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date (1857-08-03) newspaper_issue THE TRI-WEEKLY COMMONWEALTH. 



VOL. 7 



FRANKFORT. KENTUCKY. AUGUST I, 1 857. 



NO. 15. 



"Hfc fRl-WEEim CttlMONWIUTI 

"ILL BB PUBLISHED BVKBY MONDAY, WED 
BESDAY, AND FBIDAT , «» 

Bn A. G. HODGES, 

STATE PUNTER, 

At THREE DOLLARS PER ANNUM, paya 
ble in advance. 



The Weekly Commonwealth, a large mam- 
moth sheet is published every Tuesday morn 
ing at TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM, in ad 
vance. 

Our terms for advertising, either in the Tri 
Weekly or VVeekiv Commonwealth, will be as 
liberal as in any of the newspapers published in 




A D D R E 8 8 

by the American Party, 

AT ITS ANNUAL MEETING. 
1*57. 



ADDRESS. 

Called by the passing away of another year to 
meet the members of the American party in Na- 
tional Council, the occasion demands a reaffirma- 
tion of our opinions. We are ready to-dav as 
aforetime to give a reason for the faith that is 
in us, and as ready to-day as ever before to stand 
fast by our vows of devotion to our whole coun- 
try. Neither dismayed by defeat, nor disheart 
ened by opposition — neither discouraged by the 
past, nor without hope for the future — we meet 
together both to couusel one with another, aud to 
•how to the people of the United States by our 
presence and our numbers here in open conven 
tion that as a party we are hopeful and determin- 
ed as to our future course of action. 

The dominant party at the North and the dom- 
inant party at the South, by appeals made to sec- 
tions of country and the passions of the day, a.e 
temporarily successful. But a temporary triumph 
is no evidence of permauent success. Nor does a 
victory secured by passion give evidence of a 
true attachment to principle. A true soldier will 
never be disheartened in sustaining a good cause 
because of one or many defeats. 

The nine hundred thousand American voters 
who sustairded the American candidates for the 
two first offices in the gift of the people in No- 
vember last may enjoy the consciousness of an 
honest work well meant and well done. They 
ncit.. er countea the cost of defeat nor faltered iu 
the discharge of a great public duty, and had the 
thousands of men who agreed with them in 
opinion as to the justice of their principles and 
the fitness of their candidate acted upon the same 
convictions of public duty, the result would have 
been far different. At the North, tens of thou- 
sands voted for Mr. Fremont upon the plea that 
then id chance for Mr. Fillmore, while tens 
of thousands voted for Mr. Buchanan at the 
South upon the plea that a vote for Mr. Fillmore 
would secure the electiou of the candidate of the 
misc tiled Republican party. It was a cruel and 
uncalled for sacrifice of principle upon the altar 
of expediency, and one of those sacrifices of priu 
ciple which, if persisted in, in private life, as is 
sometimes the case, in the consideration of sub 
jects of great public moment, would result in 
common disaster. Wheu patriotism becomes the 
rule of action and a true love of country points 
out the path of duty, nothing can excuse the 
yielding up of that which is right for that which 
is merely expedient. 

We do not, however seek to recall anything 
in the past calculated to wound the feelings of 
those who were tempted in a moment of de*pon 
dencv or thoughtlessness to forget their obliga- 
tions to their country or their associates in princi- 
ple. 

Thousands who left our ranks in November, 
drawn away by the temporary expedients and 
passions of the hour, have returned to the fold of 
the American p.irty. They have been taught in 
the bitter school of experience that the word of 
promise may be made to the ear and broken to 
the hope. Where there was a pledge to secure, 
and the power to effect a pure ballot box — the 
waut of which is one of the great evils of the 
times — and to accomplish which ought to unite 
the good men of all parties— there has been eith 
er a criminal indifference to the evil itself or a 
bold participation in that wrong. So in the 
promises made at the North to secure a pure 
franchise through the agency of a registry law 
where all could see and know who, uuder the 
constitution and by the laws, were entitled to 
vote. 

In no instance that we can recall to mind have 
either of the two great organizations opposed the 
American party endeavored to secure those 
wholesome reforms which arc essential either to 
an inteligent or honest exercise of the rights of 
franchise. Even where an attempt has been 
made, as in New York, to secure a practical re- 
form under the naturalisation laws, so that while 
the change would not extend the five years' resi- 
dence previous to naturalization provided by the 
laws of the United States, it would, neverthe- 
less, secure a small portion of this limited resi- 
dence before the alien wasalowed to vote, the at- 
tempt has failed, by the combined opposition of 
both the Democratic and Republican parties, wao 
not uufrequently work together at the North to 
destroy the American organization. And while 
there has been a neglect to maintain a pure fran 
chise for white voters, and an open and earnest 
opposition to all reforms, proposing simply reme- 

there has also been enacted in New^ork a sue 
cessful measure looking to such an amendment 
of the Constitution as would secure a general sys- 
tem of suffrage to the negroesofthe State. Thus, 
in one part of the Union a State Constitution is 
opened to sustain the question of negro suffrage, 
while in another part of the Union the alien has 
had conferred upon him privileges wholly uu 
known to the native-born citizen. To day a foreign 
pauper or a foreign criminal, driven or banished 
from the pest or prison houses of Europe, is made in 
all things, aud regardless of his residence in the 
country, an equal with the citizen whose service has 
been life-long, patriotic, and useful in the land of 
his birth To-morrow, again, States in another sec- 
tion of the country become revolutionary in their 
plans of opposition to the Federal Government, 
and exhaust their patriotism and labor in meas- 
uics of mere speciality and favor for the negro. 

We seek to avoid such anatomies of legislation 
in both our Federal and State governments. — 
Their tendency is neither toward humanity nor 
mercy. They benefit neither the white nor the 
black race and, whether well meant or ill meant, 
result in that spirit of strife and uncharitablenes* 
in different States and among different classes of 
people which the true men of the country cannot 
fail to deplore. 

Higher aims and nobler objects animate the 
American party We know of no political differ- 
ences between the rights of the North and the 
rights of the South All are subordinate to the 
constitution of our common country The union 
of the States, the rights of the States, the privi- 
leges of the people in the States, and under the 
Union, is our chief glory and our greatest good.— 
When differences of opinion come, as come they 
will, they must be settled, not by crimination aud 
hate, but by reference to that great principle of com • 
mon right and common protection— the Coniti 
tutiox of the United States; and if there shall 
unfortunately again be dfferences of opinion as 
to what it granted and what is denied by the 
constitution, the judiciary of the land, through 
■he authorized couru of the nation, can alone 
make up and decide the final issue. The constitu- 
tion and the law must, therefore, at all 
in ail niacas become our rule of 



Toleration of opinion, the freedom of speech 
and of the press, the right of the people peacea 
bly to assemble and petition the government for 
a redress of grievances, are among these specifi- 
ed constitutional personal rights, and cannot be 
abridged except as the obuse of these privleges is 
restrained by the laws of the land. Equally ex- 
plicit arc the rights of the States over their own 
territories, and interference with them becomes 
both a public abuse of power and an act of per- 
sonal impertinence. If all men in all sections of 
the country, could realize where their powers 
commence, and where thev cease— if they could 
understand that they are no more responsible for 



other men's sins than they are secure in their 
self assumed virtues, all would be comparatively 
well 

There are many and vital questions upon which 
the American party can agree, and to these all 
other subjects should be subordinate. They are, 
in brief, condensed in the following spirit of our 
National Platlorm. We hold, for example, as 
cardinal maxims of public justice and private 
duty, to the following rule of faith and action: 



Bi 



1st. The F 



UBwlag rule oi taith 
ederal Union must 



bi 



2d. The reserved rights of the 
respected. 

'M. The decisions of the Supreme Court must 
be enforced. 

4th. The union of Church and State must be 
prevented. 

5th The rights of conscience must be guaran 

teed. 

American interests must be promoted. 
An American nationality must be cherish 



Sectional agitation must be terminated. 
Foreign paupers and criminals must beex- 



6th 

7th 
ed. 

8th 

9th 
eluded 

I Oth. The naturalization laws must be amend 

ed. 

1 1th. "Squatter Sovereignty" and alien suff- 
rage must be repudiated. 

12th. Americans must rule America. 

There is nothing here not taught in the Consti- 
tution o' the United States, and nothing here re- 
puguaut to the spirit and letter of that instrument 
of liberty and law. The provision of the Consti- 
tution which requires the President of the Uuited 
States to be a native born citizen — which requires 
the Vice President to possess the same qualifica- 
tions with the Presideut — which, in the foreign- 
born, imposes a nine years' residence, after na- 
turalization, as qualification of a candidate for 
the United States Senate, and a residence of 
seven years, after naturalization, as a qualifica- 
tion for a Representative in Congress— which for 
bids test oaths for office, and the maintenance of 
an established Religion, are all part and parcel 
of our faith and practice. So far from departing 
from any provision of the Constitution, we seek 
to restore a respect for its framers, and an entire 
and hearty obedience to its provisions. It is, 
above anil beyond all other records of political 
creeds, the platform of the American party. 

But we cannot shut our eyes to other issues 
which have been forced upon us by the Democrat 
ic party, which is not only not what it was in times 
past, but which seems to have outlived its con- 
sis ency, its usefulness, and its virtues. It has 
different faces for different parts of the country, 
and different phases to illustrate its many creeds. 
It has involved the government in great difficulty, 
and no man feels secure in the future while this 
party is in power. Uunder Democratic Adminis- 
trations there has been an open violation of law 
iu the Territory of Utah. A social system which 
would have disgraced the darkest ages, utterly re- 
pugnant to civilization, reflecting the highest dis- 
honor upon the government, a festering sore upon 
the political body, and every day growing from 
bad to worse, exists and has exi-ted for four 
years past within the borders of our own govern- 
ment. We condemn this outrage upon morals 
aud humanity, and desire to see the nuisance 
abated We trace it, however, as one of the nat- 
ural ills incident to that system of administration 
which seeks to fill the nation with criminals, pau- 
pers, and fanatics from the old world. We trace 
the great majority of wrongs in Utah, the act of 
treason, the cases of arson, the multitudes of 
murders, the cruel banishments, the beastly in- 
tercourse, to that unnatural indifference to those 
who, serpent like, have crept into the bosom of 
the nation in order to sling and destroy it. 

Other questions of great importance though of 
less magnitude also attract our attention. The 
public domain, secured by a common treasure and 
a common sacrifice of blood aud labor, the com- 
mon property of the nation is distributed withou 
regard to the general ownership, and with a lav- 
ishness of appropriation which shows an utter in- 
difference to the just claims and true wants of the 
American people. 

Who can arrest these evils and restore the gov- 
ernment to its ancient landmarks but the Amer 
ican party? Where else is there a sure hope of 
the union of the States with that free expression 
of opinion which belongs to every Common- 
| wealth of the Republic, aud to every citizen  u the 
Union? 

We call then upon our countrymen all over 
the land to organize and act Let them seek to 
give honor, strength, prosperity, and perpetuity 
to our glorious Uuion by making the love of 
country and of the whole country a passion and a 
principle. 

The past in our nation is made glorious by the 
patriotism and heroism of our uoble ancestry of 
Southern men of the stamp and character of him 
who led the great armies of the Revolution, and 
of those who were distinguished under the con- 
federation and in the convention which framed the 
constitution Northern men, too, of the stamp and 
character of the son of Massachusetts who nomi 
nated George Washington tt Virginia to be Gen- 
eral-in Chief of the armies of the Republic, and 
like him received the sword ot the leading British 
General on Southern soil at the instance of the 
forever-loved, Heaven protected Father of our 
common country. 

Living then in these great examples of the 
past — seeking to re-baptise the whole nation in 
the spirit of the great and good men who led 
the way to victory, and to independence, we, 
too, arc hopeful and heartful of the great ftt- 
ture. 

We invoke the sympathy, the aid, the co-ope 
ration of all men, all over the land, who are with 
us and of us in principle and sentiment — and of 
all men too, who wish to reform those gross 
abuses in the State and nation which have result 
ed in so much personal wrong, and left a stain 
like a wound upon the fair frame of the Republic. 
Americans and friends of Americans, North and 
South, East and West, "Awake, arise, or be for- 
ever fallen." 

ERASTUS BROOKS, of New York 

ANTHONY KENNEDY, of Maryland 

R W. THOMPSON, of Indiana. 

VESPASIAN ELLIS, of Washington, D. C. 

WM. F. SWITZLER, of Missouri. 

J. J. CRITTENDEN, of Kentucky 

H. W. HOFFMAN, of Maryland . 

W. S. WOOD, of Michigan. 

W. H. SUTTON, of Arkansas. 

AUSTIN BALDWIN, of Connecticut. 

GILES M. HILLYER, of Mississippi. 

J.SCOTT HARRISON, of Ohio. 

WM. W. DaNENHOWER, of Illinois. 



JOHN M. HARLAN. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW. 

FRANKFORT, KY. 
Office on Si. Clair Street, with J. & \V. L. Harlai 

RKFBB TO 

Hon. J.J. Crittcndkh, ) 
Gov. L.W. Powell, \ Frankfort, Ky . 
Hon. Ja.hu Haua. J 
Tatlor, Tckhkr &. Co., Bankers, Lexington, | 
G. H. Momarrat ek r 
W.Taimkr, Lou 
July83,1853-by. 



LAW BOOKS AND BLANKS, 

FOR SALE 

AT COMMONWEALTH OFFICE. 



BOOKS. 

MONROE ox HARLAN'S DIGEST OP THE DEC1S 
IOSS OF THK COURT OK APPEALS, 
2 vol*. Price, . 

KENTUCKY CODES OF PRACTICE. 
1 voL Price. .... 

REVISED STATUTES OP KENTUCKY. 
I vol. Price, --- - 

DEBATES OF THE CONVENTION. 
1 vol. Price, • 

GUIDE TO JUSTICES, CLERKS. SHERIFF 
die, by John C. Hkrndoh, 

1 vol. Price, ..... 

ACTS OF THE LEGISLATURE OP KY.— 



$12 Oil 



3 50 



S 00 



3 01) 



3 00 



THE GENERAL ACTS of 



3 0(1 



I 00 



THE GENERAL ACTS of Session 1853 and 

1834— bouudiu Leather. Price ■ • 150 

B. MONROE'S REPORTS — The 15th, 16th A 17th vols. 
Of Beu. Monroe's Reports. $5 per volume. 

LOUGHBOROUGH'S DIGEST OF THE STAT- 
UTES, 

1 vol. Price, 3 IK) 

HON. GEO. ROBERTSON'S 

Part y, its Principle, itt i 
Pamphlet. Price— 10 cts. 

HON 



BLANKS, 

BLANKS FOR COUNTY COURT JUDGESof allkinds. 
Price— 60 cts per quire. 

JUSTICES' BLANKS— WARRANTS AND EXECU- 
TIONS. 

Price— CO cts per quire . 

CONSTABLE'S SALE NOTICE'S, REPLEVIN BONDS 



H. G. BANTA, 

PAINTER & PAPER HANGER. 



To the Citizens of Frankfort and Sur- 
rounding Country: 

I AM THANKFUL to you for past favors, and hope by 
strict attention to business aud by doing good work, 
to merit a continuance of the same In the following 
branches of my trade: 

HOUSE PAINTING; 

All kinds of Zinc, White and Enameled Finished Paint- 
ing, Wall, Ceiling and all kinds of plaiu House and 
Roof paiuting done in the most durable manner. Mix- 
ed paint* always for sale. 

SIGN PAINTING 

All kinds Gilt, Fancy and Plaiu Signs; also, Signs 
neatly painted on Glu-s. or Transparent Cloth for S how - 
Windows; Trunks aud Umbrellas marked at short no- 
tice. 

IMITATIONS OF WOODS &, MARBLES, 

Mahogany, Maple, Walnut, Rosewood, Oak, and all 
kinds of Staining and Imitations of all kind, of Marble, 
iu the best manner. 

GLAZING 

Of ever) description, such as Sashes for Houses, and 
Green Houses beaded in Putty. All kinds of Suined 
aud Frosted Gloss furuished and Glazed in tho very 
best style. 

PAPER HANGING. 

Every kind of Paneled, Match, Plain or Ornamental 
Paper Hanging; Testers and Fire Screens neatly 
ed. 

June 24, lS57-ly. 



FRESH ARRIVAL. 

Ladies', 

Misses and 

Childrens" 



i p"P er - 



per 



cts per quire. 

SHERIFF'S REPLEVIN BONOS. | 
quire. 

CIRCUIT CLERK'S EXECUTIONS. Price— tit) cts per 
quire. 

BLANK CHECKS, ou Branch Bank of Kentucky, a 
Frankfort, and Farmers' Bank of Kentucky.— 
Price— fl per quire 
BLANK OEEUS. Price— $1 per quire. 

Orders from a distance for any of the above 
named Books or Blanks will be promptly attended to 
wiieu accompanied by ihe Cask; and if desired to be 
lorwurded by mail, the pustule teill be pre-paid upon the 
condition that it be refunded t \ ihe person orderiugthe 
urticle to be sent by mail. 



J. H. K1NKEAD, 
Attorney and Counsellor at Law, 



u 



GALLATIN, MISSOURI. 

ILL practice iu the Circuit Mi other Courts of Da- 
viess, and the Circuit Courts of the adjoining coun- 

Oltke up stair, in tlie Gallatin Sun Oflice 



;rjr*Otnce up s 
May 0, ltij" — I 



JOSHUA TEVIS, 
Counselor and Attorney at Law, 
LOUISVILLE, Al 

OFFICE— COURT-PLACE, NEAR SIXTH STREET. 
BicsiDitftcic— East side Sixth, near Broadway, 
une  i, IS57 — iy. 



A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT 

OF FANCY ARTICLES. 

CAR BI OBTAINED U 

DR. MILLS' DRUG STORE. 



POMADES FOR THE HAIR 

Of everv style and price at 

Dr. MILLS' Drugstore. 

TOOTH ~BKUSHES, 

A beautiful assortment, al 

Dr. MILLS' Drugstore 

COMBS 

■ •• ■ r  description and material, al 

Or. MILLS' Dm* Store. 

HAIR BRUSHES. 

The largest variety in Frankfort, at V 

Dr. MILLS' Drugstore. 

ODONTALGIC PREPARATIONS. 

Consisting of Tooth Soaps, Tooth Paste^Too^Po^der. 



TING 

AND 

CONGRESS GAITERS 

—ALSO- 
KID AUD MOROCCO BOOTS, 

BUSKINS AND SLIPPERS. 

GENTLEMENS' 

YOUTHS' AND 

BOYS CONGRESS GAITERS. 



1857. 



IV)7. 



QUICK SALES — LOW PRICE. 

§20,000 WORTH 

Fashionable Clothing, Gents* 
Goods, Children'. * Youth's 

AT 

A. SONN EBERG'S, 



Hi. Clair (street, Frankfort, 



Chy. 



KIP, CALF -v 

OF THE BEST QUALITY, 

Just received and for sale at 

TODD'S. 
A VERY LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 

H ATS, 

OF EVERY STYLE AND VARIETY, 

SALS AT 



KEEP IT IS MIND — THAT A. 
Iluest stock of 

READY-MADE CLOTHING 

Ever brought to the City of Frankfort, and is now pre- 
pared to exui bit to It's i. ieuds and customers a mo.-t ele- 
gant stock or GOODS, sua is anxious to extend the ben- 
efit of his si'pe. ioi" judgment to those in want of 

Coats, Pants, Vests, Shirts, Hosiery, Un- 
derwear, Hats, Caps, fee, Ac. 

to replenish their Wardrobes 



io well to Rive me a call, as 1 am sutlsfled they 

r do better at any other establishment iu the city. 



wiLt.i\M h . avcaii.L. 



AVER ILL & KEARNS, 

Successors to L. L. Pinkertou.) 



DRUGGISTS, 

T/EEP constantly on hand a full stock of DRUGS, 
K. MEDICINES and CHEMICALS, PainU, Oils, Var- 
nishes. Dye-stuffs, Glass, dtc. 

-ALSO- 

A splendid assortment of Pancy Articles, Perfumery, 
Flavouring Extracts, Vanilla Beans, Confection*, 
which luoy will sell at the 

■amsnthw best inaterialsTandat 
Dec. 15, 1856— tf. 



LOOK HERE! 



DOG GRASS BRUSHES. 



For Cloth, Velvet and Bonnet purposes, at 

Dr. MILLS' Drug 



FANCY SOAPS 

L rire of all shines color*, sizes ami in 
v 1 Dr. MILLS' Drug 

FINE TOILET BOTTLES, 



THOMAS A. MARSHALL 

if A VINU removed to Frankfort and resumed the prac- 
11 lice of Law, will attend punctually tU * uc 1 I'ases as 
may be entrusted to him in , lie Court of Appeals ol Ken- 
tucky, aud io such uii;i s.;uieiM« hi lie may make m 
other Couriseouveuienll.v acre.-.'  ie. He *illul»„giw 
opinions aud advice iu writing, npou cases sialed in 
writing, or on records presented toUim. He will prompt- 
ly attend to all comuiuuicai-on-t relating io Hie business 
above described, and uiay al uU nines, except when ab- 
sent ou busiue,s,be iouuu iu Fiankfon. 
March SU, lrt57-ir. 

J. W. McOUUNG. 

{Formerly of Kentucky.) 

Attorney at Law & Real Estate Broker, 

3 / Street, St. Paul, Minnesota. 

1I/ILL loan money for capitalists at 24 to 3ti per cent 
If upon real estate worth double the loan, ttl—HI 
la has no usury law) and make iuvei 



country property to the best 
Km 



iu city or 



I he best Kentucky referencesgiven ir required. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 
Jan. 7, 1857— ly. 



S. T. WALL. 



WALL & FINNELL, 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

COVINGTON, KY. 
Orrici, Third Street, OrrostTB Soitii end City Hall. 



W. «v F. practice iu the Courts ot Kenton, Campbell. 
Grant, Boone, and Nicholas, and the Court of Appeals, 
at Frankfort. May 0, Wji If 



IX MONROE. 



JAMES MONROE 



B. & J. MONROE, 

A T T O K N ■ V S AT L, A \\ . 

FRANKFORT, KY. 

JPfJAMES Monroe will attend to the collection of 
claims iu central Kentucky: also, to the investigation oi 
titles to land iu Kentucky, on behalf of non-residents 
and others. [April 9, — tf. 



ANDREW MONROE. 



