of way to the 
New Mexico and Gulf railway was 
passed. The sundry civil service ap- 
propriation bill was discussed after- 
noon and oighL Tha HcNise waa not 
in sesskm^ 

The following is a list of patents is- 
sued to inventors fbr tike week ending 
May 28th« 1872, and each bearing that 
date. Furnished thel w D ue priflAii and 
CoMMSBCEAL Qassttb by Cox A Ootx, 
soliciton'of patents, Wyhington, D. 
C: 

1 Portable store counter, Joseph H. 
Daviess, Danville, Ky. 

Aerated water fountain, John C. 
Johnson, liouisville, Ky. 

Heating stove, George Candee, Be- 
rea, Ky. 

Fire extinguishing engine, Jacob B. 
Vu Dyue, Louisville, Ky. 

Stove-pipe drum (reissue), Ben*.J. 
Hobson, Covington, Ky. 



That railway axles break less fre- 
quently in summer than in winter is 
shown by a recent report of the Ger- 
man Bail way Association, in which it 
is stated that, in the summer hidf af 
the year, 65 axles broke, wlrile daring 
the winter half 77 broke, although the 
trafOc was less. 

MioaiMl 00^01^ to be used as a noo. 
oondietflBg p  cklpg tor ataun baflan 
•ad p^flMjha made by blowing a 
JaC of aMun OiRMigh a entrratt of liquid 
slag. 



Our difTerent brands 
represent different ages, 
from 2 to 7 years old. 

As our trade aacfBda 
over •very State, and 

nearly every Territory, 
in tlie Union, we put all 
of onr brands up in extra 
heavy iron-hooped coop- 
erage, to safely bear trana- 
portatira to any part of 
the United Stetea. 

And as we want our Whiskies only 
sold pure, we will, from this time for- 
ward, rebanel and ahlp all at proof, so 
that the tradecan have no raaaon for 

changing our packages in any way. 

Druggists and other dealers desiring 
FINE, PURE, WHISKIES, will al- 
ways iBnd oar gooda maafc ttntar iraate. 



HOPKINS & HIGGINS' 

Kentucky Bourbon Whisky, 

Nob. 3 Main and 4 WkdihigtBB Stncte. 



FU££ OLD KENIUGKT 




Noa. 3 Bfain and 4 Washington Streets. 



HOPKINS & HIGGINS' 



imm BooiOi wHisn. 



HOPKINS k wmm 



KENTUCKY RYE WHISKY, 



XToa. aiBKainlMid 4 WaahingtonlStreeta J 



III TMDE-IIUI 



Old Stoek BovrboiL 
OkLPftBrnnrbaL 
Diana Bourbon. 
Old Buck Bourbon. 
Gait House BouriMML 
Challenge Bye. 
Choice Rye, 
Favorite Bye. 
Diana Bye. 



Onr different 
represent diffasent agea^ 
from 2 to 7 Team old. 



WAREHOUSE, 
No&3 Main and 4 Wnlii&igtall 
TWO D0(»8 raoMOAiy^HOuite, 

, LOUISYILLE, KT. 

•/ n 



IIFIIU ( litUU. 



HOPKINS & HIGGINS' 

FDUE OID ONTUCEr 

RYE WHISKY, 



As our trade extends 

over every State, and 

nearly every Territor 

in the Union we pp' ^ ^ 

of onr branda up y _^ 

u extra 

heavy iron-boo^ 

ped coop. 

erage,toaale* „x^^^ . 

» ' ^y bear trans* 



Noa. 3 BCain and 4 



SOPKIirS As HIGGINS^ 



Kentucky Rje WUskj, 

J* ... J 

Noa. 3 Main and 4 Waahiagtoa fltreaUi 



to any part of 
*^*^»*.tedStatea. 

^ jdaa vawaatav whttto aa^ 

^ jld pure, we will, from this time for- 
ward, rebarrel and ship all at proof, so 
that tba trade can have no reason for 
changing opt 

Druggists and ottMr( 
FiyE, PURE WinSKIES, will al- 
ways find our^goods meet thair waat^ 



TWO DOOBS FBOM G ALT ^OUSSi 



UNilS4llttlU. 



Industrial and Coiiixiiercial Grazette. 



THE FOOLISH HAREBELL 



BY GBOBOB MACDOHALD. 



A harebell hung Its wilful head I 

•*I am tired, so tired ! I wish I was dead." 

Bb» hong hw bead In the momsy de!l; 

Ai wted ha iMAvd, and WM pUUU; 
A vsivad iMT aboat to malM Mr ceoL 

*'WlBd. ywian nMvta." MM tha dainty MI ; 



And the wind, at the voice of the drooping 
dame. 

Bank in bis heart, and ceased for shame. 
«*Iamhot.aohotrahea|ghed and said; 



Then the sod, he piiit d her pitiful case, 
And ^rewatbick vail over his face. 

*»Cka^ mtmmtw, and don*t be rude; 
1 MA Ml^ AM'k an wky yoK akMld r 

The cloud withdrew, and thehiirebell cried: 
"I am faint, so ftyy t ! aud uo water beside !" 

And the dew came uoVpu its million-fold 
patb; 

But sbe mnrmuied, "I did not want a bath." 



1^1 



A boy cam« by in the morning gray, 

itka hanbaU andOuwwUaivay. 



lAlMnd. and cried: aH! 
IaMMBt,aoMBt! •oBM.daarwted.Mow." 

The wind blew sioftly, and did not speak; 
MM thaii "«irt him kindly, bat grew more 



"Sun. dear sun, I am i 
He ro.se, but lower she dfooited her head. 

"Oh, rain. I am wilberiug; all the blue 
[ oat or Me; oome^ flease do." 



Sharain eame down as Cast as it could, 
■■tforaUitawiUUdidherno good. 

8ta« MM dawwd ud aliHTtfad, aad. aM^'lng, 
■aid : 

  Thank yon all kindly;" and then she was 
dead. 

Let us hope, let us hope, when slie comes 
next \ eai , 

She'll be simple and sweet. Bat I fear, I tear. 



i Jsak (Lf) (Lf) M  



HOW ROSSINI WROTE THE OPERA. 



ilVinah 




Qt AlaKandr PoiBai,by L. 
aBtfJard. 



fOBSINI had come to Naples, 
preceded liyhi.s j^reat reputa- 
lon. The first per.' ou who nn^t 
im, as he alighted from hi.- car- 
riage, was the niiiKni- iiiiuressa- 
rio of Ban Carlo, Donieuico Bar- 
Without giTing tlie great com- 
wmar time to take a step, or to gpeak a 
mdtd, Bnrbaia addressed him : 

**I have three proposals to make to 
you, and I hope you will refuse ueither 
of them." 

"Let me hear them," said Bossini, 
w ith that Broii MBfie to dMunetMfstic 
of him. 

"I propose that yoa shoold make 
*ny house your home during your atay 

^ Naples." 

to 'aceept." 
"x  -opose to entertain yoa andyour 
"I ( . t my own taUa cafly.*' 

frienas u ^t." 
"I aece^   that yoti should write a 
"I propose me and for m^, theater." 

new opera for . oeept tba Ibinl pi»po  
*'I shall not a, 

aal." ftnw to work for 

♦'What! You rt 

fte ?" '^ou  Nr any one 

"I will not work for „ '^ooaqpOM any 

rise— I am not going to 



more music." Mow." ^ 

*'You are crazy, my dear fe* ^id you , admitted, to the credit of Rossini, that 



iuTtted to his table as if they had been 

his oldest friends. Only at the end of 
the repast, with inlinite address and 
smiling lips, he would slip in, between 
the fruit and the ciieese, a few words 
aboOt the promised opera and the great 
success it was sure to have. 

But in spite of the graceful way in 
which tha impramrio ventured to al- 
lude to the debt which the composer 
had contracted, these remarks pro- 
duced the same effect upon Bossini as 
the three terrible words did upon Bel- 
shazzar at his famous feast. There- 
fore, Barbaia, whose presence had been 
tolerated for a time at dessert, was po- 
litely requested not to present himself 
in ftitore. 

Months slipped by. The libretto 
was completea, but the composer 
showed no signs of putting himself at 
worli. Dinners, drives, picnics fol- 
lowed each other in rapid succession. 
Hunting, fishing, horseback exercise 
divided the time of the noble musician, 
but there was not a bint of so much as 
a single Mfe of jnoaleamoQK bit many 
occupations. Twenty times a day 
Barbaia found himself a prey lo fits of 
anger, to oervous and almost irresisti- 
ble desires to make an expostulation 
against such indolence. But he con: 
trolled himself, for no one had greater 
faith than be il( the wosdoful genioa 
of BossinL 

Barbaia therefore kept silence for 
five months with the most exemplary 
resignation. Bat the morning of the 
first day of the aiJcth month, feeling 
that there was iio more time to be lost, 
he drew the artist aside and addnssed 
him as follow.s: 

"My dear fellow, do you know that 
there are only twenty-nine days be- 
fore the appointed time ?" 

"What time do you mean ?" asked 
Bossini, with ttie air of amasement of 
a man who has been mistaken for 
somebody else, and to whom one has 
made an incomprehensible remark. 

•'The thirtieth of May," rejoined 
Barbaia. 

"The thirtieth of May?" repeated 
Rof^sini, with a bewildered look. 
"Did you not promise me a new op- 

•'This is no time to pretend astonish- 
ment," cried the manager, out of all 
patience. "I have waited aa long as 
poissible, counting on your genius and 
the extraordinary rapidity and facility 
for work which God has bestowed up- 
on you. But now I can wait no long- 
er. I must have my opera." 

•'Can'tyou arrange some old opera, 
and change Che title of it, that will do 
as well ?" ja 

"What an idea ! Wha^ shouldV do 
with the artistes who are engaged ex- 
pressly to play in a new opera?" 

"Let them grumhli*** 

"And the pabliol*' 

"Cloee the theater." 

"And the Klhgr' 

"Send in your resignation." 

"Enough of such nonsense. If nei- 
ther the artistes nor the public nor the 
King can force me to keep my prom- 
ise, I have given my word, and Do- 
menica Barbaia never yet failed when 
he liad pledged himaelf te do a thing." 

"Ah I ibmtU •aatket qneaCioB." 

« Yoa prmnise me, then, to begin to- 
morrow ?" 

"To-morrow! Impossible! I am 
engaged to go fishing at Fu!?aro with 
some friend's." 

"Very well," retorted Barbaia, 
thrusting his tianda into his trowsers 
pockets. **Let us talk no more about 
it. I will see what is best to be done." 

And he went away withott another 
word. 

That evening Rossini supped with a 
good appetite, doing honor to the 
viands of the manager, as if he had 
entirely forgotten the morning's dis- 
cussion. When he retired he bade his 
servant wake him early and have a 
boat ready for Fusaro. After which 
he slept the sleep of the just. 

The next day, twelve o'clock re- 
sounded from the live hundred church 
clocks, of which the fortunate city of 
Xa{rlt- is the possessor, and Boesini's 
servant had not yet made bis appear- 
ance. The sou darted his beams 
through the blinds— Rossini woke sud- 
denly, started up, nibbed his eyes and 
nulled tlie beli. The bell-rope fell 
broken at the lirst pull. He opened 
the window and called or.t into the 
court-yard. All was as quiet as a 
Turkish seraglio. He .'■hook the door 
of his room. It was locked on the 
oatside. Then Bossing returning to 
t^eji'indow, shouted for help, crying 
cfcit ^against the treason of which he 
was the victim. But not even an echo 
responded to his invectives. One re- 
source alone was left hiui, to !  a}) fr( m 
the fourth-story window, as his apart- 
ment was in this story— but it must be 



One of these artistes seated himself at 
the piano aid began to play the om- 
position, and all declared that Rofsiui 
was not a man, but a god, since he 
created without labor, without w)rk, 
but by the mere ettort of will. 

Barbaia, almost beside himself vith 
joy, snatched the music from its ad- 
^irers, and sent it to the copyists. 
The next day he received a new pack- 
age, on which was written, 

"FIBST ACT OF OTHHIJiO." 



"Ttiat may be— but I have 
the exact truth." . , , 
**Wtaat are vou going to do, then, 

ITanlfisT** 

"lam going to eat macaroni and . 
ices. I ha^ • perfect passion for 

l)oth." 

"I will have ices made fwryou.by 
my confectioner, who is the naost re- 
nowned in the city, and I will myeelf 
mepare macaroni for you, which will 
give you satisfaction, I'll warrant 

^J'^This begins to look Interesting." 
••But you mast give me mn opera iu 

exchange." 

"We will see." 

*»T^e one month, two months, six 

''^jjmed' six months let it be." 

"Oome, then, to supper." 

Wmn that very evening the palace 
of Barteia was put at Rossini's dispo- 
Sal TheproprietoT withdrew from all 
rt^rferen^e, Ld the f^^rated com- 
poser made himself .hom*. % 
Ttricte^t acceptation of the Urn^ Ml 
the friends, er^vwj^e u^^^^ 

SSSit hesitation; be did the honors 
S^ to tbcSfguests with perfect ea^ 
SdSce. Sometimes be complained 
Sat^could not find friends enough 
S make the banquets gay- with a^l 
i^e^flforts he could mg* couldnot 



this idea did not even enter his head 
At the end of an^ourBarlmia show- 
ed bis head, popjiing out of a window 
in the story below. Rossini, who had 
ot quitted his place, saw liim, and 
^ uld gladly have thrown a brick at 
wo but, not having one, he was 
him, 1 to content himself with show- 
obligec ..ggjj upon him. 
ering cu. soythlng?" fl^ildly 

"Do yo^ .baia. 
inquired l a , jgj. instantly," 
' I want tv. 



your op- 



•Iwa7«ge4 

to Join nil 



Imat table— those 



llftteen 
an 



roared K^ ssjni. ^ ^^^^ 

"You shall com 
""■"Buf^S^ i« a dete./'»We and arbitra- 

^.!5e^SK"and arbiZ-ry. if you 

please, but I warjt my o{)ex^ 'artistes." 
"I will complain to an vuo 
"Let them grumble." 
"1 will inform the public." 
"I will doe© the theater." 
"I will appeal to the King. ' 
"I will send in my resignation. 
Rossini V reeived that he was caught 
in hisow: .oil8.8olikeamanofbrai^^^ 
he chanj: I his tone and Jiia nwOBe^ 
and said ^ a calm tone : J 
"I acci vt the pleasantry and am nd^ 
anirry. buc may I not know when I am 
tohifve my liberty ?" ^^^-^ ,^ 
"When the last scene of K^^BS^ " 
sent to me," said Barbaia. 
"vSy weU-send this ewWnf tor 

the overture." i- » .nslTrtl 
Tliat evening BarbajpgtWivea 
large pile of music, on 'Wbma. w« 



I md writ-' 



A^tSSihaia, faithful to the role of' ten°in large letters 



f which he had imposed upon him 
Mdf he Invented new dishes every day, 
^St out the oldest and best wine 
from his cellar, and was as 
*n the imknoWB people wftem 



OVERTURE TO OTHELLO." 
The salon of Barbaia was fuU of mu 
oelebritieeVhen the flrstinstaU 




This he forwarded at once to the copy- 
ists, who acquitted themselves of their 
duty with the mute and passive obe- 
dience to which Barbaia bad accus- 
tomed them. 

At the end of three days the music 
of Othello liad been delivered and oof - 
ied. 

The impressarlo was beside himself 
with joy. He pressed Bossini tohii 
heart and made the most humble and 
sincere excuses for the stratagem he 
had been forced to employ, and begaed 
the author to finish hfg tfOW by isnit- 
ing at the rehearsals. 

"I will see the artistes myself," said 
Rossini, "and I will hear each reptat 
his role. As to the gentlemen of (be 
orchestra, I will have them rehea"8e 
in my apartment." 

"Very well, my dear fellow; arrarge 
it all as you please. My presence is 
not necessary, and I will wait to hear 
your masterpiece till the general re- 
hearsal. Once more, I beg you to for- 
give the manner in which I have trtat. 
ed you." 

"Not a word hv.re on that subject, 
or I shall be ofTeiultd v.ith you." , 

"Good-bye, theu, till the generalre- 
hear.sal." 

The day for this grand rehearsal 
came at length. It was the evening 
before the famous 30th of May which 
had cost Barbaia so much anxiety. 
Thesiiif^ers were in their places, tae 
mu-sicians in the orchestra, and Ros- 
sini seared himself at the piano. A 
few elegant ladies and a few privilejed 
gentlemen occupied the boxes. Bar- 
baia, radiant and triumphant, ru]; bed 
his bands together nnd fraUed npj^d 
down the stage. 
The overture was played. 
Frenzied applause nearly shook the 
arched roof of the San Carlo. 

Rossini rose and bowed in acknowl- 
edgmen^ 

"Bravo !" cried Barbaia; "now for 
the songs of the tenor." 

Rossini seated himself again at the 
piano — everybody was silent, the first 
vicjlin raised his lx)w, and they began 
again to play tiie overture. 

The same applause, if possible more 
enthusiastic than before, burst forth at 
the end of this moroeao. 
 #B«NW| rae»1U ifpeated Barbaia; 
*!ihtBMr%as8W to thecavatiua.^f 
the tenor." i 

The orchestra began to play the over- 
ture for the third time. 

"Hold there," cried Barbaia; "that 
is charming, but we have not time to 
bear it again. Proceed with the cava- 
tina." 

But in spite of the commands of the 
manager, the orchestra continued the 

same overture. 

Bart)aia rushed upon the first violin, 
seized hi{u by the collar and ^hou^ed 
iu his our: 

'•What the devil do yon mean by 
playing the same piece for anchoor^" 
"Damme," said the violmfe!, with 
true German coolness, "I am playing 
what has been given us." 
"But turn the leaves, yon fools." 
"It is useless to turn tbeoT; we have 
nothing but this overture." 

"Wliatl" cried Burbaia, "nothing 
but the overture? It is, theu, an atro- 
cious cheat and mystification !" 
Rossini rose and bowed. 
But Barbaia fell hack upon a sofa, 
motionless. 

The prima donna, the tenor, every- 
body, rushed up to hipi. For a mo- 
ment all thought he was struck with 
apoplexy. 

Rossini, startled by the effect of his 
practical joke, approached him with 
real anxiety. But at the sitjht of him 
Barbaia recovere l hinisc4f and found 
his voice once more. 

"Begone, traitor," he cried, "or I 
shall do you some injury." 

"Becalm, becalm," returned Ros- 
sini. "Let us see if there is not some- 
thing to be done." 

"Something to be done, you butcher 
— and to-morrow is advertised as the 
first representation of the new rfpera." 

"Supposing tlie prima donna should 
be taken suddenly ill," whispered Ros- 
sini in the manager's ear. 

"Impossible," was the reply in the 
same tone. "8he woul4 not risk draw- 
ing upon herself the vengeance and 
orange-peel of the populace after such 
a disappointment." 
"If you would coax her a little." 
"It would be useless. Yon do not 
know Colbron." 

"I thought you were  m the best of 
terms with her." 
"8o much the wcwse." 
"Will you permit me to try and see 
what I can do ?" 

"Do all you can— bat I warn you it 
is lost time." 
"We shall see." 

The following day, bills everywhere 
announced that the first representa- 
tion of Othello was postponed on ac- 
count of the sevens illness of the pri- 
ma donna. 

Eight days after that, Othello was 
performed. 

That famous and celebrated opera is 
now familiar to tne whide civilized 
world. 

Eight days had been sufficient for 
Rossini to produce that masterpiece. 

After the fall of the curtain, Barbaia, 
overcome with the triumph, went in 
search of Bossini to shower congratu- 
iKtions on him. Bat Bossini was no- 
whore to be fonind. 
ThO next day Barbaia rung for hia 

Erompt-er, who was also his valet— for 
e was impatient to present to his 
guest his compliments on the success 
of the previous evening. 
The prompter entered. 
"Gk) and ask Bossini to omne here," 
said Barbaia. 
"Rossini has left town," was the re- 

^^Eeft town?" cried Barbaia In amaze- 
ment. 

"Yes, he started for Bologila at day- 
•Gone, without one word focmjB?" 



"Then go and ask Oolb«m to came 

here.'' 

"Colbfon ?" 

"Yes, Colbron, you idiot. Are you 
deaf this morning?" 

"I beg pardon," replied the prompt- 
er, "but Mademoiselle Colbron is gone, 
too." 

"Impossible !" 

"They left in the same carriage." 
"The wretch ! She has left me to 
become the mistress of Bossini, then!" 

"Pardon, sir—but as 1 understand it, 
sbe is his wife." 
"I am revenged," cried Baiteia. 



Dolly Vardeii 
fashionable. 



babies are becoming 



Never take any risks. The Insur- 
ance companies will be glad to do that 
for ye«^ 

— ■ . * — t 

In a game of cards a good deal de- 
pends on good playing and good play- 
ing on a good deal. 

Fans are now set in the midst of a 
bouquet-holder, which, when the zep- 
hyr-compeller is folded, conceals it 

entirely. 

"No end of people who wish to be 
pioufl, but nobody wishes to be hum- 
ble,'' says Rouchefoucauld in hia sati- 
rical way. 

A gU8hing_poet asks in the first line 
of a recenteffiision, "How many weary 
pilgrims lie?" Weglveit up, but ex- 
perience has told us tliat there are a 

good many. 

A Newfoundland dog is agood thing 
to hf've, only one must get one or two 
children and a pond before he will be 
of any use.— Josh Billings. 

"In the world where Martin 1'\arqu- 
harTu])per passed in llie tliirty-sevenlh 
edition," said That keray in a company 
of authors, "let OS aH ^ok amaU beer 
of ourselves." 

A Boston Yankee observed tliat 
John Chinaman didn't whistle, so he 



Eoses. 

The Rose requires a deep, rich, loamy 
soil, unshaded or smothered by trees or 
shrubs ; good drainage, ear^tal water- 
ings, if the season is dry and close, 

judicious pruning. 

The soil should be well Intermixed 
with thoroughly decayed manure, and 
during the heat of summer it should 
be mulched with straw manure, to 
keep the roots moist and cool, aa^^en- 
courage a strong growth. 

All the wood which produced flowers 
last season riioald be cut clean out, or 
back to the stronir. fresh growth of the 
past year; and these free shoots can 
also be pruned one- third or more of 
their length. 

This may seem to the amateur gard- 
ener a terrible waste of material, but 
It will make the rose throw out strong- 
er flowering shoots, and produce flow- 
ers of extra size and beauty. So spare 
not the knife! As eariy in the spring 
as Is practicable, eat back thelwanehes 
with a will. 

Hybrid Perpetual Roses have been 
the fashion of late years ; but they are 
not sfl free blos. iomers as the Bourbon 
and Hybrid China. Their name is 
also a misnomer, for though they may 
bloom again in the autumn, they will 



fred Colomb, exquisitely petaled; 
Chaiiss Lefebre, beautifully bl^ded 
with crimson, purple and scarlet— Its 
leaves as regul ar as those of a Camellia : 
E ngeiie Aiq^ert, deepeet erimsoa, um 
Madame Charles Wood, elaiet erisMon 
among the largest roses gAwn. 

Moss Roses, add to the  4iarm3 of a 
bouquet— such as Princess Adelaide ; 
Countess Murinais, a pure white; Lan- 
eir, rosy crimson; and Cristatatbe peer- 
less. 

The white *Terpetaa1s.'' Madame 

Vidot, 8o|Ma CoqaereUe« and Mjs. 
Rivers, are lovely models of their spe- 
cies, and are more or less flesh-tinged 
at the center. — Bcribner's for June. 



Mrs, O. S. Johnson tells, to Ow 

Dumb Animals, the 8t Nry of a horse 

whose task it used to be to drag a meat 
cart, and which, because of viciousness 
was finally Kold to his present owner, 
at a very low price. He would bite, 
tear, kick run away — was utterly un- 
controllable. Soon after changing 
masters, the people, who had called 
the purchase a foolish one, were 



prised at the difference In the horse's 

conduct. He would go fast or slow, as 
^ desired; stop instantlv at whoa; follow 

not floweras 5ro7iiseTy"as 7n June, nor ! Jis masier's cali, ami rub his^head on 
will their blossoms be as handsome. 



opened a whistling school in San Fran- 
cisco, where fifty fiMP 8 now "do" 
Yankee Doodle, WiilMly Atillgia Os- 



lestial accent. 



Blackvelvet wristlets, fastened with 
a lamps^^Uamond stud or button of 
buraUied gold, are preferred by many 
ladles to the costliest bracelet, as the 
black serves to make a white arm very 
effective. 



It is said that a private carriage once 
owned by Baniel^ Webster has been me 
so reduceid In clrcQmstsiraes that Ithas 
to run to »nd fi^om the railroad station 
in Newmarket,  N. H., as a public con- 
veyance. 

The expected Peruvian loan will be 
one of the largest financial operations 
of the year iu the London money 
maritet. According to rumor its 
amount will probably exceed -SloO,- 
000,000, and perchiiace reach $200,000,- 
000. 



An Snglish-built yacht of seventy- 
two tons has been presented to the 
Episcopal Bishop of Newfoundland, to 
take the place of the church ship which 
was wrecked on the west coast of 
Newfoundland in August last. 

A female infant was found recently 
on the porch of a house in German- 
town, Pa., and finally carried to the 
poorhouse, where, as Its name was un- 
known, it was roistered as "Dolly 
Varden.'» 



Tliere is considerable complaint 
about the prevalence of sewer gas in 
London. The Builder declares that in 
many parts of the city the drainage is 
dangerously imporfeet and the eanee of 
sickness. 



Salem, North Carolina, is a reumrk- 
abie place. But one house has been 
destroyed there by fire iu the past 
ninety years. There is not a whi.sky 
shop or bar-room in the place. It has 
but one lawyer, and he recently moved 
there. 



An enraged Chinaman lately lassoed 
kis employer in California, and strung 
him up to a convenient beam. The 
man, however having his arms free, 
caught hold of the rope and cut it, 
and theu ^went for that Heathen Chi- 
nee." 

Ducks and geese are very plenty on 
the prairie. A man at Gillman, Illinois, 
said if he "had all tlie ducks and geese 
that had been on his farm this season 
and could sell them for a cent apiece, 
he could pay off the national debt." 

•*Fred," said a father to his son, "I 
hear that you and your wife quarrel 
and wrangle every day. Let me warn 
against such a fatal practice." "Who- 
ever told you that, father, was totally 
mistaken; my wife and I haven't 
spoken to Mie aBother for a month." 

An unfortunate Swedish sailor gave 
a rare proof of presence of mind at 
Detroit recently. He was aloft, and 
fell a distance of a hunpred feet, prob- 
ably fatally injuring him, and while 
on his terrible descent he shouted to 
those below to "look out." He deserved 
a bettwrfl ^ ; 

During the first week in April, all 
the farm laborers In a very large agri- 
cultural district in Dorsetshire struck 
for an advance of one-third. It was 
refused for a time, but recent advices 
from England show that the laborers 
were successful, and the employers 
finally gave the rate demanded. Oth- 
er districts are now following in the 
same wake. 

The remains of pterodactyls, or 
winged reptiles, found by Prof. O. C. 
Marsh in the cretaceous shale of West- 
ern Kansas, show for one individual 
an expanse of both wings equal to 
neariy twentar «••*, and for another 
twenty-two feet, American therefore 
not only possssssd Its pterodactyls 
but t^ey are t^^ laHssft IkU have as 
yet bMI fMiratt , 



unlef's the shoots are trimmed back in 
July, to within two or three eyes of 
the main stem. 

The old fashioned Moss, Damask, 
and Provence Roses of oui* cMldbood 
far excel these so-called Perpetuals Jn 
fjragrance, and they ai^rafrfdly coming 
into favor again. 

Cristata. or the Crested Moss Rose, is 
one of the loveliest of its clas. ». The 
plant from which all this species of 
roses is descended was discovered years 
ftgo, growing in the crevice of a wall 
at Friburg. Switzerland. There i.«» a 
difference of opinion among florists as 
to what particular species the Cris- 
tata belongs, and it is thought by 
many to be more like the Provence 
Roses than the true Mosses, for, when 
fully developed, it resembles the old 
Cabbage or Provence species. Its buds 
are perfection ! The calyx is divided 
into a fringe or mossy crest, clasping 
and half surmounting the rich pink 
petals, as they strive to unfold their 
many leav^. The moss Is more abund- 
ant and longer than on other Moss 
Roses, and the buds are very large. 
This variety requires a deep, rich, 
moist soil for its perfect development ; 
and when thus grown it will command 
greater admiration than any other 
ro«e. 

