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date (1922-12-28) newspaper_issue 
MT. STERLING ADVOCATE. 

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FIRST TO LAST — THE TRUTH: NEWS — EDITORIALS — ADVERTISEMENTS" 




VOLUME XXXII. 



MT. STKRI,1\'  i. KKNTICKV. TIH'HSDAY, I)K( KM I'.KR 2K, 1922. 



NUMBER 21 



5f James N. Anderson Christmas Business 



Paste* To Filial Rett 

Following a lingering lllnean, Jamon 
N Anderaon died at the home of his 
ulster. Mm. John W. IxrckrldRe, In 
the county, at an early hour Christ 
mas morning. Mr Anderson was 6" 
years of age and was a big-hearted, 
xenial gentleman, one that was never 
happier than when performing some 
deed of kindness that would lighten 
the burden of some less fortunate 
fellow being. Surviving are his father, 
l. orge W. Anderson: two half-sisters. 
Mrs. William Moore and Mrs. W. H. 
Knox, two half brothers. George W. 
Andersoi.. Jr and Orover C. Ander 
son, and his step-mother. Mrs. George 
W. Anderson, in addition to Mrs. 
..ockrldge. 

The funeral service was held Tues- 
day afternoon at 2 o'clock at the 
nome of Mrs. I^ockrldge. conducted 
r.y Dr. C. B. Clark, of Rellly, Ohio, 
with burial in Machpelah cemetery. 

FOR SALK Building lot. good aise 



tnd well located. 
Mi, 



Priced to ( sell. 

(21-tf) 



HON — BLACK WELL 

A marriage of unusual Interest to 
relatives and friends In this and ad 
lotning counties was that of Miss Le- 
lia Hon to Lewis Blackwell, of Clark 
county, which occurred at the home 
r the officiating minister. Rev. T. C. 
Lexington. Thursday after 
The bride was charming In a 
dark blue suit with hat to match. 
Misses Delia Ward May and Elkln 
-lug hex. of Winchester, and Homer 
Ion. brother of the bride, were wit- 
.os to the ceremony. Miss Hon is 
no eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
.'amen W Hon, of this city, and a 
voung lady of striking personality 
and her lovely disposition has en 
'seared her to countless friends. The 
mom Is the sou of Mr. and Mrs. M. 
k. Blackwell. of Clark county, a pros 
. urns young rarmer and young man 
l excelleut character. After a brief 
bridal tour they will reside at the 
tom   f Mr- Blnckwell. near Winches- 
ter. 



Best In Many Years 

Mt. Sterling merchants in all lines 
enjoyed the largest Christmas patron- 
age In many years. Saturday was a 
record day in thla city, many mer- 
chants being heard to reffisrit that it 
was the best day they had ever enjoy- 
ed In their existence. Some of these 
iioTohants had been In business for a 
long time, anil the Christmas trade 
gives evlder.ee that 1923 will be one 
of the best years this country has 
h a d since before the war. With to- 
bacco and other farm products going 
at the prices they are there is every 
indication that Montgomery county Is 
about to enter Into one of the most 
prosperous years in our history. 



l ive per cent money to loan on 
long time.— Henry Watson. Attorney 

(19-tf) 

•m 

MISS FLO SHIRLEY IS 

SIGNALLY HONORED 

In September and October the Pa 
 Vlc Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
, of California, put on a priae conesi 
among its hundreds of cashiers over 
the United Slates for "reinstatement 
business or conservation of business 
I tln-ir many offices. Word has just 
ii received by Miss Plo Shirley 
that she has been found one of the 
prize winners in her case a handsome 
Indies' black seal grain suit case. Miss 
Shirley Is one of the company's most 
efficient cashiers and is most popular 
among the hundreds of policyholders 
of that company fortunate enough to 
pay premiums through this office. W 
take pleasure in joining her host of 
friends In congratulations. 



■ • 



APPRECIATION EXPRESSED 

The occupants of the Methodist 
parttouage appreciate the privilege 
accorded by the press to extend to 
all through the Christmas season 
added to our pleasure by wish, word 
or kindly gIfLr-J. W. Crates. 



POUND Pair of tortoise shell a*d 
gold frame glasses. Owner may have 
same by paying for this ad and rea- 
sonable reward. -Apply at this office. 

MORE IMPROVEMENTS 

A. B. Oldham & Son have made a 
wonderful improvement in their de- 
partment store. South Maysville 
street. The second floor of this large 
building has been so arranged as to 
become sales rooms for women's 
ready-to wear and all floor coverings. 
This Is a sightly room filled with 
goods that please, in style and wear 
like buckskin. Another improvement 
is contemplated that will make the 
basement as sightly a room as either 
the first or second floor, ft is ex- 
pected this room will be completed 
during the year 1923 and. and then It 
will carry ten-cent articles and will 
be known as the ten-cent department 
of this mammoth store. The addi- 
tional' improvements contemplated, 
which we did not get from Mr. Old- 
ham, but which are in the air. is that 
another story will be added, making 
this a four-story building, accessible 
by way of an electrical elevator. Just 
the lines of goods that will be han- 
dled on this floor we are not advised. 
It may be that furniture and floor oov 
erings would occupy this floor, and 
with women's ready-to-wear goods a 
stock of millinery would be installed 
on the third floor. The store has had 
a wonderful growth and as real mer- 
chant kings we will have to take off 
our hats to A. B. Oldham & Son. 



Major J. M. Brother | Miss Simrall Weds 



Dies In This City 

Major J. M. Brother died at the 
home of his daughter, Mrs. S. S. Pin- 
ney. Holt avenue, yesterday morning 
Major Brother was 86 years of age 
and had practically been an Invalid 
for the past year or more. He was 
an ex-Confederate soldier, being in 
(ieneral John Hunt Morgan's com- 
mand. He was a native of Bath 
county and had made his home in 
Owingsvllle practically all his life, 
where he was widely known and 
honored. He was second to the old- 
I i man in Owingsvllle and had been 
active In politics almost all his 



In addition to Mrs. Plnney. Major 
Brother is survived by two sons, Ku- 
gene Brother, of Owingsvllle, and 
Charles Brother, of Hazard. The body 
was removed to Owingsvllle yester 
day and will be laid to its final rest- 
ing place among the city of the dead 
in that city. 

Major J. M. Brother was a member 
of the Christian church and had led 
a consecrated. Christian life, one well 
worthy or emulation. By his passing 
the "thin gray ranks grow thinner' 
and the number of the "boys who 
wore the gray" lose one more of their 
loyal band. Peace to his ashes. 



BEN JOHNSTON MARRIES 

At the home of his parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. Harry B. Johnston. Ben 
Johnston and Miss Blanche Miller, 
both of Flint, Mich., were united In 
marriage last Saturday afternoon, the 
ceremony being performed by Rev. 
Olus Hamilton. Young Johnston for- 
merly lived in this city with his pa- 
rents, where he Is widely known and 
has a host of friends who will be In- 
terested to learn of his wedding. They 
will continue to reside in Flint, 
where Mr. Johnston has a lucrative 
position with the Chevrolet Motor 
Company. 