R. A. LOMAN 



MONROE & LOGAN, 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

• oi Sixth street, betwee 
rthe Court House yard. 

April U, 1 -  '. — tf. 



OFFICE on the East side al Sixth street, between Mar- 
ket and Jefferson, 



T. N. LINDSEY. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 
Fraukfort, Ky., 

J ILL practice Law in all the Courts held In Fr 
./ and the adjoining counties. His Office is alhis resi- 
dence, near P. Swigert's, entrance on 
Fraukfort, Feb. 26, 1849,751-lf. 



w 



S. D. MORRIS, 
Attorney and Counselor at Law, 

FKAXKFOKT, KY., 

WILL practice In all the co :rts held in Frankfort, and 
in the adjoining counties. He will attend particu- 
larly to the collection or debts In auy part of the State. 
All busiuess couOded to him will meet with prompt 
attention. 

Office on St. Clair street iu the new building 
next door to the Branch Bank or Keutucky, over G. 
W. Craddock's office. 
Feb. 20, 1857— wdctwby. 



Beautiful styles of Bohemiuu.at 

Dr. MILLS' Drugstore. 

FINE COLOGNE, 

For sale in any quantity, either in bottles, suitable for 
the toilet, or otherwise, at ^ MILLS' Drug Store. 

handkerchTef extracts. 

The genuiue Lubiu's as well as a variety of other's 
make, in new styles, aud at all prices, at 

Dr. MILLS'Drug Store. 

EVERYTHING 

In the line of Fancy and Toilet articles, that either La- 
dies or Gentlemen cau desire, at 

Dr. MILLS' Drug Store. 

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS. 

A Handsome selection will be opened in due time for 
the approaching holidays, at 

Dr. MILLS' Drugstore. 

Doc. 1,1856. 



E. RANDOLPH SMITH ■ 

Chicago. 111. 



CHtS. S. WALLER. 

Chicago, 111. 



Danv'ille, Ky 



SMITH, WALLEK fc CO, 

REAL ESTATE BROKERS 

OFFICE-MASOMC TEMPLE, 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, 

1 i It IS particular and personal attention to the Invest 
\J me n l ol mm] lor trtfrffl in Lauds, Town Lota, 

dtc, In Illinois. Iowa, Wisconsin, aud Minnesota, and 
t" the locumm of Land Warrants. They will also invest 
money ou BO.N DS and K EA L ESTATE SECURITIES, 
al Inguly remunerative rales of interest, for parlies de- 
siring iu 

Their facilities aud opportunities for investment, ex- 
perience in the busiuess, aud acquaintance with the 
, warrant the belief hat they can make 



of ranOB, English and Dresden china. 

l\I.MNG,Tea, Breakfast, and Toilet Seta; Bohemian, 

D IWriL Belgian, » m4 f "^ '' J j ^^ gjg 

IVORY £ COMMON CUTLERY, 

Double Silvar-plated Castors, Forks, Spoons, Baskets, 
Waiters, Soils, Tea Sets, Ac. etc.. will be sold al 

BASTKR\ MR PRICE, 

Aaov 
All 
latest 

Itieiii. 

Bv calling respecifully the 
id merchants, we are sure I 



wnersare willing ^o make chance in business. 

1 the above meuuoaed goods are of the newest and 

UStyles and Pa,.erns, inanulacured expressly for 



Law. 



Medical, 



Miscellaneous, 



-ii sX-  i-SS. b 

THE LARGEST IMPORTATION I HAVE EVER MADE 
open for the inspection of the public, 

W. M. TODI 



LETTER Sr NOTE PAPERS 



OP 



EVERV VARIETY 



SIZE AND STYLE NOW IN USE, 



great North- West, 
as sale 
WesL 



tin the 



All letters of inquiry or on business promptly au 
ed. Address, .SMITH, WALLER & CO., 



Box No. **»7, Chicago, I 

J. T. BOVLE Danville Ky. 
REFERENCES. 
Hon. S. A. Doiolas, Chicago, 111. 
Hon. B. L. Morris, Chicago, 111. 
Gov. J. A. Mattbson, Joliet, III. 
Hon. D. Davis, Bloomiugton, IIL 
Gov. C. S. Moreuead, Fruukiort, Ky. 
Hou. Thos. S. Paoe, Fraukfort, Ky. 
Messrs. Bodley 6c Fimdell, Louisville, Ky. 
Messrs. Taylor, Shel«y or Co., Lexington, Ky. 
Col. J. W. Fihnell, C 
Hon. W. C. Goodloe 
Col. C. Roues, Danvi 
Hon. Z. WHkAT, Columbia, Ky . 
Hon. J. R. Ukderwood, Bowlmggreen, Ky. 
Hon. John G. Rooers, Glasgow, Ky. 
Hon. John L. Helm, Elizabeibtown, Kv. 
Hon. L. W. Powell, Henderson, Ky. 
lay 30, 



ELBY ot to., L.exin 
Coyiugton, Ky. 

v K iile, ,C Ky" 0UU,MLy ' 



E. H. TAYLOR, JR. 



ISAAC SHELBY. 



W .*!.•» HO I' SB 



w 



TAYLOR, SHELBY & CO., 

BANKERS. 

E have this day opened an Office in the city of Lex- 
ington, for the purpose of transacting 

A General Banking, Exchange, and Col- 
lecting Business* 

We are at all times prepared to check upon the priu- 
ipal cities or the United States, and to make collections 
lereon. We will allow interest ou deposit*, to be wilh 
| irawn at pleasure, and transact whatever business is 
generally connected with private bankiug. 
Approved paper can be cashed at any time during 
hours, from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. [OcL 33, 1853. 



FRANK BEDFORD, 
Attorney at Law, 

VERSAILLES, KENTUCKY. 

Dec. I, 1850- tf. 



ROB'T J. BRECKINRIDGE, 

Attorney and Counselor at Law, 

LEXINGTON, KY. 

l£7»OPFICE on Shortstreetbetween Llmestoneand 
Upperstreets. [May 23, leStf-lf. 



0 



GEORGE W. CRADDOCK, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

FRANKFORT, KY. 

FFICE removed to East side of SL Clair street, 



the Courts held in 
Dec. 7, 1850— tf 



Wolfe, Dash & Fisher, 

(Successors to Wolfe, Gillespie 6( Co.,) 
jMPOKTERSand Jobbersor Foreign and American 

L 

Kov. 14, 1856-ly 



r 



BY CALLING AT TO 



May 27, 1857. 



M. D. Sl'H F.NRY . 



W. H. M'llENRY 



and 
Is, 



Bthati 



of 
willgl 



n-ouuiry punctually andco 



A. JAEGER 6t CO., 



No*, li!) and 181, fourth 
Ky..and So. 439, Lak 
Jan. 3, 1856— If. 



WM STR0BR I DGE, 

DEALER M 

VERMONT AND IT ALLAH 

MARBLE MONUMENTS 

AND 

GRAVE STOXES, 

OF EVERV* DESCRIPTION. 

A large stock always on hand at the 1 
8, 1857-3m. 



A 



It. itl'NYAN, 

T 3AKER dc RUM VAX'S old stand, hasjust received 

an addition to his preseui stock of Staple aud Fancy 

DRY GOODS, aUEENSWARE, &c, 

To which he invites the attention of the public, as he 
will sell as low as the lowest. Give him a call . 
April «, 



BAYER & KALTENBRUM, 

FASHIONABLE BOOT M VKERS, 



FRANKFORT, KY., 

DESPECTPULLY announce io Ihe citiiei s of Prank- 
it ion and surrounding couutiy.lhal having purchased 
the stock of Mr.JoH* L. MALKia.are prepareu to man- 
ufacture, to order. Boots aud Shoes of tho Quest descrip- 
tion, al the shortest notice, and ou moderate terms. Be- 
ing experienced aud skilltul workmeu we warrant to 

JL B^Rememberthe old stand of John L. Malkiu 

\t . vV IV. 



II. D. ft W H. M'HENRY, 

ATTORNEYS AND LAND AGENTS, 

DES MOINES, IOWA, 
QROPOSE to practice io the various Courts of Polk 
[ county, and in the Supreme Court of Iowa, and the 
Uuited States District Court. 

They have also established a General Agency for the 
transaction of all manner of busiuess couuectod wilh 
Laud Titles. 

They will enter Lands, investigate Titles, buy and sell 
Lauds, and invest money on the best terms aud on the 
best securities. 

They will enter Lands in Kansas and Nebraska Terr! 
tones, if an amounl sufficient to Justify a vis. I lo that 
country is offered. 

The Seuior pariuer having been engaged extensively 
in the business of the law iu the Courts of Kentucky for 
nearly thirty years, and the J uuior having been engaged 
in (he Land Business iu Iowa for eight y ears past, during 
whk-hliine he hss made actual survey of alarge portion 
of Polk aud adjoining counties, they reel conddent they 
will oeable lo render a satisfactory account ot all busi- 
ness entrusted lo them 

They will enter Land with Land Warrants or Money, 
upon actual iuspecilon of the premises, and will buy aud 
sell Landson Commission, upon a careful investigation 
of Titles. Persons wishing lo settle io the Slate can 
Bud desirable farms and city property Tor sale, by calliug 
on them at their office in Shermr n's Buildlug, corner or 
Third street snd Court Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 

March 11,1857— tf. 



CAPITAL HOTEL, 

FRANKKORT. KY 
DAVID MERIWETHER, Proprietor. 



JOHN RODMAN, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 
OIBce on St. Clair Street, next 



Telegraph Ol 

WILL practice In all the Courts held in ri 
In Oldham, Henry, Trimble and Owen 
Oct. 28, 1853. 



JOHN A. MONROE, 

ATTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW, 
FRANKFORT, KY. 
ILL practice Law in the Court of Appeals' In the 
Franklin Circuit Court, and «U other Stale Couru 
held in Frankfort, aud will attend to tho collection or 
Debts for non-residents in any partof the Stale. 

Always at home, every coinmunica Ion will have his 
attention on the same day received, and will be prompt 
ly answered, and thus his clieuia kept aigays advised ol | 
ibeiraffairs. And having determiued to have all his 
briefs and arguments iu the Court or Appeals printed, 
aud copies rurnlsued to his clients and counsel In the 
lower courts, all concerned will betully Informed how 
his duly has been performed. 

He will, as Commissioner of Deeds, take the ac- 
knowledgments of Deeds, and other writings to be 
used or recorded in other States; and, as Commissioner 
under the act of Congress, attend lo the taking or depo- 



MERCHANT & SMITH, 

PLUMBERS AND TINNERS, 



FRANKFORT, KY 



* ll Tr£ Offl^'oid & Bank," opposite the 
Frankrort,Nov. 19, 1856-bv. 



I 1 Hardware, Cutlery, (illleaple'R Guns. Pistol* 
I and Rides, 3rt, Warren street, IwW York 



MOREHEAD & BROWN, 

Partners in the 

PRACTICE OF LAW, 

WILL attend to all business confided to them In the 
Court or Appeals. Federal Court, and other Courts 
which hold their sessions al Frankfort, Ky. One or 
both may always be found al their office, to give counsel 
Frankfort, Jan. 6, 185S-by. 



11TATER Closets, Bath Tubs, Hot and Cold Shower 
IT Baths, Wash Trays, Plain and Pancy Wash Stands, 
and every description of Plumbing work pot up inthv 
most workmanlike manner. 

Copper, Tin & Sheet Iron Work, Spout- 
ing and Guttering 

of all descriptions. 
Continually on hand a large assortment of 

COOKING, PARLOR X COAL STOVES; 

Cistern, Well and Porce Pumps; 
Pipe, Ac 



HIVING taken this well known HOTEL the proprie- 
tor respecilully elicits the patrouage or the traveling 
uublic, especially the custom of his old friends while 
proprietor of the Frankfort Hotel He hopes rrom his 
long experience in tne busiuess of bowl-keeping, his 
well known reputation as a caterer to the tastes of his 
■i-uesu, a sincere desire to please and accommodate, and 
by close application lo busiuess to merit and receive 
the patronage of visitors to the Seat or Government. 
Frankfort, May 15, lr57— if. 

•.•The Louisville Journal and Democrat publish one 
mouth daily aud three mouths weekly, and the Obser- 
ver and Reporter publish ihreo mouths and send bills to 
K D. MERlWtTHER. 



H. F. SMITH . 



ft. r HABRJSON. 



CORNER FOURTH AND JEI 
LOUSVILLK. KV. 

H. F . SMITH, Proprietor. 



J. W. REYNOLDS, / ri ,. kt 
K. O'BANNoN, \ 



.April 15, 



MANS10., HOUSE. 

Comer of Main and St. 

FRANKFORT. KY. 

mHE undersigned would notify his friends and the 
I public generally, that he has purchased the interest 
of J. T. Luckeilinihisold established and well knowa 
Hotel, and will continue to entertain the public In the 
best manner that the market*, Ac, will allow. He has 
►Hiitagedthe services of his son-in-law, Wm. K.. Tay lor, 
who is well known to a large poi-inn of the traveling 
community, as a man of business, and who will have 
charge or lite office. He asks the p 
c and will endeavor to deserve it. 



May 23, 1855. 



BEN. LUCKETT. 



FRANKFORT HOTEL, 

Thk undersigned having taken this well known house 
lately occupied by Mr. D. Meriwether) respectfully 
rdteiis a share ol the puolic patronage, and by close at 
o.Viim.io business, and keeping such a house as this 
f.!°. has been, will endeavorto merit theconfldenee 

J. B. WASSON. 



or the traveling commuulty. 
June 18, I85i-tr. 



MORTON & GRISWOLD, 



■V, 1 0 ^.V* r ,ron  t« 1 y attendedto. 
13, 1857— tf. 



M'ELEVET & VAN D0KKUM, 

FASHIONABLE TAILORS. 



No 48, 

(Successors to W. W. Northrop.) 
EEP constantly on hands large assortment or the 
choicest goods, suitable for gentleman's 
a great variety of furnishing goods. Per*' 
the city are invited lo examine our goof\s. 
Peb. 25, 1857- Jm. 



ssaatksollers, Stationers. Binders, and Book and 
Job Printers. Main street. Louisville, Ky., 

HAVE constantly on hand a complete assortment of 
Law, Medical, Theological, Classical, School, and 
Miscellaneous Books, si low prices. Paper of every 
description, quality, and price. 
Tr~7»Colleges, Schools, and£rivate Librarioi 
,dvi 



at a small advance on cost 
April I, W45-«51-by 



or JUt..I. 



pplil 



Notice 



K 



ALL persons Indebted to the undersigned arerespoet- 
fully and earnestly requested lo call and settle them 



Mounts. The amounts due me are small, and I am 
- up lie business of theeoncern as speed - 

IX MBRIWBTHKR. 



I anxious to win dup 
I Uy as possible. 

March S3, 18S7_tf. 



• 



TUT I 1 1 M VI I i V W IT II T U trarv construction i ne oDject ol an ruie 
L II L V. " 31 Jji U A Yd Li A Li 1 Mi construction is to ascertain truly the meauin 



I and decided without any change favoring a con | the periods prescribed hy that set lion. This con 
trarv construction The object of all rules of 1st 



QUALIFICATION OF VOTERS. 

Below we publish, tu the eiclusiou of editorial 
matter, the arroment 0 f Mr. Madison C John 
son in support of his opinion that a foreigner can 
legally vote in Kentucky immediately niter nat- 
uralization — provided he has been a resident, as 
an alien, of the State and precinct for the time 
req*ed bv law. We also publish the arguments 
of Hon. Gareett Davis and Hon George Rob 
ertson in answer to Mr. Johnson We publish 
them all together not only because the subject 
under consideration is one of vital importance, 
but also because we are aniious that the judges 
of elections may have botfi sides of the question 
set fully before them, and may then act accord 
ing as they think best— paying, at the same time, 
proper respect for the opinions of our able Attor 
ney General The arguments of Messrs. Davis 
and Robertson appear to us to be conclusive, and 
we do not fear to place them before our readers 
side by side with that of the highly intelligent gen - 
i who advocates the other side of the ques 
At any rate it is proper that the views of all 
person- should be placed before our read- 
ers, and then let them form their own judgment 
concerning the merits of the question: 

To the Legal Voter* of the Ashland Dis- 
trict. 

Lexington, July 21st, 1857. 
James B.Clay, Esq.: 

Dear Sir: in your note of the 20th inst , the 
following enquiries are made: 

"1st. How long is it, after a foreigner lias 
been naturalized before he is entitled to vote 1 

2d. Does the law require that a foreigner shall 
have been in the State two years, or in the coun- 
ty one year and in the district sixty davs after 
be has been naturalized, before he is entitled to 
vote? 

3d. Is not a foreigner, naturalized even upon 
the day of the election, entitled to vote, if be 
fore that time he has resided in the State two 
years, or the county one vear, and in the district 
sixty days? 

4th. Is not the case of a foreigner obtaining 
his final papers, and the case of a minor arriv- 
ing at the age of tweutv-one vears, exactly simi- 
lar? 

5th. Have the County Courts of Kentucky, and 
has the City Court of Lexington, the power and 
the right to naturalize foreigners? 

6th. Is the certificate of the Judge necessary 
to any paper, especially naturalization papers, is 
suing from any other State, if the paper has the 
seal of the Court 1 

7th. Is not the simple certificate of the Clerk 
of the Circuit, County, and Citv Police Courts of 
this State, without either teal or certificate of the 
Judge, sufficient Authentication of the natu 
ralization papers of th 
State?" 

On each of the foregoing questions I have very 
decided opinions, which I have at all times freely 
expressed to all proper enquirers. I do not there- 
fore hesitate to express them to you. though I 
hope that pressing engagements at this time will 
excuse mv failure to write an argument in defense 
of them. ' 

The first, second, third and fourth enquiries may 
be answered together. 

By my constt uction of the 8th section of the 
second article of the Constitution, an alien will 
be entitled to vote immediately after his natural 
itation is completed, and even' on the same day 
that it is completed, provided, that before natural- 
ization, he has attained the age of twenty one 
years, and has resided in the State or county, and 
in the district, the periods prescribed by that 
section. This construction of the section is to 
my mind so clearly the obvious and natural im- 
port of its language, snd the construction which 
would require the residence after naturalization so 
strained, that though I have read with care the 
discussions on this subject which have appeared 
in the newspapers, and believe in the propriety 
of a provision requiring one or more years to in- 
tervene between the naturalization and the right 
to rote, I cannot say that even a doubt has been 
produced in mv mind as to the correct construe 
tion. 

To the fifth enquiry it is sufficient to say that 
the County Courts of the State and the City Court 
of Lexington are Courts of Record, have seals 
and clerks, as also common law jurisdiction. It 
results that bv the 3d section of the Naturaliza- 
tion Act of the Hth April. 1802, those courts 
have power to naturalize aliens. 

To the sixth enquiry my answer is that the 
certificate of the judge of court in which the nat 
uralization took place, where the court is of any 
other State than Kentucky, r'« necessary, and that 
the attestation of the Clerk, with the seal of the 
Court annexed, is not sufficient proof of natural i 
zation in the courts of any other State, without 
the certificate of the judge that the attestation is 
in due form. This certificate of the judge is re- 
quired in the act of Congress on the authentica- 
tion of judicial proceedings, by the Revised Stat- 
utes of this State (section 18, chapter 35. page 
313, of Revised Statutes) and by the decisions of 
the Court of Appeals of Kentucky. 

To the seventh question, my opinion is that 
where the naturalization has been made in any 
court of competent jurisdiction in Kentucky, the 
simple attestation of the clerk of such court, to a 
copy of the proceedings conferring citizenship, 
is sufficient without either the seal of the court 
or certificate of the judge being affixed to the pa- 
per 

In conclusion it is due to candor to sav, that I 
do not claim to have constitutional law* outside 
of the range of my professional pursuits, a pecu 
liar study, and am constrained to regard the very 
high estimate you place upon my opinions as aris- 
ing from mutual personal friendship and 
which has long and happily existed between 
I am very respectfully, 

Your obedient servant, 

M. C JOHNSON 



ly. The reason of this judgment against the ad | 
tructiou of the section is to my mind, so clearly I miralty courts is not that they did not have the 
of | the natural and obvious import of its language, I jurisdiction of courts of law, but that they did 



the framers of the law to be construed. To my : and the construction which would require the resi- 
mind, it is incredible that the convention should | dence after naturalization so strained that though 



have intended to require one or two years to 
elapae between naturalization and the right to 
vote, when they used language which had been 
for fifty years uniformly otherwise construed, and 
left their intention of making so important a 
change, only to be gathered from rules of gram- 
mar so nice, and so obscure, that near sixty 
years had to elapse before it was discovered or even 
suspected. 

The grammatical construction is so little re- 
garded in Courts in opposition to the popular 
meaning of the language used, that I do not con- 
sider it necessary to enter into a discussion of its 
merits. To my mind the section in question in 
its substantial popular meaning, prescribes seven 
distinct, important and each equally essential 
qualifications of a voter, and his right to vote de- 
pends upon his possessing each and all of them 
at the time he presents himself at the polls. 

By the provisions of the section the voter must 
be: 1st. freeman; 2d. A white man; 3d. Of tha 
male sex; 4th A citizen; 5th. Twenty -one years 
of age; 6th. A resident of the State for two years 
or of the county one year next preceeding the 
election; 7th. A resident of the precint sixty 
days next preceeding the election. Each of 
these qualifications are perfectly distinct in fact, 
though briefly expressed in one united sentence. 

I am unable to see the force of the reasoning 
by which the words. "Every free white male 
citizen of twenty one years of age who has resid- 
ed," &c.,are made to mean by force of grammar 
"resided at a citizen " I would not consider it 
ungrammatical to speak of an inhabitant of Lex 
ington, who had resided ten years in Frankfort; 
though the same grammatical reasoning would 
lead to the absurdity that he resided in Frankfort, 
\l vt anas an inhabitant of Lexington. Auy num- 
ber of illustrations could be given of the feeble- 
ness and frequent absurdity of such reasouings in 
ascertaining the true popular meaning ol lan- 
guage. 

The qualifications for office in the Constitution 
may throw some light upon the construction of 
the clause prescribing the qualifications of voters. 
The qualifications of a Representative, are. "no 
person shall be a Representative, who at the time 
of hit election is not a citizen of the United States, 
has not attained the age of twenty-four years, and 
who has not resided in this State six years next pre 
ceeding his election, and the last year thereof in 
the couuty, towu, or citv for which he may be 
chosen." Art. 2, Sec 4.' 