Roses are easily propagated by cut- 
tings, but the shoots should be old 
enough to be free from softness, yet 
not too woody or hard. It is best to 
cutoff the shoots just below a joint, 
trimming off the leaf attached to it, 
and leaving two or three buds above it, 
with leaves on them; but when they 
are too luxuriant cot «ff a pari, for if 
they wlthOT the cutting will net strike 
root. 

Sand is far better than loam for root- 
ine cuttincs ; so fill up your tiny pots 
with it, and insert the cuttings f lose 
to the edge of the pot, keeping it thor- 
oughly wet— for if the sand dries the 
tiny roots will die. Then sink the pots 
in a hot-bed made of manure, or in a 
pan of hot water, hanging tt as it 
cools. 

Botto.n lieat is a necessity — without 
its aid there is little use in attempting 
to strike tender roses; and a glass shade 
to retain the heat and moisture, is also 
peedfnl. Another way to strike cut- 
tings is to flll a large flower-pot half- 
full with a little rich loam and two or 
three inches of sand; then plant the 
cuttings close to the edge, about half 
an inch apart, and cover them with a 
pane of window-glass. Place the pot 
in a pan of hot water, in a window, 
and, if you change the water three or 
four times a day, you will have a good 
hot-bed for striking tender cuttings 
of all kinds. It will take from three 
to five weeks for delicate roses to be- 
come rooted, and they must be kept 
well watered all the time. In pianting 
cuttings, the sand must be firmly 
pressed around the base, so that it is 
in the closest contact with it. 

Our roses are often ruined by the 
slug and the green tly. A few day.s of 
neglect, and every bush will be shorn 
of its glory. But if air-slaoKed lime is 
scattered over the leaves while wet 
with morning dew it will osaally prove 
an effectual remedy. 

A pint of common soft soap, with a 
pint of fine salt added to ton gallons 
of warm water, syringed over the 
bushes, 'Is also a good insect destroyer. 
No one can expect to cultivate tlowers 
without trouble. So as soon as the 
green leaves appear we must begin our 
fitrht against their insect enemies. 

Rose-bugs are routed by shaking the 
stems oontahiing them over a dish of 
hot water, «r by handpicklng and 
burning. 

Soot Is an excellent remedy for mil- 
dew; it must be dusted thickly over the 
plants while wet with dew, and in 
twenty-four hours syringed off. It is 
also an excellent fertilizer to the soil. 
Wood-ashes can be applied In the 
same manner for both mildew and in- 
sects. 

The Florists' Catalogues offer us 
many roses with high-sounding names 
a few of which we select for notice. 
Devoniensis is an unsurpassed tea-rose, 
creamy white, with a tinged center, 
and of most delicious odor. It is a 
delicate rose in northern latitudes, and 
must be carefully housed during cold 
weather, though at the south it will 
endure an ordinary winter without 
protection. 

Marechal Niel is of an inten.^e gold- 
en yellow, the fiuest known; its frag, 
ranee is unsurpassed; but, like the 
Devonlend^ it e—nel endure the cold. 

Madame FUeot If ef a imn nankeen 
yellow, with a perlsel huC ^ liBe 
Forrestler Is paler and, smaller, bloa* 
coming in clusters. 

Fils Niphetos is pure white, with 
lemon center, and Is not very hardy. 

Pius the Ninth is the deepest, dark- 
est rose that we possess. How perfect- 
ly its xleii tiBti set off Its more delicate 
sisters! , , 

This exquisite pink, and model of 
symmetry, is Comtesso Chabrilland, 
and next to it is the Compte de Nan- 
teuil, a summer rose so sweet and 
bright, monthly inhabit, andbatdy in 
some latitudes. 
Those rich brilliant flowers are AI- 



bls shoulder. What had made the 
change? Not force; the poor horse had 
been beaten, kicked and storved belbre; 

and grown more and mon stabbom. 

No , but he was well fed, well watered: 
not overdriven or overloaded ; never 
whipped, kicked, or scolded. Kind 
words were given him, and now and 
then an apple or a lump of suaar. No 
gentler, safer, and more faithful ]u)r.--e 
went on the roa«l. Bui, Indian fashion 
he never forgot either benefit or in- 

t'ury. Occasionally, when In harness, 
te saw his former master. Then, In- 
variably, all the fire of his nature was 
aroused. His eye rolled, he champed 
his bit, and showed an inten.-»e desire 
to get hoid of his former enemy. Only 
the voice and caressing hand 9i ha 
kind owuer could quiet him. 



The Bsvages of Insects. 

In no former ytar, say- ti, ■ I i. 
Farmer, do we remeuiber -u( ii kjeufc; .il 
complaint as we did iu the past year. 
The codling moth, canker worm, and 
the various  dreolious In orchard.s and 
flruit gardens; the Colorado beetle 
swarming ou the potato vines every- 
where; the chinch bug in wheat, com, 
and oat fields; the cicado or seventeen- 
year locusts, here and there in 
various localities by the million. It is 
getting to be abou' as much work to 
fight the iutiect enemies of our fruits 
and cereals as it is to cultivate and 
harvest them. Weeds, Canada this- 
tles, ox-eye daisies, quack grass, any- 
thing in that line would l)e freely ex- 
changed for by our orchardists and far- 
mers now the unfortunate possessors 
of myriads of destructive insects. 
What is to be done? Shall we call up- 
on the entomological scientists, or are 
they unable to go beyond namee, de^ 
criptions, habits, and present remedies? 
Circulio catchers, circulio traps, Paris 
green — '.he supply almost exhausted — 
have done good work, bnt yet the 
hordes marh on in their destructive 
invasion I The situation is not far 
fn.ui liL^C'uraaing. Oh I for some mo- 
dern St. Patrick, with enlarged pow- 
ers, to drive tbeso foes fifoaa we eoiw- 
try ! 

'^tality of Can. 

A correspondent of the Weetom 

Farmer, writes: In the fbll of 1870, I 

gathered s  mf orn for seed, selecting 
that which wa- lii -^t ripe as soon as 
well glazed. I traced it up by the 
husk, and hung it upon the west side 
of niy Viarn, on the outsid ^, where 
some of \l remaiuetl during the winter 
of 1870 71, and through the following 
spring, summer, autumn and winter. 
Three or four days sgo T took a few 
kernel* from each of the ears of differ- 
ent sorts, put them in a cup and cover- 
ed them with fresh earth. To-day T 
have e.Kamined the kernel-, and hiui 
every one of the white Dent  ] routed. 
Of the otl'.er, which wa.s ei^ht rowed 
and of a dark flesh color, only one 
kernel had germinated. Is not ue vi- 
tality oi the first or white Bwot some- 
what remarkable, after being e^ o eed 
to every storm of rain and snow ftom 
October, 1S70, to April 26, 1S72? 

This is one of the "insect years." 
The West swarms with poteto bn|^ 
chinch bugs, and locusts; the Hessian 

fly and clouds of grasshoppers are de- 
vastating the fields of Lf)ss Angelos 
county, Cal. ; the blar-k caterpillars 
are worse in Arkansas than ever 
known before, and are stripping the 
leaves of the forest; Virginia planters 
complain that never were the tobacco 
flieeso numerous and destroetive aa 
this seas m; and throni^ioat the Sooth 
isdlsmay at the number, siae and vo  
raeity or the musquitoee. 

The editor of the Gardeners Maga- 
zine says tliat if there isoue prevailing 
falla.'V in ^rrape culture, which we 
should always be on our guard against, 
it is, without question, the the tond«»  
cy to afford the vines more nutritive 
aid than they can appropriate. Many 
more vines are iujuied by excess of food 
then by deficiency. In the vegetable 
kingdom the same law prevails as in 
the animal; it is not the quantity of 
food taken into the system which af- 
fords nosrishment, but the quantity 
aetnallyjtoMtod^T 

Dr. Tbmiher remaAs that all thai 
can lie said at present of com-hosking 

machines is that they promise weSL 
He hopes and believes, however, thai 
they will be improved, and that in a 
few years we shall no more think of 
busking com by hand than of thresh- 
thgw ^withaflaU. 

The potato bug has reached ae tut 
east as Akron, Ohio, and is still 
"morning on to the sea." In Kansas 
and Missouri it is dying out, and the 
people are confident thai this year will 
close its career in that w^Mkm, 



I*. 



Bo^Qir fiBowN Bread.— Four tea 
cups Ml of Indian meal, two of wheal 
flour, one cup of W. I. molasses, one 
quart of sweet milk, Mie teaspoon fWI. 
of saleratus, one q(jntt  °*rim t^p^ 
hours and bake oiw ImF i — 
WMItt. '• 

.bUo b:;» '. .-.1 



Indnstria/l ctnci Ooriimeroiai Grsbzette. 



Dmy. 

ClndunaU and Eastern S.Ou p m 

Indianapolio and  'hica«ro. Cal- 
ifornia aud the Terriiories — 1.46 r K 



C'oiorado, New  rt-xic ). Nor'- 
w«»«t«rn Arkaii^.t  luri Nor'- 

Mstern Texa-s 1.45 

MemplUB. Ciarkhv   . ' 'r 
, 0«lTgtton.Hltrwepo rt , 

•M 
.. 7 :*o 
IIJU 



MAILS. 



Kie-bt. 

«.Sll 1- M 
12.00 F M 

l(Mt) p u 



Jtaspbts and CbaUMMn 
B-Ka. Oar and AUantiv MM 
Ckaitsnooga posul «lW, aii 



A K 
A Jl 
A If 



UfKtrgia. AiabMM, K. Qmt^ 
loridft... 



. 7J0 



Car., and Flor 
Lebnitoii and 

XUilruMd....... 

Bardst'tWM Branca^ 

Lexin^Um umA fi —k fctt 

Lexington and Frankfort wa/ 

maiN 

KlK'll'.VVIlif 

CJCiuiiati mail t o!it 

EvMiaville mall boat cdiUly 



7 JU A M 



A X 

r M 

P M 



8.15 p M 
8.15 P M 



11.0U P M 




V«w Alhanr A Cbicac* B B 

way malig. — 

Jefferaonvilie ■ LJt 1 

Korth Wrnoa wa* ma8_ 
Taylors vine stace (leavM oa 

'lW«.,Thure.and ^tet.) 

Mt. WaHbin^tOu stagaCIaaTea 

Taes.. lliurM.and S*at. .... 
Sbawneetow n, IIiBm ata^e. Tia 

We«t Point and UniontAwa, 



r u 
aeoc 
r ■ 



.. «.»} A 

12J0 

I TerrttoritN s.oo 

ItM 

m. I/onis, St. Jafleph, Kansas, 
Oolorado.Mew Mextoo, Nor'- 
weatem Artransaa and Nor'- 
eaateni Texas »M 

Xcmpbls, ClarkaylUe. N Or- 



P M 
A M 



_piiiii... 



.«J0 



Memphis * Ctiattawoaf poat- 
•I car and Attantlc * Oiat- 
taneoca postal car, and Ocor- 
gta, Alabama ,N. Carolina, 8. 

Carolina aud Florida. eJO 

I/ebaooo and Kicbmond jBr. 

railroad — — IM 

Baidstowa Bwcii MM . 

Lastnctoe ud FnakJhtt ILM   

I xing:toM and Fnuikftft mjr 

mails - — 

ShWhyvillt- -11.30 

t;iiicitinHti mail Ikjui 6 30 



A K 
A U 

r X 



12.l»1 p M 
lino P M 
U.O0 F U 

UjM F K 

12.00 P U 



mgbt. 

7.00 » M 
P X 

ajo p M 



n.CiO p M 

ILlKI P M 



£vaiisvil1p wail boat (daily ex- 

^ 7.00 



oept Ksunday; 
Xfcw Albany 



3.00 

( «.U0 

B R 

9.00 

. 8 on 
ViM 

N  ^ rt I • V emon way mail — _..12.0U 
Tay I    r  V ille RtageC leaves Tnes. 



war waWa, . .. 

JefllprfonvlUe. 



Thiiif.'lav and Haturday. 

Mt. Wa-'luntcton stagre (leayes 

Tues. Thurs. and Saturday 12.00 

Sbawneetown, Ills., u suc-. vki 
West Point and Univ a 
OvmM^b. W«;d. and   



A X 
A K 

A X 

A X 

P K 

P M 



700 P M 



r X 
r K 

9 K 

P M 



MMIVAL AND OEPARTURCOrTMINt 

Antra. Leave. 

XTMhTllte, MMapbM A New 
OrlMus mail, daily except 

SandRT JMiru WMah 

Naahvllle, Memphis, N. O. 
and Mobile Ejcprew, daily A K 7:45 pm 

KaKhvilie £xprtN s, daily HU r K Uit& p x 

Bichmond and liviDnton 
Expr*«B, datly MEoeptSaii- 

dav 2:40 PX 7!S)am 

Baroatowu Aocommodation 

daily except Sunday 9:10 A x 3:15 p x 

ZiauiMvt^tf, ClHciunati and LexingUm R. M. 
Ciucinniiti Mall, except Sun- 
day U:lSr ■ a£OA x 

CinciniiHti loft Line, ex- 

ce-.t soixImv 7:6ePK TMAK 

Cinci.'inad K.\i r«^  . daily 12:ttF JC tttPK 

CiiKMinaii Ni}--hl Kxpre-s-s, 

excei r suudiiv SHWAXlMBPM 

Lexitii^toi) .Mail. I X. (?iinduy (i;3SPM &0U A X 
ly'Xhititou l-;.\iiro.s.' , excwpt 

^ in.':: y 10.30P1I 2:30 P Jl 

fni!! k lor' .\ (01  M)!Modation, 

except buuiiiiy „ 8:15 A M 4:55^ X 

A'fcel&y JUaUromd, vim ahnt-JAmm. 
Express, daily except Ban- 

day 736 A X P m 

Mixed ualn, tfaUir «xcept 

(Sunday ...^ _7a»PX &05 p m 

e, yrattiaon  {■ IndUmmftMU Jt. R. 
' Toilc, 6l. Louis ( hi- 
jgo Kximss, lUily except 

BWK ay... - 7:a0 a m 8:30 A x 

Slew York, St. Lnuis ± Chi- 
cago Exi rem, daliy n-Aj a m 3:00 p x 

New York, St. LMUsAClii- 
ca^o ExpreoB, daily CKcept 

Saiuidiiy fl:(0 p x 11;00 p x 

flukday train 11:45 ax 

reMlsinflltT. yeir Albany and Chiemff* £. Jt^ 
from LiOtUitviUe. 

Par Express _ 7:00 p X i»K» A M 

Ktgtat E.K press 9:.'iiJ a m «:« p X 

Ahic&^o txpre^Ji 10:UU A M 7:15 p M 

Cin/ciitMttti V, S. Mail l.inc Stcamwa, 



Poreign Weight! and Measures 



The followlac fa a taUe of foreign weigh ts and 
meanireB,wiileta has been careftilly oompU( d 
from vailoas ftnthen tic sources, and, we bt- 
lleve, may be relied ou as correct : 

Abaai, lu Amsterdam 41 galls 

Almn-if-, in PortURal „.4^ galls 

.^Imuile, in Madeira 4.^gali i 

Alquiere, in Madeira over \% pecks 

Alqv.ieie, lu Fortugal 1;^ to nearly \]Z^c)s.& 

.\lquiere, iu Buhin I'bnshel 

Alquiere, iu SXaraulian \% bnshe! 

Alquiere, iu Rio Jaueiro..„ i to :v. bushel 

Alquiere, In Pemarabuco l to 1 4 iiuihel 

AnnK, of rice. In Ceylon _ -m^a It* 

Arroba, in PortugaL „ jaj^ tba 

Arruiai, in Spain 2.' lbs 

Arroi a, iu i {)aln (large) _ •z.'lA\^^ galls 

Arroba, in Spniu Cuuall) _ i gulls 

.\n-oba, in Malaga, of Wine about 4 a galls 

Arsheen, in Koasia 28 inches 

Bahar, In Barnvia s to 43., pet;al8 

Bale 01 Cinnamon, in Ceylon, net 

Bai ile, in Muplos.. equals aljout 11 galls 

Barlle, In Leghorn, of Wlue....^ ..Ji.04 galls 

Centar, in L«vant, contains 44 okes.^. m.8 lbs 
Centar, in Leebom, of OlI...._^ 88 lbs 

Omtajr, Ip MaltA ,„ \ 174% B* 

Centar; In NimUn _^ ....lue to IVaL r« 

Oentar, lu ittiffiy . iK to 192^2 

Oatro, |n Naples, or Ofalo......... jk^ bnshels 

.2W galls 



Morning Mall Boat.. 

BvealBg Kxpre s 

Ou SiUiaay.. 



2:00ax MWax 

^&Max ftppx 
MOPX 

'htotrn and PadueaJt R. Jt, 
lUr. for Horse 
aution, 5(i raile8...11:30 a x 2:3Q p x 
mUd MiaaUHppi Jaflwisy OMner 
lEamrth mmd Mmtm. 
Cincinnati A su Louis Ac- 
ooiuniodatiou, daily ex- 
cept Kanday l(hl5PK US AX 

CinciunaU A St. Louis £x- 

pres.s, daily _ 1-10 P X 8:30 P X 

Xonh Vernon Aooom'd'n. ... 7:U0 AX ieSO HK 



EUxnbethtown aud PndutmM 
Oreeuville Mail at £Uza- 

beibtown JO:aO A x 8:25 A x 

Litchfield Accommodation 

at Eiixabetbtown 7:00 px 805 PX 

Tkmltts daUy, Sondaya OBO^HwL 



Oarro, in Kaplea,  ^JWlBa., 





H,....S.581 bu8heL9 

I .Vt bushels 

..over bushel 
2.84bnshe!s 



Oatty, in ChlBa, of 
Cayang, in Batavti 
C'lu twert. in Russia.., 
  auega, in Spain 

HecoIlLre, in Firance. _ 
KilloKramme, in France a NetlierIands..2J21 lbs 

Last, in Amsterdam, of Grain. .86^ bushels 

Last, in Bremen, of Grain..,..^........ Jt bushels 

Last, iu Cadiz, of Salt. ..........IU bnlbels 

Last, in DautEic, of Gsain ......neailyjil bushels 

Last, iu Flushing, of Grain......... J2R  bushels 

L«st, in Hamburg, of Ckain.... JOJi bushels 

Last, in Lubec of OraiB«........jOTer 91 bushels 

Last, in Portugal, of Salt...................70 bushels 

Last, iu Rotterdam, of Grain. _.Ji&.l2i6 bushels 

Last, iu Sweden 75 bushels 

Last, iu Utrecht, of Ur^tw ^^^ff* bushels 

Lls))uuud, iu vtHTiiiinTy ■ , , , IS lbs h or. 

Li8}K)und, in Hnllmirf ;isnMi4»i 

Mark, iu Holland-.,.,.,,,, Any. 

Maud, iu Calcutfi .....75 to 84 lbs 

Miuo. iu Genoa, of Ctaraia................8.48 bushels 

Mount, in Frano^ _ I ton 

Mny, iu Lisbon 24 bushelH 

Moy, iu Oporto _ 30 bushels 

Moyo, in Portugal.....contains over SB but^hels 

Mke, iu Smyrna.............. w '£i it* 

Orna, in Trieste, ol Wine. ..»...14.»l galls 

Orna, of Oil C... ...........17 gall.'; 

Oalmo, in Naples Jtlltttoorar 10 ineliu.s 

Pfccul, in Batavia tnd Madras 1« V, if.s 

Pecul. iu China and Japan 1*^"^ ttw 

Pipe, in Spain, of Wine ...160 to 164 galls 

Pood, iu Russia is eaual to nearly SUM Stlls 

Quarter, iu England, of Oialn.. 8 bushels 

Qulnti»l, in Pm-Mig^ a9.0.5ms 

Quintal, in ^^tn^rran 12fl.-lK lbs 

Quintal, iu Tnrlroy , , "„-„,, \K1 lt S 3 OS 

Quintal, in Spain , ,,, , 90 ft* 

Rottoli, iu Genoa „■ ,■,. Ji4 lt« 

Rotioli, in Portugal ...... — -l^J^k  b6 

Rottoli, In Legborn _ 3lt« 



Sahna.l u Sicily, of Grain...... 

Salma,l n Malta, of Grain, 



..9.77 bnshelH 
.8,22 bushels 



Scheffel, In Germany.vailaB 1)4 to nearly 3 bus 
Sbipponnd, in Hamburg and Daunark..33i tbs 

Shippound. in Holland. 868 ^tt« 

Staro, in Ti t^tv ................J^^'botnels 

Tale, in China l^oi 

Vara, in Rio Janeiro — naariy yards 

Vtea. ixBfala .MOa«a aqval to lilpards 

Wanttlmfiiila. JHKCMt 



Wdglits and Momum. 

as KECOGKIZKD by THK laws up THS UHl T Ji ) 
STATBS. 



Buthel. Foundt, 

Wheat „ 60 

Shelled torn 5« 

Corn lu the ear _70 

Rye _ .56 

Oats 32 

Barley 47 

Irish Potatoes. 60 

Sweet Potatoes .55 

White Beans... 
Ca.stor Beans... 

CkiVer .Seed 

Ti!iK t 'iy  Seed.. 

Hemi) Seed 

MiUeitSeed 



...46 

....4.5 
...56 
...44 
...56 
...90 



ButheL Bounds. 

Blue Grass Seed .44 

Buckwheat.............5a 

Dried PeafllMia,.,........88 

Dried Applai.....«,...J6 

Onion8......«........«...J7 

Salt JBO 

Stone Coal— ...JO 

Malt M 

Bran J30 

Plastering Uair. 8 

Turnips 55 

Unslacked Lime 30 

Cornmeal .....48 

Fine Salt .66 

Hnngarlangrais'd.JO 
Otoond P e a a..........^^ 



A box Si by 16 inche8,22d«ep,eoiiitalBa 1 barrel, 

A box 16 by IS^ inches.Sdeep c   stains 1 bushel 
A box 8 by ^ inches, s deep, contains 1 peck- 
A box 4 by 4 inches. 4k deep, contains }^ peck. 
A box 4 by 4 inobes,4 2-10 deep, contains 1 qrt. 

The standard bnahel of the United states 
eontains 2150.4 euMo Inohea. The "Imperial 
bnshei" is about 68 cubic inches. Any box or 
measure, the contents of which are equal to 
215W.4 cubic inches, will hold a bushel of grain. 
In mcaf'uring trait, vegatableb, coal and other 
Nubstance8,one-lUlh must be added, in ou ier 
wovds, a peck measure Ave tiinea even lul. 
alies one bostaeL The nsnal piaetloe la to 
jeap the meaanre.* 



^ Vewapftpor £awa. 

We would call the Bpeeial attention 
of poetmaeten and eubscribera to the 
following lynopaia oi the newspaper 
laws: 

1. A postmaster is required to give 
notice fiy letter ( returning a paper does 
not anpwer the law) when a subscriber 
does not take his paper out o? the of- 
fice, aud state the rea-sons for it.s not 
being taken; and a neglect to do so 
makes the postmaster responsible to 
tbe puUisber for tbs^paynenL 

2. Any person wbo takea a paper 
from the postofflce, whether directed 
to iir^me or anntlier, or whether he 
ba-s subscribed or not, i.s responsible for 
the pay. 

3. If a person orders his paper dis- 
continued, be mart pigr all arrearages, 
•r Ika paMieber may eontlnue to send 
i* wtn the pagrment le niade. 

4. If the subeoriber oidecahls paper 
to be stopped at a eeitatn time, and 
the publisher continues to send, the 
subscriber is bound to pay for it if he 
takes it from the postofRce. The law 
proceeds upon the ground that a man 
must pay for what he uses. 

iw T)ta eoorte have decided that re- 
tutafi ta taltenew epap er e and pniodi  
eMa fkom the poat o fllee, or lea&oTing 

— d toaTinftht^ tmtmXUA fcr, ia pHm^ 



V. B. Stamp Duties. 

For Agreement or Contract, or renewal 

same, on each sheet I 5 

Blink Check, for whatever amount......... 0 2 

Bill of Lading to foreign ports, except to 

British North America 0 10 

Bill of Lading to Domestic ports..„ exempt 

Bond of Indemnity, each Sl.00 or part u M 

Bond for executing duties of an olBce.50c 1 OU 

Certificate of stock 0 25 

Certiacaie of deposit, not exaeedlng flOO. 0 02 

exceeding tlW. 0 05., 

Certificate (Marriage) 0 05' 

Deeds or Mortrages, or other convey- 
ances of Seal Estate not exceeding $.iOO. ext 
Do. exceedingf500 and notazoeedingflOOO ext 
Do. exceeding tl,000 for eyery 1800 or frac- 
tional part thereof. „. _ ext 

Draft or order at sight „. 0 05 

Draft, not at eight, for each SlUU or part... 6 05 
Lease or or assignment of same over 9300 0 50 
Lease above S30 *. f' r each additional Sou 0 

or part ..............^...^.^..^ 0 50 

Mortigage or assfgument of same, over 

flOuaud not ov TKyift , 0 50 

Mortme for each additional'ISn or part 0 60 

Notes, for each $100 or part » S 06 

Beoeipt for 820 and over. ext 

Power of Attorney to sell stock or collect 

dividend or interest thereon.. 0 26 

Power to meli or rent real estate......^.^,... 1 00 

Power to collect renla. S SS 

Protest of Note or Draft • 95 



Menoraada CaneandBf Vafla.* 

This table will show at a glance the 
length of the various sizes and the num- 
ber of nails iu a pound. They are rated 
from "3-penny" up to "20 penny." The 
first column gives the name, the second 
the length in inches, and the third tbe 
number per pound. From this table an 
estimate of quantity and suitable sizeh 
for any job can be easily made: 

3-pen;!T, 1 inch long, 557 per ponud. 
4 VA " 353 



G£0. -M. GLOVEK. 



THO-. K. WILSON. 



GLOVER & WILSON, 

^IHiolesaie and Retail Dealers In 

CO Ale. 

Screened Pittsbunc Coal, $5 per load. 
Indiana (Daviess eoButy; Coal, S4 50 f) load. 
Slack CoaMB per load. ^ 

Office, 167| JefRneon,bet. 4th aud &th. 

► my4 3m 



JAMES E. SAGE, 

m imi BROK[i) 

AXS 

GENBRAlls AGBNT, 
H: in Wast Jeffersaa ftrett. 

BetwoM FlMUlh a&d FUnu aortlk aide, oppo- 
stta XMoaiSTMBple, 

1X UIBVILLE, KT. 

Jel-6t 



inn -A^CRES of farming and niln- 

lllllaUUU ^ral lauds fur .sale in Ea8l Ten- 
ntsscf aud adjoining country, in tracts of one 
to a thoui-and acres, at SI to per acre. Vc* 
full intorinatlou send 51.) cents for the "Oooee 
Register" one year. To each new snbsarlber 
*  • i;ood .self-sealing envelopes will be wsaiiei 
gratis. Addiees 

OmEKT * DELANEY, 



Jel-4t 



Keal Estate A^^e 



Cleveland, Tma 



5 " 


IK 


(1 


232 


(1 


6 " 


2 


it 


167 


(( 


7 " 


2H 


(f 


141 


(( 


8 " 


2X 


u 


101 


(( 


10 ** 


2X 

3 


M 


96 


ti 


12 «• 


(( 


64 


«. 


ao 


8 i 


M 


84 


(« 


Spikes, 


4 


« 


Ifi 


It 


4Vi 


 ( 


12 


ti 




6 


l  


10 


M 


(i 


6 


l( 


7 


ft 


« 


7 


i( 




tt 



SttggaitiaM f&t . HaidMif Tobaeeo. 

FiiBt Aaesfftwaiir 

Beecmd— Friae kmg and riiorte^ia- 

rate. 

Third — Tie in neat hand8. 
Fourth— Prize neat and straight. 
Frfth— Prize leaf tebaeeo l,bOO to 

1,500 net. 