DOUBLE WEDDING 

On Christmas night Hobert Shrout 
and Miss Bethel Clark were united in 
marriage at the home of the officiat- 
ing minister. Rev.. William Triple^*, 
at Howard's Mill. At the same time 
and place Kwell Wright and Miss 
RoXla Myers were also united in mar- 
riage. Both couples are from the 
Salt Lick neighborhood in Hath coun- 
ty, where they have many friends 
who will be Interested to learn of 
their 



We are In the market for any quan- 
tity No. 1 Timothy hay. No. 1 Mixed 
Hay, No. 1 Clover hay good bright 
Straw. We are paying $4.50 a barrel 
for Corn. -Monarch Milling Compa- 
ny. (21-2U 

FOR JANUARY COURT 

(ieorgo Maze is in Indiana, where 
lie has purchased several carloads of 
mules that^ftUI be on the 
uary coatt day. 



FOR SALK -Hupmobile, in good 
mechanical condition, cheap. — Harold 
C. Greene, phone 641 W-l. (19-3t-pd) 



AMERICAN LEGION MINSTREL 

Montgomery Post, No. Ti. of the 
American Legion, will put on a home 
talent minstrel on January If.. A. J. 
Owens, who had charge of the legion 
show last year, will again have 
charge of the performance this- year, 
which fact alone insures its success. 
It Is said that this year's show will 
surpass any previous effort and new 
scentry. costumes und electrical ef- 
fects have already been received and 
will be used for the first time in Mt. 
Sterling. 



FOR RENT— Modern cottage on 
Clay street. Phone 632. (20-4D 



New England Man 

The following handsomely engraved 
announcements have been received by- 
friends here: 

Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas Simrall 
announce the marriage 
of 

their daughter, 



Mr Russell Charles l^ne 
on Thursday, the twenty-first of 
I tecembi r. one thousand nine hun- 
dred and twenty-two. 
Klllcott City, Maryland. 

The werlding is to take place at the 
home of the bride's sister. Mrs. W. 
R. Dye. at Klllcott City, near Balti 
more, and was wltnesed by the two 
immediate families. The, bride is the 
second daughter of Dr. and Mrs. W. 
T. Simrall and was horn and reared 
in this city. She is an unusually hand- 
some and charming young woman, 
and her winning personality has made 
for her many friends and admirers. 
For the past few years she has been 
In Washington, where she has held 
an excellent position with the gov- 
ernment. Mr. I^ane comes of a dis- 
tinguished New England family and 
Is also in the government employe. 
Wter January 15 Mr. and Mrs. Lane 
will go to housekeeping In their own 
home in Takoma Park. Washington. 



W. T. Daugherty 

Dies At Ashland 

W. T. Daugherty. express agent at 
Ashland, a son of the late W. U. 
Daugherty. of Owingsvllle. died at 
Ashland this morning at the age of 
55 years from heart trouble. The fun- 
eral will be held Saturday mornine 
at 10 o'clock at the grave in Owings- 
vllle bv his pastor. Itev. Paul Powell, 
of Ashland. He is survived by his 
wife, five children and three sisters 
Mrs. Claude Paxton. Ashland; MM* 
May Daugherty. of Owlngsville. and 
Mrs W L Klllpatrlck. of this city. 
Mr. Daugherty was a highly esteemed 
business man and Christian gentle- 
man 



FOR SALE— Walnut dining room 



suite of eight pieces Only 



five 



LOST Collection book, on Hink- 
ston or Maysville pike. Call phone 
S76 or return to Kentucky Central In- 
surance office and receive reasonable 
reward. 



months. Looks like new.— Apply at 
this office. 



DR. 



PREWITT ILL 

Dr .lames W. Prewltt. osteopathic 
physician, and one of this city's most 
prominent citizens, was stricken sud- 
denly ill of appendicitis last Friday 
and was rushed to a hospital at Lex- 
ington, where he underwent an imme- 
diate operation. His friends will be 
glad to learn that he stood the opera- 
tion well and his condition is greatly 
improved. 



FOR SALE — Fat hogs. Weight 
about 200 pounds. -Haydon Reynolds, 
route 6. (19-4t-pd) 



REFRIGERATING PLANT 

The Jersey Milk Company has* con- 
tracted with a Cincinnati firm to have 
installed March 15 an electric refrig- 
erating plant. This process is prac- 
tical, freezes without the use of ice 
and hold automatically to a desired 
degree of temperature. This and the 
one to be installed by William Hon 
in his meat store in the Baumont Ho- 
tel bHildlng are the first to be operat- 
ed in this section. 



READY FOR BUSINESS 

I ara now open and ready for bus 

iness at my new location on Bank 

street and can save you money on 
i 

any work in refinisliing furniture and 
upholstering. Have your work done 
now before the busy season. M. R. 
Mainline. .21-2t-eoM 



MOVES TO LOUISVILLE 

William H. Strossman has accepted 
a position with the Henry Clay Fire 
Insurance Company with headquar- 
ters in I^ouisvllle and at a nearly 
date will move with his family to that 
city to live. 



BOWLING ALLEY IS 

GETTING GOOD PLAY 

The bowling alley in the Trimble 
building, operated by Hod Eller, la 
getting a good play and many fans 
are enjoying this healthful and In- 
teresting sport. 



Claude Paxton 

Dies At Ashland 

On Saturday. December M, Claude 
Paxton. 70 years of age. after a long 
spell of sickness, yielded to the inev 
(table at his late home In kt iland 
Mr. Paxton was born at Oxford, 
county. In the year 1X52. and 
married In October. 1882, to Miss 
Addle Daugherty. of Owingsvllle. He 
come to. this city as agent for the C. 
& O. railroad 28 years ago. in which 
capacity he served most acceptably. 
Later he became associated with N. 
H. Trimble In the lumber business, 
after finishing the work of deliv- 
special lengths and dimension- 
or railroad timbers he returned to 
the C. & O at Ashland, where he 
served In the clerical department in 
the freight depot until death remov 
ed him from labor to refreshment. ^ 

The best years of his life were giv- 
en to this place with the C. ft O. 
Full of life and wit. everybody was 
a friend to Claude I'axton. He was a 
■DMfJT of the Methodist church 
since 18 years of age. 

Funeral services were conducted at 
his home in Ashland by Dr. Paul Pow- 
ell, and following his remains were 
taken to Owingsvllle for burial, with 
concluding services by Revs. .1. M. 
Fugate and C. I.. Bohon. of Maysville. 

Mr. Paxton is survived by his wife, 
who is a sister of Mrs. W. L. Kill 
Patrick, of this city, and one son. C. 
B. Paxton. route agent of the Ameri- 
can Express Company from Ashland. 
The removal of Mr. Paxton by death 
brings sorrow and tears to many 
friends We shall remember Claude 
Paxton as we knew him. a hard-work- 
ing, accommodating and efficient rail- 
road official and in the hours of be- 
reavement we extend our sympathy 
to wife and son. Peace to the ashes 
of Claude Paxton. ^ 



GOES TO ST. AUGUSTINE 

We are in receipt of a communca- 
tion from Mrs. Mattie R. Nunnelley. 
formerly of this city, stating that she 
will spend the winter in St. Augus- 
tine, Fla.. where she has accepted a | 
position as- manager of the Spear 
Mansion Hotel. 