"No person shall be a Senator who at the time 
oj hit election is not a citizen of the United States, 
has not attained the age of thirty years, and who 
has not resided in this State six years next pre- 
ceeding his election, and the last year thereof* in 
the district for which he may be chosen." Art. 2, 
Sec. 16. 

The qualifications of Governor are: **He shall 
be at least thirty-five years of age, a citizen of 
the United States, and have been an inhabitant 
of this State at least six years next preceding his 
election." Art. 3, sec. 4. 

Similar language in regard to citizenship is 
used in prescribing the qualifications of Judges, 
Clerks and Ministerial officers. 

It will be observed that the argument derived 
from the rules of grammar has no application to 
these sections, and that the provision as to the 
period of citizenship is so express and clear, that 
uo strain of construction however great can per 
vert it into a requisition of any period of citizen- 
ship before his election. A person is only dis- 
qualified from the highest offices in the State so 
far as citizenship is concerned by not being a 
citizen "at the time of hit election " Would it not 
be a strange anomaly in a constitution, that a 
a man should be qualified to fill any office in the 
State: Executive, Legislative, Judicial, or Min 
isterial, and yet not be qualified to vote for a 
constable? Higher qualifications are properly 
required in officers than in voters, a construction 
which reverses this produces discord in the con- 
stitution. The tpirit and object of a particular 
provision in a law or constitution is arrived at by 
comparing and harmonizing all the provisions 
on the same subject in the same instrument. 

The construction given by me produces this 
harmony, and is, therefore, in accordance with 
the spirit and object of the Constitution as well 
as what appears to me, to be the plain obvious 
and popular meaning of the section itself. 

I have also expressed the opinion, that 
County Courts have the authority to naturalize 
aliens, in which it appears that I differ from the 
Attorney General; according to his opinion, 
County "Courts have every requisite for this 
authority, except common law jurisdiction. He 
says, "there is nothing in the law that au- 
thorizes the institution of an action, civil orcrim 
inal, or the filing of a bill of equity or vesting it 
with any common law jurisdiction whatever " It 
will only require the reading of Chapter 16 of 
Title 10 of the Code of Practice, to perceive the 
eutire mistake made by the Attorney General. 
By that Chapter the partition of lands amongst 
parceners and tenants in common, and the assign- 
ment of dower to widows, can be enforced in the 
County Courts by a regular suit, prosecuted by 
petition and summons, and defended by answer 
in the same manner as in the Circuit Courts, and 
the County Courts are authorized to decide all 
questions of law and fact arising in those suits. 
The rights enforced by those suits are common 
law rights; questions of common law involving 
large amounts in value may be made, and decid- 
ed in those suits by the County Courts. 

If this is not common law jurisdiction I am at a 
loss to know what is. In these views as to the 
meaning of the Constitution and authority of 
County Courts, I am far from expressing what I 
think the Constitution and law ought to be. In 
my opinion the Constitution would be greatly im 
proved by requiring some years to elapse between 
naturalization and the right of suffrage, and the 
law would be improved by depriving County and 
Police Courts of all power of naturalization; what 
the Constitution and laws should be is a proper 
question of party politics ; what they actually are, 
is a pure question of dispassionate and unbiased 
construction ; Constitutions and laws loose their 
value when their construction is fashioned by 
party or personal predictions. 

M.C.JOHNSON 



The undersigned, members of the Bar, hare ex 
amined the letter of Madison C. Johnson, Esq., to 
Mr. Clay, on the proper construction of the Acta 
of Congress on the subject of Naturalization, and 
the Constitution and Laws of this State, relating 
to the right of suffrage, and fully concur in the 
opinions be expresses. 

R. HAWES, 

F. TROUTMAN 

W. E. SIMMS, 

W. W ALEX ANDER, 

JOHN A. PR ALL, 

J. 0. HARRISON, 

C. C. ROGERS, 

JOHN C BRECKINRIDGE 

JAMES B. BECK. 

On Qualification of Voters. 

Having on several occasions, orally and in 
writing, expressed the confident opinion that 
aliens were entitled to rote immediately after 
their naturalization, if they possessed the other 
qualifications prescribed in the Constitution, I 
have thought it due to myself, as well as respect- 
ful to the two eminent lawyers from whom I dif- 
fered, to express some of "the reasons which pro- 
duced that opinion. 

The section which prescribes the qualification 
of voters is in substance the same, though con- 
densed in form, with the corresponding section 
in the old Constitution, having merely the addi- 
tional requisite of sixty days residence in the 
Toting precinct. So that this question under the 
old and new Constitution, has been practically 
for near sixty years before the people of Ken- 
tacky. At every annual election it was practi- 
cally presented and decided, and during that 
whole period until last fall, a doubt was never 
expressed so far as I have ever heard, that the 
opinion I entertain was correct. When the con 
▼ention seven years ago framed the present con- 
stitution, there had been for fifty years one uni- 
form and undisputed construction of this clause 
of the Constitution, and the convention adopted 



\ oters, Ac. 

Mr. Brown: 

In the Kentucky Statesman of the 24th inst., I 
have read a letter addressed by James B. Clay, 
Esq., to Madison C Johnson, Esq., in which are 
propounded these questions: — 

"1st. How long is it, after a foreigner has be- 
come naturalized, before he is entitled to vote." 

"2d. Does the law require that a foreigner shall 
have been in the State two years, or the county 
one year, and the district sixty days, after he is 
naturalized, before he is entitled to vote?" 

"3d. 1- not a foreigner, even upon the day of 
election, entitled to vote, if before that time, he 
has resided in the State two years, or the county 
one year, and in the district sixty days?" 

"4th. Is not the case of a foreigner obtaining 
his final papers, and the case of a minor arriving 
at the age of 21 years, exactly similar?" 

"5th. Have the county courts of Kentucky, 
and has the city court of Lexington, the power 
and the right to naturalize foreigners?" 

"6th. Is the certificate of the Judge necessary 
to any paper, especially naturalization paper, is- 
suing from any other State, if the paper has the 
seal of the court?" 

"7th. Is not the simple certificate of the clerk 
of the circuit, county, and city police courts of the 
State, without either seal or certificate of Judge, 
sufficent authentication of the naturalization pa- 
pers of a foreigner within the State?" 

It would have been fairer and more just to the 
public, not to have postponed the discussion of 
these important questions, until within a few days 
before the election. 

Maj. Johnson does not reply to the first four 
questions of this letter, by specific answers, but 
in this general language: "The 1st, 2d, 3d, and 
4th enquiries may be answered together. "By 
my construction of the 8th section of the 2d arti 
cle of the constitution, an alien will be entitled 
to vote immediately after his naturalization is 
completed, and even on the same day it is com- 
pleted, provided that before naturalization, he 
has attained to the age of 21 years, and has re- 



ths clause thus construed and annually acted on *'ded in the State or county, and in the district, 



1 have read with care the discussions on this sub 
ject which have appeared in the newspapers, and 
believed in the propriety of a provision requiring 
one, or more years to intervene between the na- 
turalization and the right to vote, I cannot say 
that even a doubt has been produced in my mind 
as to the correct construction." 

Major Johnson is an able lawyer, and a gentle- 
man of the highest rectitude and honor, but he is 
like other men in this, his opinions are not infal- 
lible. I dissent from several positions stated in 
his answer to Mr. Clay. He raav be right and I 
may be wrong, but I dissent from him. The 
clause of the constitution to which he refers, and 
the only one touching the whole matter is in these 
words: "Every free white male citizen, of the age 
of 21 years, who has resided in the State two 
years, or in the county, town, or city, in which 
he offers to vote, oue year next preceding the 
election, shall be a voter, but such voter shall 
have been, for sixty days preceding the election, 
a resident of the precinct in which he offers to 
vote, and he shall vote in said precinct and not 
elsewhere." This section defines, and clearly 
describes the class of persons from which, and 
from which alone, all voters are to be taken; and 
that class in plain and explicit language is "free 
white male citizens." There is then prescribed a 
probationary time of residence through which 
such citizens must pass in the State or county or 
precinct, before they become voters. No one will 
deny that to be a voter, a man must be white, 
must be male; and does not the same imperative 
language and clause also require him to be a cit- 
izen 7 A person who is not free, and white, and 
male, does not, and cannot enter upon this proba- 
tion of time; neither can anyone, although he 
have these three requisites, unless he also have 
the equally indispensable one of being a citizen, 
native or naturalized. He must be a citizen before 
he can begin the probation. 

If Maj Johnson were asked the question, I 
feel assured that he would answer, that a foreign- 
er can only become a citizeu by being natural 
ized according to the laws of Congress; and that 
he does not become a citizen until he has taken 
the final oath. It is not an unnaturalized foreign- 
er, but a citizen that our constitution requires to 
reside two years in the State, or one year in the 
county, before he becomes a voter. A free white 
male, native of Virginia, is a citizen of the United 
States. If he removes to Kentucky, he has to 
reside in the State two years, or in the county 
one year, and in the precinct in which he offers to 
vote, sixty davs before he is invested with thai 
right. The section quoted, in constituting voters, 
requires all free white males to begin their proba 
lionary residence from the same point of citizen 
ship, and the foreigner is to place himself side 
by side with the native, by becoming a citizen, 
before his probation commences. The constitu- 
tion so reads in plain and emphatic language. 
To vote is a high privilege, a great constitutional 
right, and it is not conferred on a foreigner, the 
day when he is naturalized, or six or twelve 
mouths thereafter; no, not until he becomes I 
citizen by being naturalized, and as siien "has re- 
sided two years in the Stat.-, 4c." Major John 
son considers that the principle contended for in 
this construction of the constitution, should have 
been embodied in it, but is of opiniou that it is 
not. I think it is, in plain words. If the point 
be one of difficulty and doubt, but proper and 
necessary, its propriety and necessity would be 
sufficient in such a state of case to establish it. 

I do not think that Major Johnson's answer 
meets Mr. Clay's 4th question. Most certainly 
"the case of a foreigner obtaining his final pa- 
pers, and the case of a minor arriving at the age 
or 21 years" are not "exactly similar." The na 
live minor is a citizen without any process of M 
turalizatiou. He could not pe banished from the 
country, .is an unnaturalized foreigner may be by 
an act of Congress and the proclamation of the 
President. The latter is not "entitled to the 
rights, privileges an 1 immunities of citizens of 
every State," as the former is. No unnaturalized 
foreigner resident in one State can sue a citizen 
of another State in the United States courts held 
therein; hut a native minor can There is no 
analogy whatever between the two cases put in 
Mr. Clay's question. 

Another position of Maj. Johnsou is that both 
the county courts and the city court of Lex- 
iugton may naturalize foreigners. So much of the 
law of Congress as is applicable to the point is in 
these words: "that every court of record in any 
individual State, having'comruon law jurisdictiin", 
and a seal and clerk," kc, may naturalize for 
eigners. 

It is only courts of "Record, which have a clerk 
and a seal of office, and that arc invested with 
common law jurisdiction" that are empowered to 
naturalize foreigners. In the United States there 
are uppellate courts, circuit courts, district courts, 
admiralty courts, courts, of common pleas, probate 
courtt, county courts, city courts, police courts, 
courts of justices of the peace, Sec. All these, or any 
other courts which are courts of record, which 
have a clerk and seal of office, and have common 
law jurisdiction, may admit foreigners to ci'.izen 
ship; but such of them, as want either of those 
requisites have uot the power. The city court of 
Covington has it not, because it has no clerk. A 
court of "justice of the peace" in Kentucky is 
not clothed with that power, because this court 
has neither a clerk, or seal of office. But county 
courts have both a clerk and a seal of office, anil 
if they have also "common law jurisdiction," they 
can unquestionably naturalize foreigners. This 
qualification of the court required by the act of 
Congress as expressed in the phrase "common 
law jurisdiction" is not synonimous with "com- 
mon law court." What is jurisdiction? It is a 
power conferred on a court, or magistrate, to take 
cognizance of, and decide causes according to 
law, and to carry their sentences into execution. 
See Pat. reports, 591. 9th John. 239 This ju 
risdiction is sometimes, and partly, created and 
conferred by the common law, or by the constitu 
ttion, or by the law merchant, by the law maratime, 
or by statutory law, or by the principles and prac 
tiee of chancery. In Kentucky, all the powers 
and jurisdiction of the courts are vested in them 
by statute law; but such powers and jurisdiction, 
were partly made and established by the constitu 
tion, by common law, by the law merchant, by mar 
alinif lair, and by the statutory laws of England, 
Virginia, and Kentucky. Our courts consequent 
ly have many classes jurisdiction — as constitu- 
tional jurisdiction, statutory jurisdiction, admiral 
ty jurisdiction, equity jurisdiction, and common 
law jurisdiction. Unless our county courts have 
some jurisdiction which was created and establish 
ed by "the common law," and as it was thus ere 
ated and established, and it has been invested ir 
them by statue, they have no power to naturalize 
foreigners. There is no common law in Kentucky, 
or the United States but the common law of Eng 
land, and that body of our law was not establish 
ed by statue, but derives all of its force and au 
thority from the universal consent aud immemo 
rial practice of the people of England; and which 
consent and practice dates back to a period even 
before any of her statutory laws were pased un- 
der her earliest kings. These matters are all fa- 
milliar to well read lawyers. Now I maintain 
that our county courts, have no power, or 
jurisdiction which was formed, created and estab- 
lished, by the common law; but that all their 
powers and jurisdiction were formed, created and 
established by statutory law only, and therefore 
not having any common law jurisdiction, they can- 
not naturalize foreigners. This question came 
before the judges of the election at the last No- 
vember election in this Paris precinct. They 
submited it to R. Hawes, Esq., who gave his opin- 
ion that the county courts have no power to nat- 
uralize foreigners. Such was the proper confi- 
dence of those officers, in the eminent ability and 
legal learning of Captain Hawes, that they both 
unhesitatingly adopted his opinions, and would 
not permit men to vote on county court natural i 
zation papers. The late Judge 'Mills gave his 
opinion many years ago, that our county courts 
could not naturalize foreigners, on the ground 
that they had no common law jurisdiction. — 
Courts of equity cannot exercise this power for 
the same reason. It has been decided judicially 
in the State of New York, that her admiralty 
courts cannot naturalize foreigners; and yet those 
courts exercise powers created by statute, and of 
a nature appertaining to the jurisdiction of courts 
of law as contra-distinguished from courts of equi 



not have common law jurisdiction. Courts of law 
and common law jurisdiction, are not the same; 
but in their nature and essence are altogether 
different. 

I concur iu the position that the city court of 
Lexington may naturalize foreigners, because it 
is a conrt of record, has a clerk and invested by 
the State of Ky. with a portion of common law 
jurisdiction. Also, that where the naturalization 
has been in a Kentucky court the certificate of 
the clerk, without his seal of office is sufficient. — 
But where the naturalization has been by the 
courts of other States, the certificate of the clerk 
must have the seal of office attached to it, if there 
be a seal, together with a certificate of the judge, 
chief justice, or presiding magistrate of the 
court, that the attestation of the clerk is in due 
form 

GARRETT DA WU 

Judge Robert»on'* Argument. 

To the Editors of the Observer and Reporter: 

When I wrote the short opinion requested by 
Mr. Hanson on the residence required by the Con- 
stitution of naturalized citizens, 1 had not read 
that of Mr. M. C. Johnson given to Mr. Clay. I 
had only heard that he had, at Mr. Clay's in- 
stance, given some such opinion. I, therefore, 
entertaining a different opinion, felt it to be my 
duty to comply with Mr. Hanson's request, and I 
did so instantly on the spur of the occasion in a 
very hasty anil summary manner. There I ex- 
pected the matter to end. Having given my le- 
gal opinion, I had supposed that it would not be 
proper afterwards to notice newspaper criticisms 
upon it or to vindicate it, from time to time, by 
supplemental arguments. But Mr. Johnson hav- 
ing thought fit, — after seeing my opinion, — to 
make a new argument for answering it and sup 
porting his own, and authorized Mr. Wickliffe 
to show it to any person who might be disposed 
to controvert it (which 1 was bound to consider 
as meant for me,} I now reluctantly accept the 
implied challenge — not to engage in a full and 
thorough argument, but only to notice briefly, 
and I trust sufficiently, Mr. J.'s additional views. 

Mr. J. seems to concede that the grammatical 
construction is against his opinion and favors 
mine. Then, if the Convention understood the 
grammar of their mother tongue, they meant 
what their language grammatically imports. 
Aud this would settle the question unless we as 
sume that they, ignorantly or inadvertantly, used 
bad grammar and intended what their words con 
tradict. 

This 1 see no reason for imputing or admitting. 
To defeat the literal import and grammatical ef 
feet of the Constitution, Mr. Johnson urges only 
two considerations— 1st, usage, and 2nd analogy. 

1 . I do not admit that there has been any such 
practical Construction as should operate as au- 
thority on such a question. When aud where 
has there been any settled or well considered 
usage ou the subject? I know of none. Until 
lately there was scarcely any motive for raising 
the question in Kentucky; and when receutly ag 
itated, many of the most eminent jurists in our 
State thought as 1 think concerning it If, with- 
lut scrutiuy or question, some foreigners may 
have voted immediately after being born as cit 
izens, this is certainly no sufficient authority for 
saying that practical contraction has settled the 
Constitution as meaning less than it imports or 
something essentially different from what it says. 
Nor do I know that there has been any uniform 
usage or deliberate construction. This assump 
tion, therefore, in any proper aspect, is, in mv 
humble judgment, altogether inconclusive as au 
extraneous argument to prove that the Constitu 
tion is what it does not purport to be, and what 
Mr. J. himself says that it ought trot to be. The 
question has uot been settled. What is the Con- 
stitution? That is the only question. 

2. With all proper respect I must say that Mr. 
Johnson's analogical argument weakens, rather 
than strengthens, his reluctant conclusion. It is 
true, as he says, that in prescribing the qualifica 
tious of Governor, Senators, and Representa 
fives, the Constitution, in each of those three 
cases separately requires, in express terms, as to 
  iti/t'uship, only that the candidate shall be "a 
citizen at the time of election. And from this Mr. 
J. infers, with full and unhesitating confidence, 
against his will, that the "th section of the 2nd 
article means the same thing even though it em 
ploys language essentially different. My infer 
ence from this discrepancy is clearly the opposite 
of Mr. J.'s. The Convention intended that cit- 
izenship at the time of the election, should be 
sufficient for Governor; and therefore they say so 
explicitly. They intended the same tning as to 
a Representative; and therefore they say so inthe 
same explicit wordt — and intending the same thing 
as to Senators, they express it in the tame words 
Then, as in three distinct provisions defining the 
qualifications of the elected, the Convention uses 
the same unequivocal language without any de- 
viation, why was it dropped and language obvi- 
ously and essentially different employed to define 
the qualifications of the electors? The only ra- 
tional answer is that, when they prescribed the 
qualification of citizenship in the case of the 
electors, they intended more than citizenship "at 
the time of the election." If, as in the cases of 
the elected, the Convention intended that cit- 
izenship at the time of the election with antece- 
dent alien residence should be sufficient for vo- 
ters, why did they not, as in all the cases of the 
elected, say so? Why did they not say that all 
free white males over 21 who had resided the 
prescsibed time and are "citizens at the time of the 
election" shall be legal voters? But, instead of 
this, they say that "every citizen — who has re- 
sided," kc, thus connecting citizenship and res 
idence as co-existents, and as indissoluble as the 
Siamese twins. It is the citizen — not the alien 
or the mere man — that is required to reside as 
prescribed. In the case of an alien residing here 
it cannot, with propriety, be said that a citizen re- 
sides. Let me put au analogy for illustration. 
Suppose our Constitution had provided that all 
freemen "who had resided in the State two years" 
should have a right to vote — would a freeman 
who had resided here two years as a slave be en- 
titled to vote the instant he became a freeman? 
Would not all men concur that in that case, the 
Constitution intended only the freeman who, as a 
freeman, had resided two years? 

So far, I respectfully think that Mr. J.'s analo- 
gies are decidedly against his forced conclusion, 
and with his inclination. 

But he seems to think that there was no rea- 
son for requiring longer citizenship of electors 
than the elected. The Convention thought oth- 
erwise, and, I think, they thought wisely. An 
elector has an absolute right to vote if he possess 
the Constitutional qualifications; and, whatever 
may be his sympathies or personal qualities, there 
is no other legal check ou his voting. But a can- 
didate has no absolute right to be elected merely 
because he possesses the Constitutional qualifica 
tions. The people can check him, and may be 



ought to be some such restriction on electors— 
but thinks that, though the letter and grammar 
indicate it, there is none such, chiefly because a 
different provision is expressly made as to the 
elected. We may now soon see au all-sufficient 
reason for this difference, and the fact that essen 
tially different language has been used in the two 
classes of cases, instead of ov«jruling the literal 
import of the words applied to electors, proves 
conclusively, as I think, that no man, foreign or 
native should be allowed to vote as soon as he be 
comes a citizen. 

The condensed opinion 1 gave Mr Hanson has 
not yet been ar swered. Not one of its positions 
or illustrations has been met or essentially touch 
ed. Its grammatical construction has been vir 
tually conceded and answered only by the implied 
intimation that the members of the Convention 
either did not understand the English language 
or did not intend to use it in its pure, obvious and 
grammatical sense. The illustrations as to the 
residence of slaves and abolition citizens of other 
States and native-born citizens of our own State, 
have not even been glanced at I presume that 
silence is the best answer. And although Mr. 
Johnson said, in his letter to Mr. Clay, that, as to 
residence, unnaturalized foreigners and native in- 
fants stand on the same platform, yet, alter I 
showed that all such minors were born citizens, 
and their residence from birth to maturity was in 
the character of citizens, and that foreigners are 
not citizens until after naturalization, and their 
previous residence therefore was in the character 
of aliens and not that of citizens,— nevertheless 
this is all left untouched in the new edition. In 
addition to this all-important difference between 
aliens and infant citizens the Constitution, even 
as I understand it, makes an in viduous and unjust 
discrimination in favor of foreign birth in this: 
that, while the native cannot vote until 21 years 
after his birth as a citizen, the foreigner may 
vote one year after his birth as a citizen. Is not 
this favorable enough to foreign birth, and strong 
enough against American birth right? I think so 
— Mr. Johnson thinks so — and I submit to a can 
did world whether both Mr. Johnson and myself 
have not proved that the Convention thought so 
— first by the clear letter of the Constitution- 
next by the policy and reason of the Constitution 
—next by all the analogies of the Constitution— 
and lastly by all the illustrations which have been 
suggested. 