Sixth -liogs from l,60e to 1,700 net. 
Beventh-^^ash from 1,600 to 1,800 
net. 

Eighth— Bright and leafy tobacco 

should be prized light. 
Ninth — Prize in keeping order. 
Tenth— Cooperage: See that the head 
"f each hogsnead is well secured by 
and substantial lining hoop, and 



god and s 



DR. HURLEY'S 

SYRUP OF SARSAPABHiLA. 

WITH IODIDE OF POTASH. 

THIS Prepnration lias Ions; been recognized 
l)v the most eminent minds in the medical 
proIVssion ius the most reliable, searching .'tud 
harmless alterative wiiliiii their reach, and 
as a Blood Pnrifler it ci-i tajnly stands with- 
out a riv al. One dollar per bottle. 



Dr. Hmley's AGUE TONIC. 

Pwralx TaMtaaSo* ■•A*a»SaiX» 
awnr Ukita eetf eattiaea. 



Her* 



NO CURE NO PAY. if direcUons be follow- 
ed. No danger in taking an overdose, as 

we put nn)i..isfin In ( nr tnt diclnes. One dol- 
lar pel 



Dr. Hurley's Stomach Bitters, 

Is the remedy, par excellence for all diseases 
arising from diebi lit V, disordered stomach, 
loss of appetite, torpid liver, indigestion and 
all kindred ailments, wliere a genue and per- 
manent stimulant and tonic is required. 
Pleasant to take. One d dlar per bottle. 



I r. Seatoroolc's 

INFANT SOOTHING SYEUP 

THE indispensable remedy in the nursery. 
No more use for laudanum, paregoric, 
Bataman's Dropii or other strong opiates No 
bad effects from tlieuseofSeabrook's. Healtn 
to the children, rest to the mother and a clear 
cousclenee to tlie vendor. 25 cents per bottle. 

DK. lit RLEY'S 

Popular Worm Candy 

JS really all it claims to be— A SPECIFIC— 
1 rtunnvint; all worms from the human vis- 
cera. No harmful etfect from itsnae. CSill- 
d: -.-ii love it. No danger In gi'^ng an over- 

dose. 2b cents per box. 



DR. 8EABROOK'S 

ELIXIR OF BARE AND IRON. 

THE Great Toale and Appetiser. One dol- 
lar per bottle. For sale by all druggists. 

J. "W. SEA.T03Sr  Sb CO., 

Proprietors, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

JanSO-ly 



JCHN A. DlSmSON.. 

Manufacturer of 

FUHinTTTIlE, 

Mattresses, Bedding, &c. 

VERY LOW FOR CASH. 

Salesrooms 188 Jtatn. straeC, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

frtiS-tf 



EBTABLDSHED USB. 

OOBNWAXIs ft BRC 

Mannfactnrers of 

STAR CANDLES, OAP 

Dealers in 

Soda Ash, Rosin aud Starcli. 

Office and Balenroom, £5 West Main St., 

LOUISVILLB. KT. 

Cash paU^ear Laid, Tallow and eteaae. 
 j JaaS-ly 



GREEN & 6BEEN, 
HATTEB8&f 0110118, 

61119 FDSNliHINe 600D8, 



AXD 



Vanu&cturers of Shirts. 

(Hd Slaad, MO MainatieeMMd Ul 

Fonrth, 



THB LOUISVILLB 

INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL fiAZETTE, 

(90 rXB qmr. COMMStaSIOK to all AGElfTSi 

A Forty-Eight Colttttn Weekly* 

.'..•I,. . ' v. ■.. 

r EVOTEI  TO 

  ■ v , 

'^'*d9, Ciommeifce, AgncniltnTe/ H«ntifiutTires,* Id 

tare,&c, &c , 

^ ^ V A PAPER FOR 

•' I-- ^ I- ■ 

xiie Mercliaiit, 

Tlie Farmer, 

The Artasan, 

THE FAMUT CIECLE. 



LoiisTilla Beet aid Shoe Marke^ 



EACH issne will contain a faithful report of our local markets, with an ae- 
ceptable and interesting epitome of Commercial News. All matters of gen- 
eral interest pertaining to Finance, Commerce, Markets, Manufactures, Agri- 
culture, Horticulture, Polite Literature, Ac., will receive sneh attention as will 
oommend the paper to a generona and liberal petmnaga. Aaa 



MEDIUM OF ADVERTISING 



NONE BETTER IS OFFERED, AS ITS CIRCULATION IS EXTENSIVE 
THROUGHOUT THE SOUTH AND SOUTHWEST. 
"The Industrial and Commercial Gazettk. — This week's issue of the 
Indostrial and Commercial Qazette contains a oaid ftom Mr. J. EU Turner, 
announcing that he has surrendered the entire managemaat and editorial 
control of that paper to Mr. John W. Glaive, who will at once assume its di- 
rection. Mr. Clarke has experience and capacity, and will no doubt add large- 
ly to the Interest and value of the paper.''-HCoaiier Journal, Oct. 7, 1871. 

In order to extend its influence aad nseftilnees, the Mlowliig (Siab ntM«l 
stibscription have been adopted: 

One Copy one year, - - - - $3 00 

Three copies one year, - - - - 8 00 

Five " " - . - 12 00 

Fleven " " - -- -- - 25 00 

Twenty-five " - - - - 60 00 . 

All persons who will intereet themselves in extending and fainraeeing our 
circulation will be allowed Twenty per cent, comsslsriosiiesi avaiySS Maob* 
scrlption sent us, if preferred, in lieu of the above ^b ralea. Ageaia thoe 
acting can deduct the amount from each remittance. 

The money must accompany the list in every case, aud mmt be sent by 
postofBce. rMdstered letter, draft on Louisville, or by expres.«, charges pre- 
paid. A^dr^ , JOHN W. CLARKE, 

95 Green Street, Louisville, Ky. 



BRinriiiT PLOWS 

BK8T AND ('HKArK8T l!« C8K. 

Have taken orer SSO PreBUams at 
i rs throughout the South. Send for 
illustnted Ostaloguewith 
Price ListpSnd ceni Acates 
of planters who use thesa. 
sou KuivxAStvaaaK 
%mm 4 MAIBT, 





do boys' pegged haJfsoie.. 

do do P. 

do yonths' peaged balfaoi*.. 

do «o P. a 

Xi^BMa B P.S. 



do boya' P. S... 
do welt.. 



do youths' P. 8^ 
do welt.. 

Qrain, men's P. 8 

do half sole.. 

do boys' P. 8 

do half sola, 

doyoatha' » ,, - 
do half ssla 




lean's oalf, sewed, oak sole 

da pegf^eil Ueiu lock sole. 

do bntr Jo do do .... 
io split do do do .... 

do kip 

do ,S db. sole calf a«wed Conrrea 
do do glove do oo... 



" SMaSai 
** iTSaiw 
** laoaSM 
" 1 aoaase 
■* s Na«» 
taass 



Waxhalf D8, meB-s |l 86aS W 

Wax aadUned and bound kip, men B, II pair 1 aoal a* 
do do do boys' " 1 ooai ¥t 

do 



do do 

4o do 

Spilt, men''! 

do boys' 

do yoaths'... 
CaiL man 



bOTS' 

yoatna' 



womrsraoaMDi 

Woman's cair goat aad kM ki 

do buff, 
do 



70* as 

1 (Mat 4S 

ma se 
•sa as 



apUt.„ 



' iSS8 



I««Ues ealf, goat aad kM VsalraneSM 

do Klovecalfaadglovekid.. " s Mas as 

so lasUns „ " soi)aS7e 

Misses' calf, goat and kid '• i 73*2 S 

do glovecalf and glove kid.. " iTSaSW 

do lasting " 1 2BaS S 

Chlldrea-SMlf,gaataBdkid. ^_ « maim 

1U.DICS' sawKD ooawnsB aooxa. 

Ladlea' kid and goat ^ piUr |B OSaS N 

do clove kid " SMaaso 

a» Mating, dtv made silk gore " 1 75a2 75 
ae do Eastern maae..._ " 1 tua:^ as 
'kldandgoat .. •* 1 Hal M 

do flnro kiri iMsBS 

do ItsBagBsa ** IMMIM 

do do Eaaterateaesu— ' " laaiis 

Children's kid and goat , « 75^ .77 

do glove kid •• 1 ooai .50 

do ra! tiug,cit\- made silk fOSa ** 1 UOal ^3 

do do £aatern maa^.. * lialM 

IJU n8' SBWSD Foun BOom 

Ladle8* idoublesele, kid and goat. .VVSlrSIMBS 

do do do glove ktd tSM 

do la.'stiag.cltr made sUk gore ** tIkSIB 
do do Eastern made..._ ** SMMIIS 

Mlsaes'X doublesole, kid and gwat... *■ 1 UsSS 

do do glove kid SiSaBW 

do laaUng.citvmapesilkgora ** inaSU 

do do Eastern ma to ** ISSalM 

CHTLDRKS'S BAaTKBlf VANCT SHOXS. 

Kid aadgoat. heeled boots aad bala. " TSal «• 

do prUig heal, faao boots " Malts 

do da do aula tlas " Mt tt 

Pataatlsathsgsail IrtdiiaBetissII. " Ski • 



Wood and Willow Ware. 



PIATT&ALLEN. 

Wholesale Dealers In 

BOOSTS  Sc 




X9S ~\^est nvC Aixx St., 

Between Fifth and Sixth Streets. 



These quotations may be 
correct. The inside flgurea quota tAsStSSla 

and the outside retail prices: 

Painted, 2 hoop, ^ doz f S MM tit 

Oakgralned.a boop.i! doz 2 35^2 40 

Army 3 " '* 5 .50u* 8 

Bed cedar, iron bound " 5 4 h 50 

" brass " " 2hpNol 9 00((jj19 90 
" " " " 2hp " 2 8 OC^ 9 00 

" " " " "" 3 7 00*^ 8 00 

" " •• " 8 hp " 1 10 000*11 00 

" » »» - 2 9 00(il0 00 
Whitaeedar** " - - i 9 5t(alooo 

•»«-•• 2 850S 900 
M M MoShp**! 9003 950 

M 4. •« M u M 2 goo^ ggfl 

. " " 3 7 OOf^ 7 30 

Butter boeketa, par rack 3 t voi 4 00 

Well bodteit " -ibma 

White eadar water cans, 2 h p, BB.. 12 c ll3 50 

. " 3 " 13 «al5 

Bed " Nol 3 " U @15 

•* " Noa 3 " 13 @14 

■* •*]8o« S •* 12 @U 



ralBtad.No 



Oak grained, Mol 




Nest (8 each).. 

Keeleis, painted, Nol. 

" " No a...... 

" "No S 

KstiawtaiteplM Udba — 



H. If. WALTON. 



C. J. WALTON. 



J. B.WAUQK. 



WALTON ^ BROS., 

Importers aad Dealers b 

CHINA, GLASS AND aUEENSWA&E, 

SILVER -P-L.ATED WARE, 

TABLE CUTLERY, LAMPS, CHANDELIERS, 

SteambotUf Hotel and House JFumiahing Gooda, 
AJT THEIR, NEW SXOItE, 
••««hal«e MAUI mWBT, MwM 

oetSB-tf LouisviLLi:, ikV 



WALTON * CO., 

OUa;iidel ers and. Silver- W are, 
279«oath side Mam itroet» bet Seventh and Eighth, 

I^oiiisvillo, liy. 

♦lu fecial attention paid to all orders from the com. : y. f)ot.-s-tf 



LIFE ii^SURANCE CO. 

OIBT^ NEW YO»K. 

G. HILTOV SCBIBVEB, Rre sidaBt ^'^ SIBnT W. CSOFUT, 8eeret*ify  

Ordinary Whole- Life Policies ABSOLUTKLT NON-FOBFBITABLE from pavment of first 
annual premium. All other Policies NON-PORFBITABL E afte r two auuual payments. 
AUFoUi&esINGONTBeTIBLE for usual caoaes, and ABSOLUTELY INCONTEE^nBLB af- 
ter two " Tqi i' nrea^qins, except for tnoA. All xtairiotlons upon THAYBLana BE81- 
DBRGB TCMV^^MNO PBRHIIB ivqnlnd. IH^Smds on thePBO^tnara plan. 
BmSuIi lOT OA^KAIVS wlta UndiedWnnMta fftaaMwaendasaa taaSBbairS 
B&ntysarlydeenaMnta. 

' • 0 ■ - 

DEFABTHElirT OF KUTUCET ASD TJUIUSSSSU. 

OFFICE: S. W. Cor. THIRD it JWFERSON St8., LOUISVILLE, KT. 
C. M. DINSMOOR, Maw^er. S. H. POPE, Department Secretary. 

J^GhSSTXS "WA.N'TEID,— Lilwal twma will be made with men Of 



Eagle 

Standard 

SKIVES. 

No 14 and 16 aaaortad.. 

No 16.. 
No 18.. 

No 20 - 

CHTTISS. 
B B. 



 90A 

2 ^ 

1 83 3 3 00 
190@ 205 

2 @ 2 2} 
2 2U(;$ 2 4a 



B 



Red cedar, 4 gal 

" 6 

"41 
.J 0 

White cedar, 16 in, I. B.... 

18 

Id 

" 1« 

:8 
20 
22 

Whlteplne, Nol. 

NoS. 




® 13 

IB (9 17 

12 @ 13 

..... 14 15 

12 30(iJ 13 

..... 1350 § 14 
_ 14 S0(3 la 
15 

18S0# 17 

18 0» 3l8i 
1900(3, m 
10 C*1J ' 



«llaa» 



9 «t 



Btst Shaker 

Imitation do 2 ciO i 311 

Extra Hurl j ^"Sl 3 75 

Hteamboat extra „ 5 aOy  6 00 

Hearth 1 2 

Rattan street — ^aOg »M 



HAsvasmos. 



1 gallon. 
3 " 



4 5 90 

« 50 d7 25 

MEASCKES. 

Iron-bound half bushels 5 50® 600 

Plain " 4 60(9 S 00 

BUts " 5 003 560 

Plain peek measures 3 75 § 3 50 

" »2 „ 2 25® 2 50 

" V' » 1 7:^ 200 

" % " i2faioe 

WOODEN HOWLS. 

Cottonwood, No 1, 10 inches.. 

•* 2, 12 '* .. 
" " 3, 15 " 

" 4, 17 " . 
u " S,1S 

- S^« " 



&150 
@2 23 

is 



6VA& 



Maple, small. 

medium. 



laiaaa. 



StTVBBIXS. 

OetMsflaSi per box 

Boiling pins, perddx 

Potato maahers, per doc 

Towel rollers, per dos 

jlop sf iclts, per dos 

Step ladders, eaeh „ ». 

Spoons, per do^ 

Ladles, par de^... 

Broom handles, per M 

Pipes, per box 

Cedar GMMetSipwgnMi. 




eora Used, pw groea 
aaaxRs. 

Market, per nest 1 SM 

Clothea, par dos. „.. 11 0001881 

" handle, per dos. 10f^~*^ 

" hampers, per nest.. tOC 

'Mar ket. coYered, per nsst 8 { 

Scrap.., 
Rattan 





1 



Iixdiastrial a^nd, Cc^iiiiixercij^^ Gra^^tte 



ID OlOffUU aiCIIllMU]i«AIIRI 



W. OImAMMM, Bditor. 
O. OmARKE, Assistant. 



lifinWUIfilblllimR 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTIOh 

One copy oHe year 3 00 

Three cojiiesont- year S i*J 

rive copiesi one year 12 00 

Sea oopies one year (and one to getler- 
m^mttimb) 25 !» 

TEBMB OP ADVEBTIBIKO. 
Tm lines of Nonpareil (thii ulxe) type oonsU- 
tate a sqaare. 

One sqaare (10 lines) 1 month..„....^ t 5 00 

Two sqaares (9 lines) 1 month,. 9 0(i 

Ttiree sqnares (SO lines) 1 month 1  

One-foarth column 1 month. - -'0 (O 

One-half oolamn I month ...i 35 00 

One oolamn 1 month 00 

•lUM'oarda per year. ~. ~~ 15 00 



mrdm for eaefa indi of eotomn 

SO 00 
doable 




aovHiaK 

wlU toChwaad hy igtBl il agree- 



ivtthe«ti,or 

'^Stttorial buKlneAs notices, 20 oenti pm Una; 
MAsnbsequent iaserlion, 15 centaptr llMk 

LETTER CLBCULAK. 
AMtarelnidarpclM cotrMit tapubllafaed 
mmtr Thna«V.aSd Is daUverad to sabseri- 
binu mmr n— ntltr needed at S eenu per 

^TSk WMUBaaleatlons should be addressed 
t» JOHN W. CLARKE. 

Louisville, Ky. 



XSW SUBSCRXBEBS-PREMIUMS. 



iEI 



PWMo as who desire tt will be fsmiahed oar pa- 
te Ikaas-Atlaatk; ICscasUie, IM American 
Joamal, or lbsiyialileT?te—r. at tha IbUow- 



i;sx¥sssnsss: 



one 

^....♦4 00 
4 00 

.one 



year « K 

as 1 he postage nn this pap«r is H  oeSiiMrMar, 
payable quaruinv or yearly, in advSMS^ Iw^ laS 
subscriber, at the office where it is reoeivai. _ 

▲csats aUsw»««i per cent, anaimlsilne en aU 
— liinifHiM iwiasaspsr a d i w Msiaiia t en pace 



tn n  for subscription, etc., mast 

Mob orler, rejrlstered letter, draft 

•i-lyexpr«:.^re^djU^ 



JOH 
In«. 



and Osat. OMSlifc 
net, LeaMUabKx. 



KOtasBStraat,] 

ADVERTISING AGENTS, 

Otir anthorired ageDts In other cities to 
for adrertisemeats, etc, areas follows: 

Oeofae P. Bowell A Co.. 41 Park Bow, New York. 

VMA * Thatn, Mi Broaewar. New Tork. 

OeeneIMp4fcOo.,lMChsstnnt Street, Pblladel. 

OrHBn AWogkiaw. 4 Sooth Street, BalUmora. 

T. c. Kvlaaa, us Wastataflton Slaaet. Bostoe 

Vanooait * WHU, UU Main ' ~' ~ 

Va. 

MeCMIant* PHMkmft. 



MT* -FWr I^Miwille Wholesale 
rtion CmrrttU See RIphih Fmge. 



JUNK, 1872. 
ifooir^ PKAsns. i 



TRK SUN. 





li. 


H. 


Mm 




IJ 1 


H 


1 M 


H 1 


M 


New Moon 




10 


a p 


M 




4 


134 






First Qiuurter_ 
mu MoMt 


^5 

n 


i! 


i8 A 

•7a 


M 
M 




4 

4 


|32 
131 




»• 


iMt Quarter... 


27 




S7P 






4 


|U 




82 












aol 


4 


185 


7 


82 



«• Ov Bssisn iaths ttiitiL 

W« dudl alwiqrs teks plesmre in 
wsowliBg eaj ■neo«M in flurming, 
steek-olriiv, laaanftMtnteg, mining, 
or oUmt punaite, that wfli ins|^r* die 

people of oar aeetton, ot indooe the 

industrious emigrants from other lauds 
to settle in your midst, Bend us full 
iuformatioD, auJ write oiiIy* Ni  Kie 
aide of the paper. 

Time's Changes. 

The old dmrdi of Bar. Staart Bohln- 

8on, Presbyterian, on Third street, be- 
tween Green and Walnut, is beiug 
converted into a market house. The 
front wall is to be razed to the ground, 
and bioaiht forward to ttie sidewalk, 
with atores at ea di fhmt oomer, and 
the entrance to tho macket house in 
ttieoeater. The npper part of the 
boOiiBC ie to be a paUlo haU. 

Iks ladirtrial SzpofitisB. 

The immense building to be devoted 
totbs CTpoeition and display  tf the 
acli^ and mannflwtiu ei a of Lonisyllle 
has not only been put under contract, 
bat the work of construction, during 
the present week, has made rapid i^rog- 
ress. The foundation walls of stone and 
brick, on all sides, but the front, have 
been laid, and the first story, with its 
aumy arched entrances, and immense 
wiadows, is ap, and next week will be 
ready fiw the irea columns, pillars, and 
rafters for the second story. In point 
of size it is the largest struc-ture in the 
city, if not the West, and will be the 
most eubstaatial in build and material. 

The structure will be of brick, two 
alories high, and will occupy an area 
ortMfnfebj250feet. The building 
will be anniopriately adorned with 
towers, domes &c., and when com* 
pleted will be a veiy laipoainf and 
handsome edifice. 

The space allotted for exhibition will 
be something over 20,000 square feet 
mora than thstsT ths ClulnnaH «z- 



Plug and Cat Tobacco. Cigars. Fer 
mentedLiqnors and Distilled 
Spiritt.^ 

The following comparative statement 
of the quantities of the above named 
manufactured articles, produced and 
sold in this city for the first three 
months of 1S72, as compared with the 
same period of 1871, Ib furnished by 
Edgar Needham, Esq., the Assessor of 
this District aod is takan flrom the re- 
cords of hli oAee. Oontnuy to the 
general opinion it will be seen that 
there Is an increase in the production 
and sale of all the articles named ex- 
cept cigars, in which there is a small 
falling off. There was also a large in- 
crease in the production and sale of 
these articles in this city for %tm -year 

1871 over tha year 1870. 

DISTILLED 8PIBIT8. 

Amount produced for quarter ending 
Slst of March, 1872, 341,874 gallons; 
for same period in 1871, 131,228 gallons. 
Increased production in 18/2, 210,636 
gaUona. • 

FBtmnrrBD lsquobs. 

Amoant sold la qoarter ending llarch 
31, 1872, 12,886 barrels; Ibr the same 
period in 1871, 8,577 barrels. Increased 
quantity sold in 1872, 3,789 barrels. 

PLUG AND FINK-CUT TOBACCO. 

The amoant sold and bonded in the 
quarter ending Mareh 31. 1872 was 927.- 
072 pounds; the amoant tot the same 
period in 1871 was 724,275 pounds; the 
Increased quantity sold and bonded in 

1872 was was 802,795 pounds. 

CIGARS. 

The number of cigars sold in the 
quarter ending Mandi 81, 1871, was 2,- 
753,475. and in tiie same pwiod 
for 1872, the namber sold was 2,- 

546,300, being a decrease In the num- 
ber sold of 207,175 cigars for 1S72. 

The increase in ale and beer shows 
that oUr liOOisTille breweries are com- 
ing more and more into favor with 
consumers, as they deserve to do. 
There is no reason why Loaisvill^ 
lager should not have as high a repu- 
tation as the Cincinnati beer. Louis- 
ville ale now ranks witti any. The 
falling off in cigars manufactured was 
due to local and temporary causes, and 
future returns will show the usual 
healthy increase. The steady and 
gratifying ineiaaee in plug and fine-cut 
tobacco is a guarantee that the ad- 
vantages of Louisville as a center for 
that trade aie becomiog daily more 
widely recognized. 



Htsvy Bails. 

On Monday last the heaviest rain of 
the season fell in Louisville and vidn- 
ity, accompanied by an unuaial 
amount of lightning and thunder. 
The water descended in torrents, flood- 
ing many streets and cellars and ren- 
dering locomotion on ibot rather disa- 
greeable. Toward the breaking up of 
die storm, the sky assumed a gbaatly 
greenish hue, which had the effec) to 
greatly demoralize some of our eolo-ed 
citizens, wlio gave it as their opinion 
that "pumtin gwine to hap'n, sho'. ' 

On Saturday, lat inst. Central Illi- 
nois was visited by an unprecedented 
rainfall, covering an area from tfce 
Wabash to the Kaskaskia rivers, and 
from the Toledo and Wabarti to |he 
Ohio and Mississippi railroad. TkM- 
sands W acres woe submerged, rpi- 
road tracks inundated, and crops, 
fences, trees, &c., swept aWay.. Rs- 
ports from Winchester, on the St. 
Louis, Rockford and Rock Island rail- 
road, say some 500 yards of track near 
that place were washed away. It is 
thought that immense damage has 
been done to the crops In many locali- 
ties, but no detailed aoooonts are at 
haikL Bpringfield, Illinois, was also 
flooded, die water, in ^me instances, 
reaching the flrst floors of houses and 
compelling the inmates to take refuge 
in the npper stcHriee. 



TobMM. 

The total quantity of tobacco grown 
in the country during the year ending 

June 30th, 1871, was 262,735,341 pounds, 
which yielded, when manufactured, a 
tax of i33,o78,907. The j^rodaotlon by 
States was as follows: 

Pounds. 

152,742 

^ 100 

594.88S 



Alabama.... 

Arizona ..... 

Arkansas .. 
California.. 
Colorado- 
Con neetient...... 

Delaware..^... 
Florida..... 

Gflorsla.... 

lllinolB. 



Indiana... 

J owa,_ 

Kansas.. 
Kentucky. 
Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland. 

Masseehnsetta . 
Mlehtgan 
Mlnneaota. 
Mlaslssipid. 
Issoun 




MW 

167,406 
288,506 
5.248,275 
»,335.8I» 
71,793 
33.341 
105,305,888 
15,531 
15 

15,785,339 
7,312,i«5 
5,885 
8.2«7 
•1,012 
1S,S»,48S 
60O 
5,988 



Beatk tf duolss Ltvsr. 

Adispateh from Trieste announces 
the death, in that city, of Charles Le- 
ver, the Irish novelist, aged 03. 

Charles James Lever was born in 
Dublin, August 31, IS' B, and educated' bined 




eOVKBNlONr BONDS 

Have been flnnsr, and the saivly is eon- 
stantly dtaUnlablng In ptoportlon to the 
widely exiMded demaad. In the eveBtoC 

the treaty negotiations falling, some depMaa* 
ion may be anticipated in Qovemasent as 
well as railroad nnd other bonds. 
We revise qnotstloast 

Coapons, I8tt. 
S-anof IMSt 




LEAF TOBACCO. 



raw TMtK jcAxnr rvm soi 

SECURITIES. 

Mlsaoarl 6s 

Tennessees, old 

Tennes8ees, new 

Virginias, old„ 

Virginias, new 

North Gacoilnaa, old... 

NerthOumllaas. new_..  



scan 



91 

48 
— 54 



Mlssoui 

Montana. 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 
New Jersey... 
New Mexico.. 
New York_. 
North 
Ohio 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 
Rlio te Inland.... 
Soutb Carolina . 

Tennessee « 

Texas 

Vermont 

Vlrtjiniii 

Wa.-slii iiiitou..., 
V\'est \'irginia 
Wisconsin 

From the above it will be seen that 
Kentucky ranks first, and produced 
more than twice as much tobacco as 
Virginia, which occupies the second 
idaee, and more than four times as 
much as Teanems, tha dibd la lank, 
or 44,707,591 lbs more than Virginia, 
West Virginia and Tennessee com- 
We take pride in calling atteu- 



Tha aoatrseton engaged to construct 
the baHding liare obUgated themselves 
to have the work finished by the Srd 

of August under a penalty of $200 for- 
feitfor every day's delay thereafter. 

The indications now are that the 
work will be completed within the 
tisw designated. The applications for 
ipaee by exliibitoreaia daUly increasing 
wMhttopiomiee that air people wUl 
la Beptember next have an oppor- 
tunity of witnessing one of the grand- 
est and finest displays of arts manu- 
fiustores, &c., ever offered in this 
' other Western city. 



Stock Sales 

At Paris on the 4th, there was a 
larger crowd in town than for several 
weeks, and to all appearances business 
was lively. 

Mi^{ Nr HiUer repmrts sales of about 
600 head of cadle, of moderate grade. 
Prices 4 to 5 cents. Between 300 and 
400 mules offered. Two-year olds 
brought from $100 to gl30; iMroke mules 
from $130 to $150. 

A. W. Lydick reports about 400 cat- 
tte  m the market, of medium quality 
and selling at flrom 4 to 6 cents. Sold 
six single mules at from $135 to $160; 
and eight head of horses, running from 
$60 to $140. 

George W, Hamilton reports some 
400 cattle offered; brought from 4J to 5 
cents and mostly sold. About two 
thirds for cash, and the balance on 
eiedit of 00 days. Sold 28 two year 
olds at $40 weight about 900 pounds; 
33 calves at $20,00; 11 do., at $13; 7 do.  
at $12.25; one cow and calf at $69,30, 
one dry cow at $40. Mules not gen- 
erally sold. Horses were iu fair de- 
mand. Bold six head at IMm fl62.50 
to $164. 