JAMES SLEDD DEAD 

James Sledd. of Robertson county, 
formerly of this county, a brother of 
William Sledd. of this city, died at 
his home last Thursday from an at 
tack of pneumonia. He was 66 years 
old. 



Monarch Milling Co. has just re- 
ceived a car of Cotton Seed Meal, 
car Sugarine Dairy Feed, Sugarine 
Horse and Mule Feed. They would 
be glad to furnish Your requirements. 
Prices right, duality considered. 21-2t 



WARMEST CHRISTMAS 

WEATHER ON RECORD 

The weather during Christmas has 
been the warmest on record, Christ- 
mas day being so mild that many 
persons sat on their front porches mi 
comfort. 



«^-%x~:- kk~:-:- ":--:~:":~x~^ 

Sincere Good 

Wishing our many friends and customers a Bright 
and Prosperous New Year and thanking them many 
times for the opportunity we have had in serving 
them in the past, we are, with best wishes, 

LAND & PRIEST, Druggists 

- 




MARY CHILES HOSPITAL 

W. T. Young, of Sherburne, was ad- 
| mitted Tuesday and Mrs. Stearns, of 
Nonh Mlddletwou. and John Green- 
wade wore admitted Wednesday 



A GOOD ORDER 

A. J. Humphrey is In receipt of au 
order from Onarga, III., for .i.OOO 
plants of one variety 



SKATING RINK OPENS MONDAY 

The grand opening of the roller 
skating rink In the Trimble building 
on East Main street will be held on 
Monday night, January 1. There will 
be good music, good skates and a 
good floor The rink is to be con- 
ducted by W T. Turpin. of Rich 
mund, who promises that everything 
possible will be done for the benefit 
of the public. 



Wouldn't this be a restful world if 
there weren't any such thing as the 
limelight? 



I'ntil it breaks down, almost any 
old 



COMMITTEE TO BE ELECTEO 

All members oi the Montgomery 

County Chapter, American Red Cross. 

ara culled to meet in the Rest Room 

at I o'clock next Monday afternoon. 

January 1, for the purpose of electing 

an executive committee for the year 

1922. Lewis Klllpatrlck. chairman. 

\ — 

MARRY HERE 

On Wednesday Mrs.' Lucy Ooodpas 
ter and Woodson Powers, both ol 
Bath county, wava uturrittJ at the 
Baptist parsonage. Rev. Olus Hamil- 
ton officiating. 



WANTED Two 
quality feeders. 



carloads of good 
700 to 800. 



(21-Stvd. 



GATEW00D & HOMBS | — 

Men's Clothing and Shoe SALE 

This month closes with the best months business this firm has ever had. With a desire to start 
the new year off right and make January the largest business month we have ever had we are 

starting with a REAL SALE. 

Sale Starts Saturday Dec. 30 and Closes Saturday Jan. 6. Come Early 



All $35.00 at 
All $30. 00 at 
All $27.50 at 



$29 75 
$25.00 
$23.50 



All $20.00 at $17 50 
All $17.50 at $15.00 
One lot at $ 9.95 



Suits 




All $35.00 at 


$29.75 


All $30.00 at 


$25 00 


All $27.50 at 


$23.50 


All $22.50 at 


$20.00 



$10.50 



All Nettletons 
All $7.50 at 
One lot of a tew odd 
sizes at 




Boys' Suits 

All $15.00 at $12.95 
All $12.50 at $ 9.95 
All $10.00 at $ 7.95 
All $8 .00 at $ 6.95 

Nearly all these suits 
have two pairs of pants 



Boys' 0'Coats 

One lot at 

$8.95 
One lot at 

$6.45 

These mats are of H 
t inordinary values 



L 



Ail Shirti. Collara, Bella, Underwear 
and everything else that men wear 
at 10 per cent off. 



GATEWOOD & HOMBS 



ONE JU8T PRICE- 
AND JUST ONE PRICE 





Legion Newt 



At 



Driving 

The Buick 



Comfort in Winter 

• Model 45" Six Cylinder-* 1195 



An eomplata ai hu baan tha da»alopment of lb* •ncloa«i ear, 
Buick i1micn»Ti hava not naglactad toianprova tha opan typa of car, 
building into it a maaaura of comfort, convanianca and waather 
i aurpasied only by tha mora axpanaiva cloaad yahicla. 



Protaction afainat wind and anow ia aaaurad by tha anug-flttinf 
alarm cartaina that open with lha doora. Tha Buick daaign of 
atorm cortaina with a apacial waathar atrip providaa a cotinaaa, 
comparabra to that of any i-loaad car, whila windahiald wiparand 
tight fitting windahiald, adjuatabla from within, mak* driving 
safa and comfortable. 

Addad to thin, and equally important in winter driving. is tha 
aplendid peravmance that a Buick car alwaya producea-ita 
conatant and aurplua power-ita roadability and perfect balanca 
and ita urques'inncd dependability. 

For cold weather divine there is no auparior to the Buick open cara. 



2.V.U. $l.v S: 
23-41. il9.lv 
,. 2 1 SO. $2195 2 ■* 
Buick fa.-t.fiai. A.k .bout the 



The Buick Line for 1923 Comprises Fourteen Models: 

raang UnWltl 2' 15- tUi; 23 .16. tl 175: 
0-N.ltm. *«'. 23-44. $II7S. I3-4S." 

Mt. Sterling Garage 



will 



«kkk-x~w~:~x-:~:~xkk"Xk-mk~m-x~:-m-:-:~x-x 



WHEN YOU NEED ROWERS 

FOR ANY OCCASION 
LET US FURNISH THEM 

JOHN A. KELLER CO. 

THE LEXINGTON FLORISTS 



(.ton, OoloBftl Charles R Korhes. dl- 

rector of the United State* Veteran*' 
Bureau. Issued order* to the mana- 
of the fourteen districts of the 
to Inaugurate an Intensive 

campaign In hospitals caring for dis- 
abled soldiers of the world war bo 

that each claimant entitled to com- 
pnensation received a gorernm«*nt 
cheek for this by Christmas. 