I respectfully think, therefore, that Mr. J. might 
feel no difficulty in understanding the Constitu- 
tion as he admits it ought to be, and that his 
judgment is unnecessarily and uselessly strug 
gling to 9tem the strong current of his rightrr 
feelings. I am happy that I have no such con 
flict. My judgment and my policy in this case 
harmonize. I am well satisfied that the Consti 
tution is what Mr. J. and myself both think it 
ought to be. I regret that our published opinions 
do not equally harmonize— and I apprehend that 
it would have been better if, as I desired, we had 
stood aloof from this topic for the present. 

Having, this moment for the first time, seen a 
hand bill containing Mr J.'s letter to Mr. Clay 
endorsed by nine Democratic names, and his second 
argument, and an anonymous exhortation to the 
Democratic foreigners- I will add a little ou that 
matter. I, too, could have obtained a multitude 
of certificates, and by jurists as impartial and 
quite as learned as the elect nine, in Constitution 
al law. But my opinion waiita no such bolstering. 
If it be unsound — certificates cannot cure it. II 
sound, they cannot make it unsound. It asks no 
foreign aid. If its fuce be right, the honest pub 
lie will ask no endorser And I cannot think that 
a correct opinion by a mau of Mr. Johnson's rep 
utation for candor and mind could need any en 
dorsement, or cau be helped by that which pre 
sumes to make it current. 

For my opiniou I have the plain letter of the 
Constitution— its reason, its policy, and its justice 
— the marked difference in it provisions defining 
the citizenship of electors and elected — the plain 
reason for that distinction — and various striking 
and illustrative analogies as vet unanswered. 
And against it I see nothing but alleged usage, 
neither proved nor admitted to have been of such 
a character as to settle the question by authority 
or disturb the argument on the face of the Con 
, on such a basis, I am perfectly 
my judgment. 

GEORGE ROBERTSON 



— 



KEEiNE & I'U'S ( ULLMxN. 



U II - KKKN K 



Al rTKNDK.N 



JviiJiiNL to CO., 

•v .•■  . -»i i vnd aitriiL .i, ui „. hi 
  K  .KO  . KU N, Lit*! OK*. ID- 

II \  i O,   H.\KN. 

in 

ALL KINDS OF COUNTRY 
PRODUCE, 

St. Clair and Wapptng Streets, 
FBA.HKORT. K \ 



■ 1 1 . 



nuts due 1st of Jauuarv . May, and „.,.., 
interest charged aft. r maturity. 



1n HUEs N 0 
1U July It. 



COFFEE— ■ _ 
and for sale bv 
July 17. 



Groceries. 

in store and for sal* by 
KEE.NE A CO 



» CoBfee, jus', receiv. 
KEENE A C»» 



IfOLASMtf 

lU 10 bbls PlautaUou Molosses; 

10  , bbls Plantation Jo; 
3 bbls Sugar Hou*e do; 
1U bbls Golden Svrup; 
H 3 bMi 4a. ,lo: ju»r 

sale b) 



received ami for 

CO. 



s 



KEENE ,v 

~T 



si receive.) 
KEENE * CO 



July 17. 

OAF .VSU CAUDLES— 

50 boxes German leas' 
50 boxes extra IMUM 
and for sale b\ 
July 17. 

r BBLS POTOMAC KOE HE! 
O 5 bbls Extra Shau; in   

July 17. 

IMSH- 

£ « bbls Mackerel, .W 1, *, » n a 3; 
8 X bbls Mackerel, No*. 1, 0 and 3; 
H l 4 bbls do. Nos. 1.3 and 3: 
a kit* do. So. 1; 

5 kits Tongues and Sound*; 
■H bo\e» Smoked Heron; 
85 cans Fresh Salmon; in store and for sale 
July 17. KEE.NE or 



ING— 

re and for salt- 
KEEN I .v 



b  

CO 



"c'o 



- BOXES LOVE RING'S LOAF Sl'GAK. in store and 
rj for sale by 



July 17. 
5(J0 BAEKE..S S,i.T.ror : 
July 17. 



ixfcENE dc CO. 



UUI at CO. 



OKIE1) BEEF— an .-xcellenl .piulilv . ... Mare and for 
1/ — '- 



. 1 sale by 
July 17. 



KEENE dt CO. 



500 

July 17 



MAC KLIN 



111 * SONS SUGAR CURED HAMS, 
this day and foraale by 

KEENE A CO 

BL "FFALO TONGUES-* doi. fresl, and l .r ,ale by 
Jul? 17- KEENE  fc CO 

£ DOZ BOTTLES VVORC HESTEKSH1RE SAUCE, it. 
U store and for  ale by 
J" J H. KEENE A CO. 

U DOZ CANS SPICED OYSTERS, i., 
■ by 



KEENE at CO. 
BOXES LA BOKYEAU VfTpEARL STARCH, iu 
KEENE A CO. 



» - BOXES LA BOKYE 
Z-) -.tore an. I for sale bv 
July 17 



MACARONI, just received and for 
KEENE di CO. 



C BOXES F 
•) sale by 
July B 

.) n KEGS SUPERIOR FAMILY LARJjj pi,t 
•Mt and for tale by 
July 17. KEENE di CO. 

KEOs NAILS. ALL SIZES. Just received 



for sale by 
Julv 17. 



KEEN E A CO. 



Liquors. 



I «r- BBLS Cooper VVhisny, -.'  e»r i old, in 
HO f«r sale by 
July 17. 



A CO. 



- DOZ GERMAN 
f) 5 doz 
July 17. 

iii CASKS SCOTCH ALE VARIOUS BRANDS, Ira 
21/ quarts and pints ' 



Wine; in store aud for sale by 
KEENE A CO 



July n 



in store and for sale by 

KEENE A CO 



expected to do so whenever they distrust his pat- 
riotism and cordial allegiance to our institutions. 
Consequently, as the privilege of selecting whom 
the constituency prefer for agent, should not be 
curtailed further than public safety requires, the 
Constitution allows the Constitutional electors to 
elect the man they confide in and prefer, provided 
that, when chosen, he owes and professes allegi 
ance to our country and its laws, or in other words, 
is then a citizen Had Gen'l. La Fayette resid- 
ed in Kentucky six years and then been natural- 
ized, the people ought to have, had the privilege 
of electing him their Governor as soon as he be- 
came one of their fellow citizeus. Having to 
pass through the ordeal of popular scrutiny and 
public opinion in a trial of six years, he ought to 
be eligible as a candidate, and the people, if after 
such a probation, they should prefer him, ought 
to have the right to avail themselves of his ser 
vices as their official organ. The people have 
therefore thought fit to trust themselves and retain 
the right to choose foreigners to represent them 
as soon as they have become citizens. But the 
same reason does not apply (o the exercise of 
sovereignty at the polls, where every legal voter, 
however untrustworthy the people may know him 
to be, may affect, his country's destiny according 
to his own arbitrary or corrupt will. Consequent- 
ly the Convention thought that it would not be 
prudent to concede totereiga power to foreigners or 
even to natives, until one or two years residence 
as citizens. And they therefore so provided in 
the Constitution Mr. Johnson admits that there 



V KKSII ARRI V A I. 



o I 



S.xOES, 

LAUJKS' SLIPPKRS AND GAITKRS, 

WITH OR WITHOUT HEELS. 

LADIES' HU SKINS. 

M 18888 AND CH1LDRBHS 

GOAT and KID BOOTS 

BOYS GAITERS AND BHOlft, 

—A LsU- 

GENTS LASTING SHOES 

A N D 



- CASKS BROWN STOUT NO. | BRANDS, in pint* and 
■ quarts, in store and for sale by 
Jal y 17. KEENE at Co. 

r LA RET— 
30 boxes Haul Bryon; 
M St. Julien Medoc; 

30 baskets Champagne, best brands; for sal.- i.  
July 17. KEENE A CO. 

Cigars and To 

lit lUWk Club House Cigars; 
1 U.1MM1 -,,()00 De Cabargo 
.-'Hiii Rio Hondo 
5,000 El Tulipan 
.-.,000 Noragos 
oCella 



do; 



do; 
do; 



5,000 Rio ( 

Asorted brands; 
C boxes Old Dud Tobueeo; 
4 boxes Eldorado do; 
4 Assorted qualities iu store lin.o n 

and for sale aj 
Ju'T I?- KEENE A CO 

Sundries. 

m l OZ superior Beef Tongues; 
0 4 doz cans fresh Pickled Oysters; 

4 doz cans fresh Peaches; 
.  boxes extra fresh Lemons; 
100 bus fresh Country Meal; 
:U) sacks Northern Potatoes; 
I doz solid backed Briar Seythcs; 

4 doz Grass Blades; 

1 doz Cradles and Blades— all a No I: 
10 bbls extra White Wheat Flour; 
.'II bbls superfine Wheat Flour. 

5 doz Painted Buck 
10 doz Covered Bu 
10 dod Broon 



ior liv 
July IT 



10 doU Brooms; 
10 doz Hemp Plow Linos; 
10 doz Jute Plow Lilies; 



Lines just received an.) 
KEENE A CO. 



GLOVE KID OXFORD TIES. f» 

JUST REt'EU Kl» BV EXPRESS AN D Fo |  .\I.K .M 
EVANS' 



SHOE AM) BOOKSTORE. 

July 1, 1857. 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 
W. A. GAINES is Agent at Frankfort 

FOR 

M I 1 1 A Co , and MILLER. \\ I NU V i K A Co's 

AGRICULTURAL WORKS 

FOR THE SALE OF ALL KINDS OF 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS. 

Ohio and Pennsylvania eight horse Thresher, Separator 

and Cleaner, price $310 00. 
Two horse powerand Thresher ready for use. oo. 
Western Corn Shelters, 912 00. 
South Western Corn Shelters, $10 00. 
Liuie Glaut Corn and Cob Crushers, different *izes and 
differeut prices, No. I . «30, No. •„», $44). No. 3, %iA, 
No. 4, 960. 
PORTABLE CIRCULAR SAW MILLS. 

Single Mills with 8 feet carrlrge 9300 ou. 
Double Mills with 18 feet carriage 9350 00. 
Munn A Co., and Miller, Wingate »V C«'l Straw Cut- 
ters, No. I, 916, No. 2, 91:!. 
Earl's Paltent Cutting Box, 96- 
Sandford's Cutting Box, No. 1, 91o, No. J, 9h . 

The annexed prices above are the manufacturers pri- 
ces and at which they will be sold hero with the freight 
added. Farmers in want of machiuesin order to se- 
cure tbem will please hand iu their orders as soon as 
possible. 

June 2», 1*57— U. W. A. OAINES. 

CLOTHING] 

AT OUT 

I AM uow odering rare i 
of Franklin and surrou 



AIM . OH, AND TERPENTINE — 
5 bbls Linseed Oil; 
5 bbls Turpentine; 
kegs White Lead; just received ami 

for sale by 

July 17. KEENE A CO. 



PICKLES— 
•I cases Piceolh 
i cases Chow Chovs; 

4 cases Oysters in jrlasse-. Just received am: 

lor sale bv 

July 17. KEENE A CO. 

CiAUCKS— • 
kj 2 cases Paoll; 

% cases Harry; 

4 cases Woiceslershire; 

4 Mushroom Catsup. Just received aud foe 

sale by 

July 17. 



Kr.KNE A CO 



CLOTHING!! 

FOR CASH. 



1-1 XT K ACTS— 
2 cases Peach; 
'2 cases Almond; 
i cases Celery. 
: cases Vanllia; 




Q CASES TARAGON VINEGAR; 
•) 4 cases Lucca Oil in pints; 

-.' cases Brandy Peaches. Ju»i received, in 
store and for sale bv 
July 17. KEEN | A CO. 



BOXES TRUE CAYENNE PEPPER: 
3 cases French Olives; 
-i cases India Cnrrv Powder, lust ret 
for sale bv 

tly 17. KEENE ,v 



July 



lust received 

CO. 



inducements to the ClUzeus 

CHEAP SUMMER CLOTHING," °' 

Having the largest and best selected Stock In town, I 
and being desirous of closing them out, 1 will, on and 
after this date, sell all mv SPRING ANll SUMMER 
CLOTHINGat Cost for Cash: Consisting of a large a»- 
sortmeht of Coats. Vests and Pants of all grades and 
colors, also a large lot of Cloth Coats which I will sell 
cheap for cash. 

Call soonir you want CHEAP SUMMER CLOTHS, 
at CHAS. B. GETZ'S. 

Corner Main and St.Clatr »ts . Frankfort. 

Juue 3M. 1857-tf. 

ired Scott. 



,. Nos. t and a. 



sale at 
Juna 26, 1857 



A 8 1 Kj L T U If \ I. 

KEENE 4 CO., 

HAVE arranged the room adjoining their storo lo, 
koeplng ou hand at all times a large assor meat of 

A^ricultnral 

We have now iu «mrc and for   
ufacturers prices: 

SanfonCs Cutting Boxe 
Western Com Sbellers; 

South Western Corn Shelters, ^double ly wheel* 

Ohio and Pennsylvania Threshing Machines; 

Litle Giant Corn and Cob Crashers. 4 sixes v 

Haty and Dung Forks; 

Garden Rakes and Hoes; 

^hovels. Spades and Trace Cham... 

isjlh— , Cradles and Snvathes: 

Extra Knive. for Cutting Boxes. Ac ; 

Farm '- « u.lery of all descriptions. 
Als   « lull s.ipvly of Saeds in proper season. 

flai SISMJ J "*" ' •"pletc f.»r ailing orders lor 
anv description ol InipL-in m,. promptly and at sock 
uricesaswili nn»nts for the purchaser. 

p.riaer^»udo;kar»U.taraiWd an Invited to call at*a 
•xsinioe our s»ock- 
July 17. KEENS A CO. 



COMMONWEALTH. 



I HUM AS M. GREEN. 



MONDAY. 



:Al COST : . 18S1 



FOR iff AW I l.rASfKI'.i;, 

00L. THOMAfi U JONBS, 

,.K Linriffi i i 'ot;.\Tv. 
•Of 0MMM1 

ROiiKK W -HANSON, 



gf l-AVKTri.. 

• 

KOK IN SENATE. 

A. K. MARSHALL. 

OK JESSAMINE. 



fOM I'HK h.m H 

THOMAS 

FN     rx 

JAMES 



nK REPRESENTATIVE 

X. LINDSKY 

k'TY ATTORNEY. 

HONBOE. 



How to Vote. 

every American remember to vote the 
whole tiekei to dav. Vote (or Jovrs. Hansov. 
Marshall. Linhsf* :ni.l Monro!-:. Do tit strap 



Let 



\rehir Diioii « Letter. 

Henderson, July 21, 1857 
Geo. D. Prentice, Esq.— Dear Sir: In your 
paper of the 26th ultimo, in an article headed 
Hon. An liy Dixon, you use the following lan 

fiuage: 
"Hon 



iCT The Democrat* evidently ex| ect to carrv 
the election in this district by the aid of men who 
have not been citizen? of the United States for 
sixty da\ . Will the American* of the Eighth 
District suffer themselves to be thus robbed if 
their birth rights'* 

IJ- It was Mated in :i teietrraphio dispatch that 

official documents had I n forwarded to tin- 

Governtuenu contradict iiiir the reports   t' Judi;e 
Drummond and other-, .I'mut Utah The follow 
inp is one of then.: 

Own Salt Lakf. City. i 
Utah Territory .( 
To the Hon Jeremiah I Black. Attorney General 
of tltt United Statex. Washington. D C 
Sir: — Mv attention li w'wvz been drawn to the 
letter of Justice \V. VV Drummond. under d ite ol 
March \ ~i. addressed to yourself, tendering 
his resisnation as Associate Justice for Utah, 
wherein my office is called in question. I feel it 
incumbent upon m - t   Bake you the following 
report. Ju-tice W. W. Druminoud, in liis fourth 
paragraph says: ••Tin- ret-i.rds. papers, fcc, have 
been destroyed b\ t*4et of Gov. B Young, and 
the Federal officer- grossly insulted for presum 
ing to raise a single questinti about the treasona- 
ble act." 

I do solemnlv d- clar.- this assertion is without 
the slightest foundation in truth. The records, 
|.apeis, Au , of the Sunreme Court in this Terri 
tory, together with all decisions and documents 
■f every kind belonging thereto, from Monday 
Septeinbei 22d, 1"." 1 . at which time said Cou-t 
w .i- tii t organized. u|i to this present moment. 
are all safe and complete in mu custody, and not otic 
■•i them mining, nor /  in tin  i • n r hern disturbed 
bit any person 

Again In the decision of the supreme court in 
tie- cas.- of Moroni Greene, in which the decision 
was written by Judge Drummond himself, I find 
the following words: "That as the case for which 
Greene was coir icted - • m- to have been an ag 
sravaied one, this court does remit the cost of 
the prosecution, both in this court and the court 
below" Greent w a* provoked to draw a pistol 
in self-defense, but did not point it at anv one.— 
He was a lad of l * year- old Much feeling was 
excited in his favor, and he was finally pardoned 
by the Governor upou a petition signed by the 
Judges and members of the bar of the United 
States Court, the Hun Secretary of State, and 
inanv of the most respectable citizens of Great 
Salt Lake City. 

Again. In relation to the "incarceration of five 
or six voung men, from Missouri and Iowa, who 
are now (March It, 1857, ' in the penitentiary of 
I 'tali, without those men having violated any- 
criminal law in America,"" &e. This is an utter- 
ly false statement. But I may presume he al 
fudes to the incarceration, on the 22d January, 
1 856, of three men, and on the 2!»tli January, 1856, 
of one more. If so, these are the circumstances: 
•'There were quite a number of persons came 
here as teamsters in Gilbert & Gerrish's train of 
goods, arriving here in December, 1855, after 
winter had set in. They arrived here very desti 
tute, and at that season of the year there is 
nothing that a laboring man can get to do. Some 
of these meu entered the store of S. M. Blair & 
Co., at various times in the night and stole pro 
visions and groceries. Some six or eight of them 
were indicted for burglary and larceny, three 
plead guilty, and a fourth was proven guilty. The 
four were sentenced to the penitentiary for the 
shortest time the statue allowed for the crime. — 
And just as soon as the spring- of 1856 opened 
and a company was preparing to start for Califor 
nia, upon a petition setting forth mitigating cir- 
cumstances, the Governor pardoned them, and 
they went on their way to California. It was a 
matter well understood here at the time, that 
these men were incarcerated more particularly to 
keep them from committing further crime during 
the winter. 

Since that time there have been but four per- 
sons sent to the penitentiary for forgery and pet- 
ty larcenv for terms of 30 and 60 days, to wit: 
one on the 19th November, 1*56; two on the 24th 
November. 1856; and one on the 26th January. 
1856. So that on the 30th March, 1857, and for 
several days previous there was not a white pris- 
oner in the Utah penitentiary, nor is there at this 
date. 

I could, were it my province in this affidavit, 
goon and refute all that Judge W. W. Drum 
raond has stated in his letter gf resignation by re- 
cords, dates, and facts; but believing that the 
foregoing is sufficient to show you what reliance 
there is to be placed upon VV. W. Drtimmond's 
word. I shall leave the subject. 

M ^ In witness of the truth of the forego 
i ) ing. I have hereunto subscribed my 
( S $ name and affixed th - seal of the United 
States Supreme Court for Utah Territo 
iy, at Great Salt Lake City, this twenty fifth dav 
of Judc, A. D. 1857. 

CURTIS K. BOLTON, 
Deputv Clerk of the I. . S. S ( \nirt in the absence 
of W. I Appleby, Clerk. 



The Mother Moulds the Man —That  t is 
who moulds t^e man, is a -cntrment 
by the following recorded observa- 
tion of a shrewd write; 

"When I lived among the Choctaw Indiaus, I 
held a consultation with one of their chiefs res 
peeling the successive stages of their progress in 
the arts of civilized life, and among other things, 
be informed me that, at their start they fell into 
* great mistake: they Mill sent their, boys to 
school. These bo - came home intelligent men, 
but they married uneducated an uncivilized wives, 
and the uniform rWMtll was. thai the childi en were 
all like their mothers. Thus the father soon 
lost all his interest in both wife and children. — 
And now. said he. if we would educate but one 
clam of our children, we should choose the girls, 
for. when lh«*» I. -come mothers, they educate I 
their sons This ; s the i tint, and U is true No] 
nation cau become uillv enlightened whim moth 
ei  are not. in a good degree, qualified to dis- 1 
charge the duties of (he home-work of educa 
tion " 



ETDr Jones, of Philadelphia, who so success- 
fully cures impediments of speech, deafness, 
chronic diseases and inserts artitioia) eyes, has 
again resumed his practice at the Gait House, 
Louisville, Ky.. where he may be consulted for a great national 
month or bo to   



Archy Dixon.— Last vear the Sag 
Nichts trumpeted the fame of this gentleman far 
and wide as a valuable and influential acquisi- 
tion to their party. They exulted loudlv over 
hir professed adhesion to Democracy. 

•We learn from the Hopkihsville Mercury that 
Mr. Dixon has recently avowed his intention to 
support the principles of the American party and 
I * \ ou for Hon. Jas. L. Johnson, the American 
candidate for Congress in his district. Mr. Dixon 
is ardently attached to Southern interests, and 
has become convinced that the Democratic party 
can neither save the country nor protect the Soutli. 
There arc thousands like him, who were beguil 
ed into the support of Buchanan, who now repent 
of their error and seek safety for the country and 
true patriotism in the doctrines of the American 
party." 

In this article you do me great injustice — I will 
not say intentionally — for there are many reasons, 
and which I do not think it necessary to mention 
here, why I believe you would not knowingly do 
me a wrong My motives and position in regard 
to Am existing political parties have been so lit- 
tle understood and so frequently misrepresented 
through the public journals that I owe it to my - 
.-elt and to such as feel any interest in my politi- 
cal views, to state my true position. 

You say the Sag-Nichts last year exulted loud 
lv over my professed adhesion to Democracy. 1 
never gave in my adhesion to Democracy, nor 
did I ever profess to be a Democrat in any sense 
of the word; but. on the contrary, I declared my 
eelf, at all times, when it was proper for me to 
do so, a Whig, and this I did both in my public 
I • Mi aud private conversations. I was a 
MMMI of the Whig convention that sat in the 
cit\ ol Lexingtou on the 12th day of April, 1856. 
I I liie resolutions and address published by 

thai convention It is a Whig address and Whig 
resolutions, and embrace my views as far as 
MM] ffm M the public polity of the country. I 
entertain the same views now that I did then. 