Wbl. J. Iduighlin v^orts about 800 
cattle, and selling at iKMii 4} to 6 

cents. About 400 mules— mostly of 

inferior grade, A good many horses 
ofl'ered, but few changed hands, as the 
buyers and sellers were too far apart. 

There w as a number of private tran- 
saction in the horse trade. Many of 
Ihe traders are begina^g to buy with 
the view, vt graiing ror the fidl Spath- 
ern trade, 

^Messrs. Sconce A Howard, of Louis- 
ville, took 73 head of mules to Paris 
with the view of selling them publicly 
but didn't put thoM np. 



in Trinity College, Dublin, and in the 
University of Goettiugen. He was by 
profession a physician, and during the 
prevaleneeof the cholera, in 1882, was, 
medical officer for the district of Lon- 
donderry, where he performed many 
marvelous cures. He was afterward 
physician to the British embassy at 
Brussels for three years. He has re- 
sided in Italy since 1845. He was one 
of the most popular authors of the 
day, and in his death the literary 
wierld loses one- of ito bvigfateet oma- 
ments. 



Crops in Kentuclcy. 

TbiooCc— Fine rains; crops pro- 
mising; tol acco forward and plenty; 
firuit abundant. 

Palaski Co.— Wheat and oats good; 

fruit large yield. 

HoPKixs Co.— Wheat best for years; 
corn injured hy cut worm but replant- 
ed; tobacco large crop; plants are line 
and abundant, other crops promising. 

Brbcksnbidge Co.— Crops back- 
ward; tobacco planting Is late; firuit 
abundant. 

Ohio Co.— Fruit best for ton years; 
oats look well; com splendid; tobacco 
big crop expected. 

MoNKOE Co.— Wheat excellent; 
crops of all kinds promising most 
abundantly. 

Crop Prospects at the South. 

Eastern Virginia, North Carolina, 
Tennessee and Georgia, liave recently 
been visited by rains, which have been 
of great benefit to the growing crops. 
From South Carolina, Florida, Ala- 
bama and Mississippi, come aoccounts 
of drouth, and consequent tiaekward- 
ness :or failure of the cotton plant. 
The want of rain appears to be severe- 
ly felt in all these States. In Lousiana 
there is a decided improvement in the 
condition of the growing cane, yet 
well informed parties do not expect a 
crop of over 75,000 hogsheads. In 
Texas the ^ospect tat all crops vpgimn 
to be very promising. 



tion to these facts, and remark, by 
way of parenthesis, that Louisville is 
THE tobacco market of the United 
States. 



Ct instisai . 

The totcl revenue collections for the 
Fourth District of Kentucky, during 
the month of Mtay, 18IS^ wwa as fol- 
lows: 



LOCAt STOCKS AND BONSS 

Have been In fair demand, with sales of city 

and county bonds at quotations. Louisville 
and NasbvlTle railroad stocks, as well a* bank 

stocks, have been more active, with some 

sales at higb tignre i 
We quote as follows: 

STOCKS. 

Bid. Asked. 

National Bank, Flrst...-......^,.... IIS lao 

National HanS, Second 102 103 

NatiiouiU Bank, l'iaate»i*....-~.. lO^l 1*5 

National Bank. Citv 105 106 

Kentucky National Bank......... ltd 101 

Bank ol Atnerica ™ !t«5 V» 

Bank of Kentucky 107 lOS 

llaiiii of Louisville  *5 

Merchants' Bank Ha 121 

Commercial Bank - 74 75 

Northern Bank-... 124 125 

C itizens' Bank 117 11« 

People's Hank W Sr2 

 Ia.sonic Bank 1o:h 1(4 

Farmers' Bunk I'X) 

iSecuilty Bank llti 117 

GerraaU Bank 140 142 

Wesl'n Flnanc'l forporai'n Bank..l02 iwl 

Falls City Tobacco Bank HX» 101 

Farmers' and I'roverh' liank li S 110 

Manufacturers' Bank ^- 

Louisville Insuran  e Co. Banli "iii 2l'o 

German Insurance Co. Bank 140 142 

Western Insurance Co. Bank VAi 136 

Traders' Bank 

Central Savings Har.k, new W 97 

Cltv Railway slock LO 

Lou., Cin. ife Lex. R. R. com'n t-5 5o 

Lou., Cin.*. Lex. R. R.,_preferred... »0 W 

Louisville & Nashville K. R _ ~i 

Gas company stock 1'4 11.5 

M&rket-street Railroad .u..^ o5 4U 

Boinis. 

L.4 N. R. R. Co., old, 7 ?ic 97 *flO 



As will be seen by onr statement for the 
month of May, the valae of the staple is 
greater than for many years. Prices of aU 
gradee an Mix •oataln^ with salea during 
the week of Henry eooatj cutting leaf at S29 
perlOO iba, the beatpriee obtolned thIssM 
son. The adoption of » mxtUurm tax of Me 
has bad the eff^t to increase the ping mans- 
facturing, with the establishment in thiselty 
of another factory, which is the most exten- 
sive in the West. The demands for ull (grades 
exceed the supplies and prieea are (blly sus- 
tained, with lalher U^a SMMpSsaad a i 
ityof M^tleaf, wMih ie in rsqnsel. 
TOBAOOO STATEMENT. 

Stoek on hand Nov. L U71_.. 

Beeetvedln May '73 

Received |w tev l oi M iy» 

Total 

Delivered in May 

Delivered previooal}..... 




Spirit*. 

Tobaoeo.. 

Banks and bankers. 

Income 

MlaoeUaneooa.... 
Fsaaltlcs, Ae...., 



. J77444 00 

., met 

«I7 06 
.. M)» 
71 18 

209 31 



Total _ »78,589 04 

There were 18 grain distilleries in 

operation during the mouth, producing 

100,000 gallons of spirits. 

Green Wallace, a negro man, and 
Siartha Wallace, a white woman, were 
arrested in this city, on Monday last, 
ehaiged with unlawful cohabitation. 
Tbey exhibited aeortified mairiage li- 
cense, lagtily dssBVted by the County 
Clerk, which was doubtless obtoined 
by fraud,' as the laws of Kentucky are 
averse to miscegenation. The wo- 
man, it is said, is proud of her colored 
affinity, says she loves him and will 
stick to him through thick and thin. 



J., M. & I. R. B. Ist mort.. 7 fie.-. MV^ 

J., M. & I. R. R., 2A mort.. 7 «e 77^ 

E. A P. R. R. 1st mort., 81 e 90}^ 

Shelby R. R., tat mort. 8 Vc 90* 

City for improvements, 6 ^c......... 7^ 

City for bounty, 8 Ve 81 

City for schools, « fe 80 

City for wharf, old, fl'fc 81 

City for wharf, new, 6 80 

City for water-works, old. ti 'f^c 8.3 

City for water-works, new. (  I9c siv^ 

City forli. A N. R. R.. M. S.. c... si 
CTty for L.AN.R. R..L.E.. i. c... si ^ 

City for E. & P. R. R., 7 f^c . 0 

City for St. Louis Air- Line R. R ."W 

City for old liabillUes, 10 y'rs. 7 'fc. 91 
City for old liabilities, 5 y'rs 7 %'c " 

City for school purposes, 7 "f'c 

Water-works bonds, ti Vc 

Canal bonds, second Issue,  i 'r c„... 

Caiv'il bonds, third l-ssue, 6 ^c 86 

( anal bonds, fourth issue, 6 He. 84 

Market-street Railroad- _ «5 

Citv Railway bonds , 50 

Kentucky State bonds, old, 6 f e_.- W 
Kenfuckv State bonds, uew,SfkJ.- US 

0\\\o River Bridge Co., 7 10c "^W 

Grayson county, 7 't^c................ 

Muhlenbnrg county, 7 V B ..~ 7s 

Lyon county, 7 % c — 7S 

Caldwell county, 7 f'c.-_....._. 7.S 

McCracken county, 7 Ve....... 74 



SI 



79 



88 
82 
82 

82 

8'-' i 
92 

no 

«95 

«95 
8.3 
94 

87 

6ti 

55 
100 

SI 
79 
79 
79 



The sales for the week at the 
have been as Jollowv: 

WEDNESDAY. MAY 29. 
Halesof ;i" » hhds: Ballard co lugs and leaf 
J7 50,20 00, 21 .50, 22 A 26 0 J, Barren 7 'XjuU Z\ 
Boone 7 50al2 .50. Breckinridge 7 fXjall 25, 
Adair 7 30a9 SO, Butler lugs 7 MaH. Daviess 7 
50, • SI^U Orayaon T SSall », Green 8alO 
80, Haidin • SMO 71, Hart 7 SS, 16 5S, n 7S. 
Henry traeh to catting leaf 7 80, 9 80. 13 Mb 
14 SO, 15 50, 17 7.5, 18 Jo, 10 23, 22 SO, 2» W, IiO- 
gan 11 20al4 50, McCracken lugs s lOaS 20 
Monroe H SOaO 10, Ohio s soalJ :*), »  \veu 8 80a 
16 25, Taylor lugs 8 30a8 70, Trimble 9al5 75. 
Warren 8 SOall, Webater ilaU 25, Tennesaee 
8 79al2 50, Indiana 7 MalO 50, Missouri 8 Itn 
11 75, Virginia 10 cOalO 75. 



Shelby county, 8 90)^ 

111 county, 8 Vc 

... U}i 



New Albany city, 1 '^c 

Louisville Transfer Co.,8 vc 

Log.iU county, 6 Vc '"'^ 

OwenslK ro and RusseUville K. K S4 .S5 

Bonds nuurked * are sold with the interest 
added. 



*92 
«»» 

«ioo 

70 



On Saturday, the 1st iu^^t., William 
K. Wadleigh, discount clerk of the 
Merchant's National Bank, Boston, 
was discovered to be a defaulter to the 
amount ef 987,000 la T7. 8. bonds, the 
result of stoek speeulationB. He was 
arrested and held in default of $25,000 
bail. 



COMMERCIAL. 



See J. B. Lithgow A Oa's adverdse- 
mentim 5th page. 



A bill has passed Congress and be- 
come a law, to meet the many cases of 
government bonds which have been 
lost or destroyed. It provides that up- 
on reeelving satisfisotory proof that 
any interest bearing bond of the Uni- 
ted States has. without bad faith upon 
the part of the owner, been destroyed 
wholly o-- u part, or so defaced as to 
impair i i - value to the holder, and 
which bond shall be identified 
number and descciptton, the Seeretary 
of the Tiueeury tfiall, undisr certain 
reguladona aofd restriotions, issue a 
duplicate of such bond having the 
same time to run, bearing like interest 
as the bond so proved to have been de- 
stroyed or defaced, and so marked as 
to show the original number of the 
bond destroyed and the date thereof. 
ItiserttaaMttiatlhlity atflllon dol- 
lars worth of bonds will be reissoad 
under the pfoviskma of this law. 



The Science of Health.— The 
first number of this new Health Jour- 
nal is published. It is devoted to an 
exposition of all those agencies so 
vitally related to Healdi and to the 
treatment of Disease, such as Air, 
Light, Teoopenture, Diet, Clothing, 
Bathing, Ezetdse, Sleep, Electricity, 
and all normal agents and hygienic 
materials. It is an Independent jour- 
nal, published in the interests of the 
people which is certainly a strong com- 
mendation. This first number contains 
many articles of general interest. The 
seaean n/t sight, hearing, taste, smell 
etc, are Ulnatrated and explained. 



Blne^rass Wool. 

The wool dip that is now being 
shorn in the BlBegraas distiiet is three- 
fenrthe Cotswold, Bourbon county be- 
ing the largest wool producing county 

in that section, the clip amounting to 
140,000 to 160,000 lbs. About 75,000 
lbs of the present clip have been ship- 
ped at prices ranging from 58a61c. 
The condition of the wOol is unusually 
good, the' heavy rains previous to the 
shearing having cleaned it ntoely. 



The Grand Lodge of New York, A. 
Y. M., met in New York city on the 
4th inst., with delegates present from 
every State and Territory in the Uni- 
ted States, and from the grand lodges 
 A England, Ireland, Bootland, Prus- 
sia, Germany^ HuncMy, Bronswiek, 



FINANCE AND TRADE. 



I N'DUBTBiAX. a O&maBKfL GAaam Omca. 1 
y^, Shnisdsy KvwBlna^Jnael^ins. J 

XONXTABT. 

The loesl sooney market remains qnlet, 
without any material Increase in the volume 
ef eorreneyto lessen the stringency which 
has prevailed for the past few weeks. The 
banks centinue to confine their line of dis- 
counts to their rei^ular patrons, and manifest 
no disposition to make new business. The 
demand continues fully equal to the ability 
Of the banks to aeeommodate at the rates 
befetotHTS qiK ted-»aU per eant. for ap- 
pnived atonatues or aeeepted e bilst e gs h i . 
Street rates are variable, rangtag ttvm ItslS 
per cent., as to circumstances. 

In New York a plethora of N.ational bank 
notes is apparent, which Induces banks and 
bankers in that locality to loan the same lor 
a short time free of interest, provided the 
loans are repaid in legal tenders. 

The Bank of Englaad rate of dlseonat bas 
b««i redoeed from 5 to 4 per cent., and the 
spede of the bank shows an increase of £630,- 
OOO. This reduction of discount is attributed 
by some to tlie idea that the Washington 
Treaty will now faU, and that an influx of 
coin toBatfaadfiroas the UattadBtsUs most 
follow. 

Specie In the BsBkoC llNUMS has taiMasad 

lo,O00,000f aarthewesk. 

XASTBBH XXCHAHOa 

Rales rather dull, with ample supplies, and 
d^tesace qaolM at par to I-IO premlnm. 

" OOU). 

The gold market has ruled steady rtnd firm 
at 113 ^14 i. Tbe main topic of iraihediate 
Interest In the market Is the Washington 
Treaty, as it Is the general opinion that its 
failure will lead to an increase in the ship- 
ments ef coin abroad and thaa aHas« hasii 
ft»r higher prioea. Gold is now saofa lha» 4 
per omk Utfhsr thaa 1* has been for some 
months past. 

The changes slneeow last report have been 

as follows: 



Date. 



May 80 114^^ 

May SI 114 

June 1 Ill 

jrtinei 8.. U 

June »..... 1 1 ( 

Jaoo C»  



114^.^ 
lUVi 




REVIEW OF THE ICAEKET. 



THURSDAY'. MAY' 
Sales of I'-v iihds: Adair co SIO •JoalO 50, Bar- 
ren 7 ,S0;»12, Ballard 9 .50al2, Breckinridge 7 35 
alO 50, Daviess? 40all, Grayson 7 7tal0, Green 

7 TOalO, Hart 8 80, 12 5o, 36. Logan 7 60al2 75, 
Lame 11 50, Mason 9 aOaU 50, Monroo Sail, 
Muhlenbarg 10 60, McCracken ITelO.Tilwble 

8 eOalfi 50, Taylor 7 80al0, Todd 8 55al3, Ohio 
70al0 2.5, Simpson 7 7ta7 80, Warren 7 60all, 

Webster 8al0 7S, Indiana 7 50al2. Viiginla 
i2 2».TeiiinmssT«aMb 



FRIDAT. XAT ». 
Bales of 2i3 hhds: Ballard ea HI 50, 13 50, 

16 25, 18 25, Barren 8all 50, black fat 10 75, 
Breckinridge 7 60al0 25, Bniler 9 l"aU, Chrif- 
tlan 10 iiall 75, Daviess 7 iOall 75. (ireen 7 20 
11 7o, Grayson ings 7 r^iaT sg. Hancock 7 S^a 
9 80. Hart ^a2o, Henderson lugs :i0a9 50, Lo- 
gan 8 IS, IS SB, U i«, MetcaUe? OOalO 7S, Mc- 
Lean 7 80al0 79^ Mnblanbarg 7 70. 8 2», 10 SO, ^ 
Ohio trash and leaf 7 Tttall 51^ aimpada7 Ha 
V 20, Taylor lOall se, TTlmbla IS aalS,1MU 

9 40alO 75. Warren 8 .SOalO 7S, Wekstav t Ma 

10 50. Union !) ':0a9 !X1, Indiana 7 MsMfl^VBa- 
nessee 11, West Virginia 17 2S. 



SATURDAY. JXTHE 1. 
Sales of 245 hhds: Ballard co tl3 50aI6 2S, 
Barren lugs 8 60a8 70, Breckinridge 7 4UalO 75, 
Butler 7 N)a9 90, Daviess 7 5tal2, Hancock 7 «0 
alO 25, (Jreen V all, Hait 7 ?0al2, Henry S 40, 

14 75, 1} , Henderbou 7 60al2, Hopkins 8 lAJaO 70, 
Logan7 80alO,Mnhlenbaig7saal07a,MeLaaa 
8, 10 50, 12 75; Meade 8 aOail 7S. TSylor 7 8QalS. 
Ohio 7 SOalO, Owen traah and cutting leaf 8, 

15 «, 17 50, 2S, Trimbles Stel2 2B, Warren 7 60 
10 75, Webrtw 7 SOalO. Tenneasea MaU W, Yli- 



The trade movement during the current 
week niider review has not been large in any 
department, excepting provisions. Under 
the pressure of continued heavy eanpUes of 
live hogs at more Northern points, and ac- 
crued llabUlties, holders have been disposed 
to make oonoes»ions, with large sales of cured 
meats to Southern consumers at quotations, 
which are far below prime cost. F.xas;gerated 
reports of the daily receipts of hogs at Chi- 
cago have been made by telegraph, which de- 
pressed the market. The mppUea, however, 
continue ample. If not large, for the season 
With the weU-assuied Ibct that llve stock is 
now a general specialty all over the West and 
Senth, and with a good corn crop, the supply 
of hoKS next season must inevitably exceed 
that of the past season. Prices ot liogs have 
declined for three successive years iu alx ut 
an equal ratio, commencing at l^^then6 ^, 
and last year to 4 ia4 ic, at whleh rates the 
bulk of the hogs ware pnrehased, and at each 
snueeailve seaaoa the bnyefs, or paokers, 
were unable to sustain themselvee— In fact, 
raany of them lost heavily year by year— the 
past season's prices not being low enough to 
enable them to retrieve tlieir losses. Present 
prospects favor an opening rate the ensuing 
season not to exoeed live weight, for 
hogs, yet, from the dear-bought experiences 
of the pMS thies yaais, tt Is svldssu thai the 
utmost caution will be required to make the 
venture even safe. 

The receipts of live ho:;s contimu" heavy 
at leading trade depots, upwards of one hun- 
dred per cent In excess of the previous year 
during the same period. The receipts at 
Chicago and Cincinnati to the lat, alaee the 
close of the packing year, say Mareh4|h were 
asfoUows: At Chleafo 7084^, a — I n ata tt JMS 
the previous year, and at Clnelnnatl, llBJSBi 
against .S5,332 the previous year. 

Cotton Is the only staple article of trade 
and production that is sustained with an 
active and s miewhat excited market 
at advanced rates. The light supplies and 
Innrnssri Jar^gn demands of spmneas have 
eanaedtheadvaaee. The prospeeta of the 
new erop are Ihywrable for a good yield. 

Prleeeof moat ertlelea are unchanged since 
last week, with a downward tendency for 
hempen fabrics and domestic wool. 

Breadstnm are quiet at at barely sustained 
rates for flour and all kinds of grain. The 
wheat harvest promises well, though In lim- 
ited districts the late rain atoaas have been 
damaging. 

Tha tariff revlalOB hsassateilalV unasttled 

business, and the whlitty market la some- 
what excited, and transactions at present 
limited. 

The weather has been stormy, and is now 
very eoollte the season, after two days heavy 
rains In JnnSt with the thennoaseter mi the 

morning of the 5th down to 52. The river Is 
at a good stage and riaing. 

The late heavy rains with a warm temper- 
ature have been very beneficial to the crops, 
particularly to the corn, wtiich is vigorous, 
though backward, and the InjiteatiOBS now 
favor another abundant yield of eont. This 
will make three years of soeesaslim large 
cropsofocNB, rather an nsipal oewnfraare m 
our broad daaaala, aad |^ aapsa apatbsr 
JamaeN»af*afP^. 



MOKDAY. SWSM «. 
Sales of 171 hhds: Adair eo iBald 75, AUesi 

9 30a9 40, Barren 8 OiaU^ Booaa Iflalft IS, 
Breckinridge 7 TOall, Butler 7 TSalS S8^ Davlaa 

trash and leaf 7 ICall 75, Green 7 TOalO 71, 
Hanco( k 7 .naio, Hart S .50al2 50, Henry 7 Ma 

10 25, McLean 7 XialO 75, Muhlenbarg 7 90a 
10 75, Simpson 7 SOalO 50, Owen trash &c 7 40a 
12 25, Ohio s 4i*a» 40, Taylor 7 60a9 10, Warren 
7 7Uall, Indiana? oOal2 25. 



TUESDAY, JUNE 4. 
Sa;e  of 1:7 ; hhds: J\.dalr co 89 yoalO, Alien 
'J, tialfard   7ua21, Barren 7 70all 25. Breckin- 
ri lge7 4(iall 25. Carroll 8 80al0, Clarksville 10 
al2, Daviess 7 JOalS, Graves 11 25, Green 8 60» 
10 75, Careen river logs 7 80a8 80, Gzayaon 7 M 
alO. Hart 7 80aU 75. Hancock 7 TOhM, Henry 

7 90^13. Logan 7 40alS 5S. Xjurua* • SOatt SS, 
Meade 7 SOal? 25, Mason ln«s 7 SOaU 25. Met-, 
calfe 8 90al0, Mnhlenburg 7a9 90, Ohio 7 Ma 

8 60, Owen common !) 4Calii 75, suupsou 9 Ma 
10 50, McLean 7 7tall, Warren 8 ^iealSMk 
Webster 7 7i'all 50, Indiana? SOaS 80, nitasis 
7 50alO, Tennessee »al5 75. 

market ejaees steady st thslbilowlaa 
ge of quotations: 1 ^ 

Factory traah f7 MM " ^ 

Planters' lugs ................. 7 SOm _ ^ 

Common leat g 90# 9 3B 

Medium leaf — » 50#10 SS 

Good leaf .; 10 50^1:^08 

Fine leaf 12 50#14 OS 

Cattlacleaf: ItliMM 



SPECIAL XEFOET. 



8ALr:s AT TH K ROt  NE H(  USE, GLOVBI* 
WHiTK CO., PROPRIETORS. 

WKDNESDAT, MAT 29. 

Sales of 7Ahhds: Logan co S14 50, 12 ^ 11 
75, 11 50, 11 50, 11 25, 11 ^ 1^ U, U SO, 11 50, 
12 Si, Daviam leaf 18.12 71^11 fa, 11. ]e8a,lil 

10 28, Henry vomm 1«tf ITM. ttTS. MS. 

Trlmblecuttlng leaf 15 75, 12 50, Ohio leaf IS 
SO, 11 7a, 10 25, 11 50. 10 50. 10 SO, 10 75, 9 80. tSiw 
» 50, lugs 9 70, 9 20, 8 70, 8. Logan lugsf M, 
9 IU, 9, 9 90, 9 2r, Daviess 7   , 8 10, .S 80, 7 
8, McCracken 8 20, 8 10, Monroe 9, ti 50, Green 
leaf 9 90, 9 40. lugs 8 10, 8, Barren leaf 10 M. 
9 80, Henry lugsS 80. 7 SO, » 30, » gO. 8 40, Adair 
ings7 88,lsaf f aa^Mshliahanlap HHM; 
Batier laai 8, 7 Tai OamB am 
IsafUTIL 

nrtraanAT, xat 88. 
Salea 45 hhds: Hart county bright ^ 
raised by J. U Garden, 838 p«r 100 ha, ] 
leaf 12 75, 12, 11 50, 11 50, U 24, 10 50, (ireen 18, 
10, 9 70, 9 50, Ings 8 70, 7 90. 7 90, 7 70, S 5.5, Trim- 
ble leaf 10, 10 SO, lugs 9 20, 9 !40, Hart leaf 10, 

11 75, 11 75, lugs 8 30, Green (Ind) low leaf 940, 
9 2S, Taylor leaf 10. lugs 7 00, 7 80. Monroe 
lugs 8. i 78. leaf 8 88^ M,M, McCracken leaf 18^ 
lugs 8 40, 8 8, Lotaa tags 7 80, 7 5«, 8 78, DavlSH 
leaf 18 28, 18,8 88, lu gs 7 88 ^7 Ml, ' 

msAT.iux a. . 

Saias af M 

wiwar *• 

wranwr 17 », Logan leaf U 26, M 88^ u 18^ 

18 60, 10 25, Ballard 18 25, Green U IS^ M SlL 
~ ifs, 9 20, 8 70, 7 90, 8 SO, 7 28, ladlaaa leaf 18, 
; t, lats 7 M. 7 70, 88^ • M» 8 1% 



Industrial and Oommeroial Grazette. 



h 80, 80, Todd leaf 10 50, 9 5»), 9 40. 8impson 
9, 8 9b,* ai.T 70, 8 -JO, Ohio leaf 8 6U, 8 9C' 

SATtnttDAY, JUNE 1. 

Sales of 35 hhds-: Henry co leaf 518, 11 75, 
Oreen 11, 10 75, 10, Maaiy (Tenn) U 50, 10 50, 
10, Taylor 10, 10, Maade 11 75, 10 60, Locan 10 
9 60. logs 8 10, 7 80, Mnhlenborg leaf 10 e  
loss 7 80, Ohio low leaf 9 5n, s 10, lugs 8 ]0| 
7 50, 8 JW, 7 60, 7 80, 7 Kt. Meade lugs 8 30, Hart 
^««t■^ ^^T« leal lO 50. lugf t , Davieas Ingi 7 10, 

7 flk WMMter 7 70, leaf 10. 

XOKDAY. IVKK S. 

Sales of 28 htada: Slmpaon oo leaf tlO M, HV 
10, 10 35, Muhlenbarg « 9d, 10 75. 10 15, lO 75. 
Groen lu, 10 75, Iv 75. lugs 9. 8 60, 7 fi«, Adair 
leax 9 fOalO 75. logs 8 20. 9, KimiMon loga 7 60, 

8 KL LanM 7 20, b 60, Gi^en (Ind) 7 SO. 8 20, 
WiMV 7 «k HarAlnlMf 10. 

TUIBUAT, XOTR 4. 

Pftle* of 46hh ls: Robertson Tenn^ leaf «*• 
?U; 7.=i. 11 :\ II UK 11 25. 10 25. La: ii. 11? 11 ,50 
Mc 'i:iokeu IS. 10 75. Logan 1' 1" Vi, 10 25, 
1(1 i! '. 10 25. Meade 11. )u. ItHvi.- K id 2.5. lo 2.5. 
Barren 10 50.10, lug : 7 70, MuhlenbttrK coin- 
nioLi leaf 9 50, 8 40, 9 9 90, coioiDon lugs 7, 
7 30, lx gaD lugs 9 M. 9, 7 56, 8 ao, 7 70, 7 40, La- 
me 9 Meade 7 80, Cumberland 8 50,7 80, 
Webster 7 7U, Green oommon leaf 9 70, Ohio 
OlMUBOa ll^ 8 OO. 8 40, 7 90, 7 79, 7 SO, ]ib«t- 
OMn)lMf 12 75. 






al6 
al6 
al6 
al« 
al6 
a 

al9 
a 



COTfOV. 

B«oeipte at all the domestic porta continue 
■mall, whldi, with the dacreaaing ctock,a 
fair sidBniBsdMiiaod and th* ImproTamant 
at Liverpool, bai ledtoaa advanoeand glvan 

■peculators an opportunity to successtnlly 
bull the market, causing an advance in New 
York, alnce last Friday, ol P^c for middling', 
lj%c for low middling, J i n- t: ,o.l oi'iiuai y 
and )4c tor ordinary. Thedeciuud from t piu- 
MiSMd Alppwa, In tha m— mMmw, liaa 
iMlpai isnraad ttaa wmtMiattt. 

n» V«w York 4«oMttoBS for Om WMk 
■Milli^ the SMlML ffMas«MtVMTi kMli 
law middlli^ 

For June ..,,„,, ■, -„■■ „ , -« 11-16 

For July 

ForAuguei ...^...^ .^^...J6 7-16 




PET eooDs. 