Defending the American Legion's 
program for the flv»-year excision o'f 
immigration, the Hooaier legionnaire, 
published by the Indiana department 
of the legion, criticises Andrew Mel- 
lon, United States secretary of the 
treasury, for hla appeal for cheap la- 
bor to aid the steel interests. The 
Hoosler Legionnaire sayH editorially: 
Not content with attempting to 
block each move of the American 
Legion to obtain adjusted compensa- 
tion, Secretary Mellon now seeks CO 
obstruct the legion's program for re- 
striction of immigration Mr. Mellon 
declared that certain classes of labor 
essential to certain American Indus 
tries should be exempted from exclu- 
sion. It is interesting to note that 
the classes Mr. Mellon would alio*' 
to come In are essential to the si - I 
Interests and the ^Ighty or more al- 
lied corporations of which ho h one 
of the chief stockholders. A total ex- 
clusion law would deprive Mr. Mel- 
lon of some of his cheap alien labor. 
Andrew Mellon lias been pictured as 
it man of immense wealth who is pa 
trlotically sacrflcing his time in the 
president's cabinet at a more pit- 
tance. The fact is that his position. 
| as secretary of the treasury is wr.ith 
more in dollars and cents t.  the priv- 
ileged interests, of which Mellon is 
one, than any other office he could 
ML His latest attack on tli- proposal 
for a five-year total exclusion of Ini- 
migrants is propmted by  h", i.ame 
personal selfishness that characteriz- 
ed his attack on adjusted oni pulsa- 
tion and his opposition to tin surtai 
and excess profits tax. The moral fl 
ber of the nation means nrrtMBf to 
Mellon when his money is lit ..take. 



uveal Ui«  U«4 three yeavrN aa a 
hoaie for disabled aoMiers 



CTORS 

AS AUXILIARIES 



tod by the addi 
tion of five sanitary Inspector! who 
will be graduated from the School of 
Public Health, operated jointly by 
the State Board of Health and the 
University of Ix ulsv1le. In January 
These men will be sent to oouatlei 
out In the state and the board of 
health now Is proaecuUu* inquiries to 
learn where they are most needed 
and where they can be used most ef- 
fectively. 

Kach of thae men. In addition to 
having pursued technical and theo 
ret leal studies In the School of Pub- 
lic Health, last summer was given 
practical work under the supervision 
of the health offcier In one of the full 
time health departments. 

In connection with Its present in 
vestlgation of the places where these 
men are most badly needed, the State 
Hoard of Health Is conducting an in- 
vestigation to see what Is the gener- 
al need for sanitary' Inspectors, In or- 
der that. If It Is found desirable, the 
facilities offered this class of pobllc 
health workers in the School of Pub- 
lic Health may be explained. 



Mary Coleman Ayres 

MT. STERLING REPRESENTATIVE 
Phone 235. 



MOSS — CHASE 

Last week Kdward G. Moss, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Moss, and Miss 
Gola Chase, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Patrick Chase, moved quietly 
.■may to Paris and thence to Lexing- 
ton, where they became husband 
.Hid wife, "two souls with a single 
thought, and two hearts that beat as 
one." Mr. Moss is a young farmer 
of promise and Miss Chase is one of 
our brightest young girls. Their 
home for the present Is with the 
groom's parents. 

Of Hie total apple crop In Hie north- 
west. 15 to 20 per cent are of the 
Delicious variety, according to the 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture This variety brings higher 
prices than other promient vraleties 
ot 



— — 



PUBLIC AUCTION 



In order to settle the estate of the late W. M. Kirk, I 
will offer for -al. at public auction on 

Monday, January 15th 

(COURT DAY) 

at 1 :30 o'clock in front of the court house, the residence 
property, located on West High Street, just outside the 
city Ifrnita. The residence is a two-story frame with 
seven rooms and is in good repair. There are about 
four and one-half acres of good land, which makes this 
property very desirable. If interested, see 

H. T. KIRK, Administrator 
or J. 0. KIRK 

Cravens, Auctioneer. 



Wm. 



— — 



— 



i 



I 



DRIVE AGAINST CATTLE T. B. 
STARTED BY LEWIS FARMERS 

Th« work of eradicating tuberculo- 
sis from Lewis county cattle herds 
ha- baen given a good start with the 
testing of 500 head of animals, ac- 
cording to County Agent R. O Hate. 
Six of the animals tented proved to 
he carriers ol the disease aud were 



« * « * * 



• • * * • 



DR. H. M. WRIGHT 



Office— Traders National Bank * 
Hours— 9 to 12; 1 to 5 * 

* Phones— Office 912; Residence 554 * 

• •**«•••«*•*. 

__ 



Rehabilitated by the Pnited Slates 
V. trans' Mureau and taught the 
trade ol shoe repairing, a vet Tan In 
llritton. Okla.. was unable to Hnd em- 
ployment until the American Legion 
post, composed of eighteen BW)n a look 
action. Post members learne I that 
the local shoe repairer wished to sell 
his shop. They immediately borrow- 
ed the money to purchase the shoo 
and put the buddy to work. All mem- 
bers of the post signed the note. The 
rehabilitated veteran will soon have 
the note paid 



It may be said for country butter, 
however, that It averages sweeter 
than the disposition of the boy who 
has lo do the churning. 



I Poultry and Produce * 



* G. D. Sullivan & Co. I 



* w. 

* Phones 



St., Mt. Sterhna, Ky. • 
Office 474; Residence 1S2 • 



The rule that a man's affinity is 
younger and better looking than his 
wife is one that knows blamed few 
exceptions. 



See The Advocate for printing. 



WASHINGTON LEAF GROWERS »«♦••»»•»♦»♦•«• 

get pointers on grading * Highest Market Price Paid • 

Important pointers on the stripping 
and grading of burley tobacco this 
fall have been explained to close to 
300 Washington county farmers by 
means of nine demonstrations put on 
in that section of the state through 
the co-operation of the Hurley Tobac- 
co Growers' Co-operative Association 
and the extension division of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture at Lexington. 
County Agent R. M. Heath says. 
Demonstrations were held on farms 
of J. R. Claybrook, C. W. Homen. 
Kverett Wakefield, R. A. Thompson. 
J. H. Hopper. William Arnold, Jack 
Rayburn. George Russell and James 
Gowin. W. L. McMurty, grader from 
the burley association, conducted 
the demonstrations. 

According to those who attended 
the demonstrations, tobacco in that 
part of the state this year Is one- 
third better than it was last' year 
Very little injury from house burning 
and practically no green tobacco was 
found. The crop also is said to have 
good color. 



Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. 



Shortest and Quickest 



Happiness comes from striving, do- 
ing, loving, achieving, conquering - 
always something positive and force- 
ful-David Starr Jordan. 



THROUGH PULLMAN SLEEPERS 

Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia 

and New York. 
Direct Route to Richmond. Va., Old 
Point. Norfolk, Virginia and 
North Carolina. 

Two Through Trains to Louisville— 

Steel Equipment— Dining Cars. 

«*••*•***••*••*«. 

* Bring me your Shoe Repairing • 

* and get Best Service, Best Leath- • 

* er, Best Workmanship. * 

* W. M. RIESSINGER * 

* 4 Court St. Mt. Sterling, Ky. • 
*****«***•*«•«*« 



a * 




1923 SPRING 
SEED CATALOGUE 

WOOD. STUBBS & CO. 