I voted for Mr. Buchanan. I voted for him un- 
der particular circumstances, and would do so 
again if similarly situated. 1 had no Whig cau 
ilidite i   vote for; and upou the great sectional 
MMI M which the Presidential canvass was con 
i led. I thought him nearer right than either 
Mr Fillmore or Mr. Fremont. 

I introduced, as you well know, in the Senate 
of the United States the amendment to Judge 
Doushu'f Territorial bill to repeal the Missouri 
restriction The policy of this measure it is not 
-- UT for me to discuss now. It is enough 
lot me to say that I believed it to be right then, 
and .-till think so It is a fact known to the whole 
country that the repeal of this restriction Mi 
condemned both by Mr. Killmore aud Mr. Fre 
moot. Mr. Buchanan approved it. Those who 
MM instrumental in repealing that most obnox 
i hi.- measure were held up and denounced both by 
Mr. Killmore and Mr. Fremont not only asagita 
Mi Ml enemies to the country. 

Mr Fillmore, in ■ speech made by him after 
his nomination l v the American party, declared 
it to be Pandora's Box from which had issued all 
the evils that afflicted the country. To have vot- 
ed for him after such a declaration would have 
been not only to stultify myself but to have # ren 
ittmd me an object of contempt in the estima- 
tion of the honorable men of all parties. But 
there were in addition other considerations that 
induced me to vote for Mr. Buchanan I knew, 
M MJ well informed man, of whatever party, 
must have known, that the contest for the Presi 
I (MOT was narrowed down to Mr. Buchanan aud 
, Mr. Fremont alone, and that the one or the other 
|« if to be the President of the United States. — 
Mr. Fillmore was not in the tight, as the result 
has clearly show n, or, if at all, only to aid Mr. 
Buchanan or Mr. Fremont. To have assisted in 
gil ing the State of* Kentucky to Mr. Fillmore 
would not have aided Mr Buchanan or secured 
(he triumph of national and conservative princi 
pies It would only have divided the vote of the 
Boul hw States and increased the chances ofsuc- 
I M oi Mr. Fremont, the Bla?k Republican can- 
didate. Neither principle, consistency, nor pa- 
triotism required me, a Whig, to aid directly or 
indirectly in the election of the Black Republican 
candidate. I looked upon him as leading a fac- 
tion whose declared principles placed them in 
open hostility to the Union, to the Federal Con- 
stitution, and to the liberties of their country.— 
But whilst I voted for Mr. Buchanan I did not 
subscribe to the Democratic platform of princi- 
ples adopted by the Cincinnati convention — 
DM of the principles contained in that plat- 
form I have always condemned and can never ap- 
prove. 

But I w as then, as 1 now am and have been all 
my life, a Whig. The principles of that once 
great and glorious party were my principles — 
they are my principles still, and will remain so 
until I have better reasons for changing them 
than 1 have yet had. They are broad, just, aud 
national, and look to all the States as equal, and 
to every citizen of the United States, no matter 
where born, nor*what may be his religion, nor in 
what pari of this great Republic he may chance 
to reside, as entitled, under the blessed Constitu 
tion, to equal rights and equal privileges. They 
do not proscribe American citizens, whether uat 
uralized or to the manor born; nor do they ex- 
tend to aliens the right of suffrage either in the 
States or Territories, or propose to share with 
foreigners, who have never been naturalized, the 
irnty of the American people Despised, 
abandoned they may now be, but 1 cannot but 
remember when they rallied to their support the 
good aud the great men of the country, and when 
their success was heralded to the worid by those 
whose patriotism, it may be, has since caused 
(MM t ' MMt them, as the triumph of the con 
stitution and the preservation of the Uhion.— 
Other parties have risen upon the ruins of this 
once glorious party ; but have they shown them- 
selves more patriotic, more devoted to the Consti 
MMI and the Union, or more capable of achiev- 
ing success than the noble victim whom they have 
dragged to the sacrifice? The blood of that vic- 
tim, shed as it was by those who should have 
shielded and protected it, has sunk into the 
ground, and from it have sprung, as from the 
fabled teeth of the dragon, not men united in a 
common cause and in defense of common princi 
pies, but armed men, whose sharp weapons have 
been Miami in fearful hostility against the hearts 
of each other. 1 have said that I am a Whig 
and even amidst the ruins of that once great par 
i v 1 am proud so to declare myself, and in so de 
daring let all who feel any interest in my posi 
tion understand that I do not belong either to 
the American or Democratic party. I have 
never attached myself to either, but have occupi 
ed, as I now do, a position independent of both of 
them 

The views of Mr. Johnson aud myself are iden 
tical. We agree that the naturalization laws 
should be extended; we agree that to extend to 
aliens the right of suffrage in the Territories is 
to enable foreigners who arc not citizens of the 
United Slates to form the constitutions an,d shap 
the policy, nAonly of such new States as may be 
hereafter admuted into the Union, but of the Fed- 
eral Government itself; we agree that no State 
should extend the right of suffrage — so far as 
voting for Federal offices is concerned — to any 
i.ut citizens of the United States; and that to do 
so is at war with the sovereign rights of the other 
Mates, aud a violation of the spirit and genius 
ot the federal Constitution; we agree that alien 
- 1. ifO, whether in the States or Territories, is 
tli- m • t dangerous and deadly enemy that South- 
re institutions will ever have to contend 
with; we agree that naturalized citizens, should 
be treated as native citizens, and their rights, 
religious and political, respected; we agree that 
M citizen .-hould be proscribed on account of the 
place of his birth or of his religion; and we agree 
on all the great questions which distinguish 
Whigs from all other polical parties, and I shall 
gi\e him my vote, not because I was beguiled in- 
to the support of Mr Buchanan, nor because I 
have repented of any errors I have committed, or 
that i seek safety for the country and true pa- 
triotism in the doctrines of the American party, 
nor because Mr. Johnson is the American candi- 
lateajbut because he is a Whig; a Whig upon 



addresses to the people of his district; a Whig 
who has never attached himself to any other po- 
litical organization, and who would rather be 
right than fill any office that truckling subservi 
ency could confer upon him. 

Entertaining the views here expressed, you will 
readily perceive the reasons which have influenc- 
ed me not to identify myself with either of the 
present political parties, and why I have prefer 
red the abuse, the censure, and the misrepresen- 
tations which have been so lavishly heaped on 
me by the parlizan journals of each of the ex- 
isting parties to takiug a position with either— 
such a- uly own judgment could not conscienti 
ously approve, aud my own sense of duty to my- 
self, and above all to ray country, forbade. And 
iow, in conclusion, permit me to say, that, in 
all the votes cast by mesince the dissolution of 
the Whig party, I have been controlled by no 
party obligations, by no desire to advance the in- 
terests of one party at the expense of another for 
mere partizan purposes. That I have not look- 
ed to the effect which such votes might or might 
not have on my political prospects, but that in 
the giving of them I have looked alone to the 



principle and the promotion of what I then be- 
lieved, and do still believe, the true interests 



of 



place in your paper, 
spectfiillv ydhrs, & 



that you will give this 
I remain faithfully and i 

ARCH'D DIXON 



California Items. 

The emigration hither from the "Flowery 
Kingdom" is greater than ever. The Wizard 
brought over 700 almond eved passeugers, ami 
some 8 or 10 vessels are on their way from Hong 
Kong with thousands more of these agreeable ac- 
cessions to our population. 

Theatricals have revived. In this city. Miss 
Julia Dean Hayne and Mr J. E. McDonough 
have been playing to fair houses at the American 
Theatre. On the3dinst.. the latter took a benefit, 
which was successful. 

Miss Annette Ice has been the reigning star at 
the Metropolitan 

On last Saturday night week, a band of seven 
Mexican robbers attacked the Chinese tents lo- 
cated near the Stone Fort on Mariposa Creek, and 
succeeded in relieving the Celestials in one of 
the tents of all their small change and revolvers. 
They were not so fortunate in their assault upon 
the adjoining tent, in which resided Ah Chu, a 
Celestial celebrated among the Cantons as being 
a brave warrior, having killed two Mexicans since 
his arrival in California, who attempted to rob 
his camp. 

A fugitive from the scene o  robbery informed 
Ah Chu of the presence of the banditti, who 
quickly made their appearance, and demanded an 
immediate surrender of all the gold dust in the 
possession of Ah Chu and his companions. Ah Chu 
bravely refused, whee the Mexicans fired upou 
the tent and killed one Chinaman dead upon the 
spot. The Chinamen returned the fire, when the 
Mexicans charged on them, and a desperate hand- 
to-hand encounter ensued. 

The Mexicans were finally driven off, but not 
until they had severely cut several of these unfor 
tunate victims of Mexican rapacity. One Mexi- 
cau was dreadfully beaten with clubs by these 
Chinese, who, u'lintimidated by the revolvers in 
the hands of the robbers, rushed upon the villain 
and dragged him to the ground. Two others of 
the thieves were also badly wounded, and it is to 
be hoped that this will lead to their detection 
Three of the Mexicans after the fight left for 
the San Joaquin river and four for the town of 
Mariposa. 

A gentleman who had visited the scene of ac- 
tion where the fight had taken place states that 
there must have been a desperate struggle, as the 
ground was literally torn up by the leet of the 
combatants, and the soil looked as though it had 
been sprinkled with blood. On the day after the 
fight, the Chinamen in the neighborhood assem- 
bled in great number and buried their fallen com 
rade with martial pomp. 

■ — • — - 

The Fremont Land Case — The Supreme Court 
decided a number of cases.  ome of which are 
elaborately prepared and of very great, impor- 
tance. The case of the Merced Mining Compa 
ny vs. John C Fremont and others, decided by a 
majority of the Court, settles definitely the right 
of the Merced Company to prosecute their min- 
ing operations on the Fremont grant, by perpetu- 
ating the injunction against the defendants. The 
importance of this case is evidenced in the fact 
that improvements amounting to upwards of eight 
hundred thousand dollars have been made upon 
the property. The decision is rendered by Mr. 
Justice Burnett — Mr. Justice Terry concurrning. 
Chief Justice Murray dissents iu a separate opin 
ion. The majority of the Court expressing no 
opinion upon the point whether the minerals in 
the soil of California belong to the State or to the 
United States, hold that the license granted to 
work those lauds, whether it be tacit or express, 
confers certain rights upon the occupants, which 
will enable them to sue. Although the right to 
enjoin trespassers was once questioned, it is now 
conceded, and as the value of those lands con- 
sists in the gold contained in them, to remove 
that gold is to work an irreparable injury to the 
occupant. Hence an injunction to restrain the 
removing of the gold was perfectly ptoper. Upon 
this the Chief Justice liases his disagreement. 
He does not consider the injury of such an ir 
reparable character as to bring it within the 
scope of the rule laid dow n in the authorities as 
well as by the Supreme Court in a previous case. 

[Sacramento Union, June 23rd 

Women in Adversity. — Women should be more 
trusted and confided in, as wives, mothers and 
sisters. They have a quick perception of right 
and wrong; and, without always knowing why, 
read the present and future; read characters and 
acts, designs and probabilities, where man sees 
no letter or sign. What eLe do we mean by the 
adage, "Mother wit," save that woman has a 
quicker perception and readier invention than 
man? How often, when man abandons the helm 
in despair, woman seizes it, and carries the ship 
through the storm? Man often flies from home 
and family, to avoid impending poverty or ruin; 
woman seldom, if ever forsook home thus. Wo- 
man never evaded mere temporal calamity by 
suicide or desertion The proud banker, rather 
than live to see his poverty gazetted, may blow 
out his brains and leave wife and children to 
want, protectorless, loving woman would have 
counselled him to accept poverty, and lire to 
cherish his family, and retrieve his fortune. Wo- 
man should be counselled and confided in. It is 
the beauty aud glory of her nature, that instinct- 
ively grasps and clings to the truth and right. — 
Reason, man's greatest faculty, takes time to 
hesitate before it decides; but woman's instinct 
never hesitates in its decision, and is scarcely 
ever wrong where it has even chances with rea 
son. Woman feels where man thinks, acts 
where he deliberates, hopes where he despairs, 
triumphs where he fails. 



*Jw7»-l" r ' SaTmeo'wmself ^Slfijto b^JuchT^his^ublk 



i Deafness and Diseases of the Ear 
are cured with unbounded success by the success- 
ful Dr. Jones, of Phila , Pa. He is practicing at 
the Gait House, Louisville Ky., where he will re- 
main a month or so longer- 

Stammering and Impediments oj speech of all 
kinds cured without pain, on scientific principles, 
in from one to three hours by Dr. Jones of Phila. 
He never fails and requires no pau till his patient 
ran talk and read without an impediment. 

Artificial Eyes inserted without operation which 
move and appear as perfect as natural. Dr. Jones 
can suit any case whether the eye be partly or 
wholy out — warrants every eye to move and ap- 
pear as stated His eyes are the onlv ones in 
the world that will move as the natural eye. 

Chronic Diteaset of all kinds treated with a suc- 
cess hitherto unknown. Persons suffering from 
the effects of meicury and diseases of the kid- 
neys will do well to call on Dr. Jones at the Gait 
House, Louisville — where he will remain for 
about a month longer. Persons that are afflcted 
with deafness and cannot come to Dr. Jones, can 
by giving a full description of their case and en- 
closing from $15 to $30 ($15 if it is not of long 
) will have all sent necessary to cure 
if it costs more than the above they 



('..rrespouilence of the X. V. Expre-n 

From \ew Granada. 

Ashnwall, July 10. 
On the 18th of June, a law was passed giving 
President Ospina full power to settle the differ- 
ences between the United States and New 
Granada, excepting that he is prohibited from 
any arrangements which shall destroy or compro 
mise national sovereignty in any part of New 
Granada. 

Another law was passed on the 15th of June, 
"erecting different portions of the Territory of 
the Republic into sovereign and Federal States," 
thus completing the division of the entire Terri- 
tory of the Republic upon this plan. And we find 
in the official Gazette the project of a law pro- 
posed on the 26th of May (which at latest dates 
had not been decided upon) "for the security and 
arragement of national affairs at Panama," which 
clashes with the terms of settlement proposed by 
Mr. Morse, and which, if passed, would absolutely 
preclude the possibility of any amicable settle- 
ment of the matters pending between the two gov- 
ernments. 

Important krom Central America. — Since 
our last letter, we have received a variety of 
rumors from Costa Rica and Nicaragua — 
the most important of which confirms the report 
that the Chamoristas and Leonistas are prepar- 
ing for a severe contest, and the two Provisional 
Presidents, Martinez and Jerez, will then decide 
their respective claims. 

We have now learned that a battle will be had, 
between the forces ol the said parties next month. 
The Chamoristas (who were formerly opposed to 
the North Americans, but into whose ranks a 
number of those formerly with Walker have en 
listed,) have sent urgent solicitations to W alker to 
return to Nicaragua. At least, so say our ad- 
vices from that quarter. 

The Costa Rioans pretend that they are send 
ing to England for three gun boats and orjier 
means of defense, one of the boats to be placed 
at San Juan del Norte, one jn Lake Nicaragua, 
and one al San Juan del Sud; that thev will keep 
oue to fortify their posts on the San )uan river 
aud the Lake — that they intend to sell the boats 
and appurtenances of the Transit Route to Har- 
ris and Morgan, aud they will protect them in 
the use of the same. 

We have dates from Costa Rica to the 6th 
The expeditiou of Webster is likely to be fruit- 
less, aud it was believed that a commissioner or 
agent of the Costa Rican Government would go 
to the United Stales in the steamer Tennessee, 
soon expected at San Juan del Norte, and said to 
be chartered by the Costa Rican Government to 
convey to their home the remainder of the desert- 
ers. 

We learn that the conduct of Rivas towards 
Gen. Zavala (reported in our last letter,) has 
created a rupture between Guatemala and Nica- 
ragua, the former government declaring Zavala's 
expulsion from Leon, whatever might have been 
his personal differences with Rivas, an insult to 
itself 

The only uews from Salvador is an attempt at 
revolution by Gen. Barrios, (who commanded the 
forces of Salvador in the late war,) on his return 
from Nicaragua. He was allowed to submit 
quietly and to resign his command, after de- 
fense aud threats of the government for four 
days. 

CostaRica. — On the 27th ult., Messrs. Web 
ster & Harris arrived at San Jose for the purpose 
of endeavoring to make a contract for the transit 
lor certain parties in New York, including Mor 
gan, Garrison, and others It was generally be- 
lieved that they would not succeed, as the gov- 
ernment had strong grounds to doubt the capa 
city of Webster to carry out his propositions; be- 
sides which, the $511,000 promised by Webster was 
not forthcoming. 

On the 3d inst. Capt. Thatcher, of the U. S. 
sloop of- war Decatur, Dr. Hine, U. S. Consul, 
Lieutenant Scott. U S. N., Mr. Carey Jones, 
and Mr. Young Audersou left Puuta Arenas for 
San Jose, but no news of their arrival had been 
received at Punt a Arenas previous to the depart 
ure of the steamer. 

Nicaragua. — By a decree of the 27th, the ex- 
traordinary contributions levied during the time 
of the war have been done awav with. 

On the 23d of May General Zavala, Command 
er in Chief of the Guatemala forces in Nicaragua, 
entered the government house in Leon, and gross- 
ly insulted President Rivas in person, making 
use of the most offensive language, and even 
threatening to hang him. By the intervention of 
Gen. Barrios, of Salvador, the matter was tempo- 
rarily arranged, and Gen. Zavala, with his forces 
was ordered to leave the city. 

Since that date President Rivas was deposed, 
and Generals Martinez and Jeroz appointed pro- 
visional Presidents until the general election takes 
place. 

The country appears to be in a most unsettled 
state, and the result of the Presidential election is 
anxiously looked for. 

Mflt of Life Among the Literary Men ot 
Loudon. 

Descending the steps which led from the Plaza 
inCovent Garden, we entered Evans,' that "abode 
of supper and song," as it was poetically termed 
by its enthusiastic proprietor, who, meeting us as 
strangers to do the* honors of his establishment, 
and having offered us preliminarily, with the well 
bred heir of and old courtier, a- pinch of scented 
snuff from his golden box, led us through a long 
avenue of supper tables and resolutely happy fel 
lows, to the highest seat of the great subtsjranean 
hall. There was much to be seen and admired 
by the way, if we trust our polite host, who had, 
apparently, all the masterpieces of the English 
school hanging from his expansive walls. 

There was the Garrick by Reynolds, "an uu 
doubted original" — the Mrs. Siddons, ditto, ditto, 
— the genuine John Kemble by Lawrence — the 
Mrs Jordan, and all the pretty Pollys and Dollys, 
the gentleman Johns and light comedy Jacks of 
theatrical celebrity and coffee house notoriety; 
and there was Johnson, and the delightful, blun- 
dering Goldsmith, painted to the life; but there 
was Thackery, under no counterfeit presentment, 
but in life itself, puffing, drinking and encoring, 
asJife alone can puff, drink and encore, in a gen- 
uine chiaro oscuro of smoke and tobacco and mist 
of hot whisky,- through which his great round, 
ruddy face was shining like a full, red tropical 
moon. The comic gentleman having sung his 
last stave, 

"So Ring and be merry, for time's on the wing. 
Who know what to-morrow to many may bring?" 

the curtain being dropped and the last drop of 
punch drained, we arrisc simultaneously with 
Thackery, who has been seated at the next table, 
just in front of the stage. Availing ourselves of 
the privilege of strangers, we watch his great 
towering figure striding through the crowd of ta- 
bles and sitters until he tikes his seat in a distant 
corner, where he is heartily received with a hail 
fellow aud renewed calls for punch, by three oth 
er evidently kindred souls. 

By the aid of our host, stimulated by Yankee 
curiosity woj are not long in doubt about the com- 
pany. The large imposing looking gentleman who 
first fills our eyes, is some one, it matters not who. 
The .-ccond one is Mowbray Morris, a snug, 
business like man, the general manager of the 
Times; and that little fellow there with the sharp 
eagle face and long white hair all pushed back 
from the forehead, who seems to do all the talking 
aud a full share of the drinking into the bargain, 
is Douglas Jerrold. He is evideatly under the 
full inspiration of the occasion, and his barbed 
wit is flying fast and frequent, and mark how, as 
he speaks, he drives forward that wedge-like head 
of bis, as if determined to open a space in the 
heads of the listeners for each word he utters, and 
stick it there. 

He looks older than he is, from the whiteness 
of his hair, and the shrunk appearance of his per- 
son —increased, doubtless, by the loose and ill ar- 
ranged dress. You would say, at first sight, that 
he might be sixty five years of age, but as you 
watched the sharp, darting glances of his grey 
eyes— which, though full, seemed small, when 
concentrated in the eagerness of bis animated 
conversation, and observe the quick, rapid move- 
ments of his features, and the lively, muscular 
action of his whole body — you are not surprised 
to learn that he is ten years younger 

But a few weeks since Jerrold thus looked, 
talked, and set the table in a roar. It was long 
after midnight when we left and he and Thacke 



3 een him since in the "abode of supper and of 
song," for no one was a more frequent visitor than 
Jerrold; but they will not see him more. How 
the comic song of that night comes up again to 
the memory, mocking sorrow like laughter at a 
funeral ! 

Vvbo*k n n fc ow Ud whltTo SSSSS °" 



Col. Forney. — A Democratic newspaper in 
Connecticut says of J. W. Forney: 

"He unquestionably contributed more towards 
Mr. Buchanan's election than any other man liv- 
ing. Indeed, some think the contest in Pennsyl- 
vania would have been doubtful had it not been 
for the active exercise of his talents and influ- 
ence." 