The market has been doll for nearly all 
classes of dry goods, with only a limited de- 
noand to supply urgent wants. Brown abeet- 
ings and ahirtlnci are inactive; hoMan intl- 
mate more atrenKtb, owing to tkaadvaaoe in 
MiMm. Bl— chad rtiaartiifiMidrtimitif 
teHaaltad damaad, with aoma ipntwlliflTri 
movement on the part of boldara, bat yet 
without reanlt. Glaied cambrics are quiet 
and unchanged. Rolle I jaconets are quiet at 
some reduction iu juict-s. Canton llannel.s 
are firmer, with an upward tendency, in 
iypa fay wiUmwiwinaeaf aothwu Daa- 
iam art qvlit aad udiatited. Tkksiiiow 
aoaaal i ii o v a— attatat— dy jrteaa. OoMim- 
•dcaof thabaM; makaa and atjlaa are in fidr 
demand. Printing cloths are reported dull 
and declining; sales lor the week at Provi- 
dence h.ive been at 7^c for 04x64 extras. 
Prints a: f (lull, Willi no demand beyond im- 
mediate wants, and the market is steady at 
qaotatioBS. GinKhamaarelnfciria^pMtiBr 
desirable styles and prieaa ataadjr. Tka da- 
mand far dreaa goods is conflned to naall or- 
ders at nndianced prices. Woolen goods are 
quiet, and the market is without any special 
festare of interest. 

[N. B.— Our  inotaliouK are the casli prices 
Kmall and time orders at the usual rate.] 

BROWK SUEETIXG ASID SHIBTXNG. 

Invincible 14 a 

Columbus „„...__...«« ISVja 

Great Western....— ~— IW^a 

Penn Mills 

I aurel Hill , - 

An Ills. I ■ . . 

Macoji I U a 

Talla-s-see 18 4a 

Atlantic H ISVia 

Georgia, 36 inches 

Alabama and Georgia, 36 inches. 
Augusta. MUMtaas — 
Htaudam Wtttmm,M 1 

selma 

Hoosier 

FINE KROWH 

Pepperell N, ;i0 inches. ll^^a 

do O, .a do _ 12^,a 

do K, do „ IV/t^. 

do K, do ^....^ I4V^ 

Nashua O, :« do ^..^^..i,^ 13V.  

do K, do 

do E:. 40 do -.. 

New Tortc MUls.a»iadMS..... 

Warren F F_ 

Kruit of Loom.ilinehas.. 

Red r ank., 38 ' " 
Klafksione._.~.~.... 

Hope 

Hone, .'ft! inchc 

Hill, 4-4 

Lonsdale... 
wamsutta . 
Pepperell, ';-4., 

do 7-4.. 

do !*-4 

do 10-4 

do 11-4... 

Freemen. 

h«pragu  
Amerl( 

Aliens. 
Garner . 
ArnoI is 
» oon 

UUU: ell 

lia:i;;U n. 

lyonclon Mourning 11 a 

Siiai'Min do IPia 

Merniuac D H^ia 

Merrimac W 12J^ 

Pacific lljia 

Kiciimonds _ 1 1?4* 

Lodi 11 a 

Uamsutta 9 a 

Bedford «^a9 

Atlantict. f!\.a 

American Star "i'aa 

Albion solids 12 a 

l oliy Vardcn 12 al2 ^ 

Minneb.alia. inches 35 a 

Miunehar.n t-x' ; a, it.ct.t-i  40 a 

('onesi i2.'i jucd.tl, .■    ipches 22 a 

('onostot:a fxn a. s(i inches 25 a 

I.ewision, H(j inciies 32Jia 

Lewiston, SZ inches 27 ia 

Omega AC A. 80 a 

   met;a A 26 a 

darsed Brothers 65 a 

Kven-tt 25 a 

hitaiulard 2t J^a 

?-iaud.-ird .\ 22 a22J-^ 

Standard A A -"'(a 

f^taiidard A A A ;12Ha 

6TKIPE-. 

Amoskeag IS al9 

.■\ilj;tuv » ~i a 

.\merkan 12 6al3K 

r.ROWN DRIIiLS. 

Applet on 

Pejiperell 

Bout 

Pejiperell fine 

Winllirop 1-3 

   suabiirg, '/g, 8-oz 15 

Osuaburg. 4-4 ....SU 

CAMBKICfi. 

Portland — 7 • 

^'^tfltitrfr • • 

S. 8. A Sons- 

I^oMtela P M 0f ~ — ■ 

SLATE AXD BLKACHBD DBIU^. 

NnnmV-ra^r satten— li^^ 

p. p] . . drill — — J5 a 

Lacouia drill - I S • 

g ntagdiU J - 

Amoskeag W • 

Mid Uesex -1^ « 

Bates ~~i» • 

Scotch 1400 M a 

Gordons 1600 ^ a,„, 

Glaaoow W 



.13Sil4 i 



For Heptember. 
''or October 
For Kovember. 
For December 

Total bales of this description for the week 
were 152,400 bales. 

Immediate dallveiy aalsa have been 13,332 
bate, tndirifag M» Ibr aoqpar^ M» ior eon- 
w, 1» far spawHalton and 917 in 
transit. 

The receipts for the week ending Slst, at all 
the ports have been 13,117 bales, against 12.0S3 
last week, making: the total receipts since 
Sept. 1, 1871, 2 t 5:^,2:i5 bales, against 8,792,a6t 
for the aaoM partod Of llllt.71. alMwli« n d*  
crease this year of 1,U9,0M balaa. 

The details of receipts are as follows: 
1S72. 

Received this week at Bales. 

New Orleans d,517 

Mobile ^766 

Charleston 1,874 

Savannah 2 429 

Texas 371 

Tennessee.- 8,725 

Florida Wi 

North CaroHna 119 

Virginia 1,0«2 




Total receipts 13.117 

Decrease this year 23,283 

The exports have reached a total of 22,007 
bales, of which 17,084 were to Great Britain, 
3,033 to France, and 2,000 to the mt of the 
Continent. 

The stocks, are now reported to be 192.516 
bales. 

The following table shows the quantity of 
cotton in sight at this date of each ol the two 
past seasons, as made ap bj cable telegraph 
reports to the Slat ott: 
Stock in 1872. 

Liverpool 874,000 

London 2;«,C0O 

Gla.sgow 300 

Havre .216.000 

Marseilles 18.000 

Bremen 24.000 

Rest of Continent 86,0u0 

Afloat for (JU Britain (Ameri- 
can) „ J44,000 

ACoat for France (American 

and BrazUian) 24,000 

Afloat for Bremen( American). 5,000 
Total India afloat lor Europe..40S,000 

Stock iu U. S. ports 192,516 

Stock in inland towns.. 25,759 



1871. 

967.01 V» 
83,700 
601 
23,490 
14,319 
62.925 
56,000 

188,000 

41,000 
33,417 
336,055 
267,139 
24,689 



Total 2,250,575 2,098,335 

These figures indicate an increase in the 
cotton tB a^ht of 'JSKUO halgt. npif rail with 
the aama data ori87L 

TtaaMaatttniBy weather taaa baai Ihvor- 
able, and the ataiid is propittons In the ex- 
treme. The sales for future delivery have 
exceeded the supplies of late which has had 
the tendency to stimulate the home markets, 
which with the continued maintenance of 
good prices in Liverpool have induced more 
activity at full rates for immediate deliver- 
ies. Our market with meagre receipts, is but 
litUe better than nominal thm IMlowlng 
advanced qnotatlons: 

Middling . ©251^ 

Low middling ©21'-^ 

Good ordinary @23 

Ordiaarv .. 020 



PROVISIONS. 

The market is quiet, yet during the week 
the order demand for bacon for the South 
has aggregated a large amount, and stocks 



Markets by Telegraph. 



NEW YORK. 

New York, June 6— F. K. 

Cotton— Active and iiig her; middling up- 
lands, '^%c. Sales 2,iXJ0 bales. 

Wheat^Dnll; No. 2 Milwaukee, fl 72; ani' 
ber Western, 82 03. white,  3 10. 

Flour- Heavy ; Western and State soper- 
flne, 15 7Sa6 25; good to «diolea,f7 OOaOM. 

Whisky— Firmer at 91e. 

Com— Moderate demand aai Itfi^iar; West- 
ern mixed, 63a66c for new. 

Oats— Dull at 52a.53c ; Ohio, MtM^ 

Eggs— Firm at 1.5 4aI6c. 

Hops— Firm at 2'a^ for 1871; lOa-Wc for "TO. 

Wool— Quiet; unwashed, 48c; Ohio, 77a80o ; 
pulled, TOe, 

Batter— Heavy; Western, ttatte. 

Ooffae-Firm; Bie.l|aUK«. 

Bngar— Firm; lUr to good rsftnlag, mig$0; 
Cuba, 8a i»c. 

Rice- Quiet iit ^ . ."'..o. 

Pork— Quiet; new mess, $18 25. 

Lard-Finnar; at— m, OPtiliiB; koMa rand« 
ered. ti%c. 

PlsJroa-DoMk Saoteh, MlftS7; Amarlean 
firmUtfOaSS. 

CHICAGO. 

CHICAGO, June 5— p. ir. 

Wheat-Market Firm; No. 2 spring, tl «8a 
1 rejected* fl 12. 

Com— Advaneed; No. 2 mixed, Uf^A^f^ 
rejected, 42a. 

Oats— Excitat and hlgbar; Mo. 1, 4SJ^ va- 
jectetl, 38c. 

Badey-Dnll; No. 2 ft;l!, .5.'.a5.Sc. 

Rye— Dull; No. 2, 70a72c; r^ected, £9a60c. 

Fork— laaattva and daalinlnc; aMi.tl2 15a 
13 20. 

Liard— Advanced; ^e, cash. 

Whisky— Dull at aMHc 

Bogs— Dull at iS 75a4 00; receipts, 12,0^0. 



The fbtlowing lathe mage of qvotattons in 

round lots: 

POBX. 

Mess $12 00@12 50 

Prime. — 

BAOOH. 

Shoulders, padcad 
Uib Bides 
Clear rib 8idfl8_. 

BreaklhBt, eanvaaicd. 

Plain 

Canvassed. 
.sugar-cur( 
Magnolia, 
Kentucky 
Pedee... 
Golden : 

Sugar-eared, eanvassed 

BEEF 

Dried 

Tongnea, V doz 

r ienr rib .sides, packed 

ri,-ir 

Shoulders. 

Tierce, prime.. 
Head and gut 
Kegi,— - — ■ 



The market Is quiet and generally Inactive, 
importers awaiting the removal of tlie duty, 
July 1st, before withdrawing coffee and tea 
from bond. We quote: 

SUGAR. 

KalrtofUlylUrM.O.. per lb 9] 

Prime 

Choice 

Island, raw. 




IXflgR AHD IgtAHI. 

The market has become lam animated than 
last nMMith, with ample stocks of flour on 

hand. Wheat is scarce but In limited de- 
mand. Corn and rye are in good request, but 
at rather lower rates for round lots. 

Round lots of flour are freely offered at our 
quotations, with small ^^les at an advtgice. 
Weqoala: 

FLOUR. 

Fine $4 75 $ 5 00 

B^porrtna' 3 r^i^ 5 75 

Extra 6 i;5i^ (  50 

Extra family 7 2.Vd 7 75 

No 1 ...  ) CO-3 0 50 

Fancy _ U SOJIO 00 

Rye flour ; _ 5 25/§ 5 50 

Biickwdeat, in bbls nominal 

Buckwheat, in sacks, y§i lb nominal 

GRAIN. 

Wheat, Red- „ i 70©1 (5 

Wheat. White 

Corn, shAlled 

Com, elialled, sacked 
Corn, *ur tn bi^k.. 

Oats, in balk 

Oats, sacks ineindad- 

Rye 

Barley, 
Barlev, 
Bailey malt- 




12 

If* 



PI.AID OSNABUBOS. 

Tennessee — . 

Texas — 

Decatur... - ~- 

nafjpbannock — 



...St 
..A 
..14 

..M 
..12 



aS5 
a2i 
a 
a 

al7 



..18 
..15 
.JO 



Ogden A. brown 

Albany, blue 

Amoskeag 

WORSTED BRAXSa. 

Common colois 

Hieh colors. No. 63 

CAKTOK FI*AJ(f»BL. 

Hamilton, brown -15 

Lacona. bleached •»» 

Pemberton A ""^i? 

Naumkeag ~~. — J| 

Kockport, b eached •• « 

bPOOL. OOTTOH. 

John Clark. Jr.. A Co.'s (Thoa. Bxm- 

sell.agcuti l,tst 6-cord ;i;,"22 

Jno.Cark, Jr., A Co.'8beBteBamar«-2 

J. * P. Coats' - — 

SUff. rd Brothers •« 

WimmanUc 6-cord.. ..^ » 

WlUlmanUc enameled. —40 

Brooks • 

Oreen A Daniels... 
Orr A MtNaught- 
Stuart 1s.-~- 
 }«): 



a25 



.70 a 



a21 
a 



...70 a 

40 a 

.70 a 

J9 » 



Hard Standard... 
Demarara. raw... 

Cuba, raw. 

Porto Rico, raw- 

A's 

B's 

Extra C 

ClrrleC „..12 

Yellow 01 

Soft refined „..-. 12 

Molasses sugars..................^....-......^.. 9 

COFFEB. 

Rio, common _ at 

fair ^3S 49XB}  

" good. 
" prime, 



Lagutra ,,, 
Java, Qo:w*L^ 
" Imitation 
Ceylon... , . - 

M0TiAflBE8.\ 
Plantation, tsir.. 
Plantation, prime to 4 




Eastern syrap. 

kagL, 



do 



Borglinm ■ .» 



RICE. 

Carolina, new 9 ia 9% 

Carolina, old-. a mi 

Bangoon 8 

Furs and Peltriet. 



LONDON. 

LoxsoH, Jane 6 — 4:80 p. ir. 

Consols— 9^ :; for money; 92 ia92^ for ac- 
count. 

United Statea Bonds-lseZi, 90^ old 'fifis. 
91^ old fTa, 0^: IO-40S, 90%. 

PARIS. 

PAsm, Jteia S— F. X. 
Bonrse— Rentes, 55 franes 71 eantlmaa, 

UVBRPOOL. 

lityxBPOoii, Jane 6— p. x. 
Cotton— MaAetatrong; wkMMng nplands, 
IVAd; do Orieana, 11^1^; aalea of 20,000 
bales, of wMdi 0,000 were for speeolatien and 

export. 

Wheat-Lower; Red winter, 12b Id; Oallfbr- 
nia, Il8lldal2s4 l. 
Corn— No. 2 mixed, 27R0d. 
Flour-278 6da288. 
Chesse-«3s. 
Pork-Als. 
Lard-«ls6d. 

Cumberland middles, 20ir*l^ort rib. Ski Od. 
Bead Clover, 66a57s. 

NEW ORLEANa 

Nkw OnuBAits, June 5— p. x. 

Cotton— Active and stronger; sales of 1,700 
bales; good ordinary, 2^c; low middling, 
24*4c; middling, 25c; receipts, 7.S bales; ex- 
ports, none: stock, bales. 
Corn— Ea. -;e:-: ii^ixt-d, 70c; white, 75c. 
Oats— Low( r :\: : .i'itr. 
Hay-Scarce; pi inie, 832; choice, ^5a36. 
Pork— Ijower; mw, $12 03}^ 
Lard— null; tieree, i^iaOe; reflned, O^c; kegs, 
kettle-rendered, lOXe; reflned, lie. 
llam! — Bngar-eured, ll^aU^e. 
Sr.j;.^.r— Inferior to common, 7a7J^c; low 
fair, ^^.c. 
Mo;a. 5^ts— No supplies Louisiana. 
Coflee— Quiet at 16^al9c. 
\Vh ky— Firmer at 82Hc; choice, 95a97c, 

COUNIBT FEODUCE. 

Prices are fluetoating and gieen apples are 

merely nominal. Good fresh butter com- 
mands full rates, but efjgs and yuiii;.u' chick- 
ens are a little lower. Prime old crop baled 
hay commands lull rates ixv shipment. 

We quote as follows, remarking that select 
.api'les, potatoes, onions, Ac, nty repacked 
command 50c@$l 00 more than country pack- 
ed. 

APPLES, GREEN. 

Prime to choice V bbi„ ^ — nominal. 

Inferior... nominaL 

BUTTER. 

Choice country 12 alfi 

Inferior " alO 

Western Reserve. 20 a25 

New York tub;. ^...^.^^^ 25 aao 

BEANS. 

Piine white, per bush , nominal. 

ritea Havy no—ikal . 

BEESWAX. 
Tflikm. «ft •» 

CHEESE. 

Western Reserve, V * - a 

Factory , new 12.V^al3J^ 

Pine Apple a 

Tom Tfcumb .~. , a 

English Dairy. — •* 

EGGS. 

Fresh, V dozen . — 1^13 

Packed . al4 

ESCULENTS. 

PoUtoes, per bbl 12 75a 3 00 

do now 5 QOa 5 60 

Onions, new, par bbl 4 fiOn S 00 

Sweet PotatOM, per btol„ nominal. 

FEATHERS. 

Prime live, lb 63a65 

Mixed — 45a65' 

FLAX SEED. 

Prime, D bosh ^^^^ $1 60® 

Mixed — ^ — 1 45® 

FBUrr, DBEBD. 

Apples, new, « k-.- 8^a 9 

FaMhsBtiiuanen, do .. — .nomlnl 

Peaches, halves, do ......... do 

GINSENG. 

Prime, old, V k 80 a55 

New ~ 70 a75 

PEANUTS. 

Fresh, common, V Ib^.^.^^ ~ 7 a 7^ 

Fresh red 7 a 7 ^ 

POULTRY. 

, » aSl 00 Chickens, 9( dos OS 00a4 50 

,.1falOO TurinyaVk-4 — ~ - » 

ids a CapMM a 



LIVESTOCK. 

Tbere kas been an Inereaaed demand for 
gopd ea«g1tlo»#d beeras, both for home use 
and the Wastarn maikeii. yet prieaa are un- 
changed.' The supplies of all kinds of live 
stock have been fair, exceptirg mules and 
corn-fed beeves. Grass-fed cattle are in more 
ceneral supply, for which prices are lower. 
We quote best butchers' and shipping beeves 
kt 16 am 7fi( good, 14 60a5; medium to coda- 
mon, ftsS 6u, gross; fresh mllkeia, 125*40. 

Sheep— We quote best heavy, wool off, at 
S3 50a4 gross; lamb.s, C4a4 50 Ibr best and V 80 
a3 50 for light per head. 

Hogs— Receipt i fair and mariMt beiskiw 
We quote best butchers' at tte4 2S; light at 
13 7oa3 90 gross. 

The receipts during the paat week have 
beenaafDllowa: 

Beevea. -~ 902 

Bbeap - 1,040 

Hogs ~. 1,200 

Mules 28 

Horses 24 



IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. 

The following teble exhibits the Imports 
and Elxports of the aevMal leading artleleaot 
trade, by Mdlraad and ilver, tor the pait 
week and ainee Oaptawhwr 1, U71: 

ixronm xzfokts. 



Apples, green, bbls.. 
ieroei 



40 

Bacon, tierces............ 272 

Bacon, casks _ 600 

Butter, packages 212 

Barley, saelu. 1196 

Bagging, pieces 2U03 

Cotton, bales... 3U9 

Cotton yams, balee^ 21 

Coffee, bagk 2^5 

Cheese, padcagea...... 

Candles, boxes 

Cement, bbl& 12 

Corn, sacks „ 44314 

CstUe, head 328 

Eggs, bbls 138 

Flour, bbls 32J6 

Feathers, sacks 4« 

Hides, bundles 1264 

Hogs, No „ loU 

Hay, bales 1439 

Iron, pig, tons IWo 

Lard, tierees 139 

Lard, kegs 26 

Malt, sacks 1448 

Molasses, bbls. 61 

Mackerel, oackagea. 78 



Nails, kegs 

Oil, bbls 

Oats, sacks.. 
Fork, bbl8_ 
Pork, bulk, 



792 
782 
1832 



deoes.. 



••10M@«« 
11 @UH 

@ 

viMmsn 

12 @13 

lOJ^Sll 

10Vi@ll 

i2%®mi 

12^12^ 

.12 



The trade is steady, 
and fair suppl 
on arrival: 

Prime Raccoon, earth 

Prime Mink , 

Prune Gray Fox 

Prime Opossum 

Prime Otter 

Prime Beaver.. 



ft goed demand 
fallows 



80S 



50 



40 

10^ 15 

. 4 011(9 6 00 

...» 1 00@ 1 60 

Prime Deer, V Bk, Ky* and Tenn 250 80 

A Greeley banner in » Vmw York 
town oenoists of an old w bM n l Ml l n top 
•f* pole 60 feet higb. 



9278 
1475 

1176 
31 



,ple  

Potatoes, biMSM., 
Rye, sacks...... 

Sugar, hbd8_.. 
Sugar, boxes A bbls „ 1251 

Ser-d 'ty-''-^ 43 

To . . ■ N 2247 

T .:- ,. . .,   ..xt'S 4.52 

Whisky, bbls.. 1400 

Wheat, sacks. 1005 

WoQdTMVO 475 



15786 
11484 

21329 
12372 
44512 
62444 
2128lfl0 

5S3.55 
78407 
3551*1 
1532 

302«lO2 
15749 
11914 

223441 
4661 
•56774 

2yl40:} 
57641 
316*i9 

ma 

.3.3709 
23312 
11710 
5638 
80788 
77392 
67905 
10153 
769S67 

mm 

58630 
12761 
24672 
34 '34 
.v»17 
17308 
958 0 
1U62S 
8721 



8 

2S0& 
809 
168 
74 

1206 



3T5ft 
58830 
32975 
8003 
1331 
40611 



3529 182554 
37 3100 
526 3297H 
1054 31179 
1134 47049 
15579 226251 
21916 133U1 
159 10914 
4? 
38;i2 
91 
758 
664 
1477 
1196 
5S2 
915 
8:!0 
76 
119 
838 
8-12 
526 
4008 



44 



LOUISVILLE'' 



modem improvements, and Ovens larger 
than any Stove made in tlie City, and 



THE LITHGOW'S GEM 



Vat Oua ov Wood, apevfoelmodelor beantj, and wftrrantMl to hKf aene 
perior ftft » Qtdeli Bakmtrun mkinifcfltnred by the welHaeiwii 
mad eetahMghei honeeof 



J. S. LITHGOW & CO., 



LOUISVILUS, KT., 



35841 
6642 
34138 
14712 
.39576 
179: 
2«5o7 
31011 
170.)1 
8^85 
6926 
44077 
6:^ 

18812 
9(7 302766 
767 45740 
loa 27481 

18 -m 

544 lS0h9 

80 -s»2n 

2331 291 SS 

l.S'ft .52618 

2127 91667 

12 2E0a8 

346 S208 



Who will give the best guarantee of satisfaction for both of these Stoves 



Bagging and Eope. 

Th«^ WB«t«8Mk aetMIr Hm 

yet it roles steady, with ami^ atocka of flax 
and hemp bagging on hand. Sales of power- 
loom in round lots atl^c for2-tt)and 17al7^^c 
for 2 ia234-!t  weights. Small lots at an ad- 
vance. We quote: 

Power loom , 2-k - 16^a 

Power loom, 2^^^a3^%-.^ f. -.17 al7Kj 

Hand Kentucky, UgkU : _..16Jial6^ 

Flax bagging - a6?4al7 i 

Machine rope a 

Hand-made _ _ a 

Iron ties in lots 7 • 

A Berlin dispatch annonnces the 
death of Gen. Hildenstein, who direct- 
ed the bombardment of Strasbourg. 



Br.slne.ss continues moderatey active, with 
f.-iir orders from dealers. The market re- 
mains steady and prices fat some articles 
lower. 

Acid. Sulphuric 3^0 

Acid, Nitric 18 (||25 

Acid, Muriatic 5 4j|10 

Acid. Tartaric, tb 70& 75 

Acid,Cltrlc,lb 130^135 

Acid, Oxalic, lb.„ _ '^Q 40 

Alum, lb — 4%» 5 

Ammonia. Carb, ft 269 28 

Ammonia. Aqua, ft 10 @ 12 

Ammonia, Spirits Aro, ft » 56a 

Arrowroot, Am, ft 13® 14 

AIchohoL08°,gal - 1 8Vffi2 00 

Analine,red, ft - 3 WH^S 25 

Balsam Copc^ia, ft ~ 1 05(^1 10 

Balsam Tofu. ft - - 1 10@1 15 

Borax, ft — dm 38 

Blue Mass, ft & «0 

Blue Vitriol, ft 14 « 15 

Bismuth Sub Nit, ft 8 75^3 90 

Bay Bum. gal 8 00@5 50 

Calomel, ft Qd 15 

Camphor, ft 80® 85 

Cochineal, ft M«l 00 

Chloroform, ft •- *„"^ . 

Copperas, bbls, ft 2^® S 

Copperas, kegs, ft - H'^h," 

Cream Tartar, pnre,ft 46347 

Cudbear, ft ^& 

Ether, Sulphuric, ft 

Ether, Nitros, ft ~ ~ 45® §0 

Gum Arabic, ft 45® 

Gum Assafcetlda. ft-  »@ •«j 

Gum Aloes, ft _ fwifi 

Gura Opium, lb — 0 6036  o 

Indigo. II. 1 »f 

Isinglass, Cooper's, ft — - 

Licorice. Calab. ft — ~ .eiJ®^ 

M£«uesla. Carb. 2 oz. ft.......~— 805 « 

Morphine, P. A W.. os — 0 lOA 

Madder, lb . W 

Oil, Castor, No. 1, gal 1 »9l » 

Oil, Sweet. gaL. 1 »|| g 

Oil. Tanners', g«d_--.„ g 

3 2515 S 

Oil, Lemon, ft — — 

Potass, Iodide, ft — 

Potass, Bromide, ft 

Potass. Chlorate, ft...— 

Quinine, P. A W., os ~ 

Rosin, bbl ~ — 

Boap, Castile, Fr — 

Soda, Bicarb, Ne ^rcastle, casks, ft.. 
Soda, Bicarb, American, casks, ft. 

Soda. Sal, ft ~ ~.— ~ 

Soda^sh, ft 

Salt, Epsom, ft — i.~.~.  

Salt, Bochelle, ft. — 

Snuff, Mac, ft — 

Buufl, Garrett's, pacdka, »^ 
Snuff, Garrett's, bottJe8.dOS.. 

8antonine.ox. 

Bolphor, Flonu ft 

Snlphor, roll, ft — 

Saltpetre, Comml, ft 

Ssdtpetre, pure. ft....~ 

Turpentine, bbls, gal 

Turpentine, cans, gal ......... .m..^. 

Venetian Red, English, bbls, k _ 

Venetian Red, English, keas » 



SQUARE TOP, KNOWS TO AIX, AND THE 







-AND — 



6 25 § 
8 75(8 
1 36@1 40 




PLANTER 



Petroleum has been successfully ap- 
plied, in St. Louis, to the refining of 
crude oasMron and its conversion into 
bar or malleable iron. Common Iron- 
Moontain pig-lxoii ie said tolikV* t Mn 
converted into the M llaagt tx Uer 
iron by a single appUoaHen of the 
liquid ftiol in the paddling ftunaee. 



Four and Six-hole Premium or Step Stoves, are also manufactured by this. 
Firm, wliile they are, as yet, proiHietors and manafacturus 
of the Justly CeMiated 



WALLACE PATENT GRATE 



The popularity of which has become so great, by n tmo m of Hs genuine iMilt^'' 
and extreme low cost (which brings it wlthia the r eac h of all), 
that it has almost entirely superseded all other 
Grates so extensively made by them. 



SENP rOfi CIBCULAES A 'D PmCE& 



■wa "w 



MMT 



6 



Iiicliistrial and C ommercial Grazette. 