OOBdataUMd as reactors. It later de- 
veloped that two of the six reactors 
had been purchased by their last own 
er from a fanner whose wife and in- 
fant child died of tuberculosis. Far- 
mers throughout the county are co- 
operating with County Agent Bate in 
I the drive against bovine tuberculosis 
J by acting as district chairmen to 
' push the work in their communities. 
Nineteen of these chairmen already 
have listed 1.618 head of cattle own- 
ed by S27 different farmers lor the 
test. 



— — — — = 



STOCKTON'S ELECTRIC DRY CLEANING CO. 

wishes to thank its many customers most 
heartily at this time for their many favors 
in the past, and hopes to be of more ser- 
vice to you in tht future. 

Pieace accept our best wishes for a 
Prosperous and Happy New Year. 

STOCKTON'S ELECTRIC DRT CLEANING CO. 

South Maysville Street, just across from Greene & Duff's. 
[. Ky. 



The- 



Phoenix Hotel 

Lexington, Kentucky 

Central Kentucky patrons in 



Will continue to 
tha usual 
looked after. 



CHARLES * -ERRYMAN, f-r.s. 



Up 



Hobby horses, sleds and other toys 
ran a poor race in an informal refer- 
endum among 87 world war orphans 
of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home at Xenla, conducted by the 
Ohio department of the American Le- 
gion. The children were asked to 
name first and second choices for 
Christmas presents by Mrs. Walter 
Dean, chairman of the auxiliary 
mittee. Although their ages ran 
two to flfteen years, the orphans for 
the most part selected useful gifts 
which would help them In making 
their way in the world, according to 
Mrs. Dean. "One little girl twelve 
years old asked for a copy of 'Les 
Miserables' and a fifteen-year-old 
boy selected 'The Technique of the 
Linotype.' "' Mrs. Dean said. "Other 
requests were for Longfellow's poems, 
the Bible. Testaments and the work 
of Browning. In not one Instance 
was there a call for a book other 
than a classic. ' Yarn for sweaters 
was second choice of many girls, ac- 
cording to Mrs. Dean, while a num- 
ber of boys asked for sweaters, skates 
and sleds as second preference. Al- 
most $1,000 was received from vari- 
ous auxiliary units to buy Christmas 
presents for the orphans. Mrs. Syl- 
via Garver. matron of the home, is an 
orphan and wu reared and educated 
in the Institution Then she obtained 
a position as a school teacher and 
later married the superintendent ot 
the home and returned as matron. 
A Christmas tree was placed by the 
Ohio department of the auxiliary in 
every ward of Ohio hospitals in which 



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23 



For the exceedingly liberal 
given us during the 
past year, we desire to extend our 
heartiest thanks and wish for each 
and every one of our many friends 
and customers a Happy and Pros- 
perous New Year. 




veterans of the world war. In a cam- 
paign conducted by teams of leading 
citizens, aided by members of the 
American Legion and of the Disabled 
American Veterans of the World 
War, a fund of »L'5o,000 for the pur- 
chase of two club houses and a sixty 
acre summer camp for th« use ot the 
city's former soldiers ha* been rais 
ed. One of i he club houses Is 
. -it pied by the Bentley post of the # 
legion and the second club house will J 
lie erected on Walnut Hills for the $ 
u«e of the .1,500 disable,! veteran, of J 
Cincinnati. The camp will be eslab \ 
llshed at Avoc-a Hark on the Utile ' 
Miami river The camp hi 



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S. M. NEWMEYER 



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"BETTER VALUES FOR LESS 



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From the Merchants 



SEASI 



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SWINGS 



of MT. STERLING 



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/Sincere Good 
Wishes 



To every person in this community 
and to all people everywhere we wish a 
Joyous and Prosperous New Year. "Peace 
on Earth. Good Will Toward Men," is the 
: pirit of the season, and we enter the New 
Year with this principle guiding our busi- 
ness policy. 



Ladyes Specialty Shoppe 

t M I HO t IMM MM M M+MMM M MMM MMM+M+j 



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That this New Year to you may be 
In other years a memory, 
Filed to the brim with happiness 
That all your future life will bless. 




B. RINGO 



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■ 



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May 1923 bring you all 
You feel that you should have in times 
gone by. 

May it be the best year you have ever had. 
Our thanks for all you have ever had. 
Our thanks for all you've done to help in 
1922. 

Baird fir Heinrich 



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THBNKr 

Thanking our friends for so kindly re- 
membering us the past year and wishing 
for all a Prosperous New Year. 

Baumont Hotel 



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We desire to express our THANKS 
and APPRECIATION for the liberal pat- 
ronage of our many friends and patrons 
during the year now closing and to wish 
you each and every one a very HAPPY 
and PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR. 

W. 0. MACKIE & CO. 



1 



^-:-:-x- -w-:-:-x-x^:-x-:-:-:w^^ 



OURNTOi 



At thi.s glad season I desire to take 
this opportunity of extending the Season's 
Greetings to my many policyholders and 
friends, and to extend my sincere wishes 
for a Prosperous New Year. 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LITE AND 
■ ACCIDENT INSURANCE CO. 

Home Office, Anchorage, Ky. 
NOEL HODGES, General Agent. 

 -x-:-x^^-x-x-x~x-x^x-x-:»:-xk^~xkkk-:-x- ^»x-x^  



-xk~x~x-^^x^-x~xk~ x^:^^ 



A Happy 




At this Joyous Christmas Season I de- 
sire to take this method of offering heart- 
iest thanks for the co-operation extended 
me in my work and wish for each and 
every one of my friends a Happy and Pros- 
perous New Year. 

Prof. M J. Goodwin 

County Superintendent of Schools. 



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[Sincere Good 
BE Wishes 




During the past year 1 have enjoyed 
a large and satisfactory business, and to 
each and everyone I am deeply grateful. 
I desire to take this method of offering 
Best Wishes at this Glad Season and hope 
that the New Year may abound with Hap- 
piness and Plenty for You and Yours. 

G. W. MAZE 



x-»x^wv»w-; a  »»♦»»» o xvxs -» 



:: 



BEST WISHES 




Here's a Happy New Year Day to you 
— and 364 other days after it. just as hap- 
py, brimming over with prosperity. 

W': couldn't wish you more. 

E. F. GRAY 



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Sincere Good' 
Wishes 




To my friends who have entrusted 
their business with me in the past year I 
desire to offer my sincere thanks and Best 
Wishes for this glad season. That the New 
Year may have in store for you much hap- 
piness and prosperity, is my sincere wish. 

R. M. MONTJOY 



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♦MM to o o 3 : c ' ' ' • •-•-♦-•-•-•-•-•-•• A - , -'-''  ; " ;  




ear i 



For the exceedingly liberal 
accorded us during the past year we 
indeed thankful and assure our many 
friends that we will make all necessary 
additions to care for your needs and com- 
forts. With Best Wishes for a Joyous and 
Successful New Year. 

The Bays House 

L. C. Bays, Proprietor. 



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Best Wishes ! 




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The days ot H  - 22 remaining art ' f ew 
M.d for the past in business and pleasure 
we are grateful and pledge our best ef- 
forts in mrttrllg bttttC service and hope 
to continue to merit your MMMMM 
patronage for 1923. A Happy. Prosper 
ous New Year to all. is our wish. 