That is correct. If Forney had not bought the 
Irish, and bribed the Dutch, in Philadelphia, and 
smuggled in several thousand illegal votes, Buch- 
anan never would have been elected. But the 
Colonel should not complain; those who do such 
verj^ dirty work are the very men to get 



Orioin or Puffing —Few persons have an idea 
of the origin of the word puff, as applied to a 
newspaper article. In France, at one time, the 
coiffure most in vogue was called a pouff. It con- 
sisted of the hair raised as high as possible over 
horse-hare cushions, and then ornamented with 
objects indicative of the tastes and history of the 
wearer. For instance, the Duchess of Orleans, 
on her i.rst appearance at court after the birth of 
a son and heir, had on her pouff a representation 
in gold and enamel, most beautifully executed, of 
a nursery. There was the cradle and the baby, 
the nurse and a whole host of playthings.— 
Madame de Egmont, the Duke de Richelieu's 
daughter, after her father had taken Port Mahon, 
wore on her pouff a little diamond fortress, with 
sentinels keeping guard; the sentinels, by means 
of mechanism, being made to walk up and down 
This advertisement, the pouff, for such it really 
was, is the origin of the present word puff— ap' 
plied to the inflations of 



PEORIA 

MARINE & FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL, - - - $500,000 

J. R. M VISO.V Agent, Frankfort, Kentucky. 

The following statement of the PKOKIA MAKINK A.Nu 
P1KK lNsOKA.NCK COMPANY, made iu complt 
ance with the laws of the Slate of K*ntnekv. Peoria. 
Illinois, May 27lh, 1857. 

Nairn- an.! locality of the Company. — PEORIA MAKINK 
& FIHE 1NSI KANCK COMPANY. Peoria, tllinoU. 
The amount of its capital »l»ck. — FIVE HUNDREb 

THOUSAND DOLLARS. 
The amount of iu capital »lock paid up.— THREE HUN 

DRED THOUSAND DOLLARS. 
The A ■■eta of the Company are-- 
1st. Cash »u hand, six thousand one 
lars. 

ill. Real eMatc unencumbered, eight 

hundred and Hit   dollars. 
:id. BnnUs owned by the Company, seveulrtMi huu 

a dred dollars, drawing irn per cent, 
lib. Debts of Ihe Company wcared l»  mortgage 

are twelve thousaud live hundred and seveniy- 

flve dollars, drawing twelve per cent, lntereal. 
Uh. All other debts as per number |  
Itlh. Debts for r remium^ due aud not due, eleven 

thousand dollars. 



dol 



ind our 



utiug of dtaaoui tod 
ceplances, maturing 
sight to uinety days to rua 



Aiu - 



ro. puff— up 
— Notes and 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 



St. Ann*- Hall. 

A family school for twenty boardiug pupils, 
(the Rev. R. McMurdv, Principal, assisted by 
competent instructors in every department,) will 
open on the first of September, on the place in 
South Frankfort where Mr. Fall's 
nary was formerly conducted. 

A few day schollars will I 

August 31-lm. 



WM ar.- 



Boots, dhoes, Books & 

Aud the latest style of 

MEN AND BOYS HATS, 

Which v»e offer for sale as low as they ran be bought in 
any retail market. 

We return our thanks to all our patrons for past fa- 
vors and would be pleased to see them al our oft stand. 

I uly tf. WORRIS i HAMPTON 

Blank .Megotiahlt Note*. 

Blank Negotiable Notes which can be used 
for any Bank in Kentucky For sale at this 
Office 

July Mb, 1857. 

The 17th Vol. B. Monroe's Reports, 

Just published aud M sale at this office, price 
$5. It cau be sent by m ail to any one sending 
the price of the book and 4-  cents in postage 
stamps to pay the postage on it. 

June 29, 1857-tf. 



O* We are authorized to auuouuce Thomas P. 
Porter, Esq.. as a candidate to represent the dis- 
trict composed of Franklin, Woodford, and Jes- 
samine in the Senate of Kentucky. 



7th. All other securitie 
bills, notes, drafts 
daily, haviug from 

from dale Two 

and sefen huudn 
eight cents. 

uni of liabilities due or not due to banks or other 
creditors of the Company. — Seven thousand 
four hundred aud twenty-seven dollars forty 
eight cenU. 
Losse.i adjusted ami due.— None. ~ 
Losses adjusted and uot due — None 
Losses unadjusted. — None. 
Losses in suspeu.se. wailing 

and dollars. 
All oilier claims again, t the Company. — Nti 
The greatest amount msured by the C»inf 

risk.— Ten MM dollars. 
1'he greatest u mount allowed b  the rules of the Com- 
pany to be insured iu IM oae city, town or vil- 
lage.— No rules concerning the same. 
The largest amount to be Insured in any one block. - 
Not exceeding ten thousand dollars exposed to 
any one Are, 
The act of incorporation herrw itli enclosed. 



HOLLAND, 
STATK OP ILLINOIS, , 

Pkoru Cocsty. ) **' 
Personally appeared before me the undesigned No- 
tary Public iu aud for the City or Peoria, county Peoria 
and State aforesaid, Ch»rl£s Holland, Secretary or 
the Peoria Munuc and Pire Insurance Company, after 
being Urstdul) sworn, depo-, » and saysthat theaunea 
ed statement of the condition of the said Company Ls 
correct according to his knowiedgeand beiieL 

[: _ T Givou under my hand and official seal 
L - * J this-.tllh day of May, A. D.. 1857. 

BERNARD BAILEY, Jf. f. 

\ inn , „ p  irom the. original on B.ein this 
THO.S PAGE, . 
Prankfort, Ky.. July 37. 18A7 

AUDITOR'S OFFICE, » 
Frasefort. K.t., July it, 18*7. , 
This is to cerliiy that J. K. U A 1 SON, as Agent ol the 
Peoria Marine and Fire Insurance Co , of Peoria, III., 
at (Frankfort) Franklin county . has died in this offlce the 
statements aud exhibits required by the urovisions of an 
act, entiled, -An act to regulate Agencies of Foreign 
Insurance Companies," approve, I March 3, lr 36; and it 
having been shown to the satisfaction of the undersigned 
that said Company is possessed of an actual capital of al 
least one hundred and tlfty thousand dollars, as requlr 
ed by said act, tin- -aid ". K. Watson, as Agent as atore 
said, is hereby licensed and permitted to take risks and 
transact busiuessoflnsuraur,- alb is offlce iu Frankfort, 
for Ihe term of one \car from the date hereof, 
this license may be revoked if it shall be i 



to ihe undersigned Uial since the tiling of the stale 
inents above relerred to, the available capital of said 



, Special Notice. 

We are requested to state that Rev. Cauwal- 
lauer Lewis will preach regularly at the Buck 
Run Choch on the Sabbath after the 1st Saturday 
in each mouth. 

June 9, lH57-tf. 

Just Received 

At Blackburn's, a large and handsome assort- 
ment of Fancy and Staple Dry Goods, Queens- 
ware, MMMMM) aud Varieties. He will 
offer as good bargains as any cotemporary ; and 
respectfully invites the public to examine bis 
Stock of Goods. R W. BLACKBURN. 

Muvl. Ilth. 1857-tf. 

Ctpt'ditiou for Liberia. 

Free persons of color wishing to emigrate to 
Liberia, Africa, will apply to Alex. M. Cowa.n, 
Frankfort, Ky. The ship will sail on Nov. 1, 1837. 
The expense of going to Liberia from Kentucky 
will be defrayed by the State appropriation to aid 
free blacks living in Kentucky to go to Liberia. 
The vessel will take oth 
the libertv to go to Liberia. 

May 11, 1857- 6m. 



hi 



YouKhioghen, Coal. 

I3.0UU BUSHELLS, just received and forsale 



July i  



R. C. STEELE k CO 



Company I 
any thou 

In testimony whereof. I have set my hand, the dav and 
yearabove written. 

I Ho. A PAGE. jludUur 

July 29. l".-,7— w ttu-j» 



AMERICAN CENTRAL R. R. 




MARIETTA 



OPEN THROUGH TO MARIETTA, PARKSBIRI,. 
HARPER'S PERRV. WASHINGTON CITY. BAL 
TIMORE, PHILADELPHIA, N F. W YORK dr 
BOSTl )N 

(July our Chan)!, of Cars between CincLttuaul 
and Baltimore. 

ON and alter Monday, June »M. i~Y, . trains will run 
as follows: 

Baltimore and Cincinnati 

Will leave Cincinnati at 3:4i A. M. One hour for din- 
ner on the steamer John Buck. at 8*31 P. It) arrive at 
Grufton ai ":U P. M.; -H minutes for supper, arrive at 
Baltimore at Ml A.M. next mnM at Philadelphia 
at 1:00 P. .VI. aud New York at 6:Oti P. M. 

Baltimore and Cincinnati Nisht Express.. 

Will leave Cincinnati at 7:30 P. M. One hour for 
breakfastou the steamer John Kuck at «:15 A. M.; ar- 
rive at Gralton al 1:30 P. .M.; and MM at 3:30 A 
M.. next morning. 

Passengers ukiii;; tins route will save both iu time, 
distance and comfort, and will not he subjected lo fre- 

•jueiit changes of cars, and the n»k ii.«smg eonnec 

lions, as other routes. 

This route affords th* opportuuily to passengers to 
stop on business, or to visit al Harper's Ferry, Balti- 
more, Philadelphia and New York, for the same price 
they would have lo pay lo New York alone, by more 
northern routes. 

Baggage checked Arough to Baltimore, Philadelphia, 
Washington City aud New York. 



FREIGHTS. 

for the 

iuov4 r* \ Ik* rit* need* 
together, with the 



The large and spacious ears for the transportation ol 
slock, under the charge of f 
ful, aud bestqualidedi 



facility for resting, aud procuring feed from the produ- 
cer at low rales, offer* greater inducement to shippers 
lhau any other route. Besides, shippers who employ 
this route will be certain of iruusporiaiion at all seasons 
of Ihe y ear, and not exposed to serious and heavy losses. 
cousequeututKMi delay from snow and ice waickso often 
inierupts the transportation ovor other roads. All kind* 
of freight carried as low and as quick aa by any i 
road. 

TTpThrough tickets may be had at the ticket 
of the Kentuckv Central Kail Road, al Lexington and 
Paris, and at the Company's offlce 



House in Cincinnati, and at Ihe Tickei Offlce at Little 

Depot. 

Ask for Tickets via 



C«reat Attraction! 

More goods at cost for cash, at T. S. «k J. R. 
PAGE, Jr's., St. Clair street. In order that our 
customers and the public may have an opportu 
tunity of purchasing dry goods at cost, for cash, 
we have determined to offer our large slock of 
Staple and Fancy Dry Goods at "Eastern cost!" 
for the purpose ot reducing our stock. Those 
wishing to get goods at their own prices will con- 
sult their own interest by giving us a call. 

Junel5-tf. T.S. & J. R PAGE. 

Notice. 

R. W. Blackburn respectfully requests all per- 
sons indebted to him, up to the 1st of January, 
l""o7, either by note or account, to call and pay 
the same. Open accounts must he paid, or closed 
by note Feb. 



JOHN FOGG1TT, General Ticket Agent, 
i. E. GIBBONS, General Agent, 
A. D. SM ALLEY, Travelins Agent 
July 27, 1*57-1,. 

GREENWOOD 

FEMALE SEMINAR \ , 

FRANKFORT, KY., 

Mr.. M. T. Kt.\ | V V, I'rlnc 
Mi„ LAIR V M. HEM) ILL. 



THE Eighteenth Session of this School will commence 
on Monday , the \0th oay of August, 1857. in the new 
and spacisdn School House, just erected for the purpose. 

at Greenwood. 



M 



French, Latin, Drawing,and Painting. each. 
Music on Piano, 
Use of I 



jaSmtsvMMt 1 ^ 



fnslrucUons in 



'JO 00 
IU uu 
a 00 
i ou 



plain and ornamental needle work 



without chanre 
No deduction for voluntary absence. 

in address the Principal. 



rjtHE undersigned. 



TRANSYLVANIA L7NIVERSITY, 
Medical Department. 

rev 

und 



rav. ant 
ofjoyo 



HE 41st Session will commence on the First Monday 
sr, 1857, and will continue four mouths, 
rectionof ihe same Facmty as heretofore. 
( lO 3 Tickets to the full course $105. Matriculation and 

Ticket 810. All in adcanke." Good Boardfng?wUh fuel 
and lights, from S3 no to 94 On per week. 

ROBERT PETER, M. D., Dean. *r. 
Lexingtou, July 29, l-.1T — wdtlw3m 



MM— 

' « bbls Mackerel, Nos. 1, 2 and 3; 

8 half bbls. Mackerel, No*. 1, S and 3; 

H quarter bbls do. Nos. 1, 2 and 3; 
■ kits do. No. 1; 

5 kits Tongues and Sounds; 
25 boxes Smoked Heron; 

25 cans Fresh Salmon; in store and for tale by 
July 1„ 1857. GRAY A TODD. 



Negro Woman for Sale. 

SHE is a first rata Cook, without Incumbrance, aged 
about 45 years. To agood master or mistress in the 

fulltide %%^lS^^^r^^^- nM - 
have office. f.* 



V CAftlK 

. _. Professor of ihe Piano and of the 
German Lai guage, having Just arrived from New 
York, where he has been teaching the above branches 
fur the last 9 years, iutends making this city his perma- 
nent residence, if he finds it lo h s interest to do so.— 
He would therefore offer hi* services to those in want of 
a faithful aud thorough teacher and roquesU a liberal 

^'rEFERKNCES — J . H. H»*SA,E»q., Kev. J. N. No« 

T °" E.A.FELLMEK, 
July *7 1857-iwr. Capital Hotel. 



Trustees Notice. 

I LL persons having claims against Ji 
A of Woodford county, will pleas* l 
immediately to the undersigned, hU trustees, staling all 
the parties to the claim, when created and when due. 
And all persons indebted to the said Shousein any way. 
will please come forward and settle ihe same with us. 

JOEL W. TWYMAX. 

J. K. GOODLOE, 

J. E. HASKIN'S, 
July 24, 1857— lm. 

* % *Veoman. Lexington Observer and Reporter, i 
Statesman, and Louisville Journal and Democrat ini 
weekly to amount of $2 each and charge this offlce. 



rjt HI 



leave Frankfort, is desirous u  sell hu 
3 very fine 7 Octave Pianos at an ex- 
ceedingly low price. They are to bo seen 
at the Mansion Houm. Call and *c 
T. 



O mM 

HTI fl 



Jul, 8, 



■Mm* 



GEO. A. ROBERTSON, 

DEALER IN 

CONFECTIONERIES & GROCERIES, 

Cmrmtr St. Clair and Broadwa, Street; 

HAS always M hand the choicest a i tides io bis line, 
which be will sell ai the lowest 



p AN DIES— 

l/Ju»i r-scjived from Sew York tw 
FRENCH PrfEMllJM CANDIES 
May li» MP. 



LOUISVILLE fe FRANKFORT 

AND LEXINGTON A AID K'K V .  K FOlt I 

RAILROADS. 



Arrangement for 1857. 



II 



BRANDIES— 
A loiof ihe fluent FRENCH BK AN DIES at nssary- 

U percesM below the market rate*. _________ 

Jl.; 15. Ioo7. OKU. A. HOBEKTSON. 

* PL' HE article of PEACH AND APPLE BRANDY. 
A 11 store and for sale U« 



May 15. l8iT. 



GEO. A. ROBERTSON. 



O..D BJLRBJN WHISKY by tbegallon or bottle, 
*al - by 
May li, 1847. 



GEO. A. RO 



N 



■■TINES— 

W DMMlMttr*! MADEIRA. SHERRY. PORT. 
gF. JtfUAS, CH AMPAGNE. and MALAGA WINES. 
c»eii)jrtluii at auy olber e»labliabineul in Hie cily. 
May tf, MP. GEO. A. ROBERTSON. 

CHEESE— 
A lot of New York Cheese, a line ^Jj£ ,e 1 



May 15. 1«57 



GEJ. A. 



ERTSO.VS. 



LOOK AT THIS! 

rig COPAKlWEtsHlP heretofore existing between 
G VINES dt PAGE. HI dissolved bv mutual con- 
urn oa MM M day ol' Jan lary, lrt" 7. All persous in- 
djjtjJ to us eilbjr bt ii »t-s oraccojiil will please call 
e triv an 1 mUU, h die business of ibe late Arm must be 
closed a* *o 111 as possible. KiUier of the drm are au- 
thorised to seuletue affairs of tUe concern. 

W. A. GAINES, 
Jan. 9, 1656— if. J VS. K. PAGE. J*. 

To the Citizens of Fraikfjrt and Frank- 
lin Connty. 

HAVING sold mi interest in ihe Block of goods in the 
Uleilrinol GAINES dc PAGE to I'HOS. S. PAGE, 
I lake Uus uiiiiho I ol' evpr.-s-ing in, thanks to the cus- 
tom jri of llii) old Iiojij and of sp.-al-.ing a good word 
for Hi j  {« «u. Mr. James R. Page, Jr., my former 
partner who will coud.ici the business will deal with 
ui  custom jrs honestly and liberally. As to the aeuior 
pinner, Mr. Tnoiuaa S. Page, be it much better ami 
more favorably lino* 11 in tins community than inysel.. 
therefore I ueed uol apeak in lus favoi. 



Jan. 9. 1857-lf. 



apeak in Ins bm, 
Kesiiecllullv 

W 



A. GAIVES. 



NEWS TO THE PUBLIC. 
COPARTNERSHIP. 

THE undersigned hating f..r,ue.l a copartnership for 
lb.- purpose of carrying on Hie DRY GOODS busi- 
ness in all of iUv.incij, branches; will ratal 11 the old 
Km l it u tin .•« .v ;'ag •• a. Tn s. P.ige ha* purchas- 
ed Hi I interest ol Mr. Gaines in the stock 

We itiund keep.ug ■ bssjfl and due slock of 

Fan:/ aii D)m3Jtic Dry Goods, 

and will sell ihe. 11 al s 11 ill p-o.lis: wuere we will be 
pleaaed lo wail 011 Ule old cusui tier* of lite lale drm and 
as many new o.ies as shall favor us Willi Ibeir putrou- 

**rii j slyle of the drm will be THOS. S. dc JAS. R. 
PAJE, J*. THJS. S. P.aGE. 

Jau. 9, 1-57— if. JAS. If. PAGE. J*. 



THREE DAILY PASSENQER TRAINS — SUNDAYS 
EXCEPTED. 

N andailerMondav.May Uth. 1857, Trains will run as 

"oltows: 

FIRST TRAIN — leaves Looisvi lie at 6 o'clock.*, ni., 
♦topping ducen iniuuiea .0. break.'asl at Lagrange, and 
at all cegularsudiousaud arrives ai Lexington at 11:115 
a. 111., connect at Eminence with stages lor Newcastle; 
Frank loci with swjes MM Lawrence  urg, Sal visa. Har- 
diusville. Daunlle. and Vecaailles; Pay lie's wilh stages 
lor Georgetown: auu at Le\ ng.oii wilh Coviugtou and 
Lexiotuou Raided. Tor Paris, Falmouth, Covington 
and Mat si dle, aud woli cages for Winchester, Ml. 
Sterling', OwiugsviKe. I.'icumoud, Irwin, Nicholasvillc. 
Oauville. Uuicaster, ( Orchard, Stanford, Loudon. 
Barbouisviiie. aud all points South. Reluming, this 
irain leaves LMltjBjjbM al ••• p. m.,stoppiug at all reg- 
ular MahMMi ami arrives al Louisville al i.'oii o'clock. 
p. it'..   ouueciMig bv stage al Pay ue's for Georgelown. 
and at Eminence .or .Newcastle and Shelby ville, aud al 
Louisville witli Jede.souville aud New Albany aud  a- 
aasa rfallrsjsJi forSt. Louis, Cairo, and all poinU North. 
West aud South. 

SECOND ri'il IM lauif Louisville at J:4jo'clock,p. 
in.,siop( iuz at Hooo's aud Smith's Suuions, Lagrange, 
and all M*iiousei kt of Lagrange, iiudarrivesal Lexing- 
ton al 7 :30 o'clock, f). in.: connecting at Eminence by 
stage for SbeloyviUe aud .Newcasile. Relurniug, this 
tram leaves Lexiiigtou at 5 ('clock, a. in., stop 
ping iweutv miuu es .oc b -ei k a i al Frankfort, ami 
al a*l Sta'ious east of Lrgraitge and al Smith's and 
Hobb's Stations oo'v, wesl of La»g'Tif^e, arriving al 
Louisville i-t mi o'clock, a. in.; iu close connection 
by Jelfervouville aud New A'b.i,i\ aodSiiiem Railroads 
»uii ludiau«|K |is, Ter.e Hau. p. Vincenues, Evuusville 



Chicago, Si. Uiu.s, Jeffe.-so.i Cuv, Keokuk. Burlington, 
Rock Islam 1 , Galena, Dubuque, aud all the principal 
lo»ns West »• d South. 

THIRD TRAIN— srrowMODATtoi—LeavesLou.sville 
at5:ijo'ciocU. o. n.-suirioMi^at »»m Im . ami amv- 
ing at L..3rau«e a, oio o'clock, p. in. ReiO'oief leaves 
La^r,u.;e i-t to: . tlo clock, a. in., vooping at all a.yf'ous, 
and acvesfi Lonisv-'ie al B o'clock, a. m. 

Fiei-otl . osle. ve Louisville auu Lexington every 
iuoniin„, ... .u.  ,uiui.\B excepted. 

Fare " al .bouH centner, jie andadiscount of near- 
lv 23 r»e- ceoi. isii'iowot; -o- .icLe.s. 

irpFo' auv .uituer WkNMllN, please call at the 
Depot, co-net of leflersoo aud B.iooU streets, Louisville. 

SAMUEL GILL. 
May II. 1H57. Supl. L. et F.and L. & F. R. R. 



ADAMS EXPRESS COMPANY. 

  "  W ^'T" W ~ , ^ W « W ^7?"^" 

UmCK Al GWIN 61 OWEN'S HARDWARE STORE. 

0. W. OWEN, Agent. 



STOVES!! 




State or Kkhtcckt, County, SS. 

A Statement respecting the affairs of the Adams Ex 
press company, made pursuant lo an act of the 
Legislature ol Kentucky , entitled, "A* act eetcemiHn 
Li frets Ceai. uaie*," and numbered 751, declaring said 
comp.iuics lobe common carriers, and providing lot 
the safetv of articles entrusted lo theireare. 

-The business of said company is conducted by nine 
Managers, whose full MM aud proper places of resi- 
dence are as follows, viz: 

WM. B. DINSMORE. New York, N. V. 
EDVVAKU* S. SA.NKORD, Philadelphia, Pa. 
SAMUEL M. SHOEMAKER, Baltimore, Md. 
GEORGE W. CASS, Pittsburg, Pa. 
JAMES M. THOMPSON. Spriugdeld. Mass. 
CLAPP SPOONEH. Bridgeport, Conn. 
JOHNSTON LIVINGSTON, New York, N. Y. 
JOHN BINGHAM, Philadelphia, Pa. 
RUIt'S B. KINSLEY, Newport. R. I. 



imp. 