IhtQMBtlty 0 



: Fork t* a 
Cora. 



of 



Now these figures, as we have al- 
ready shown, may not be absolutely 
correct, but they may feiqi^ish some 
guide for calculatiou. 



n fa very easy to see Vbe dfflksalttes 

of arriving at a perfectly satislactory 
answer to this question. 9tiU, (be ex- 
perieuce of others is wOTth eomethlng 
and may safely be taken as tome gen- 
ial guide. 

One farmer, who made an effort to 
amtisiy Umpelf ou the question as to 
th* qonatily of ludian me&l it required 
to BMke ft poaad of pock, w«lgfaad off 
two bogs a year aud ft ItfJf old« ftnd 
^hree pigs six moattn oM, on the 1b  
y of September, then measured off 
i corn accurately, and had it ground, 
very night lie wet in boiling water 
.eal eiioiigb for the next day's use, to 
1 3cb a consistency tliat it would run 
itftdily. Tlie bogs bad uo slops from 
f2l0|MMMftnd nothing but the meal 
and water. Ou the let of December 
they were killed, ftnd flvft cents a 
I ound was deducted for what they 
weighed on the 1st of September, when 
the trial began, !\:id be found that, al- 
lowing six cents a pound for the pork 
which they actJaliy laid on iu 
the trial, they had paid 9S cents 
per bunhel for the corn, which 
ffftve him Just about. 16 2 3 Ibe. 
of ff«rk to the boshoL Aaothar 
Cmmmt weighed a thrifty pig, ftw 
months old, 150 pounds, and then fled 
GS pouu(l ! of corn meal mixed with hot 
water thin enough formusli. This bush- 
el of meal was consumed by the pig iu 
about six ftnd ft half day^ and the gain 
wasjnet eighteen pounds. Another 
farmer pat op ft Saflhlk sow to fatten. 
Her weight was 2SS ponnds. From 
October 4th, her weight being at that 
tiate 2% pounds, to November 17tb, he 
fed her ten bushels, or 560 pounds of 
marketable corn, aud killed her at the 
latter date. Her live weight before she 
killed was 413 pounds, or an in- 
the ten bushels of corn of 



Salting, Packing and Selling Bntte^r. 

Bianehard's Batten Manual reeeom- 
mends one ounce of salt to a found of 
butter, as sufficient keeping; but 

the better paying class oT customers, 

who are a little more fastidiou i about 
the quality, prefer about one-luilf as 



X«w to XOIOUbA Bagi. 

Editors Rnral World : As the air is 

literally fall of chinch bogs, I' propose 
to give my plan for the 4«ttrQotion of 
the most of them, providing ttie farm- 
ers will all help. Now is the time to 
commence operations, by the edges of 
wheat, and other small grain, where it 
joins com; and if your neighl)(Nr across 
the lane has wheat adtJofaiin^ the lane 
or fence, 4rill yoor com vows along 
your fence and tell him to do likewise. 
The sooner these rows are planted the 



much, and this is found sullicieut if 
thecaseine has been properly removed 1 ^be bugs will gather to them 

Butter-makers in the vicinity of'^^^terand stay on the forced rows 
large jtowns should seek out regi^r 
cnSstotai^lb* their ptodnet;'1tr''Wlfieh 
case It n»y "be put op in baHs; or any 
other form adapted to tl^ demand. 
"Philadelphia prints," which have 
acquired a world-wide^reputation, are 
pound balls, with a small figure upon 
the top. They are usually enclosed in 
a white linen napkin, and packed in a 
clear, xinc-lined chest, with apartment 
at each end for Ice, to k#ep it hard 
whUe belQg tmnsported tomaiket. 

For the great mass of butter-makers, 
the wooden tub, holding from 50 to 100 
pounds must ever be the most econo- 
nomical form of package. In the 
vicinity of New York city, heavy re- 
turn pails, of the best white oak with 
thick covers having the owner's name 
bnadad apM them, are^nsed and re- 
mad y«ar after year. In some parts 

of the West miserably poor oaken tubf 

are employed, which affect the butter 

very injuriously. In other localities 

ashen tubs are favorites, while in Nor- 
thern Vermont the most approved tubs 

are the spruce. Spruce is, unquestion- 
ably, the least liable of all timber to 

aflTect the flavor injuriously, while it 

is generally Relieved that Ibr Ifrag 

keeping and maeh exposure good white 

oak is preferable. 
Stone and earthen jars and crocks 

are sometimes used, but we do not rec- 

commend them. Much depends in the 

purity of the salt — it mu.-t Ue jterfectly 



HOR 



O. fcPBATT. 



CHAS. BBmaas 



"PICKETT" 



longer than they will the later corn. 

This done we have the trap set. I 
suppose every farmer knows that as 
soon as they have killed the wheat, or 
the grain is harvested, the bofs will 
gather on the ecMV. Tlien let every 
one be his own judge when to kill — 
but kill he must. My plan is to *'mud" 
them to death, if it rains in time before 
they leave the traps. This I do by 
running a plow quite shallow, cutting 
off the corn roots just below the lowest 
bugs; then follow with a barrow and 
brush i ack and forth until you are 
satiafled th^ hav* more thMi they 
can paek. If there is no raiv, straw I 
and fire is the next best plan; drive { 
along on the stubble, if the wind is \ 
right; fork otFthe straw and barn as 
you proceed; don't be afraid of destroy- 
ing your corn, for the bugs will destroy 
ten times as much if let alone, and 
then (wliat we call) the second crop 
will make the whole field lii^t and 
chaffy. 

There is no work done on the farm 
that pays better than killing chinch 
bugs. If any one has a better plan 
please give it iu the Rural, and then 
let all papers copy, and all that take 
papers tell those that don't vead them 
how to kill chinch bugs. 
Chapbl Hilii. a. F. C. 



FLORAL 

ExMbitio 



4 V 



'^AP-ZEOUSE, 



vV 



SPRATT a CO., 



pnoi'EiL:To::s, 



C n:e» Ei;|biii !i;id Maiu stre:-'a. 



LOUIrtVn.Li. KY. 



A. McBRIDE. 
HAHDWAHE, 



Farmm' and MeehawlBi' Tbola, 

HoaaekeepMs' aad Balboad Hntwwm 

ot every descriptloD. AgenU for 
American File Company aaA 
Morse Twist Drills. 

75 Third ttreett bet. Main and Markett 



BY THE 



LOUISTlLLE 



tion over 4 1-2 pounds of com to ono 

pound of pork, or a fraction leas than 
than 12 pounds of pork from a bushel 
of corn, an increase per day a little less 
than 2 3-4 pounds. The price of corn 
at that time iu his neighborhood was 
70 oaoti a boahel, so that the pork cost 
htevTarTeeitiapiMiid aad Ite Just 
barely got out of it whalLB, after allow- 
ing for shrinkage. 

We could multiply muAi experiments 
to an indefinite extent, bat the resnlts 
will not differ materially from the 
above, where the conditions are simi- 
lar. Probably, taking all the accurate 
trials together, tiie general average 
would be about l'  1-2 pounds of pork 
to a bushel ot corn of 56 pounds, and 
from this It is fisir to deduct about one- 
fifOi to get at the net weight, leaving 
say about 8 2-5 or 8.40 pounds of pork 
as the aveeage net result of the Judi- 
cious feeding of a j^ushel of corn, or 
one p'-'und of i- ork from G 2-3 pounds 
of corn uncooked. The lowest amount 
of cooked corumeal is stated at 34-5 
pounds to a ix uud of j-orl;. 

Now taking all*these experiments, 
and we eould easily show the relation 
which Ifae prioe of com bears to that 



« 4I|^t ft)|0^ ^jfetTOTW^**^'^ diesolved in water 
toa JwyrllqaM. Tb« rfBee of salt is, 
1st, to nm» n ^ buttermilk tnm the 
poree of tlla batter; and Sd, to i— d e r 
haimkM what eaanot be Mmored. 



Can if Hmim. 

The London Horse-Book says: Ail 
horsee must not be fed in the same pro- 
portions, without regard to their ages 
rheir oonatitntions, and their work; 
beeauie the idipropriety of auch a 
practice is self-evident Yet it is con- 
stantly done, and is the basis of disease 
of every kind. 

Never use had hay on acount of its 
cheapness, because there is no proper 
noorishmeut iu it. 

Damaged com is exceedingly in- 
jurious, because it brings on inflam- 
mation of the iMwds and skin dis- 
eases. 

Chaff is better for old horses than 
hay, because th^ c:iQ chew and digest 
it better. 

Mix chart with corn or 'jeans, and do 
not give the latter alone, because it 
makes the horse chew his food more 
and digest |#b«Ctif, 



Hay or graes itehe will not support a 
of pork, by rimwing the price of pmrhiitiorse under hard work, because there 



per pound, at different prices per iMnh 
el for corn. If corn were 12 1-2 cents 
per bushel, pork would cost a cent and 
a half per pound, aud iu that propor- 
tion throughout, or giving it in deci- 
mals, we have : 

Pork V p. Corn r bu. Pork "f* lb 
in cents. cents. cents. 



...r'j bu. 

27 
f» 
23 
2S 
«0 
SI 

c 



1.5 
L78 

2.3S 
2.H2 
2. n 
:{.. 7 
3 92 
4. 



4 o2 
4.1S 

5. 

5.^.^ 
6.. 4 
7.14 
7.74! 
8.:33 



With com at 50 cents per bushel, 
pork will cost 5 95-100 cents per pound. 
If corn costs seventy cents per bushel, 
the pork will cost 8 3G-100 cents a pound 
to produce, aud so on. But ttiere are 
naa&y wtio cannot raise com at fifty 
cents a Iwshel and many who cannot 
ndse it for 70 cents. If the com costs 
more the pork wi'.I eo^t more. If corn 
is selling at oO cei:' -a lusbel and pork 
will bring but 5 cc-i.ts a pound, you had 
better sell the corn tliau feed it out in 

large quantities 
By reversing the table, you have, of 

course, the value of corn per bushel at 
diflbrent prices per pound for pork, the 
com to be need In feeding for the pro- 
duction of pork; and to find what the 
price of pork should b^per pound, 
lakiug the price of corn as the basis of 
f-alculaf.on, j'ou divide the price of a 
hjshel of corn by S.4 i. thi- number of 
pounds of pork produced by a bushel 
of corn, as we have seen, and the quo- 
titnl will b« the answer. If, for ex- 
■■pli.'inni la iO cents, divide it by 
flJI^ and yo« haw 8 JS oaiita. And so 
to find what the price of ooni iriM«ld 
be when pork is selling at a certain 
l rice per pound, you multiply the price 
of a pound of pork by 8.4 ) and the 
product will be the answer. Suppose 
pork is selling at 10 cents a pound, 
what shoald be the price of com used 
to imd out in its production? you mul- 
tiply the 10 eents by 8.40, the avwage 
namber of pounds of pork, niade by a 
i^ jriMl of oocn, and you have 84 OMits 
i ^f^a aonMponding price of oon. 



is not sufficient nutritive body in eith- 
er. 

When a horso is worke.l har:l its f  od 
should chielly lie oat- ; if nut worked 
tiard its food should chiefly be hay; be- 
cause oats ' supply more nourishment 
and fleeh-making material than any 
other kind of food; hay not so much. 

Rack feeding is wasteful. The bet- 
ter ])Ian is to feed with choppeii hay, 
from a manger, because the food is not 
then thrown out, and is more easily 
chewad and digeatad. 

Sj^nkto the hay with water that 
has salt dissolved in it, because it is 
pleasing to the animal's taste, and 
more easily digested. A teaspoonful 
of salt in a booket of water ie suffi- 
cient. 

Oats should l e hraieed for an old 
horse, but not for a young one, because 
the former, through age and defective 
teeth, cannot chew them properly; the 
young horse can do so, and they are 
thus properly mixed with the saliva, 
aud turned into wholesome nutriment. 



To Make a Sheep own a Lamb- 



Applyiif Kuiwra. 

A. correspondent of the Rural Home, 
V^rites : If the farmer has manure 
made, or kept through the summer, It 
will become fermented; it cannot be 
av ridod in tha wans eaaaon. Bu6h 
manure is iMist applied on the surface, 
and worked in with the harrow ; and 
if applied to winter wheat, there ia per- 
haps no better mode, as it has the me- 
chanical effect of keeping the surface 
loose to resist the frosts of winter, as 
well as the etimulating eflbct ct pro- 
ducing an earthy growth of the crop. 
But iu the use of green manures in 
spring for summer crops, experience 
has convinced me that to plow under, 
aud allow fermentation to take place 
in the so:!, where all the volatile gas- 
es can he absorbed and taken up by 
growing crop, ia most economical aud 
best. We are often deceived in the 
effects of manure by the amount used. 
In applying' common iMurnyard ma- 
nure in an unfermented state, we get 
but about one-third the amount of 
manure iu the same bulk that we tiave 
when used iu a di eaj'ed comiition. 

Figs in the Open Air. 

We doubt as to the hardiness of 
every variety of fig in this climate, but 
nevertheless here is a hint maybe use- 
ful for an experiment, aud we may 
have Kentucky &^s, who knows? Cole- 
mau^ oT the Rural World, of St. Louis, 
says: "We have raised the fruit in 
the open air, but flrom a slight inad- 
vertency had the wood always injured 
if not destroyed in the winter, by 
using straw, rags and barrels to cover 
them. General Worthington, of Ohio, 
wiv) lias raided flgs there for thirtj- 
years; after mauy fruitless trials finds 
that simply laying down the limlos on 
the ground and covering with six 
inches of .soil ie the beet i«otection. 
They are obtained as one-year old 
plants or as cuttings, as they strike 
easily. Tlie common yellow or small 
purple are tha best varieties. The 
plants begin to bear at two years, aud 
these two varieties will produce fr\iit 
from July to October. With this imto- 
tectiou during winter, any soil that 
will grow good tomatoes will produce 
figs. They are delicious eaten fresh 
from the tree or with cream and sugar. 
The plants are set ten to twelve feet 
apart. It is much regretted that more 
attention is not paid to th0 culture of 
this fruit." 



JEFFERSON COUNTY 



ASSOCIATION, 



On their groands, near Louisville, Kjr., oom- 
meocing on * 



Thursday, June 6th, 1872, 



And oonUnoiof tbree dagrs» 



Th*^ Iiirfftrirv willspuie neither pains noi 
e.x,' t^usf- in I'lUtiim tl;e a;i ounflt and biiild- 
liia»; in \ i \ f -. ' iii.li !- tor- t'.K- fxi!it !t;oi:. 

Theeiiti - Fioni; Hall, inland dowu st.iirs. 
will hi' .•t«;ir()} ri.i Io i tor tli.- disp'.aj- of fiow 
ers ami f1'./ nl dosiiins. tlieiet.'V giving all ei 
iiibliors .".ri)]);*^ roiiru for (ii i*;jiy. 

Premium lists will l e ready loi distrlbutloii 
on the l-Hb of April, and may be obtained bv 
addreadng 

I. L. HYATT, President, 

Or W. H. MERIWETHEIl, S«cielary. 

spU-td 



rr-s s. fHEti-Ji. jKHSi c hbmikii f. 

J. S. PEELPS i CC, 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE, 



Coruer 



■tnrli antl Main Streets 



jAn20-60Q 



GL073R, w'.::;::;: a co.. 
Tobacco Warehouse, 

Main 5tM bet. Xintte aud T«st]i« 

LOriSVILLE. KY. 



All Tohacco*; Tt r-,'ivi-(i i-y r,^ will be iiiHured 
!iaiii;ijsf OSS or li\ iiiffo:- ^ixtydays 

after arrival, fret' of oi  i t.p 'iwi-.pr. Auction 
sales daily. Keturns prouipily made. 

.. waat9-lt 



iU S43r 



jos.T.to]CFmisAceL 



DRY GOODS. 

CVnOW TARH s. 

BATTIBO. *& 
Kos. 70 and 7a W^er Bias ev Bizni Bs^ 

mh20 ly IX UJHV1X XA KT. 



laiporter mmd Wholw Te Dealer In 

Nuts and Fancy Groceries, 

FOURTH '■ Tr.EET, Iwt. MAIN & M.\RKET 

I have opened my NEW STORE, »f» above 
with an excellent Maortment oi' goodsi, con- 
Blstlnc in part at dlreel Importattone of 



RAISJ.VS, FKJH. fURRANT^. 
DATES, PtlUNEr^, CIRTONS. 
ENGLISH. FRENCH AND 

DOMESTIC PICKLES, 



And a full aamrtment of best brands Canned 
Goods of every dej-criptlon, all new, ami se 
lected wltb ftrest ca»^, pnrche?e i at U e Imv 
est cash prices and offered witK a cert.i:uty o! 
fjivli^g entire tuitistinctlon as to quality ?.r«^ 
|.riCi.'s. ^ motto iB **Qaick sales aud »!nAlt 
profits." 

o«2i-iy ('. G. pr oci; 



PAGE & CO., 

PR0P]||8101» 

FARMERS' 
Tobaeco Warehouse, 

Main st, bet Bli^ai and Ifbitti, 

JiOUISVILM:. KV. - ' 



INVESTMENT. 

THE Traders' Bank and Warehouse Compa- 
ny oflter tor sale the lollowlug bonds, to- 

^ Sixty (60) one tbooaand dollar bonds, Casey- 
vllle district. Union county, Ky., bearing 
etfit per cent. Principal and Interest paya- 
ble at Bank of America, New York. Fifteen 
(15) one thoosand dollar bonda. L UwUeT iUe 
district. Union county. l^Xt beanMeMkaMV 
cent. Principal and interest peyaliealBnK 
of America, New York. 

As the localities issuing these bonds are al- 
most entirely free from debt, and will be 
 atly benefitted by the baildlng ol the Ma l- 

inTllle and Sbawneetown railroad. In aid 

of which they were Issued, we regard the se- 
cnrlty good and the investment desirable. 

We also Invite bids on $125,000 7 per cent, 
bonda of tbe city of Evansville. Total au- 
tliortxed MU, «L,SM N»; nopiilaUon. 

^f^a-^b*^"^ 



J. K. 



4 HIGOIlfS^ 



DLstilleis and Dealers in 



, RONALD, JK. 



ronald.bhotebe&co., 

NINTH-STHEET 

TOBACCO WAREHOUSE 

Corner Main and Ninth streets, 



LC'ISVILLE, KY. 



}antt-ly 



Fresh and Genuine 



CARTER, JOHN T. FISnE. 

JAJOB 6. cAxma. 



mm, \m 



Snccessora to 




EEXTOCEY BOUBBOl 



see.! 



Two 



LOUISVILLE, KT. 



jan 13-lT 



m. 



ALL AND WZNTEB 



till 



A eorrespoudeut of the Maiue Farm- 
er, witteK Bometimes it is flesirable 
to make one sheep own the lamb of 
another, but often it ia a difBcnIt task. 
An experiment that we tried a few 
days since proved a perfect success 
and was easily conducted; and for the 
benefit of those who may be similarly 
situated we communicate it to your 
oolaauis. One of oar sheep lost her 
lamb. I A few days a yearling drop- 
ped A lamb which she did not own 
and in tecthadno milk for it. We 
took tbe lamb immediately after it 
was dropped and sprinkled it with 
fine salt and placed it with tbe sheep 
that bad lost her lamb. As soon as 
she tasted the ealt she commenced 
licking the lamb, and in a short time 
was as fond of It as she was of hac 
own. She is now taking tha gwto a t 
«aie of her adopted ekarga. 



mil m.k aASO mm k mmi 



Imp »tcfs and Wholesale Dealtrs In 



STAPLE AND FANCY 



BBY GOODS 



IVOTIOIXS.. 



Prompt «ti*-ntion given to oix'.ers. Hoad- 
qnarters for Hope Jeans and all Koutbern and 
^Veet•ra nuuinfaetnred goods. Bpeelalties lu 
Dress and Ifuncy Goope end Notions, 



262 MAIN STREET, 

Souti Side, below Sevenrii, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

mrSO-tf 



Georgia Corn in Egypt. 

r Gen. Charles P, Stone, ' formerly of 
the United States army, now attached 
to the Egyptian War Office at Cairo, 
reports a very satisfactory cultivation 
of Georgia corn, tbe seed of which was 
received from tbe United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. It was not 
pUnted tUl the 20th of August last, 
tbns loosii4( aii^t dajs, of the hot 
«Qmmar weatktr. It MOM air in four 
days, and, behig weU irriiated with 
Nile water, grew rapidly, reaching the 
height of eight feet, throwing out three 
or four shoots from each stock. The 
ears were gathered at Christmas, full 
and ripe, but not as long as he expect- 
ed to see them. The hills were shaded 
by orange trsas, and ki n oa the exparl- 
mamtdldtt^t 'ia aaa rf m vftt as it 
might kava tea* 



HEiriT WIHMH0F7, 

UPHOLSTEBEE, 

27o. &2 West llain Strsst, 

Warehouse and Factory No. 29 East 
Main St.. three door from Gait House- 
. • oo38-tr 



Garden & Vegetable 



FLOWER SEEDS. &c., 

Imi oried dii^etly from Knglard. Qernuuny 
aud the Eastern Staip«, rf^aidfese ot 
cost, havinc only Best Qoality 
in view, by 

I«TAlSr^ Sc ISTETJITEIl., 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Seed Storp Xo. 173 Fourth street, between 
Green and Wainut streets. Our IllnsJrated 
Descriptive CuUioKue is sent free to all -who 
apply. fsblT-tf 



WHOLBSALS. 



ill'CORD.BIIiDL[!UO. 

No. an MAIN ■tN«t._ML OCYENTH and 
KIQHTH, 

LOUISVILLE, KY., 

Dealers iu Foreign aud Dome-tic 

DRY GOODS & NOTIONS 



Fall and Wtater or ISTl. 
WMeliwfflfceuaint 

LOW TO TBE TRADE. 



Agents 1 
en and   
Blankets, Yarns, Sbeettng. ■Slc. 



oc28-tf 



CHARLES MILLER, 

WQoleeale and Betatl Dtaler in 

BEST PITTSBIRGH 

COAL, 



OAee, 188 Jeflbrson street, bet 4th and 



FLORAL PAIK, 

\Ve make a sj eci.i'.'y ol 

Greenlioiise Beddiiig Plants and Bulbs, 
BOTJG^TJETS, 

Floral Designs and Plants 

For WecldiuE Parlies. Funtials, Ac. Corner 
Sixth stret-i ami (iiiu-i .v auenne. Orders by 
lUitil or tt-legi-Hpli will rt'* -ive i-ronipt atten- 
tion. AU pluuts warrauletl tru^- to name and 
sent by ext res^ C. O. D. Send lor t 'alalogue. 

Conservatorj^.4th sL, near Walnut.   
Addrea 

•FLORAL PARK ASSOCt ATION," 
ap20-3m J. SERB A CO., Proprietors. 



SALT. SALT. 

ROBERT A. NEWHOOE. 

General Agent 

Ohio River and Kanawha 

AndaoleAamtlm tliis City for the 

Okil linr, M Kutib 

OF AU. ORADXS. 
NO. 29. THIRD PTIIEET, 
BeClreen Main and the RiTer. 

LonsvnxE. kt. 

The Ohio River J*alt Company :s composed 
of the'fbllowiug conipauies: 



OLD WHISKIES, 
Sehmdw V Coektett mm. 

I^mrlk and Jfnin SlrteU^ 

idofovpriusiititf. 



Bogar Run Salt Cc. 
Fomeroy do 
Lesdlni^on do 
West Columbia do 
Hirtford City do 
Coal Ridge do 
Bedford Uo 
Byracose do 
Itamap do 
Oemaa c!o 
VaUsgrClty do 



Dabney Salt Co. 
Excelbior do 
Miuersville do 
Union do 
SUr do 
Jacmon do 
Clifton do 
Diamond do 
Hatton do 
Hope do 
New Castle do 
Wtedsor do 

The Kanawha Salt Co. Is composed of the 
fSnllowinKFnmaeM: ^ 
Pioneer Tnxnaee, Loean Fnrnace, 

Wasblnattm do Snow HIU do 

Critienden do ^maa do 

Danl Boone do Kgaton oo 

Bnmlng Sivtns Fsmaae. 

I can tarnish any ol tha a fcew r e 
may bodeaind. 
Oetlttr 



^ Bkomk Spied, 

us MVali IU ZMlM^^r 




f 



X ncJ iit^t via 1 M.n cl Gomniercial Grazetie. 



A. SCHOEFFEL. 
I C. SCBOXFFSJU 



cr 



A. SCSHBFFEL ft CO; 
FO£K ■ PACKERS, 



IS Wt 



UaOUSVILLB, KT. 



del6-Iy 



HEXKT O. TrniXXn. JAVn M. DVNCAK 

BKYAir p. SC.\LLy. JOaiUA O. JABVIS. 

JAB7IS & CO^ 
PORK-rAOKBKS 

General Provision Dealers, 

47 West Main StrMt, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



deie-ly 



J. C. B'MBBAIf. 

B. A. BAOBT. 



$1,000,600 ! 

PUBLIC UBRARY OF KENTUCKY. 

FStES mjMlfG FOR ALIi .49 n  

EALP A MIIIION m GIFTSM! 



MTEilX 




Pr«Tisiou Bealm Md fieaeral Cmi- 
■iMlMlmfeuti, 

Cma ot the GaMxatod 



^ Ka Kate and it tmd 91 WmUi^Im Hfti 



CHOUSE. 

. W.. THOlfAS & CO^ 

PMlDHi, Oiren of the Celebnted Golden 
Haau, Breakfast Bacou.  fce^ and gen- 
eral Dealers in 

PROVISIONS, 




200 MS 



^ - I II . I 



^EES, 60SLEE & CO., 

PORK-PACKBRS, 

PROVISION & COMMISSION 

UBd CBrenof "Kentucky" brand Sogar- 
cored Haius, 

es SMond street, Lonisvnie, Ky. 



^AXILTOir BBOTSEES, 

PORK Pi^OKKBS, 

AND 

POMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

iroprleton of the oelebreted Pee- Dee Pork- 
pase. Logan street, between Jacob and 
lamilton. Carers of the cel. : rrtt. l Sngar- 
srcd "Pee-Dee Hams." Eusln* ^ liouse, 

C4 Second St, bet, M^dn d- Market, 

\ I.OUISVILLi:. ICY. (leKMy 



Fourth Street, between Green ard Walnut, liOuisviUe, Ky. 

iri^'i*?T!^i?v*^^ii?-!5®.f**«''''® Legislature, incorporating the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF 
K-bNlUcKY , and granaugtta ptapetoal coat iai-, Uu» xivmxjom wUl^flv* Uieir 

SECOND GB AND GIFT CONC3ERT, 

In tlie great hall of the PabUe Library Bnlldlng, in Louisville, Ky., 

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1872. 

Bailrting has a front  .f 68 feet on Fonr.h street, by aO-pth of 2W) rn. -oin- sio. '.es n 1 "iKl.t 

l^r . .'^V'^^'^r*'' '^^",""*, Library at a owit of &l;»,.oo. Tt.e tiu:^ largj ",o a Uo"nln^^^^ 

K^L ■^l^-'"''"/.. "P'-n i.rt l fr * to ihegTAtuftous nw and enjoyment of ail  «i^iui^e^^ 

btal.- lu iiie I inau. Amiii isira purpose  ..! ti.e Trustees, by t.he "Ka v •.\.iv-t\   ^^ t^'r now annoMS 
for tbe asth of tseptember, to raii«? the money wilb which io pa . th" ba;.-i.--rr:T. ' th^' p-.rchS.* SionTv dSe 
upon tbePablicLibrarv boUdlng,toenlaz«etUaiaKary n.i".rh ;.s :., "i -o v? rmi,,w ?hp-^ns?i 

Iw^l? "I* contriborion of a sia^e cent toward the support of tUt Jibrarv." To provide the 
Sf^S^h wll K^sflH""*!"!" philanthropic undertaking, ONE IIU.N^IJKED TllOlt^AS'D TICKB^, at 
f 10 each, w 111 be m Id. 1 jii li ticket consists of four quarters, bearinK the sa.-ne -minter and mav be divided 
wh^ii'i^iiL'i''.*""*',^.?'"','.*''' through the a.viKionil spaces left ft.?that pu^e TS^^ 

^^£^if«V-S^,*'if'' ^"tit CI to ariini^sion to the coiu-ert and to the entire ,riit awa«fcd fclot to^alD^te. 
?ilMtoX%,\^Mo ;Vci^^ .'^rM.'V'^V "'=V''r'"" thecon *nandtoon6^htiS^iiS35d 

2i«^fo?'r. 'l'.':.'"'--t'''=i-*^ V '«'-ter^||»; n whole tkAetalbrCloo; asforfaM} M for |Soe; lU IbrSmo 

■ 'f-^r.v.-H.. NodiscounionleMthaBflOO worthof atatime. ' "«^»«'»"' 

During thecc nccrt tin- .-uni of 

$500,000 IN CURRENCY 

WBI begivea to tbebol'iers of tick-ff^ by .:Ntr!h ition hy !ot of one TJ;oL'8AKD gifts, «a IbllOTrq: 

Lisa? O-F a-iiPTs. 



couHBi mm-m\ 



FOB BALE BT 



Bridgeford & Co., 



Sixth, bet. Main and, Hiver. 

mar9-it 



O&AirD GIFT, OASB. .. 