MI. WRUNG BOITUNG WORKS 



:: 



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w^x^^x«x-x^x-x^xx-x^x^-x^:-xK*» 









ADVOCATE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

(Incorporate) 
MT. STERLING ADVOCATE 



J. W. HEDDEN. Jr. - • Associate Editor and Business Manager 

MARY C AYRE8 Local News Editor 


Entered in the Poatofflce at Mt. Sterling aa second-clan 


a mall matter. 













la visiting 

enter 



In Winch 



LAST 1S8UE IN 1922 
With thla Issue. Iieeeinber 2v we cloae The Advocate flle of 1922. We 
take this opportunity to thank each and every reader of The Advocate, each 
and .very advertiser and all who have patroniied our job rooms for their 
most liberal support. It was an expensive effort to secure a subscription 
list that is attractive both in numbers and desired teiritory. but we over- 
came obstacles and have the list, and to our patrons we say from our heart. 
We thank you With this list, expensive though It has been, we have held 
our advertising rates down and have had a most liberal patronage, and for 
this we iii s.iy. We thank you. Then there are our Job rooms that have 
enjoyed a remarkably line business. We love the people who have made 
the year closing so good, and are here to pledge untiring efforts in making 
The Advocate the avenr . for presenting high and ennobling ideals and a 
channel through which business men may come In contact with the greatest 
r. We thank you. kind friends, and say goodbye to 1*22. 



REASON'S GREETINGS 
Our adv.rtisinc space Is taken up largely this week b;." merchants and 
other butlnesi people who believe in conveying all the meaning of the words, 
"I thank you. " It is true the year closing has not been a!l that we could 
have wished tor, but barring the strike Incidents and conditions that grew 
out of t hem. business men. those who overcome problems, will close the 
 ear with Inlands on the right side of the ledger. 



Edith 
friends and 

this week. 

Will .... ■ 8 Carrtngton. of Plnerllle. 
spent the holidays with his family 
in this city. 

Mrs. John I). McColm, of Hunting- 
ton. W Va.. is here vialUng the fam- 
ily of her father, W. T. Tyler. 

Miss Gladys Sharp, ot Islington, 
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. 
R. WhiUitt and Albro Whltsitt for 
the week-end Mts.i Sharp will arrive 
tomorrow. 

Mr and Mrs. J. H. Swango and 
children. .Miss Marian and J. H. 
Swango, Jr., of Terre Haute. Ind., are 
expected Saturday to visit Judge and 
Mrs. O. B. Swango. 

Mrs. I • - 1 1 • McCormick. Miss Pearl 
McCormick and Graham McCormick, 
of Lexington, and Wes I'henault, of 
Versailles, are guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
O. W. McCormick and John McCor- 
mick 



• •••«•••• 

OWINQiVILLK 



l et us be thankful that 
he named the animals, was not infill 
enced by tile man who named Pull 

cars. 



It is preposterous to scoff at 
It buys you luxuries, so-called friends, 
make-believe loves, and heaven or the 
fond love in your baby's eyes. 



To get a license to run an autoino- ! If departed spirits want to com- 
Mte'oae kaj to tare bad some expei I municate with us they should talk, 
lenco. but In marriage the experience' not knock. We get enough raps as it 
conn s alter the license. I is from the living. 



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For Mrs. Wilson 

Mrs. Nancy Katherine Prewitt will 
entertain Saturday afternoon at 
cards complimentary to her staffer, 
Mrs. Joseph Wilson, of Shelby county. 



Mrs. H. G. Hoffman was hostess at 
a luncheon yesterday, entertalnning 
at her home on North Maysville 
street. The table was beautifully 
adorned with Christmas flowers and 
a delightful menu was served. Mrs. 
Hoffman's guests were: Mrs. George 
Snyder, Mrs. Dan Chenault, Mrs. 1) 
C. Pox. Mrs. R. L. Coleman. Miss Liz- 
ale P. Coleman, Mrs. Eunice. Reld. 
Miss Josephine Chenault and Mrs. J. 





For tl-.e patronage which has made 
our business successful during the past 
year we are indeed grateful, and to all 
we wish a most Prosperous and Happy 
192:5. 

J. R. LYONS 



The Saltans Club, au exclusive so- 
cial organisation of this city, save 
their annual Christmas dance last 
night at Trimble Hall. The ball room 
was never prettier than on this oc.a 
sion, when it was so beautifully and 
elaborately decorated with holly and 
mistletoe and evergreens. The music 
was of the best and was furnished by 
the Centre Six of Danville. Messrs 
Reid Prewitt and George Hamilton II 
were the committee in charge of the 
dance and proved themselves to be 
the best of entertainers. A large 
number of beaux and belles from this 
and surrounding towns were in at- 



Ons of the prettiest events of the 
holiday season was a luncheon bridge 
given Christmas evening by Miss 
Lucille Vice. The home was lovely 
with its Christmas decorations of 
holly, mistletoe and bells. Mrs John 
I. Vice assisted her dsughter in the 
entertaining. Those present were: 
Mr and Mrs. Dillard Douglas, of Mt. 
8lerllng; Misses Thelma Blount. Ed 
ith Knight. Grace Crooks, l...u Brad 
shaw Sharp, Carolyn Bascom and 
i Mary Wagoner Berry, of Sharpsburg: 
Misses Vtrgallne Byron, Micha Mar- 
tin. I.eona Palmer. Etna Stamper. Lu- 
cille Callett, Oddle Power. Mrs. Chas. 
Brest on, Mrs. Shanklln Piper; Messrs. 
Ewell Shrout. James Richards. Bas- 
com Thompson, ('lark l-ane, Harvey 
Crooks. Carroll Estill Byron and Fas 
sett Botts. 

Miss Rose Jones, of Winchester, 
spent Christmas with her sister. Mrs 
Ployd Ross, and her father, Sam 
Jones. 

Elile Richards has returned to his 
home at Portsmo..:!:. Ohio, after n 
visit to relatives here. 

Miss Kathleen Palmer, of Lexing- 
ton, spent Christmas with her father. 
Oscar Palmer. 

Clell Johnson. Prank Stamper and 
Andrew Denton attended a dance In 
Winchester Monday night. 

Lacy Byron, or Catlettsburg. is vis-' 
Itiug his parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. T. 
Ityron. 

A number were here Front Mt Bier 
ling Monday to attend the funeral of 
Claude Paxton. who died at his home 
in Ashland Saturday night. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Strader and 
son. Theodore, have returned to their 
home in Lexington after a visit to 
Mrs. Strader's parents. Mr. and Mrs. 
J. J. NeabltL 

Miss Aetna Stamper has returned 
to Hazard after a visit to her parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. David Stamper. 

Miss Louise Beits! spent Christinas 
with relative* in Lexington. 

Miss Lucille Vice I ft Tuesoay to 
visit friends in Richmond, 

Arthur Mui l.land, of Pa: I . is visit- 
ing his grand; ar. nts. Mr. and Mrs. 
Nathaniel Markland. 