I HAVE i'i«t received ;t large assortment of the ! c- 
1 OtMIIM STOVES ever brought to the city o 
Fruukion. which 1 can sell as cheap as can be bMftjM 
in Louisville, forcash. Give me a call aud see for y our. 



Copper, Tin & Sheet Iron Ware 

In all. is various'irauches. wholesale aud retail, ascheap 
as it cau be bought al any other ho ise in the city. Job 
work executed wilh neatness aud dispatch . 

Till (iutterins and Spouting 
made an. I put upon the shortest notice aud most reas- 
onable terms. All of those who are in want of 

Copper, Tin or Sheet Iron Roofing 

would make it 10 their interest 10 give uu 
go ing elsewhere. 

T£7 Do. .'l forget to come to Old Bank Building, one 
doorlrom the corner Main aud St. Clair streets. 

June II, !■ * » — If. H. R. MILLER. 



eestai gut trutt are the 

. f. no change from day lo 
ible to make an accurate 
ucy of such changes. 
M e'mployed in the busiuesa 01 
late of Kentucky is, as uearly as 
tied. IM ihousaud dollars. 
 ers. Ule managers above named. 
sa J process served upou any au 
Cotupauy, iu said county, shal: 
_d aud taken as good service upon said Com 
and ourselves. In Witness whereof, we have 
hereto subscribed our hands this I llh day of April. A. 

D. 1656. 

Wi. B. Dihsmobe, [L. S.] Berts B Kinsi.st, ,L. S.j 

E. S. Saaroao, " Jas.M. Taonpsoa, " 
S. M. SHoaMAKia, " Clsfp Spoonkr, 
Geo. W. Caas, 
J.Livi 



"The persons la. 
siockholdeia of s*i j 
  day , aud of wuoin I 
' ataleiueiit.owiug .0 

"The amount of C 
said Company, iu .11 
the sum can be MM 

"Aud we, Ihesub: 
do hereby agree MM 
thonzed agent of sa 
bed 
V 



WILLARD'S 

PATENT PLANTER & SOWER. 

THIS is an ingenious machine, for which letters pateul 
were grauled lo Mr. Hozax Willsro In May last, ll 
waa exhibited during the last season al several Stale 
Fairs, always comiuumliug uuiversul admiration. Large 
quantities are uow being manufactured lor use during 
Hie coming spring, aud il is believed that a machiue thai 
accomplishes so great a suvtugol labor, mustalouce 
come uilo geueral use. Il is especially adapted lor the 
South, aud our euierprisiug pluniers will dud it worthy 
of their alteuliou. i he maciiiiie is of about Iho size ol 
an ordinary carl. The followiug description Is from a 
late number of the United State* Journ.,l: 

"l oibe agriculturalist this is, undoubtedly , the most 
valuable pateul thai has been issued for many years. Il 
isiuleuded lor sowing broadcast, covering and harrow- 
ing utihe same time, for sowiug iu drills and a.so for 
planting iu hills, and will accomplish either object as 
well as could iiosaibiy be done by hand. The gram is 
placed iu cylinders, which are made to revolve with the 
motion of the w heels of the curt. As the holders rolale 
Ihe grain passes out through the screeensto the ground. 
I'ne seeds are eveulv distributed and the machine 
may be regulated to sow any given amount to the acre 
wilh perfect accuracy . The grain is covered by the re- 
volving harrow, which receives its motion Irom the 
curt wheels. This harrow revolves with great rapidity 
111 the opposite direcliou from its forward motion. NMU 
harrowing up the ground Mislead of mailing il down, 
and tearing to pieces any stubbie, sodsaud manure, and 
leaving them behind instead of d ratting incui lordlier 
iu bunches us wilh ihe common harrow. The holders 
cm easily be taken off, und tLo revolt ing harrow used 
lor mellowing and preparing Ihe ground, which can be 
accomplished with il much more rapidiy and eltlcieutly 
than with a harrow couslrucled on auy other plan. 

"For sowing iu drills the harrow is taken of and the 
guides, as seen iu the engraving on Ihe inclined board, 
are changed so as to make the seeds drop into the drills 
prepared by furrowers, attached justahead or the board. 
A coverer for each furrow is attached Just behiud, con- 
structed so us to hoe the lightdirt 011 to the lurrow,aud 
compressing 11 upou Ihe seeds. 

"Ihearraugeineul is the same for planting In bills, 
excepting thai the guides are changed so us lo drop the 
seeds into hills. Ilcan be regulated to drop any uuiu 
ber or grains in each hill, to make the hills any distance 
apart, aud to cover lo any depth thai M) be required. 
I he attachment for plaultugand covering is very simple, 
autlsso ingeniously arranged as 1st prevent the lumps 
and stones Trout being thrown upon the grain, while it 
compresses the dirt upou Ihe seeds much better than 
could be doue with either hoe or roller. 

"Another ver  valuable feature ubout this machine is 
au attachment for pre pari ug cotton seed , consisting ol 
au extra cylinder iu which the seed is placed, made to 
revolve by the moliou of Ihe wheels iu the same mun- 
ner as ihe other. By ibis arrangement the seed is pre- 
pared at the same lime it is being dropped from Ihe 
olhercylinder, uud can be planted wilh tins machine 
without rubbing or any oilier previous preparation, as 
well as other kinds of gram. 

"I he whole machine is extremely simple In IU con- 
struction, is uo more liable to gel out of order, aud is as 
easily worked as auv ordiuaiy agricultural implement. 
Although entirely new,il is uo doubtful experiment, us 
it has been thoroughly tried for ull purposes, and its 
practical operation exhibited dunug the last season al 
various Stale Fairs, commanding in all cases the univer- 
sal admiration. if the whole agricultural community." 

The machine* are now being manufactured und sold 
by J. M. EatRsos* ct Co.,  o. 1 spruce Street, N - - 
York, at the following 

PRICKS WITH RIOUT TO L-L IS lOt NTT: 

Machiue complete, .... - flUU 00 

Machine complete without the extra attach- 
ments for pre|uiring coltoii seed, - - 80 00 
Machine for sowing broadcast, and harrowing 
ouly. ........ 70 CO 

JQ- Persons who may be desirous of procuring one 
of these invaluable Machines can be accommodated by 
calling upon A. G. Hooots, the proprietor of the Frank 
fort Commonwealth, who will exhibit a representation 
of the same, so that Farmers can lortn their own opiu 
ioiis ol its practical utility. 
March 11, 1857— If. 



H 



BY 



STATE 



CHOICE FIRST CLASS INSURANCE 

— IT TUI— 

JEk TNA 

INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF HARTFORD. OHM. 
Incorpoiated 1-19.— Charter Perpetual. 

FIRE and INLAND 

NAVIGATION INSURANCE, 

Calls Ihe 



Inn of iu irlends. patrons, and the pub. 
lie generally, lo the following facts: 
OF ITS HAVING 

A CASH CAPITAL OF $500,000! 

WITH ASSETS AMOUNTING TO 

1,307,903 42! 

Has Transacted Business successfully 38 Years, and 

C ONT1NUKS TO PROORKSS I If IIKAl.TH, WEALTH XSD 
VITALITY. 

Paid an Aggregate Loss or over 91^,000.000. 

I* organized on a National basi«, with local agencies 
iu ull principal places, under a Mercantile system: 
rounded on a Cash Standard, wilh uu Olivia- 
ble repulatioii alike Hi- same on the 
banks or the Hudson, or the MIssU. 
sippi, the Gull or Metico, or the 
Northern Laikcs; presenting a 
p.. .ten', i orgunixullon as 
a conservaior of pub. 
lie good and Bond 
of integrity; equal 
to all emergencies 



AMERICAN AND ITALIAN 

MARBLE WORKS 

WILLIAM CRAIK, 

Opposite the Posi-offlce, *t. Clair IMM . 

FRANKFORT. KY . 

HAVING purchased 
of KNIGHT oi CLAKK 
i heir entire slock ol 
Marble Monuments, 
Tombs, dec, I will con- 
linue to fluish to order 
Monuments, t ablets. 
Tombs, Head tslonea. 
t eiuelery Post*. Ta- 
ble I op». Counters 
aud everything * u tue 
Marble line, al short 
notice an in the very 
best style. 1 have 
secured ihe servicesol 
one of the best or de- 
signers and carversin 
Philadelphia, and 1 
pledge myselflo get up 
better work thau has 
ever beeu Auished in 
Frank lo ri , and as 
goo«! ascun ! •• rt imb- 
ed elsewhere 



and 




SHOES'. SHOES!! SHOES!!! 

A LARGE aud well selected slock ofSHOKS, BOOTS, 
GAllr.KS, SLIPPBKS, BUSKINS, dtc, for f 



Geutlemeu, Childreu and Servants, of every variety 
oi style, for sale at EVANS 1 
April J2, 1S57, Book and Shoe Store. 



GENTLEMENS' BOOTS 4 SHOES. 

ki AUK expressly to our order and 
ill satisfaction Call and see al 

April £2, 1857. 



warranted 10 give 

EVANS' 
Book and Shoe Store. 



BOOKS AND STATIONARY. 

Ill A V K uiutle large auditions to iny stock iu this line; 
many uew Books aud every style aud quality of Pa- 
per aud Euvetnpes.  . H....I t ....... of all fciuds for sale 

very low al KVANs" 
April -£4, 1*57. Book and Shoe 



Iron Railing, Verandahs, &c. 

a great variety of designs at the shop, 
Jan. 15,1856. LYeoma 



jul'aclurerspr 
WILLI A 



AM CKA1K. 



e. w. OWRK 



worthy 
the 

STABILITY AND DIGNITY 
—or an— 

Eminent American Corporation, 

ON MERIT ALONE 

rOCHOIHO ITS CLAIMS 

TO PATRON \ C1E AND FAVOR 

Arlording superior facilities and security in matters of 
Insurance— Commercial. Mechanical, Mercantile or 
uktng for importance aud public 
sert ice 
-THE FIKST OP- 
INSURANCE 
OF AM ■ at IC A 
iim acs at 
Rates and Kule« as Liberal as the 



Eaperlal attenil 
Owelllug* aud 



linn given to the I 

Contents, Tor a period 
one lo five yeara. 




THE KENTUCKY 

MILITARY INSTITUTE. 

DIRECTED by a Board of 
Visitors appoiuted by ll.c 
Stale, is under the superii. 
1,-iolcn, • oi t ol. l_ \\ . 
IsHUm t»,S dislii.guisbcd 
Lradnuic oi vt c,i Poiui,aud 
la practical hugiueer, aided 
'by an aole Faculty. 

1 lie coarse ol study istlial 
luugUliii Ihe best Colleges, 
aim ibe addition 01 a more 
cxu.-i.ocd course in Mathe- 
matics. Mechanics and Prac- 
tical Eu?ineeriugand Mining Geology ; also in English 
LiUfalare.ilisloi ical .leadings. Oook-kccplngaud ousi- 
njss e'or.us, aud 111 Alo.lern Languages. 

ng n ii-.e--.illi sen. -annual session Opens On the 
seeoud Mj.iday in Sepleiuuer, ("lb Sep . l.-oO. j C barge 
$1.i-j per a tll-t early sessioii. pay able 111 ad t ai.ee . 

DM e . insiraclioiiandexlcnsioii ot ibe buildingswil| 
ma%e .oj.u iUis saasJSM l or a Idilional students, wbo 
have Hie past y ear oeci. uecessarily decliued. 

Adl.-.tss.ue aapariuusu leut, ai •Milnury Institute, 

Fraualiu.ja.i. . .t . ibe undersigned. 

P. 00ULEV, 
11,1856. PresidenloliUe board. 




"State of Pnnsytvavia. 

••IK- 11 leiueiuoe-ei., tuaton the eleventh day or April. 
Isjii.be o.e uie.-.inie ii'eo-ge W. Cass, President of the 
Attains E tpre»s Company, pud made oalb that the fore- 
going siatemeuu signed if unu, 1st, ue accordiug lo the 
best or his kuowletcge uud belief. 

"G. W. CASS. PreiU. 

.   "City or PiTTsacao. 

  L.S. )• Coia- i of .1i.es he 
- — 1 — I S-a.so/ Pen** 11 tetania: 

Be il re incline. -co. stsMS 011 me eleventh day or April, 
A. li. MM, He fare me. Ch. McClure Hays,ucoiuinissioiiei 
inthe Suite of Pennsylvania for the Stale or Keulucky 
duly au.hori'.ed and coiuiuiss : oiied by ibe Governor ol 
Keutucky , aud MssWklM It ws IhereoT, as such lo lukc 
II before I ackuowlettgiiientsor deeds, dec, lo be used or recorded 
Ihereon, personally came George W. Ca»s, who being 
duly sworn according lo law, says thai the foregoing 
slatemeut within isirue lo the best ol bis knowledge uud 
belier, and assuch sworu and subscribed before me. 

"In testimony whereoL I have hereunto set iny hand 
aud atUxed my official seal the day and year aforesaid. 

CH. McCLUKE HAYS, 
Orbs, for ICentuekt is / ea««jv/eaaia." 

State or blMn SS. 

I, Alexander H. Kennick, clerk of the Franklin Coun 
ty Coua in ihe Stale uforesaid, do lesliry that the forgo- 
ing is a irue uud complete copy taken from Ihe original, 
this day Hied in my office, and lhatG. W. Owks is the 
agt-ntol said company . 

In witness whereof, I have hereto set my name as 
clerk, this lblh day April. 185G. 

A. H. KENNICK. r.r.c.c. 

April 18, 1856-tr. 



BRAND'S 

PREMIUM 

STOCK MILL, 

For Cutting and Grinding Corn and Cob. 

THE atteu.iouor S k ock Feeders and FiTinersgeneral- 
l» iscalled .u ibis Mill, wuicu has iiikeulue drsl Paa- 
«, lift tie Lou. bou Comity Kv. Faiciu competition 
with the "Li. tie Gii-u." 1 aud several or the mostdisliu- 
guished Com imio Cob Mills: yuu ii oas come out first 
Lest iu every other pu*ce wuece il BM been exhibited, 
aud sti uds pre-emiueu.ly above every other Mill I'or 
the following reasons: 

Mi, s .Mill combines three principles— that or cutting 
wiib several cj'suaiteel blades, wilh ibal or Crushiiigand 
Griudiug. U is heavier and slrouger, aud less liable lo 
break or get out or repair than auy other Mill before the 
public. Il is more easily adjusted, belug set coarse or 
Hue by a siugle screw, wbich may be done by a boy III 
years old. Il mav be used for culling and griudiug 
Apples, Turnips. Beels. Kulabagas. aud wilh a small ad- 
ditional expense, will cut uud grind Corn with Shuck, 
wbich cau be done by 110 oilier null exuiut. And dual, 
ly, il has greater grinding surface, and will grind Huer, 
fasler uud easier luau any other Mill of ihe sainu size in 
Use. 

This Mill is furnished co nole.e. wi.h Sweep, Hook 
aud Screws. a ud auy farmer wi.li bisuu^uraud a\e,can 
selil up und have itg.in.lMij; la half auhnur. 

WE MAKE THKEE SIZES. 
No. 2, with ouehorse,wiilgi-iud lubus.ielsof dry corn 
per hour. 

No. 3, with one horse, will grind 15 bushels. 
No. 4, wtlii two horses, will grind -JO bushels. 
1 1 JQ 3 Mauuluclured by James I'odd Ot Co., for H. M. 
J Brand, and for sale al the geueral Depot. E. Karl «Sr Co.. 
* No. '.'7. Waluul street, near Front, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

, - 'I o.t n. 1 '..11 n 1 y and State Bights for sale, and a 
liberal discount made to those busing largely lo sell. 
March ft. lift If M. H. BRAND. 



LOSSES EQUITABLY ADJUSTED 

—ARB — 

PKOMPTI-Y PAID. 



POLICIES ISSUED WITHOUT DELAY BY 
U. WINUATE, Agent, 

June 5, 1857-:im. Frankfort, Ky . 



V 1 11 I N I I  I 

FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Ot LONDON. 



Dealers 



GWIN & OWEN, 

in Hardware and Cutlery, 

IN BANNA'S NEW BUILDING, 
MAIN sTREBT, 
FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY 

Jan. 30, 1837— tf. 



WALL PAPER. 

A SPLENDID A*SOKTMEM, -mtarlii us ckoap *» 
whitewash." No trouble lo show goods at 

April SK, 1847. 



h VANS 
Book and Shoe Store. 



HATS! HATS!! 

OUK Spring slock 01 KASHlo. 
Si KA tv and SoFr HATS are 
ready lor mspectiou. If you waul a Hal thai 
useful, oruumoulal, comloruble aud hecouit 

April *J, 1857. 



•£SiJk 

al that is 



FINE CUTLERY. 

HOGErtS, WOS'IENHULM'S et caOOKS S Knisus, 
Scissors, 1 



EVANS' 



April ---J, 1857. 



TRAVELING TRUNKS, 

For as e 

EVANS' 



Authorised Capl nl 



rJlO 



HPHMM as in piih-ahclphia. 
Arwoon c. Co., jour ^'abndm, 

John Gaioo, liaoaua A. Stcaki. 

Mvaas, CuMMI d( Co. W«. M'Gkk, 6t Co., 

PoWKRS Al WcioHTNAN, V\ HITK STBPHK.la dl Co. 

Agent for the United States— 

FKEDEKICK K A I CHFOKD sTAKK. 
United stales Branch Office. No M, South Fourth st. 



William aoaais. 



MORRIS & 

HAVE Just opened, in the room formerly occupied by 
J. B. Lainptou, on SU Clair street, next door to Pier- 
sou's Confectionery, a large aud well selected assort- 
ment or 

BOOTS. SHOES, HATS AND CAPS, 

Jusi imported from the Est,, and equalling ir not sur 
passing iu vaiie v, elegauco o." su-ole and NBWNEae, uuy 
ever before oOe.ed iu .ma market. These articles are 
all uer., having oeen puicliaaed on', a lew days since 
rrom »ue best manu.aclureis o( Philadelphia aud New 
York, and ate warranted or the best workmanship and 
a fa moat 1 u pat- em. The a leution or purchasers is par- 
ticularly iiiM.ed to their unrivaled assortment ol pamcy 
shoss for botii Utdies 1 and gen 'emeu's wear, selected for 
summer use, aud to .ueir superb s,ock ol hats, ol every 
shape and uue, 1,0111 the rscaercA* wb'.e silk ventilated 
bead-piece, as ligu:, «rial and poetic as a t'airy's dream, 
lo the woolen skull-cap, or a -•«' cent s, aw hat. Their 
stock of 

HOOKS AND STATION t:K\ 
is large and well selected. The public are invited to 
call aud examine this stock of goods, and M ihey desire 
to purchase new and good articles, will no doubtttud il 
iheir advautage. 
Frankfort , March ig, 1654 — U. 

^OEOKOE 8 IEAIEY. 

CIVIL & MINING ENGINEER, 

« AND 

LAND SURVEYOR. 

ir/'^nl^e at Smith, Bradley dc Co., Land Agents, ih 
Randolph street. South side, between Clark and Dear- 
born streets. Chicago, 111. 

Sept. 14, 1*55— If. 



OF the very best 
cheap al 
Aprils, 1S57. 



CHILDREN'S HATS. 

THE many varieiiesaud a'y lea ol these Hats, Soil and 
Straw, are loo uumerous for an advertisement 
Come aud see for yourselves at EVANS' 
April M, 1057. Book and ! 



GOLD PENS. 

LiTODDARD 6l WILSON'S best make Pensal 
5 April ii, ltJ57. EVANS* 
[Yeomau copy.] Book and Shoe St. 



SIX MONTHS. 

II EREAFIER all accounts created with me will be 
tl due on Um 1st of July aud 1st of January ol 

each y ear. - 
May i», 1857-tf. H. EVANS. 



A NEW & CHOICE SUPPLY 

OF 



JUST RECEIVED 

W. A. 



AND FOR SALE 

GAINES. 



Philadelphia. 
Age in for 5 



ATKINS' AUTOMATON: 

OR 

SELF-RAKING REAPER & MOWER 

BEST MACHINE IN USE. 



SAMUEL'b 

NEW ESTABLISHMENT. 

ITS 



lUBI SAMUEL,BAaBKaAKiiHAiR DaaasAR. is hap 

orm his . ri -lids and the public ihatben 
a^a.u -S ablistied 1 lie .mf ir^tble aud com mod ions room - , 
a. id . ea It 10 a, ie... I lo all who may git e linn a cal I . Hi* 
ua # ssiaolisbiueu I is m.lie building o 1C0I. Hodges. Oli 
Si. CI nr tlreel . lie solicits public patronage, an ■mopes 
t lal us dd 1 rieiid»andcu,loiuers especially, whopalroi." 
Ued mm before the Ule dre, will uow dud Iheir way 
ba.k 10 lui sliop. 

March 1 -J. I -jj— *by. 

DENTAL SURGERY, 
BY E. G. HAMBLETON, M. D. 



HOME INSURANCE COMPANY 



OF 



NEW YORK, 

OFFICE Ko. 4. WALL 8TRKKT. 




Covington. Ky.- 

Cornerol Madi v 
Insurestbroughout ihe • : • I 
plicalionsupnii request. 
Nov. it, H55— If. 



P. S. BUSH, 



NEW X(l K 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 



300 



BARRELS SALT, for sale at 35 cu per bushel by 



17. 



W. A. GAINES. 



HHDS. N. O. SUGAR, Just received and for sale by 
0 April 1, IS57. W. A. GAINES. 

« n BOXES VIRGINIA. KENTUCKY AND MISSOU 
I U RI TOBACCO, in store and for sale by 
April 1, le.»7. W. A. GAINES. 

jiOFFEE— 

L i sacks Prime Old Java; 
8 sacks Kio; 
sacks Laguaira, just received andforsaleby 



April 1, 1857 



W. A. GJ 



LADIES! LADIES!! 

I WILL, for two dollars, send lo any lady 
printed or written direclious that 



s 



UGAR— 

4 bbls. Fine Granulated; 
4 bbls. Powdered; 
4 bbls. Crushed, just 
April 1, 1857. 



person 
II euuble them to 

acquire in one half hour the beautiTuI art or Polchl- 
■neala.Dlaphanla and Grecian Paiuiinx also me- 
an ol Trausferiug engravings M Tables, Siauds, Boxes 
aud Glass, four different arts, each worth double the 
Satisfaction given or tnouev refunded. Ad- 
H. G. BAN 1 A. 
House and Sign Painter, Frauklort. Ky. 
i3, 1857— 6ra. 