€i5,'.t'0 Cjii b 



osrs 
oxrs 

1 

1 

iZZ''.Z'. 
1 

iZZ'.'.'.'.'.'. 

1 

l._ 

lZZ'"Z 



Total 1,'XK) Gifts, r.ll cnnh. 



•2- . m 

■ J / 
." .' (") 

4.1 IK) 



(i:t(«( ol t2,0bOeacti. 

55  1,000 " . 

I I " S.-ti •* . 

-! •' « 0 " . 

" 7iK1 " ,. 

"  " 600 .. 

  " 500 " .. 

■ I 4 Jft ., 

u 3 0" . 

• 0 " SO-i •• ., 



$1^0,000 
50,000 

.» «,ooo 

ir ,(X!0 

is.i.or 

.....^ lO.S'W 

^..^IKi 

.....^ ill.U.! 

........ 22..')i«. 

2U.(J0 ) 

IS.O-'O 

,„ 211,000 

(il,J X 

.?ilU,0'' 



WASHBffiTON FODNOBY. 

JOHN B. DAVXES, 

M.inufactnrer of Marine, Land and Portable 

STEAM SH6IHE8, 

Grist, Bistiilerj ud Saw 101 ladiMnf, 

TOBACCO. GOmir AHB lAT mSBBS 
AW 8GK1WS, 

B «er,Shwt Iran and Copper W«it ot 
•II t eMriptioii«, 

Wrought Iron r*p0 mnd Steam WUHmgt, 

tSlteam and Water CKngea, WUellMi, te. 

Corner Main and Ninth Streets, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



M. uoniKsox. o. t. etrrFiKLB. jo. knowles. 

J. M. ROBINSON & CO. 

DKY GOODS 



STEEL EAIL! DOUBLE TEACZ I 

Baitiiore &lio Bailmil, 

The Qmt Short I4iie &om GIHOnnrATI w CO- 
LUMBUS 

El j^LSO?! 

BaTing 87 to lU mllw, and arrlTlng ono tnOn 
In advance at 

NEW YOKK. 

Saving ai mllea and tnlTlBc DC lieoit in ad 
vane* at 

Bil.i:,TIMORE. 

Saving 77 miles njirf arriving S?^ hours Inad- 

N - :it 

R«aehinc 

PHILADELPHIA. 

One train the qoiokest, 

no Croat Iroa lallway IrMfet 

Over the Ohio river, at Parkenbug shd BaU- 
atre, are eompleted. 

Morning  ;ight Lines ol* 

BuUman*8 Palace Drawing Jtoom 
and Steeping Care 

Are mn on Uila rovte tmm OlneiBBatl otO - 
lombtu tQ Baltimore or WaaUncton City. 

WITHOUT CHANGE. 

By this route you avoid ALL OMNIBUS 
TltANSFEBS and FiaRRIES. 

TlcltetB for sale at all Ticket Offices in the 
South and West. 

L- M-i'^^-K, J. L. WII-SON. 

Gen'i TicJiet Agent. Master Transport'n, 

Baltimore, Md. Baltimore, Md 
SIDNEY B. JOKKB.Gen'l Pnss. Agent, 
ocM-tf Ciacinnaii, Ohio. 



1\/ 3000 



y Si 




0Kr THE BEST. 

WEBSTER'S 

Unabridged Dictionary. 

*•»••• Wwda and MeanJngaSaot In oChar 

Ljctlocaries. 



3000 Engravingj^M^Pagee Quarto; 

Tmienever I \ri.«h to obtain exact 
W¥ tlons, I c msuli i*. ^Hchuyier 

Every scholar knows ;rs valne. 
[W. u. Presoott, the HlatOffaMh] 

Been one of my daily companions. 
[John L. MoUey, the Historian. *c. 

S »*'«»lk«OW,hieldeflningI)i. ; ,nary. 
fHorace Mann.) 

The best gnideof atadentA u/ oarLaanuMa. 
[John G. WhimnO 

Excels aU others In deflningsclent iflc terms. 
iPtesident Hitchcock.^ 

Eenoarkable compendium of human knowl- 
edge, hv. S. Clark. Pres t Ag. College!] 

A neceesit^for every intelJlgent familv 
ftadent, teacher and pr' fessioniUiaaB. y^mk 
Ubn»laeMBpieteirUhoat tHelM^BlSS 
OiemMMHryT — 

Also, 

Webftex't HatioEal Pictorial Dia- 
tlonary, 

1040 Pages Octavo; 600 EocraTiaflR 

Price $5. 

The work Is really a gem of a Dletlonaiv 
Jnst the thine fV.«r the Miilton,— f xi XSSL 
EdueaUonal Ihfontbly. — 

PuhUrtied ^* G. * C. 31 EBRIAM« Spd^ 
field,' Maaa. Sold by all bookaallara. 



WM.KAYE, 



vt 

Char^ Steamboat and I^tatlon Bella 
Alao, Brass Castings and finishec 
work of every description, 
ter street, bet. First and 
Seoond, Louisville, Ky. S-aC-jO 



TH^ LOUISVILLE 



AKD 



3^0TI03SrS, 

Vo. 2M9 Mala Street, 

Opposite Ixtalaville Hotel, 

LOTJis'sriXiiiE, K-sr. 

Jan«-e: 



,Tr'ui'«-'.*'.'A''M'' '■-^■•^ I "la be pai.'. on p-.eseat-tion att4je'.fHc* of the Public T.ibr.irv, tlip 
lira (iH., .iitf-r ihc ^h ■.,^^ cr i:-,.n anv MiMi^rx- , ^ v ;ur six montb8 tbereoftcr. 3Jo prize wiU i e paid 



third (lay alter liic ilr 

V. ituc ut pre.s«-:itatioii of ti 

Tlif ftraw-ng will tnlco jil.-ico 
ion of iIh' olHrns aii ; lrii.-l--Hs 
(lisiiitertMfii clti;-fti«. v.l-.u wl; 
iron. M. 1". KA ;:iirN..Tii::L'.- 



•n any hu 
!-  t ..rit(sfr:wtioiiii- j 
iii I 'lhlio. in ti;i; v;i ',' 
o' 1 h,' l'nl)iio I.;i ;i'.r\ 
^M i rt'.stn: aiirt r  e li. 
"f A pm-f y. 



.. ILIAN MARBLE WORES 



Late 



»11:LD00\, BI LLETT & CJO., 

liarble Works and gtadlo 

la i?amira, Itatr, 

UHDEK TEE DTr.KJ-riOK OF 

Koaa. Chat. BoUett Sculptor, 

or tbm KmArnmj of flne Arts, Par 

TATUE.S Monomenta, Toaaba, Tablete, 
_ Vaults, Tllfs, Vane. Ifanteir Ac. A«J 
'^uted from the very beat rtf IniH sm 

ta..' loeltaUanMartle, Also, 

RAIVITE WORT* 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

jHlc6-No. Green Ftreet, between Third 
and ? ourth. Lo^i^•vllJe, Ky. 

fc^Offlce and Warerooms in ist. Louis, 
a-ner OUve. between ElevenUt and Twelfth. 



AUEKICAIT and FOEEIGU 

PATBNT OFFICE. 

[ESTABLISHED 1862.] 

P.\ TENTS for new inventionsseenred in the 
United States and all Fnrnpoan countries 
at greatly red need rates. Patent rights and 
l^atented goods sold on commission. 



Hon. J. IV.'x-i '  ]■ K .' rt. i-tf "M (• I 
Hon. H. \V. HUT' }•„ .'u'lffMl; nj,!i. (a! t i t ) "v" 
 ;fi,. K!.I ir. : ;l l i.A v. \ . s. .Vurs-iia;. Disi. K'v. 
Hon.T. r:.( Oc:ii;.\A".LliAiuvllorJLou'vUie Chan- 
cer}' f.Jiirt 

Hon. i: 1). S.7 .\ NiJlFOBD.PresMt. Famien* and 

Ijrevcrs' 1 ;ip:-. 
Ii -ii. .inj ;■ .\v V.KF.. Muna. er lloyal losurance 

( onij.xii-.-. I.ivsri.i .il. 
Col. PKti.. i.:,K. roi.i. .-, t:'y sm.  iiilicial dirt. 
I/r- "y^"^' '! ' J.' ■• "';-.l!'?"'''e'; of '-ridiiini ("r.liinet. 

lir.'-i.':-. ]■') 

The I'lij.w: hv riiilfiren fnm) lore 1 

which ciiii I.I •: :!.' ;u..:i. i)'  ■. ..i.f ui \s i :, i. . .„..■..„ .„,. . ., 
and the oT!;-r I -utiii .- wiili naiiilr. rs.. ■ .rn -ot ;u!;i:£: :  'i.' il 

of txitlj « li.-l- an- ii,(.r..ii«i:iy iiii.\i- l liy :  \-..'v:i.f, li.^ Vdj.nd rl ij,i jit '1 
nom, aii 1 iJi, II tl;e child at tl.esea nrt v.iiWi v. ill orati aiit ili« retrom 
lontf tc. ii;t- i,un,l .T drawn lnni edi:ite)y Ik fore ;t. 'i"hi:Ml,iy r iof  -'.s 
rtrawii, uii.l it :s .-viftent that, by thlsji;o !e of tlrawlrc, fraud, favonu 
any nuKitiir will (h•HV.■,i^ inii'o.s-il)if 

In a Ciiu-a' sr) l.fciicticial v^'.Uf piitilic, it iyexptctpi] 
sold or i.ot. tlic tirHv.iiit: u iM ii« v. ; ll^eUs." iiDsolmel v 
day of tfi. . rawing, they will l e dt*tro\ cd, and li.-" l 
nnii ^ll ' Ml valuf in projiortion to the pei ce»:ta}; ■ 
of tli;- tK 1 • !- an- sold, the capital gift will be reduc- ■! 
' '■■ the sail- of ...11 the tickets and a full d-:' . i 



' !m mediate supc-rvi»- 
.'::.:i e ! eminent and 

f ! f iiSvIIlo. 



r ti;r.'i - 
i;f IJ Ofl Co. 
Naiiojial Bank. 



..n!T^^ l^, Miiu'.i.'er G.\it Ho: s». , Jjr. JSORVIN ORic.i. 
- :ol. Mil!, l":! vi-ri-ity, I.ouiKvii'e. VAI.. ROSE, Aicert ; 

■nrs otiicc. f 



•! !Jie audience, and tin dor -:• 

I j;  ri Ki---, t;. ' iuiio^Mi 

: • .': i.s .v.u ly doi-e: 
Km. .T. J. KAXTKK. Mhv • 
, I'o... T. L. El'KNETT. t": 
I ilKNItV WOL,yOKI).Trv;i' 
N O. BRANNIN. ITis': M;. 
1 HIJ.II' JVD'JF,, ft It I ..I 

.TAS. Bitll i fip.l-. ; .. , •: 

W. C. I'. WillPPs!, 1 n j r t"r Will.Md Hotel. 
J. (". JOHXHTON, Pr. sidei;: Tr ^U i-i' ii. iik. 
H. VICTOR J{J£WCo:ait, tfr.a of .NVw.-ond), Buch 
anan A t'o 

HENRY UEPPKN'.rrp'v't nr (Jf^rinnsi i'ouk. 
ANDREW 6RAHa ;, T. oacco A Cotton Herch't 
._ ' N.i rps. I..AC. Hhort-LlneR 

p.is TCxjirese Co. 
. ..^ ■■ Pis. the contents of 
- I'^.liieealeahoxes, 
■ ) ." fti»r the contents 

V cir v.- H ..iimoer tliere- 
'■'.- ■ : '.i.'i- liiav. n will l'.- 
.:. r- U .-LINT gilts :ir»- 

or i: k :.u\vl(.  ii;e of wtiat gilt 



.t evry ticket wi.l be 
cpUc. SlMUlfianv;; 
c::'-.- n.'Jf-ri il will li i l 



hut whether all are 

  t-- 1 1." left unsold on the 
11 .Mill pa:.;. t;n: '!!- 
::i Kpt-;. 1 ( r irsiMic-, ..niv tlirre-iovirlh.s 
. ..'.i;.. ar, othfis '.n pro;, iti 'ii. 
r Al.u :iiini«i to l.iiv  ;»oii;dOosoearlv. I)e- 
, , r . r . . .1 . .° j , - ^in' " ;.T' ' • » • " a - luananmentu hnj the dar of diawlni; is 
•"Hi I'.r , , f,')'^^ ^" »" ' ' tbeKrst concert given f..r the henefit ofthe pSb^ 

IR i.lhrar. , 111 I.w.mbi'r lat^t, thousands oi dolu.rs «■•. vtd lor t:cke! i were retur'ied beanae themonaC 

1 h ^ .n'-^d ot o, cur afcain, If Uioae who want tickets apply for una In time. 

be k^rowi; i^n^'s "hev'^iroJItn^"^ '•"•^ pnrcta»e or d«w girs need not 

^ul  •hn■-,•r:^ of tickets will note that there are 1 ,i«0 gifts for dMilbatioa bv lot at this MmMwt * . - 

721 a.- Ht IIh- tirvt i-iitf-rtaiument In Liecemlier Ia«t uj-wmwmub oy loi aiuia eOBCen, Ustesd Of 

or ..tio-rwisp and not paid for w j.en the drawing comes off «»n oepunoui on CO. D. orders 

T 1h- '1 riist  i-s have s«f 11 nil tli(- service* of Hon THi iS F" Ttft A\ri V'm-v n r -r^ . , 

to . cf .1.S their a;,'.^nl in lii.- finaiH ial and business aft ir^ ot-thi-(.rand«S^ 
len,M.s known to ali..o.st .very one in Ki-nincky . au.Uo verv man" cit i?..s^ 

ami lie is authorized to see that the money arisinK from th ^ «"ilp^tf tirUPts '«  Jr.lf^ 2- Dalon. 

Drovers' Hank to remain for the payment^ tha offered i ris i ^ko fl!.'^ f 'll" Farmers' and 
conducted and the elfls Justly awarded %dpi^iptlv^^ ° ^^'"^ draw lug is tatrly 

All.gifus drawn wTll be paicfintull without any dlscoui.t. At the concert in December last, for the ben- 



conducted and the gifts Justly awarded ►nd promptly pai?] 

. n will be paid in full wltbontany discount. .,11, i„e (.-wDcertin uenemhor loat 

y^"^f • the«pital gift was drawn by Mr. JOHNTDUBFJr!rt^fcL2SLT*i^^nd" 
^aid to him without discount. 80 all tbe gifts thendriWwa»iaidIaSda?Jff 

(i all applications ofageots 



efit of the Publk; Librar; 
, Uie entire snm pai  

. will be paid again. 

Inventors International Gazette. . '^. 2°iSi'»'?"*''D'' connected « mi tlu   (,ncert, an-: on'f rs for t.cket 
I ' I to asu wrreSi, saouid be iuldre«t (- i 10 



\0 CEISTXS I^EPl 

HENRY E. ROEPER, 

Engineer and Patent Aeent, 
aplS-tf a02 BROADWAY, jr. T. 



rBIE HOUSE, 



&d 8t» bet HiAi 4 l^eaiiiore, 



BOSr. TBOS. S. B&AKUISTS, 

▲OEXT PUBI.IC LiBBaBT. PlibUc lihiaiy BnOdlBg.Xioalaviue, Ky. 

Those who communicate with this offlce shonld write their names and poetofflcer very nlainlv Ordina. 
plalnly^ ritle?^ writing may b« made oat, but names of persons and places, to be undentood, must be 

The PuMic lihrmry i" now open day and nUdit. and .all citlzecF are cordially invited to the nseand en' 
oyaMM ofttt books, perlodJcala asMl papaoi Jras of " 



Jt 

JOHN 8. CAI 



. President, 
r. Hecreury. 



charci - 

W. X IIAI.i nMAX. Vice-President. 
FakmEKs DRUVERij' BANK, Treasurer 



At the earnest .solicitation of the Tru! t(-es of the Put.'.ic rJbrary 
- —ent. To tbe management and oouirol of this undi-rtiikinK 



 f Kentucky. I have consent^ It' 
• time will be devoted, flrom tin 



agent. » w m*,. ■■iM mw ^^a^J^jm. »uu VI OI JS llinir-ll ...... ..... tv^i,.u ^.--i. 

^^*ir3iS^:l?}^lS!i[S^^iS'i^L^^''^ Al^^^^ ^ duty to .see that the money' arising fron. the 
»JJ« Of lsdwp*tililB tl*B Jpn^ Drovers' Itank, to remain for the pavmeut of tlu- offered 

glfly to see tbat the otawlng te fljlrty contacted, and that tliose who draw jrift« are promptly paid on pre- 
5??H^-*'5..°Li?5'!i'??f[!?i,^'l.'^-l*'i^'}"S..^ ■'^^^ "J i^- "'■'oy ability. ThiB concert is giv^ 



mwukuuK Wl idi.:ii iivjivcui, Buu luiBnuio' 1 Bnaii perTorm to tm- i p!-;i or mv abilitv. Thr» concert is efven 
for the purpose of enlarging and making Belf-suatainine a free library, already the largest and most val- 
us-ble ever known in J-oulgvIlle, and It Is to be hoped that . fr,r si) lau-faijl.- a purpose, . very ticket may be 
a old. K nowing the ojj|ect to a jEopd one, and the means lawful, I shall do all I can to makeit thesucoras it 
o«jau»iSS» aod wtuob Usoebt pi) It will attain. 

whow^tah to act aa^agents for ttie sale of tickets can Itarn terms by addre&sing me as above di- 
Soa» Mi4 thoaewbo oan give tbe beet of references need appl v. Liberal terms will be slven to 
who can Itarnish satisfhi'tory refereucer ■i.tma 



II'ANTEI — Agents for our new 16-pacepa- 
I  er, The Contributor. Thirteen depttft- 
nients, religions and secnlar. Rev. A. B. 
Earle writes for it. SI 00 a vear; a S2 OOnre- 
rriitira to each subscriber. For agents' tenaa, 
address Jamks H. £aki.e, L'oston, Mavs. 

• mr28-4t 




OWLOPHYTE 

Fertilizer Company 

MANUFACTURE A FERTILIZER EROMNIGHT SCHL^ 

WHICH IS SUPERIOR TO ANY KNOWN SUB- 
3TANGE FOR MRIGIONG LANDS. 

It is shown by analysis to be STRONGER than GUANt 

and yet only costs one-third the price. Ajvtj Sipedo 

FERTILIZED for Tobacco and Cotton Crops. 

For Sale by the LEADING AGRICULTURAL HOUSES IN 

THE CITY at $40 Per Tun. 

r«*^Priv.cip. il Warehouse and salesrooms at No. 30 Thiid BtrMl. Send far 



GARDNER'S VILLAGE ENGINE. 




ITHC3-0"W 

FIBip - EXTINGUISHER 



TBOICAB^^BAMLETTB, 



  MAirUFACTUREBS OF 

GABpNEB'S JPII(£ EXTINGUISHERS, 

Fatantad FMrauy 14 and DMembw ». nn. CBd WMfe B. 18^ 
P^fr^^U^qr|Ci^CTOBT, n * TS west main BnOOET, I^IOBVnU, KT. 

— (:) 

The GARDNER EXTINGUISHER lias been adopted by the Inited States Sv^ervising Board 
of Inspectors, approved by the Secretary of the U. S. Treasury and ordered to be placed oi AU 
BTEAM VESSELS in the United States, in compliance with Law passed by Congrees. 
JX has been adopted by tbe ftUowing fire departmaulu* 
LOUISVILLE. KY. 

INSURANCE PATROL. PniLADELPHTA, PA, 
^ FIEU8 PEPAliTMlCNT, CAMDEN, N. J. 

FIRE DEPABTMENT, CLBVELAND, OHIO. 




s 



Indiistrial and Commeroial Grazett^ 



flliVMMKifi« A«ii«riean in calling 
i'.ttent!^ to the statement cf an Italiftu 
1o'»rn?i! that the recent ' iait of the 



?rn part of 
1  rff rtuce to 
the Caspian 

■:-vs : 



eeted jnnctiou ot 
,. . V, :ii the Blaok S^r 

Ti.L  entire leugili of :as (.:*:. al would 
I c hix hundred and ihiiLv Ruf^sian 
v.-.-rt-, aboDt four huuolreJl, mUes, 
thoQ^tf tb« moiatftin cLnin Uihte 
. pierced only meurare? eight verff()i^ or 
pb  ut five miles. It is calcalatedT tkat 
thirry-t'A'o Ihor-an I Irt'tO'cri -n-iirhave 
t ) I. e employed foi ^^\\y f-.'.y. years in 
order to complete O'^ undertaking. 
Quite apart from the uireot c jmmercial 
•dntntages which wv uld result from 
the completlcirtif this c:»ual, it wp«ld 
Serve to repleni'^h the Caspian Sea with 
witer, a highly important considera- 
tion. During the la*t decadt, and 
even longer, a remarkar kable reduc- 
tion of water wa-« noticsd,.*.) muoh so 
ihM the final extinction, that is exsic- 
catittn, of the sea wa  ripprehended. 
The result would aotoui^e malarioui 
 a Ute extreme, hot ftlao jAestructive (rf 
^^i^iteat source of wealth, BMnely* the^ 
sturgeon, sterlet, and seal flsheris* 
(chiefly at Astrakhan,) by which eight 
hundred thousand poQuds of caviar 
alone are annually obtained. An in- 
surance of water supr'y to tl ^-e i)er- 
Bons would, therefore, give u-utwed 
stimulus to their local enterprise, 
though the same may not be neatly as 
iMportaat Mfli# eflBMJtoa comflMM9 st 

CftHfMfttM uidSilk Cnltvn. 

flu Franeiseo is to become the cen- 
tre of a t6»-crowing country , and we 
shall haro our tea for little or nothing. 
An enlaqpvMttg Japanese brought 
over on a recently arrived steamer an 
tnormou^ quantity of tea plants which 
are to jilauted a-s a-j experiment in 
Calili'Tiiia. Hixteen tL;  usaud of the 
taa plants are Irom the southern part 
of the fdand of Kipbon, whras the 
finest of Japanese tea is produced. 
Tb* caast ▼allay* of Northern Call- 
limia are eooaideted tMstatmbtdtatba 
culture of tea. The same Japane^ 
who bad brought over the tea plants, 
imported five hundred thousand cards 
of silk worms' eggs, some time since, 
tht minority of which were placed in 
CMUbniia. Ha haa now brought otw 
a second installment, and native Jap- 
anese are to teach the young ''cocoon" 
how to Aoot in the most approved 
style. 

A baloou capable of a certain degree 
of guidance through the agency of a 
rudder and screw worked by four men, 
has been constructed at Paris by M. 
Dttpoy da Ijmbc. 



Sixteen Years cf Saccess. 

In* 1856 the now famous MrsTANO 
Liniment was fir#t inade known to 
the public by an extentslve .system cf 
advertising. From that time to the 
present, the derasrd for it has been 
steadily inerea-inc until it has taken 
the lead of a'J em'oro.-ations, lotions, 
ointments, and other external reme- 
diae, rnported ov domestic, ever Intro- 
dticed in to the American market. In 
The most celebrate I racing and trot- 
ting stables, in th- e^'ahli.ihments of 
Ktage and city . .-'I ponj.iar?es, and in 
the stahle.s of [ i /.-, ■,'ruUemeu, it i- 
the only reco^i. zed cure for such dif.- 
eases of the hor^e an require outward 
treatment. Nor is it less valuable as a 
local application for Pome of the most 
distreesiug complaints to which man 
is subject. Rheiimatisni, stitrnes-! of 
the joints, ueuiaigi.-^, .- . j"^ throat, tu- 
mors, wens, eai-acne, t oothache, yield 
to its pain-sub iuiiijr, counter-irritant 
properties, and burns, scalds and cuts 
are iMaled with iaeredilifta rapidity 
under Its operation. 

$1000 Reward is  ^ered by the pro- 
prietor of Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical 
Discovery for a medicine that will 
equal it in the cure of Bropchitis, se- 
vere Con eh s, and the early llages of 
Consumption. 




VALUA 



FAF Efts 

For Safe 

louid 




Tb6 Sdetice of Hmlth, 

A Hew Independent Health Honthly 

DEVOTED to th« preaqrvation and restora- 
tion of Health on HygleDio principles. 
Health is the grer.t want of the age. It Is 
the first need of the indlvidnal, the nation 
and the race. Health is long life; disease is 
liremature death. Health develops bodj', 
mind and soul; disease dwarfs and paralyseti 
all. To educate the people in the science of 
life, which includes all that relates to pre- 
serying health and to the art of treating dis- 
ease witbont medicine, is the object ana par- 
pose of this new health Journal. 

THE SCIENCE OF HEALTH wiU aim to 
disseminate tbronghont the world a knowl- 
edge of hygienic principles. It will not be 

the organ of any person, business or institu- 
tion, but an earnest teacher of the laws of 
lift- and health. 

THE SCIENCE OF HEALTH will be the 
exponent of all known means by which 
health, strength, h.-ippinessand long lite may 
be obtained, by using and regulating those 
agencies vltallv related to health and the 
treatment of disease, Inolndiog air, light, 
temyentwe bathing, diet, elotbing. eKeraae. 
ra^^Mg^^daU Bonsia aceota aad bjrgle- 

TERMS.— Pablistae l montblrattl OOayear 
in advance; single numbers, W oents. Clubs 
of ten at 11 50 eaoh. p.nd an extra copy to the 
agent. We are offering the most liberal list 
of premiums. Local agents wantCMl every- 
where and CMb commisslonaadTen. Address 
aH i»am to SAMUEL S. WSLLa. 
Jfle lat Pttbli^r. 880 Broadway, WTV 



niTOHTg EAST. 

The following are the lates of freight from 
Louisville to tbe various points mentioned, 
inekxliac dzayac* from store: 

vrm raoic iaitisvtixk. 



To Bov .ii 

To Providenre 

To New York 

To PhiUdelphia.. 

To Baltifnoje 

To I'it '^burK 

To HutTalo 

To Cleveland 

To Toledo 



«iO 


70 


65 


75 


55 


60 


59 


55 


45 


S J 


.•55 


40 


411 


45 


30 


1 35 




1 3-i 



t 0 
So 
70 
65 
6i) 
53 
CO 



JIS.I.IIINIIIS(CL. 



Xmportflis and Wbolesale Dealers, 



•yO & Tfi Si^tii street. 



LOUISVILLE, KY., 



Ave just in receipt of the following 

DRY GOODS 



100 pieces assorted  4.-eiiadine ;. 
li'O do assorted linen Lawiis. 
50 iio white Linen suitings. 
•2M do Bon Jour Delaines. 
I'JO de assorted f^ummer Caasimerett. 
50 do L%WCK and PercaleM. 
200 do plain French Jaeoneta. 
KMO do asMM-ted iiingbavs. 
one do Xxtatoville .leans. 
MO do 4MBerted '^Assobet" Rob Reys. 

ia.vXc-tf 



CompIeti|» Also, three Vol^  

Dafly Courier, 

1 



1 5l.t 



..«!i3 C al2 fO 




BARGAINS 



TO 



ei 20 

1 vs 

I 10 
1 00 
90 
70 
80 



PRINTERS 



BIVEB FBIUGHTS TO NEW OKLKAN3 AKD WAY 

LANDINUS. 