V 



The WALSH Co. 



Wishes You 
A Happy New Year 



0 



I THANK MY FRIENDS AND 
CUSTOMERS FOR THE PAST 
YEAR'S PATRONAGE AND EX- 
TEND THE SEASON'S GREETINGS 
TO ALL. 

MISS OLA ROGERS. 



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CAN YOU RECAl L A LIKE 

CHRISTMAS TEMPERATURE? 

This was an Interrogation given to 

Mr. Martwell. He said: "I reinem- 
tendar.ee. At intermission supper^ was j bep we| , ju8t such weatner a8 we , re 

passing through now — H years ago. 



served at the cafe and 
supper parties were given 



private 



RELIGIOUS 
• ••*•*«•* 



• • e 



New Yea I 
church next 
o'clock In tin 



services 
Monday 



at St. Pat rick s 
at 7::!t  anil !♦ 



e • * • • 
• • • » * 



***•••*** 

SICK * 
......... 



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1922 



1923 



SEASONS GREETINGS 

Thanking you for your generous pat- 
ronAft and with the hope that our contin- 
U«d effort! to render the best possible ser- 
vile may meet with your approval — and 
with the wish that the New Year may hold 
in store for each and every one all bless- 
ings that are worthwhile. 

KENTUCKY UTILITIES CO. 




The year dosing has been one of the 
I..-M i„ our business career, and for it we 
h;t\.- nascn to thank a generous public. 
Our saddles are strictly hand-made and of 
such duality as brings prices from $55.00 
up. No other like them. Ours is a real 
leather goods place. 

J. R. SALMONS 



Mrs. Thomas Helnrlck, who has 

been very ill of pneumonia, is much 
improved and w ill soon be on the road 
to recovery. 

William and Albert Green, ( lav. 
young sons of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. 
Clay, are recovering from an attack 
of chlckenpox. 



It was Christmas week and I was 
living with Robert Tilton on the John 
Mago.van farm. The weather was so 
spring-like that the grass began to 
grow and peacli trees of an early va- 
riety were in bloom. Later in the 
winter the weather became intensely 
 old. and there was no peach crop 
that year." Mart Wells was then 
|| j ears old and this incident is fresh 
in his memory. 

Rev. J. W. Crates says: "1 lived in 
the state of Massachusetts when we 
had weather Just like this about 40 
yean; ago. when people went about 
their business in their shirt sleeves." 




Your friendship during the past year 
has made our business successful, and to 
one and all we are thankful. May a good 
Providence Bless You with an Abundance 
of All Things Your Heart Desires during 
the New Year. 



E. T. REIS 



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HON PACKING HOUSE A GO 

George M. Ober, of Indianapolis, i 
here for business. Mr. Ober is a man 
of affairs who has given up a $50 per | 
week salary in order to put Um Hon 
Packing Company enterprise squarely 
on a business basis. Mr. Ober has 
taken rooms iu the Tyler Apperson 
building and will in a short time be 
Joined by his son. W. H. Ober, and 
the two will install the plant with a 
$16,000 worklug capital. Added to 
this blUlding will be a poultry depart 
ment where slaughtered poultry will 
be placed in storage, and as soon as 
this plant is put in working condition 
with a weekly payroll averaging $20 
to each laborer of the 1*0 employed. 
Mr. Ober proposes to bring to Mt 
Sterling a canning plant that will be 
operated by at least 20 men and wo- 
men on a payroll at $2f  each. 

There la auother company that 
would locale here with about to men 
and wouieu on a payroll that will 
make overalls and waists, giviug oou- 
staut employment at not less than $2f  
per we,-i, Such plants are greatly 
needed and their location would 
nieau great growth Figure 100 per- 
sous with an average of $2D per week 
and we have a salary distribution an- 
nually of ILI0.OO0. These statements 
come from Mr. Ober, who has had 
much experience In this business ami 
who assures iih his tigures are not too 
high. 



ANOTHER TOBACCO RECORD 

Nim Gilvln. of the Sid»vlew neigh- 
borhood, last week delivered 1,630 
sticks of tobacco, which was raised 
on one and one-half acres. The crop 
weighed I, CM pounds and brought an 
advance of $4OS.^,0. This is certainly 
MM record, und we are wondering 
who will be able to beat It. 





A year of health — 

A year of prosperity — 

A year of happiness — 

That's our New Year's wish for you. 

JERSEY MILK CO. 



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A breezy girl 
wife. 



a wludy 



* 1 wish Ui extend Rest Wishes tu 

* my patrons and to thank iheni 

* for their liberal patronage. 

* W. M. RIESS1NGER 

* 4 Court St Mt. Sterling. Ky 




WE ARE GRATEFUL for the business the public has given our in- 
stitution and at this season wish to express our appreciation 
through the columns of this 



YOUR PATRONAGE and hearty co-operation have made it . 
ble for us to remodel our banking house — and when completed 
we hope it will be one of the most modern in Kentucky, affording every 



w 



ITH BEST WISHES to All for Health, Prosperity, P 
Happiness throughout the New Year. 



Mt. Sterling National Bank 



— - — 



I 



WINDOW GLASS 



— AT 

DUERSON'S DRUG STORE 




Mrs J c Power* Is visiting rela- 
tives In Erlnnger 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel I.. Taylor are 
spending Hi.' Ik. II. lays in Chicago. 

Miss Jenmol Gatewood lias return- 
ed IHMM troll] a two months' stay in 
Detroit. 

Mr. and Mrs. ,W Hoffman Wood 
have returned from a visit to relative* 
In I'm: i 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Glnn have re- 
turned from a Beveral months' stay 
at Pinevllle 

Miss I.uoile Catlett, of Owingavllle, 

was the guest of Miss Evelyn Prew- 
Itt for the (lance. 

Alexander Benton, or Hazard, is 
spending the holidays with Mis mo- 
ther, Mrs. N T. Benton. 

Mrs. W. C. Lydick. of Cynthlana. Is 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Tip- 
ton and Joe W. Stephens 

Mr. and Mrs i; Berry IMeratt, of 
Chicago, are guests of Mrs. Hose Pie 
ratt and other relatives here. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin I). Wood. Hunt- 
ington*! are visiting Mrs. Wood's pa 
rents. Mr. and Mrs. James E. Gay. 

Mr and Mrs. John Keller and Miss 
Frances Burkhurt are spending the 
holidays with relatives in Louisville. 

Miss Nell Steele, of Lexington, is 
spending the holidays with her pu- 
rents and other relatives in this 
county. 

Mr. and Mrs. N. M. White and son. 
Steve, of Prestonsburg, are guests of 
Mrs. Whites parents, Mr. and Mrs 
Steve Pieratt. 

Mrs. J. R. Hicks, who has been 
spending several weeks with Mr. and 
Mrs. Squire N. Williams, left today 
for Umatilla. Fla. 

Mrs. Dan Chenault, of Lexington, 
d Miss Josephine Chenault; Utah- 
uioiul, are guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
George It. Snyder. 