• TIERCE EXTRA PRESERVING SUGAR, just re 
I ceived aud for sale by 
April 1, 1857. W. A. G^ 



NOTICE ! 



CASH CAPITAL, »500,OOOOtl 
l Of \»»KTS June 30, '»5, 717,»7« 44 
A M O I N T OP II Mill. I I II.-. ."V3.677 ti- 



T?a 



This Company coutinues to Insure Buildings, Merchan 
dise, Ships in Port and their cargoes. Household Fur- 
niture and personal properly geuerally, against 
loss or Damage by Fire, on favorable lerma 
Equitably Adjusted aud Promptly 
Paid. 
H. WINGATE, Agent, 

Frankfort, K 9 . 



FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL 

TREES. VINES, SHRUBS, &C, 

CULTIVATED AND FOR SALE 



Ed. D. Hobbs & J. W. Walker, 

*LaSS£ l*m ^!!iit *^* uni " 



th, 



H 



IS  perafonsonthe Teethwill be lirected by asc 



in ,i Medicine; 
1 cess . From 



jutidc kuowledge, boll 
thisbeiug the only sate guide to uuilorii 
this he is enabled 10 operate wiihf'ur less paiu to- he pa- 
tient .void ol danger. All work warranted; ibe work- 
manship will show tor itself. Calls will beihankfolly 
received. 

TT7J.nce, at his residence on Main street. 
Praiiklori. May 47, 18.19. 




Hra,s aii Lit fir Sale. 

I WISH *.» -sjH a vjry c .uveni Jut and roomy 
H ssysg w* 1 Ltrg.. l 4 in S • UU Frankfort. Ai y 
p  :* » 1 1.1 * » ll a gill It its; can Mf I good 
bt -run » 1 i' 11 1 *• »ast uu u, by applic-iiion 10 me 
Jintl H-.7-:r. C. G GrfAHAM. 

NOTICE. 

ALL Pimfl indaaieJio ihsUte drm of BAKER dc 
it J.  {At, arj UJfJ-»  aetMsd luat ihey must come 
Txttti au l piy tha n"' 
a xt, or 1 1 -y will f 
for c Lie j 1 ion . 
Mill. - • — ' 



b. Hi 



da 
lUdS 1 



or Aujrust 
,f an oru 



RAK.KK St RUNYAX. 



5 rt \ t LBS H A 
,[) J I si »m tud tor sale by 

■ 1, 1S57. 



A. GAINES. 



R C. STEELE'S 

O O -A. Xj yard 

On JCaron., near the Penitentiary. 

18 OOO BL'sllKLS ON H AND AND FOR SALE 

June 0, I8.id.-U. 



Senna Tig. 

I IS, s a new aedicine.ndaiirabiy adapledfon tspur- 
' nasle.at 

Dr. MILLS' Dr 



Neatly 
the 

Vine*, 
nam. 

application 
Frankfort. Kv 

irrr ■ 

Will la 



Catalc 



printed 
Fruits, Ornaments, Trees, 
». Shrubs, dec, at the above 

ed N-^^a^Vo'ooaY, 




^Orders may be addressed to HOBBS & WALKER, 
'illiamson Post Office, Jefferson county , Ky..orto 

A.G. HODGES, Frankfort, Ky. 
rt,Oct.l7,l«54- 



PHOENIX FOUNDRY 

TENTH ST* irrwKII MAIN AND CANAL, 

OFFICE NOIITH 8IDB M A I ft' STREET, 
BCTwaaN ai"TH aao tenth. 

WM . H . OR 4. 1 ft U KR . A-sent , Man ufacture rr,rstearr, 
Euginesand Machiuery ror Saw or Gnat Mills, Co«l 
Mines, dtc, dec. Cranks, Gudgeons, Rag Irons, Saw 
Slides,Carriage SegmenU, Cotton Gin Segments, and 
Piiilons.Car Wheels, Grate Bars, Mill Spindles, Mill 
DoKsandStirrups,alwayson hand. 



Hotchkiss' Rea 

r or Grist or Saw Mills. . _, 

A larue assortmeutor Patternsror Mill Gearing 
Castiiigs made atthe shortest notice. 

WM.H. GRAINGER, MfmU 
April21 1856— If Louisville, Ky. 

EXECUTORS' NOTICE. 

ALL persons indebted to the estate of John C. Hern- 
don.,! jcease-l , wil I please call and settle as soon as 
practicable. Those holding claims acaiust tin 
willplease reporuhe ainountto W.T. Herudon 
as couvenieu'.. 

M IRGARET J . H ERNDON . Ezecatrtx. 
W. T. H ERNDON, F.ttenlmr of 
J. C. HERN DON, deceased. 
April 1», ) - v,_ir. 

BUSH CORN MEAL; 

«^sa,»«r»»ssw aBiVa 



1 1... uiii, usee iu isil. 
40 used successfully iu 4n53. 
300 iu twenty dilfereut Sluiea iu loot 
12UO iu all parts ol Hie Luiou iu I -.0.,. 
3UUO ■■llilSlg for the liarteal of 
' 11 hi, 1. AKb »1A GOUD KEAftUAft t'Ott I HIS uu- 
ralled lucreaseaud great popularity : 1st. llisslroiia 
ud reliable, aud easily mauuged. -Jo. 1 1 saves ibe bar. 
labor of rakiug. 3d. ll sates al least uiiolher baud h 
binding. 4lh. 11 suves shalleriug by Ihe careful hand 
ling in rakiug; besides, Ihe slraw being laid slralghl, il .» 
well secured iu Ibe sheaf, aud does uol drop iu lue altei 
bundling, aud the heads are uol exposed in Ule slack Be 
lhal Ihe ua&tN aaviug even exceeds the Labor saving. 
5lh. It is a good Mower, being one ol ihe best couvem 
ble uiachiucs iu use. blh. 11 has a kuile lhal docs 
choke. 

lis other excellencies, loo uumerous to meution here, 
are tairly giveuiu ihe circulars. Its intrinsic worth 11 
also a'lesled bv ihe award (mostly iu only 'J y ears) 0'.. 

OVER 70 FIRST PREMIUMS! 

Pltcc. — l.'KafKl tvD .Mow kr. f-Jtsj,— 9^5 ou its re- 
ceipt, $75 0-st  ep euioer, auti 4 5u U- sl December. 
P..ce 01 Skl. •ssAjna* l.'EArsRou'y f)'T5. Cousiderut ie 
saviug *o ..e.^ht sS tbo^e m a stteSaaM who o-det prior 
lo lis Oi Ma.culrlso hbeinl tiiscouui lor advuuee pay- 
ment. 

To secure a Machine, order immediately. Thoughsc 
lilllekuown the pass season, aud uoue ready for deliv- 
ery till Isl May, yet uol iwo-lhirds ihe customers could 
be supplied. The repuuillou of Ibe Machiue is now 
widely established, so iu»l Tuaac THOcaaao will um a: 
uearly supply ihe demand as twelve huudred did las 
year, and »e shall also be selling tour moulhs earlier. 

Itj 3 Order early , Hyou would uot be disappointed. 

PaarHLKTSgiveu 1 mi- .ti  1 1 ally the OPINIONS in 
FA KMfcK. - , together with orders, uoies, Oic, mailed st 
applicauls, and prepaid. 

l£J  Write tons al Chicago, (111.,) Dayton, (ObiOs 
HALTiaoas, (Md_) which ever is ueuresllo'you, or di 
reel letters lor lulormutiou to Fbank'oht, Fraukiiu CO., 
Ky.,M  W. P.JACOBS, General Agent. 

J.S. WrtlGHl 01CO. 

"Prairie Farmer" Works, Chicago, Mar. 31 ld50— tl. 

Agents Wanted. 

HAVING takeu use Gjneral Agency Tor the sale ol 
Mitchell's ftew National vlapior Is57.iutlie 

Mateol nVeulucky, I desire 10 eugsge a number ol en- 
ergetic pei'souslo canvass lor the same . Ihe precise 
lermsare not slated except 10 those prepared uud re- 
solved to go iulo the business. This much, however, 



A I a meeting or the Board ol D..ectors, at Frankror 
loi the New York Lire 1 11 sura 11 •. ■  Compuny, ou Sa 1 
urduy.llte 1st day or March, MM, lue rollowing resolu 
'ion was unanimously adopted- 

'•1'ne undersigned. President and Directors or the 
Company, have examined the report and exhibits o 
ihe New York Life Insurance Coui| aiiy for the lust 
year.einbraciug a full statement of lis affairs, assets, dtc. 
lothe 1st of January. IpUo, and being satisfied with the 
perfect sound condition or the Company, cordially re- 
commend il U  the encouragement aud support or the 
whole community. 

"ll commenced its operation* tweive years ago, with 
* V 1.1 11 mi. which has accumulated lo gl.llMI.UOti 60, priuci 
pally invested in stale slocks, and iu bonds and mort 
gages, believed to be undoubtedly good. 

••We know of 110 mode oriiivestiug money more prof- 
ilably. The profits are mutuul for '.be disured, aud 
nave averaged not less than thirty per cent, annually 
on the premium paid." 

C. S. MOREHEAD, President . 
R. C. W IM EKSMITH, 
EMD. H.TAYLOR, 
I'HOS. S. PAGE, 
A. G. HODGES, 
CHARLES G. PHYTHIAN. 



■LBVKNTU ANMCaL BBPOKT 

Amount »r assets 1st January, 1855, • 
Amount ol' receipts for premiums, inter- 
est, dec, lo 1st Jauua- 
ry.lSM, - - - «3TH,IC6 14 

OlSBl* RSK MIC NTS . 



Commlaaloner's 8ale or the Jordan Mill Property, 
uow owned by M1LE9 lit. \ il l. 

BY virtue of a decree oi the Barren Circuit Court, and 
to me directed, I will offjr for sale to the highest bid- 
der, al the court house door in Glasgow, Barren uunly. 
on the 3d Monday iu August next, a tract of land on 
Bever creek, iu said county, supposed i   contain 175 
ACRES. SaI.1 land will be sold for part cash 111 Hand, 
partiu six aud t e balance 011 twelve mouths credit, 
which aiuouiils will be mude known on the d~y of sale; 
the purchaser Tor the part sold on a credit will be r quir- 
ed to give bond witli good security. 

Upon this Uud is silualed two mills, one a water grist 
■mil. aud the other a water saw mill, noth are GUOD 
M ILLS, ibe laud is good ror farming purposes, and well 
furnished with ullthe necessary buildings. 

Oue of ibe lines "f the Barren county Branch Railroad 
is wilhin oue mile o' this laud, wilh a strong probability 
that the road will be located there. Any pier so 11 who 
wishes a good and convenient farm and mills, within 
lour miles or Glasgow, and wilhin seven miles of Ibe 
Louisville dc Nashville railroad, will do well to alleud 
ibis sale. 

H. P. CURD,C«ie . 
July e, 1S57-31. |Ch. Glasgow Journal.] 



, TIERCE RICE, in store and lor sale by 

I April 1 1857. W. A. 

II ULASSES— 
Ji 5 bols Sugar House; 

5 hull bbls. Suguar 

5 half bbls. Plantation; 
■i bbls. Golden Sy rup; 
4 hair bbls. Golden Syrup, Just received 

sale by 
April I, 1857. 



BOXES STARCH, Ins 
Apr.1 I, 1857. 



'aid losses by death, interest on dividends, 
aud all oilier expenses 3"-' 



- 2-.'l,-.'40 19 



01; Dt-.Kr- U. that the owners ol U u 
the East side or Lewis street, bel 
pavemeut in Trout of the properly   
the corner of Broadway street, be u 
required to repave ami recurblbe a 
respective properties, with good sin 
brick paving, uuderllie dirjcioii o 
tee; and that they be required io ha 
orberore the •-'Olh day of August 11 



Office City Council, 

FRANKFORT, June •», 1857. \ 



I \ CASES FRESH PEACHES AND 12 CASES PINE- 

I I APPLE, iu store aud for sale by 

April I, BsV. W. A. GAINES. 



, DOZ. MILLER, WINGATE dc CO'S CUTTING 
I ES, iu store and for sale by 



April 1, 1H57. 



100 



BBLS. KANAWHA SALT, for sale I 
April 1, MB. W. A. 



ID 



BOXES ROSIN SOAP, in 
April t, leS7. 



W. A. GAI! 



- rt BUSHELS BLUE 
DU sale by 
April 1, lAvT. 



SEED, in store and for 



w 



lll.l p 



the 



rts ol lots on 

e end of the 
. Chiles, and 
1 are hereby 
rout of iheir 
1 ug and good 



ANTED— 

'. u,l)00 lbs. Bacon; 
.ni kegs Lard; 
500 lbs. Feathers; 
500 bushels Hemp 
pay the highestcash price. Call 
April 1, 1857, 



Seed, for which I will 
on 

W. A. GAINES. 



10 



BOXES 
April 1 



SJM 



don 



I56.1M5 95 



Accumulated und to 1st January, 



•1,(15!»,U08 65 



may be said, that il is uot desirable for any io engage, 
or continue in lue business, who cannot make for him- 

who cau 1 

MACEY, 



Rsv. A. R. 



jeiu lue business, Wl 

sell «100 permouih. There 
#300. 

Fur particular -add re s  

Rs' 

Bridgeport, Frankliucouuty ,'Ky. 
Feb.ll, 1857-om. 

Farm and Negroes for Sale. 

I WISH to sell my rarm 111 Frauklin county, on the 
waters or main Elkborn, about 1* miles rrom iU 
mouth .containing 100 acres; about hall or It bottom land 
and the balance lull land well limbered. The bottom 
laud Is in a high stale or cultivation. There are 011 the 
laud a good hewed Log House containing four rooms, 
and all necessary out buildings, aud auabuudaut supply 
or water ror all purposes. 

Also, two negro women, goad cooks and washers- 
women between 35 aud 40 y ears old . 
Dec 8, 1850-tf- BEN. F . GRAHAM. 

s 3 DOZ CANS SPICED OYSTERS; in store and for 
June le iO, T l857. KEENE dc CO. 



It will be seen bv the above slate m e n t that this Com- 
pany is in a flourishing condition. Those desiring iu 
formation in regard lo insurance, will make applica- 
tion to the undersigned. 

H. WINGATE, Agent. 
Frankfor{ Branch Bank. 
W. C.SNEED, Medical Eramintr. 
March 19, 1858. 

STATEMENT 

or TUB 

New York Life Insurance Company, 

Up to the 1st of J a in n ry. 1856, mi it in conformity with 

th» riqairement of tki Uw of Ktn'.nekw. 



of ihe Board, 

G. W. GW IN.. Vayor,. 
BaTCHBLOB, Cit 9 Clerk. 
June 15, 1857-w-Jin. 



Office City Council, 

FRANKFORT, Kv-, June 3, 185 




GERMAN SOAP, in 
1857. 



W. 



and for sale by 
A. GAINES. 



a I 



ORDERED, Thai the p 
side oT Broadway street, fru 



n the south 
s corner on 

St. Clair street, to Page & Graham's corner ou Ami 
street, be and they are hereby required lo re-grade, pave 
and curb the sidewalks in front of their respective lots 
or rraciions of lots, under the superintendence and di 
reciou of the Street Committee; aud Uial they be re- 
quired 10 have the same done on or before the loth day 
of August uexL 

G. W. GW1N. 
Attest: J. W. Batcrblok, City Clark. 
J uue 9, 1857 — w'Jm. 



ASSETS: 

Cash on hand, - 

*W Shares Delaware and Hudson Canal 



Compaoy stock, par $-J.\000, cost 
Boiids Albany City Water slock, par 

I Income, par $40,- 



50 

$50,0110, cost 
40 Bonds Erie 
000, cost 

24 Bonds Watertownand Rome Railroad, 

par $-.'4,0U0, «ost - 
10 Bonds Hudson River Railroad, par 

$13,500, cost 

6 Bonds New York Central Railroad, 
par $6,000, cost - 

Loans on slocks, 

Bonds aud mortgages first lien, - 
Premium notes on Life Policies, bearing 
lute rest, 

1st, ia 6, - 
premiums 



$ 4 -J .560 11 

WkWkt a  

52,500 »• 

34,387 50 

23,800 00 

14,105 98 

5,573 74 
37. WW 6? 
383,723 28 



interest, ... 
Interest accrued up lo January 
Quarterly aud semi-annual 

due subsequent to 1st Jar 



91 

21,878 60 



.182 5* 




LIABILITIES 
Losses due and unpaid— none. 
tVossesadjusled and not due. 
Losses unadjusted aud in 

Losse^s'isled— believed lo be 

or unjust, ... 
Accumulated dividend 
Taxesin litigatlonaboul 



$ 52,500 110 



16,468 45 

1 00 



mm m 



July 4, 



MORRIS FRANKLIN, Praiidtnt. 
PLINY FREEMAN, «ctaary. 
U. WlftUATB, Agent. 

Frankfort, Ky. 



Franklin County Set. 

rlKEN up by Orlando Brown, living in the city of 
F'auk fori, one SORREL HORSE about 1S -, hands 
high, rnaiked with a blase in the race and a large sad- 
dle scar upon ibe back; also a scar ou the breast; shod 
all rouud, supposed lo be about six years old. and valu- 
ed by meal one hundred dollars. Given under my 
hand as a Justice or the Peace for said couuly, this 18lh 
day of May, . 
May 20, 1857— if. GEO. W. G WIN, J. r. T. c. 

Ql5^-ir you^rant excellenHSIN 



Proclamation by the Governor. 

S200 REWARD. 

In t he name and ty the authority of th* Commonwtalt hof 
Kentucky. 

117HEREAS. it has been made known to md that 
 V LEWIS DEATHERAGE, did kill and murder Sa- 
Rtii Bostwick in the county of Simpson, and has fled 
from J uslice: 

Now, therefore, I, Chablbs S. Mobbrbad, Governor 
ol the Commonwealth or Kentucky, by virtue or the 
power Invested in me by law, do hereby offer a re- 
ward or Two Hundred Dollars forthe apprehension 
or the said Deaiher*Ke and his delivery to the Jailer ol 
Simpson county, within one year rrom the date hereol. 

/JY TESTlMOJfr W HEREOF, 1 have 
. 1 hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal ol 
) L. S.  the Commonwealth to be hereunto affixed, 
( ) this 36th day of June, A. D„ 1457, aud iu 
- - " v "*' the oiilh year ot the Commouweallh. 
By the Governor: C. S. MOREHEAD. 

Mvsos Bbowb, Secretary of State , 

Proclamation by the Go^rnor. 

EREAS it has been made knownWo me lbs 



BOOK BINDING. 

A. C Keenon informs bis 
friends and lormer customers, 
thai having regained his health, 
he has purchased back from A. 
G. HoUses the Bindery sold to 
him in Novembe' last, and will 
give his whole attention to ita 
nauagement. He respectfully solicits a continuance of 
ibe pa. -onafce here' t ore e xtended to the establishment. 

TQ* CLERKS will be furnished with RECORD 
BOOKS ruled to any pattern, and of the very bestquall 
ly of paper. 

IH 3 BLANK BOOKS of erery description. manufac- 
tured at short uoltce, lo order, ou reasonable terms. 
TQ* Bindery at the old stand, over Harlan's La 
Frankfort-July 31, 1847-773-lt 



CHILD'S 

PATENT GRAIN SEPARATOR 

THEtubscrlber-wouldrespectrullycalltheattentloiiof 
the Millersand Farmersof Kentucky to witnessan 

operation oT 

CHILD'S PjITE.YT QRA1.Y SEPARATOR, 
Now onethibilion atlhe Frankfort Hotel . Byttscom- 
bined action of Blast, Screen, and "action .it effectual 1 j 
cleanses wheali'rora smut, (without bursting the ball, 
cheat, cockle, chaff, dirt, dicsndthus rendering the 
wheaiclean and pure. Orders are solicited for both 
1 Mill and Farm Machines 



Jan l-  If 



W. B. SMITH. 



COACH FACTORY. 



\V HE 



at the 

amount of Slock required by the Act of Incorpo- 
ration has been paid In to the Deposit Bank of Cynlhi- 
an»: . 
Now, therefore, I, C. S. MOREHEAD, Governor 01 
Commonwealth aforesaid, do hereby declare said 
authorized lo commence business as a Banking 
lion, according to the terms or lis Charter. 

IX TF.STIMOJii'Y WHEREOF, 1 hare 

k a; 

(   this Jeth day or May, A. D., 1857, 
-" v *' 65th year or the Commonwealth. 
By the Governor: C. S. MOREHEAD. 

Mason Bbown, Secretary or Slate. 



hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of 
the Commonwealth 10 be hereuuto affixed. 

In the 




& aunr. 

KEEP constants on hand a line assortment or Car- 
riages— any kind or Carriage made to order and Of 
the best material. We have purchased the sole right Of 

Everett'^ Patent Coupling, 
Tor the counties or Franklin, Anderson. Lincoln and 
Garrard. 

N. B. We would call the attention of pur 
our Spring; assortment of ( 
JT_?A11 work made by uai 
April 1855— tr. 



Runaway Committed. 

THERE has been committed to the Jail of Har- 
lan county as a runaway, a Dark Mulatto 
Man.aboutinirty years old, six reel three inches 



..nirtyyeL 

high, rather slender built, and weighs about 
pounds; the most or his upper front teaib, are 



The owueris hereby 



s upper rr 
notidedlo 



180 
out. 

forward, prove 



properiy,payehargesaii.llakehlmaway,or he will be 
dealt with as the law requires. 

AMOS JOHNSON, 
Jailor, f Harlan cemntf,*,. 
Ml. Pleasant, Feb. 4. lo5T-6m. 



R1SH WHISKY— 
ay , 



' * oio** 1 ln rokert'on S 



PROCEEDING AND DEBATES 

OF THE 

CONVENTION, 

CALLED TO 

C0NSTITTJTI0N OF 

(OFFICIAL REPORT,) 
Now pubDshed and for sale at the Cobboswihts 



Th.i work c  
Law Binding- 



Urrica. at   . per copy. 
ntalnal13   pages. and is bound In the best 



100 B A S |5l L M*7 KMP m ' m  iB ^W* " 



Tri-weekly commonwealth, 1857-08-03

4 pages, edition 01

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Location
  Published in Frankfort, Kentucky by A.G. Hodges & Co.
   Franklin County (The Bluegrass Region)