Way. K. Oriaans. 
Heavj- freights, such as ba- 

coti uiid io)).icco, V lOOCts.i bi 9 9* 

Pork, per bbi I 80 

Whisky, per bbl_ „ S 00 1 60 

Hay. per ton M m 9 CO 

FkMr, per bbl 1 iO 05 

Moles, per bead. g OO 

Hwws. per head u*M 

€Mtle, per faead„ i§ M 

p, per head 75 



RAILROAD FREIGHTS. 

The foUowlus is the railroad tariif to the 
. below : 



Bates of 



9 



o a 5 

Ml 
? 1 1 

? f r 

r ■ I 



NashvtUe, T^na. «0 

ClarinviUa,Teao SS 

Chattanooga, Tenn. SH 

Atlanta, aa^LI 77 

Ant — *a, Qa « 

flaTaanab, Oa..^^ JU 

Macon, (Ja -...^90 

Albany. Ga .......1 «e 

W«sl Point, (ia - 77 

Oolnmbns. Ua. T7 

Montgomery, Ala.„ 65 

Rome, Ga.....^ 77 

Helma.Aia 65 

Jaekson, Misa. 

Mobile, Ala.„ 55 

Meridian, Miss 1 "3 

New Orleans 40 



sn 

1 05 
1 H 

'.3 

ilS 

1 35 

1 35 
1 1') 
1 

1 10 

1 00 
1 52 
80 





j 


1% 


and over 






65 


ao 






65 


25 


45 


43 


1 44 


52 


SB 


69 


1 M 


77 


65 


fr5 


1 91 


82 


fti 


63 


I 94 


63 


7t) 


70 


2 li 


90 


ftj 


PO 


2C4 10i 


«»j 


63 


2 04 


77 


6) 


66 


2 04 


77 


.v» 


56 


194 


66 


59 


S9 


1 84 


77 


55 


53 


1 91 


65 




?0 


i'm 


56 


 B 


6H 


2 75 1 03 


46 


40 


1 ^ 


40 



FOR SALE— %0 pounds of Brevier 
type, of which this j.s a sample. Will 
divide the funt, if desired. Friee 40o 
pA" pound. 



FOR SALE.-«iOpoaods Minion type. 
This is a ^edmeii. Pxioe 40 oents per 
pound. 



FOR SALE— p'^' D''^ npareil tvpe, of 
which this is a jsample. The jont will "be di- 
vided, if desired. I'rice 5uc per pound. 



FOB BALK.— SSO ponndR Agste tvpe, of which 
this is a specimen. Price€(X;p«r pound. 



All thU Type ia from the Franklin 
* Mipp^ Foundry, Cincinnatit and is 
•«/ (hetmne mries. '   



F0& SA{t%rl6S pairs cv.ses (single. 

double and lrel)le;, good 
as new, at prices rang- 
ing from $1 7b to $2 00. 



Railroad connection)) are now eslablLshed 
to Ltittle Rook, Duvall'd Biult aud Jackson- 
port, and other point-i ou the White and Ar- 
rivers and their tributaries. Tbe 
tariff to the points designated is as 



i I I i I 



"I ecr 



UUtle Rock 134 1U74«4 1»2(»»1 
PBTaU's Bluff..! 27 1«r*«114 1MA7 
It Aannport...a « Im ft p 1 M  Ji% 



FOE BALE— 218 fonts Job Type iii 

Erime order, many fonts 
avlng been used but lit- 
tle. Will be sold at a 
bargain, 1 y «iugle font 
or otherwise, as may be 
deairad. 



FOE SALE— 54 single and double gal- 
leya (braaeand wooden), 
Mkoioete, stands (single 
and doable), imposing 
■(ones, lacks, Ao., Ac., 
in lota to salt purchasers; 
tad all 9t verg'low fig- 



THia 18 AN OPPORTTJNITY FOB PUB- 
Uabeia and printers to replenish their of- 
fleaaat a saving of from :30 to .50 per cent. 
All Inqnlrles should ije addressed to 

J. H. TUBNEB, Trustee, 
■teeet, LooisiiUt, Ky. 
bfreaqprascaD. 



ACL 



▲ND IN 



GOOD PRESERpON! 

THE VotaaM it  he ullon Press 
extendeftom Its rise to f» fall, em- 
bracing that important epoch of Mr. 
Lincoln's administration (and asnas- 

i-iuatiou\ bearing date of September, 

1864, to Deceuilier, 1865. The acts and 
edicts recorded in this volume are 
worth preserving for future reference. 
The three volumes of the Daily Coyx- 
Tier are: Vol. XXXm., from Dec. '4, 

1865, to June 4, 1866; Vol. XXXIV., 
from June 5, 1866, to Dec. 7, 1866; Vol. 
XXXV., from Dec. 7, 1866, to July 5, 
1867. Address C. H. C, 
my25-rf Care GazetCOfRce 



Louisville Wholesale Prices Curreiit. 

[N. B.— Our quotntl  ns 8*e tter.'' '_ rates; 
small orders al iU4|Baal advance.] , 

ALE AXD BKKR. 
Ale, f oto braud.....„ •'0aI5 

" i'lu . m.B lu^ttded.......... li 

Beer, c. ni:noa.._ ' 

" L.a-.:t.r U 

I'oiler, 'iottlet; 

BAGGING AND HOPE. 

' (8ee reoia' Ke; ort.) 

Shfikor, « dozeu t'  O'ja J 2o 

Loui-sviUe. - J-2"»!3 V ) 

Common 4 ^ 00u2 50 

HroguCioia. • s 

BAKK. 

CbestnntORk^^^ifiOxd.^.. ....... 

BACON. 

(See Provision Repoit.) 

BAGS. 

Uenney in bales..... 

izesewed ........ ... 

Grain, 2 bnsbel.......... 

Burlaps 4-basbei . 

do 2 do 

Seamless tlH&'^l 

COUNTRY PRODUCE 

(.See 8i)eoial Report.) 
COOPERAGE. 

lion i:;)' p Uourbou Ijui i^ i- 52 o I'i'J 

Higlnvitiebitrreis,f)nm-kooped 2 'M 

Woodlioop(16 hoo»Hlgbwii%bbU.T7o@ 1 
Oil barrels J!....*.... 8 06^ 

Pork barrels, 1 50® 

Lard tierces 1 75@ 

Ham tierces _ - 1 W& 

Bacon hhds 2 dOfSi 

Queensware Tierces. To.jj 

Flour barrels 60(4 

Half Whisky barrels, iroi\ hoop 1 6C'^ 

" " " wiiod hoop 1 

Ten gallon Whlskv kegs 1 Oii'5 

Five gallon Whisky kecs 9C(» 

COOPERSTDFF8. 

Barrel l oks, iH im 114 OOg 

HoKs!ie:'.(i I. Dies, -y liXD 21 00-1, 

Baric' slaves, rough, # 1000 Itt Oiy^lS 00 

Barrel staves, dressed,^ 100 20 00*823 00 

Uogsheud sUves, roosh. V 1000„... SO MS83 00 

CANDLES AND SOAP. 

star Candles.full weight. -19K9» i 

is to 8b JO 

Common Tallovk Candles 12 #13 



J55 

..is^Ttie 



i^berts 

^Laotii - , i.i.i. 

-azUs ^ ..^^..^ 

Peanuts— „ - 

n.ti. Ah^Wnds 

Almonds, soi: atxeU 

GROCERIES. 
(Sec  ?v*:cial U«port.) 



GUNPOWDER. 

Oranije ^„ 

Uoponf^'B....... .V 

GRAIN, 
fecial ileportj 



Rongh K^ntuciij 
TtreBSea' ~ do 



I . i- ■(;.! 

J^:- — 

K.\Y. 
On wharf. 

Timothy, il, pres d.?5! 00(t24 ^ 
Timothy, lou^e do „ £0 OGaJrt w9 
Timotby,'\oo«e in  rag- 
OB». 

HIDKS. 

Dry Flint, at. 
Dry Sal I n 
Green Saltet'.. 

'jrefn 

.Sheep Pelta... 
Calf Skins, gyean , 



M 

» alt 
7JialO 
is al8 
U a22 



... 7 CCS? » 
... 4 25c!S4 7&' 



alio 
... 10 a U 

in Ktore. 



OILS. 



Lard ^ gal 



Xfa«eed 

(-n».tor 

TH. M^-rs Baak_. 
LnUr^^tlUg 
Ben»»u 
§tr&lia . , 

Wh;»e lefti 





HOPS. 



The Patent Right Gazette, 

PQbUshed by tbe U. S. Pateat'ftMit As- 
■oeiatlon, 94 Cbamben street (Post- 
offioe box 4460. New Yorii. 

ANNliL SIBSCKIPTIOX fERMS. 

(Invariably in advance.) . 

To clubs of Sand noMex 5, M cents for each 

To*f fiSipr af jtasa mi»r M, 86c for each copy. 
To dMi *t Wimt m aimt U, 75c for each copy. 

HOW TO GET YOUR OWN COPY FOR 
NOTHING.— Send on the names of F(»UU 
subyrlbera^aj ^i l^Slid "f^Jf^ send yoa^ copy 

Large Pay for Spare Honrs, for 
Evening Work, for Rainy Bays, 
and for Those Seeking 
Employment ! 

Good Ibr 
Farmers, Gar- 
deners, Nurserymen, 
Physiciaus, Ministers, Stn- 
deiits, Teacheid, Clerks, Con- 
ductors, Postmasters, Merchants, 
KechAOics, Lftwyen, lAdles, Children. 

niyH-3ra 



FOBCH & OOOEE. 



Imiforteia aad WboUsal^ Dealers in 



DRY GOODS, 



NOTIONS, fta, 



Kortb Side, between Ftftk aud Sixtli. 



TTT-E are now In receipt oj our new spring 
TT Rtork of .Staple and Fancy Dry Ooo ls, 
Notions, Ac, to which we ^11 the attention 
o: doee buyers visiting thlsmarket. 



STAPLE GOODS 



(hi 



Full lines of new. ilyle 

lugs, BleacheA^MiuUns,' 

b aigs. Brown Drill, Apron 
MusIluB, dc. 



KEN 



Fall lines Kentueky Ji 




Brown Bbeet- 
rtatdOinia  
jBea Island 



itorn Jeans, 
Vancy 



DRESS G9ODS. 

lines of all the novelties of tlie seas 
mose Silka, Japanese Poplins, Fron 
. OrsMidtoss. Lavai. QigMMUes. Pv- 

Pi«iM^ teraisa. S^umm, fflnghaw. 



Eastern, new., 
do old... 







"(bee iVeeiaVlieport.) 

. FAr::::, 

rsown wrappin".. . I.... „ _ 

Doable CieTTLi.^ 

EOTATOir?. . 
(SeetSaBtry PrfHlr'^.) 

ilAO-. 

.^Olt wooie;^ 



al 10 



KICE^ 



5 
I 

a4 



.Per pound.-. ... 



Balsfj^^ 



STRAW 



.'■•I W^».S1 00 
.4U OOuoO 00 



NOTIONS. 



We have the most oemplete atoek in the 
market. Buyers will find it to their intereat 
to ezaaUaeoorstosk ba' 




Gterman Soul Vo. 1« at . , 

"^So.l,at. 6 

lk)eln, t — 5 ^ 

CdgatoFamOr at 13 A 

COTTON. 

(See Special Report.) 

COTTON YABN8. 
V doasB, at 

M M 



Ne. 500,1 
No. 6dl , 
N0.7QQ. 



al8 
al5 



CCNPFEK. 
(Bee Qroeeriw. Bpsslal Bspoct.) 
CHOCOIiATK. 

Vanilla 45 

Double do 65 

Triple do SO 

Des Families 26 

De Sante 30 

Baker  k Co., No. 1 40 

COAL. 

Pittsburg, retail — 

Pomeroy " 

CORNMEAli. 



bSO 
aSO 
a 

aSO 
a32 
a 



.20 



Bolted........^. 

Unbolted 

Kiln dried, perl 

CEMSKT. 

Hydiaalie, per bbl 

raaler 

CANDIES. 



60a 65 
5ila 55 
aSaSM 



IRON. 

Hangtasroek.Nol fbnnd'ye.VtoafiS ons53 00 
*♦ No 2 •• •* 4» ooaSo uo 
" Mill 

Weatern stone-coal, foiMnhy 

" " min"."."."V..V.'^ 
St.^ania Bton o eea l» teundry 

miir."' "..'.'.'.. ""' 

Tenneeaee No 1 fonndry 

2 " 

mill 

Alabaaaa cbarcoal. No l foundnr-. a 
Celd-blast " car-wheel, HedaiB OOefrl 00 

" Red river aSS UO 

** Tenneeaee 54 OOaSo 00 

Bar.V ft 4Sa52-.5 

Hoop, eoopera.._ .. ......... 4 9-lUa 5 9-10 

Hbeet „ _ S a7 

BoUer «. « « a 7 

Nailrod^^ ... 8 a 8   

Horse shun, keg ..^^^^^.^ S ^ 7 u) 

Mnle 8blMMt«g~ 7 »a 8 00 

Horseeboenalfi ....... Ite 28 

Caatlnge «. 9(a4H 

Pulleyi ^ i» S 

Utloa per bbl S6al 05 

LUMBER. 

Boofb. Dreeaed. 
Clear Boarde, (a inch) par M....tlSO 00 tUS 00 




ad rate 

Mrate 

Clear Boards, (lyc ineb) 
vdrate " * 
Jrate " 
car Boards (1 inch) 
at. -ate " 
8d late ** ** 
Sd rate Fine Weatherboardint, 




110 00 
iWOO 

mat 

17 N 

eoo 

5) 00 
46 00. 
ao 00 



Poplar Weatherboarding 17 30 

Poplar Boards (1. 1% * 2 inch), " " 



i 50 

aao 
as 00 
snot 

ITS 



11000 
M 00 
1«8M 
•7 M 
MM 
TOW 
COW 

ss 

ao w 
soo 
a 10 



1 ao 

3 00 



Assorted. 
French.... 



.15 



CANNED GOODS. 



alS 
aid 



Oysters. 13b.. 

Oysters, 2I^.. 
Oysters, «piced.... 

Lobster, iw 

Lobster, 2It 

Damsons, 2Ib.. 



125 
2» 
275 

2 00# 2 25 

2 2U(d» 3 25 
- -@ 3 2.5 
223@ 2 50 

@ 2 50 
2. "=.00 2 75 

•.: om 

3 OCra 
3 C-O^ 3 23 
--^ 400 

ami suo 

2 00® 
... 2 2-5® 2 50 

._ 3 lOui 

... 2 cO@ 3 00 
2 26® 8 U) 

... 2 

... S 00,1$ 



Green corn, ilb^... 

Ureen peas..... 

Salmon, 1». 

Peaches, 2!b 

Peaohts, uU  , 

Strawberries.   

Strawberries, 31b., 

Pine Apple 

Cherries 

Blackberries 

Raspberjies 

CurranUs 

Whortleberries . — 

Gooseberriee......... 

Pears 

PIam& 

ei.A8ii. 

Brandy Pearhes ■-'),^ Tj 

Brandy (. herriea. ...^ -l i'   

Tomatoes, 2tt' .^^.^ 1 ^ a 1 75 

Jellies :;lo 

Pres^-i ve.-. I'.s^orted 4 0 J'uclO(Xi 

Woree tt.rbliiieaaaoe,pile«)4pts_. (i  2 25 

Do do, laspmrMo — 4 2.5' « 

Catsup, tomato 1 W.';* 2 bO 

Do, w*inut » C*3t0 

Pie frnlt, ttssorted 4 nO(   

Pickles American- ....^.^.^ 1 »-5; » 2 ( t 

Pickles Ed gl tab - 3 90« 7 50 

Sparkling Catawba. 13, IB, la 

DrvCatnwba _ 5, 6, 10 

Claret wine idOu.H M 

Englisb Ale and Porter, y doz 2 7t.» .3 fM) 

Cr.leniaii's Imported Mustard . * t^... Sj ui b5 

Cross  V Biai-kwell's .Mustard. It tb 6-% 65 

Pepper, pis doz I hy^i 1 40 

Green {.epper, pts V doz 2 Z a. 2 50 

Tomato Catsup pis - 1 lO© 2 5 ) 

fancy decanters, qts- I 2 to 

French Mustard, V doz — 1 5*r» 1 1^1 

" Imperial & 2 {. ) 

De Luxe O 4  ' ) 

Gberkir.s, plain, » dos, pt8„ - a 4 -.'i 

'• *• - - ) 

" mixedi.ii 3 To V ' i 

Pickles in bhls „ 10 (M^kl. 

" ball bbls „ - ft sod 

CORDAGE. 

ITemp R' pe, per lb 17 

Ht-rt i' i'. i e, tarred — 18 

Hemp .-^ashcord 24 

Hemp I'a -kicK yarn 

Hemp Bfcd-cords, per doz... 

Hemp Clothes-lines 

Manilla Kope, under  ^-iuch 




do do" ^ ;-iuch and over 

do Eed-t'ords, per doz 

do Plow-lines 

do I lot hes- lines 

do Cotton rope 

do Siftal rope ~» 

DBY GOODS. 
(See Special Beport.) 

DRUGS. 
(SeeBpedalBepor.^ 
FISH. 



(R17\ C 
(?»1S " 

....14 @!*  
....2 00^4 0 I 
....2.25®:? -5 
....21 @23 
....20 @21 
....4 0''al -J') 



Box Boards or se\eci common 

Common or Fencing - 

Bheetina Beards. 

HemkMK Boards, Joist and 

"HWHltHilf ~. 

PoBla)rni&. M fset and under- 

Clear, tomgned and 
ad rate, •* 

3d rate. " 
Common, " 
Hemlock, 
geiMgraUow..fiae. 

ad rate 

CSILIIIO— TOKOUXD AMD OROOVaD. 

Clear - _ ^.J$t 00 

2d rate„ „ 5 50 

3d rate S 75 

Per 1.000. 

Hemlock (aU kinds) J17 (a &M 00 

Sawed Laths.. 3 uoa 

Cut Laths.......... H W»a 

Clear, lyi and a laehes. 55 ouatiO 00 

Beeond-rato In^ Su OUa 

Third-rate Inch 38 0(.Hi 

Box Boards, inch 22 OUa 

Comraou 20 OOa 

Feuc-nt;, iucli .22 00a 

Sheet int: _ 12 Soa ■ 

Secoiid-rutt^^, ln di, dreeaed 00 OOa 

Third-rate, ineh *• 40 00a 

SheiviiiK, " - 40 oca 

SecoDil-.i-.te flooring 50 Of-a 

Tturil-rute fioorinj; 40 OOa 

Comiiiou il -(.iinK —.32 50a 

Weatherboarding, dressed 27 oOaJO OO 

Weathtrbcardlng, rough -J5 OOa 

Poplar SejiuUing and Joiat 22 25a 

Beet qflality Sawed Pine 1 Ifi :Dch)....S5 Ua 
" •* " (I.S in)No.L.«a6a0 50 
" • N0.2.. 6 »a 

Popuur...-^.. 8 35a 

P09Z8 Ann LATHS. 

re lnr Posts, (H feet long) —.36 00a4O f O 

P'oplm- Laths (4 feet long), sawed — 3 Orta 

2 75a 



Cast _ 

Aiuericau blister 

Germau 

.Steel slabs 

Ste^ 



SEEDS. 



Clover, sappllng...- 

Clover, common... 
Timothy 

Cleiiu bUlegrH.v-; 1 

Extra cleau blue^rass 

Orcbard grasa _ 

Herd grass 

Millet seed I 

Hungarian grass _ L 

Spring wheat _ 

Spring barley „ _ _ 

Top onion sets , 

Red onion sets 

White onion sets _ 

SRD POTATOKS. 

Peachblows, per bbl 8 

Russets 

Pink-eye - 

London Lady 

Eaily Goodrich. 
Early Boae.. 

White 




saanoATs. 



Oak sole tan., 
iiemlodtaole 
Buffikl'^siaaiater 

Hamesa.. 
Skirting.. 
Kipski -8, city-.. 

Cult, city — . 

iiridle.'fl dosen.. 

Upp^-r 

Kre'icb calf 

Phihiilelphla calf.. 

Ilo«  .kins 

KngU»h bog sains 

Coir lieatlDfi. 

Enameled Mather, 




;«ft 40 
3Ua -^i 
3:1a :5 
38a 42 
4Sa 4^1 

7Ha 1 25 

1 20a 1 .W 

.45 U'aM) Oti 
.-._40 fJi)a50 00 

. 40 UOa48 00 

1 50a 1 60 

5 OOa 8 01) 

5 UOal^ ix' 

54 00a60 OO 

24a 28 



Mackerel, N0.I...- — 

do No. 2 

do (large) 

do No. 3 Uarge). 
do (lamlly) 



Bbbls. 



Half-bbls 
100 



.W TSaW OJ $S lOaS .50 
.. 11 00al2 00 6 Otlad 25 

.. 12 r)t al2 SO 6 2Sa6 50 
.. S 7.5a 9 25 4 75a5 25 
.. S 50a 9 00 4 50a5 40 



Mackerel kits, 15 Ibe, No. 1 1 •»al «) 

do do do No. 2. I 26al 35 

do do do large 1 30al 40 

do 00 do No. 3, large 1 10a I 25 

QO do do No 3, family... 1 r  .il 15 

Whiteflsh, half-bbls, 100 tbs. No. 1 5 9 ^a 

do do do do No. 2 4 50h5 m 

do kit, 16 Hw, No, 1 — - 1 2-5al 3-5 

do do do No. a... 1 lOal !W 

Sardines, haWe e - .^ ■ ^ 5Sa 5« 

Herrhag, « box. 35a 40 

FLOUR. 
(Sae Special Report.) 



FOHEnN FRUITB, Ac. 



Figs, new. fl ft- 
Cnrrants Zante, 

Raisins, layer,... 
Prunes V 
LemousSH bx 
Orange4.%oox 

Dates, 

Citron 



19 aiy 

9 ail 

1 3 00a4 80 
11 sl4 
7 OOaS 00 
5 50a«ao 

10 all 
45 a « 
U a» 



Vfoot. 

LARD. 
(See ProTlskm Report.) 
LEAD. 

PMt. per ft.-.—- 8J^9^ 

LEAF TbBACCO. 
^ee Spaeial Report.) 

MANUFACTDRED TOBACCO. 

Vireinla extra !^s,ln fancy pkgs..y....91 00^1 15 

Vir;;ii)ia tlo« biiiiUt 96M1 00 

V'ir..;i iia ine'l'um bright 7-5® 85 

\':' ,'1. in (■•uu'u aud miMi'Jiy (new).. 63^ 65 

Viri;ini.H tlue light pressd,&12- lneb. »i§ 90 

Vi: /ii!!:\ I'.u-'Mum bght pressed 80 

iv. :a;icy roll and twist 85(^1 05 

i.'. pancake and flg 1 OOrtjjl 15 

,,; -. kyP. ue bright, tt)8_ te^^ 

v' i'lediiim and mahogany rvS-oi (» 

. -iy f cia-non, It s, souudlL 089 W 

■ I Ly aud .Missouri^ Its and 14s, 

hTi^-ht 

Kentucky and 

ir.i^ '.'uTii .. 
KeutU'jky t 

Kf^ntncky nu\ y, V.^ tt..-!, in oi'-ddies... 
Kentucky n.ivx-, tti, in br.i: s 

SiiOKIXO TOKACt r. 

Fmits and Flower8,l ft boxes, round 

Jancy . ^ 

Fruits and FtoweonJ ft boxea,sqna r e 

plain 



Vir. 



K 



Norway. .„ 

Snrprlas 

smns, wnm asb laabt ^ 

spiRira Aif» 

Aloohoi 

Pure Spirits Prool 

Hiiftiwiius 

Rwtifleo W hisky, 
Old Rye Whiskies 
Old Bourbon WhUklen. 
Foreign Sootch aut 
Fail city Bourl ou. 

DOMESTIC GITXa, 

Old Tom Gin 1 :15 

Yeroit'sScbeidam -Scnapps...— J5 %1 io^ 




New 



Bum. 



— J"l 



BRANDIXS. 

Cognac Brandy, domoattc , 1 • 

Pe:wh Brandy !• 

Apple Brandy _ I 81 

Caiawba Rraudy 4 9 

Blacklterry Brainly J, T 

Raspberry Brandy 



g-g^fcandy. 




Pmnar Brandies 

BITTEM. 

Drake's Plantation Bitters (a9 50 

Bratly's Bitters 50 

Schroeder's Cofktati Bitters 

Stomach " 

WIN 19. 

Port Wine 

Slierry Wine 

Ginger Wiue 

Blackberry Wine 

Wine 



nsLpbeny Win 
CtanalraeaV ' 




STARCH. 



Pearl, V 




Pure 

atlTer CMoei aad eon 



SPICES. 



Cassia In mats, Vft-.—. 

Ginger, Afrtean 

Nut-Toegs, No 1-.-.—-.- . 

Pepper _„. „, 

Hi tneu to. 

C i o ve-s 

Ma.je.-. 

fEAa. 

Oolona, MaA 

EngUM BeeakfiMt, green.... 

Young Hyson..- _ 

Imperial „-.....—. 

Gnnpowder— ..— 

Japan-... 



-A 



„ flO'^j 
1 I 



TALLOW AND GREASE. 



Tallow 
lireiise, 5'ellO' 
While- 



w, per ft.. 



TIN pum ATimmsp 

Tin pit ICV bx- 

DoIX 

;Do I C roofing..-.. 

Do I X roofing-... 

Do D X _ 

Do I C 14x20 b'gt... 

Copper shret * 

Copp*-r bottoms 

Metidic l ottoma. 




Hollow ware, country- 
Block tin. pig 

Lead, bar 

TWIEOL 



Missoori MlftAlO". 

' £ bAvt, % 0)6 and long 



580 (v 



Cotton twine, per lb— ... 

Jute, 1 and a-piT- 

Hemp, fine ana coarse-. 

Paper.- 

Flax „ 



0^ 



603 

Brown Dick. 1 m bales 60^ 



Glolden Leaf, 1 9  bales. 

Rose, 1 tt  bales and \i ft papers 

Planters' Pride, 1 tb and  4 Tb bales.. 
Pride Virginia, 1 lb bales. 



Virginity, 1, U and H ft 

Star, 1,  i andji ft bales 

Virginia Gold Leaf ft paper*.-., 

Old red, fts and }i lbs - 

Durham, lbs and  ^ lbs 

Durnam J^s 

Log Cabin ]4 aud !bs 

Eureka S and }i Ibn 



3 7o 

80^ 65 

5-5^4 

— «i 7.) 

Si ou 
55 
9 70 

«5 9 711 

ri 

3o 



White wl 



VINBCEAR« 



WOOL. 



iat ou 



Tnb washed..- 

Huwashed oTn^.lng. 
Unwashed ciu: „ - ^. . 



iTU 



45(450 



WOODEN-WARE. 



5 V4 



Tom Big Bee ^ aud V4 lbs 

Common wealth  iand % Ibe 409 

MOLAfl^BS. 
(See Groceries Bepott.) 

NAVAL 



Tiiipwltiyi rgal. 



asoo 

. 3 75a4 75 
5«0b« 00 

A.na8S 
sin 8» 



HhljaftC; 



NAIL& 
OHPAlZ 



76 



Jilt 



Si 



Buckets, patnteA, V 

Chums 

TubsV nest (8; 
Tubs, 3 tn 
Wsskbon**.,^ 




WINDOW-OLABB. 




«x8 and AxlO, boat 
8x11 and 10x13.. 
11x14 and 12x18. 
I«x24.... 
18x22- 
18x90.. 



^ Mmmatof mx per cent. 01 
often or mote bosea. Double 
twtaa tbe abere raMa 

■ ^-F-*^ 1 



Parties de :irlng anytblnc tm. tbls^M^rlli 
flad the following iUOtattoM aorreel. 
Fire Proof, "ihgiedoar^^.Mi,.MM.MMA 87e 1 
Fire and m SiKS n 



Louisville industrial and commercial gazette, 1872-06-08

8 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt783b5w908p
 Local Identifier: lic1872060801
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/lic/xt783b5w908p.json
Location
  Published in Louisville, Kentucky by J.H. Turner & Co.
   Jefferson County (The Bluegrass Region)