Mr. and .Mrs. T. Ilullitt McCoun anil 
children, of Lexington, are guests of 
Mrs. Nancy S. McCoun and Miss 
Elizabeth MeOottn. 

Mr. and Mrs. , T. J. Wilson and 
Misses Winlfnd and Mragaret Wil- 
son spent the holidays In Win cheater 
with Mrs. Ann Burke. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tinsley Barnard and 
children spent Christmas with Mrs. 
Barnard's parents. Kev. aiid Mrs. D. 
M. Holbrook, in Ashland. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mont joy and 
children spent the week-end with 
Mrs. Montjoy's sister, Mrs. Dlythe 
Anderson, in Fayette county. 

Miss Mary Gatewood, who attends 
school in Chattanooga, is spending 
the holidays with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Colonel Gatewood 



Mrs. Frank Mrown and Mrs Thom- 
as Duff, of Stepstone. were in town 
Saturduy. 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Roberts 
spent the holidays with relatives in 
Lexington. 

Dr. and Mrs A. H. Stoops anil Miss 
Nancy Berkeley will leave next week 
for Florida. 

Miss Ethel Harker. of Lexington, 
was the guest of Miss Louise Orerfr 
for the dance. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kd Taul had as their 
guests Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. K. C. 
Poplin, of Paris. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. McChesney, of 
St. lx)uis. Mo., are guests of the fam- 
ily of D. F. Wyatt. 

Miss Bettlc White will leave Janu- 
ar  I for Umatilla, Fla.. where sin 
will spend tin' winter. 

Miss Man ll.all. of Owensboro. is 
spending the holidays with her mo- 
ther, Mrs. BRUM E. Beall. 

Mr. and Mrs. II. I). Morton, of Hunt- 
ington, W. Va., are spending the holi- 
days with Mr. and Mrs. Kd Taul. 

Mrs. Charles O'Bryan, of Hot 
Springs, Ark., Is the guest of Mrs. J. 
Lawrence White and Miss llattie Ow- 
Ings. 

Miss Lillian White was in Winches- 
ter Monday night to attend the Klks' 
dance and was the guest of Miss Ruth 
McCord. 

C. C. Conley and Joe Adams, of 
Ashland, and C. A Rugan. of this city, 
spent Sunday with A. I!. Thomasson 
and family. 

Miss Jane Cox. of California, and 
Jane and Joe Kemper, of Lexington, 
are guests of William Sledd ami Miss 

QeofffJe siedd. 

Mrs. S I). Hall and Miss Virginia 
Hall spent Christmas with Mrs. Hall s 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Sluf 
l'essel, at Clay City. 

Misses Belle Scott, Rosalie Bloom 
Held and Mildred Todd, of Winches- 
ter, we're guests of Miss Louise 
Sinathers for the dance last night. 

Mrs. John L. Coleman and Miss 
Frances Coleman will leave early In 
January for Tallahassee. Fla.. where 
they will be guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Kenneth Collins. 

Miss Mildred Uatewood was in 
Richmond Tuesday evening to attend 
the dance given by Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam O. Mays for their niece. Miss 
Patsy Rosson. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Arthur and 
daughter, Elizabeth, and .Vlr» Mary 
l'ratt McKee and daughter. Ada, i l 
Lexington, are spending the holidays 
with Mr. and Mrs J, W. Hedden, Sr. 

Mr. und Mrs. Edward Mathias and 
Miss Lillian McNamara. of Covin* 



Are Your Sows Pre- 
pared to Raise ^ 
Thrifty Pigs • 

A properly balanced ration for the 
•ows before and after pigs are born 
prevents runts. Insure a well regu- 
lated system and abundance of rich 
milk by feeding 

Purina Pig Chow 

All Pure Ingredients: — corn 
meal, digester tankage, O. P. 
linseed flour, 1110 
alfalfa leaf flour. 





and Miss Irene McNamara, of 
rere guests of Mra. P. Mc- 
Namara during the holidays. 

Mlaa nvrtte Bruce VanAntwerp. of 
Ixmlsvllle. Is visiting Mia 





llghtfully 



Mra. A. B. Thomasson and Mrs. 

Burl Ray were in Lexington shopping 
Saturday. 

Mrs. Byron Hall and son. Ben, have 
returned from a visit to relatives In 
Philadelphia. 

Mr and Mrs Charles Pitman, of 
Carlisle, have been guests of Dr. and 
Mrs. A. B. Stoops. 

Mrs. George R. Warren, of Lexing- 
ton, has ben the guest of ber daugh- 
ter. Mrs. ('. B. Dnerson. 

Miss Florence Wallingford has re- 
turned from Maysvllle. where she 
spent Christmas with relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Wood and chil- 
dren, of Carlisle, have been guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Thompson. 

Mrs. Bishop Clay and Miss Agnes 
Clay, of Lexington, are guests of rel- 
atives here during the holidays. 

Misses Mamie and Hazel Sullivan, 
of Lexington, are guests of their pa- 
rents, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Sulivan. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wilson, of Shelbv 
county, are guests of Mrs. Wilson's 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. George Owings. 

Mrs. Strother Cobb, of Middletown, 
Ohio, is spending the holidays with 
her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Mike Wil- 
son. 

( apt. C. H. Petry and granddaugh 
ter, Mrs. Bogie, and great-granddaugh- 
ter. Josephine Bogie, visited relatives 
and friends In Shelbyville and Louis 
viiie this areeK. 

Ben F. Nickell. wife and children 
have been in West Liberty with rela- 
tives this week. Mr. Nickell returned 



til the first of the yea". 



In honor of Mrs 
Wright s mother, Mrs Mary J Peck, 
of Lexington, it i I o'clock dinner. 
It being hnr eighty-first birthday an- 
niversary. The French doors were 
thrown open between Uie two dining 
rooms and covers were laid for twen 
ty-four persons The cloth was of 
Mexican and ftlet lace; the center 
piece of poinsetta and mistletoe and 
pink ro e 01. The lovely dinner con 
i sisted of several courses. The guests 
were: Her sister, Mrs. Bascom, and 
her niece. Mrs. Dudley Hunter, of 
North Carolina, and Mr. Wright's sis- 
Ur. Mra. Rice, and daughter, Mrs. 
Catherine Rice Goodpaster, and ner 
children, grandchildren and great 
grandchildren 

Open Session 

The Junior Women's Club enter- 
tained with an open session meeting 
Tuesday afternoon at the home of 
Mrs. J. Miller Hoffman In Kverett 
Court. The members, with one Invit 
ed guest each, were present, and an 
unusually interesting program was 
given, the feature of which was a 
one-act play, "On Vengeance Heights." 
The play is a ^tory of the Kentucky 
mountains and H the one that recent- 
ly won the prize at Kentucky Univer- 
sity on amateur night. At its presen- 
tation in this city Tuesday the prin- 
cipal role was taken by Miss Eliza- 
beth McCoun. assisted by Mrs. Tipton 
Wilson, Leonard Payne and Henry W. 
Sullivan At the conclusion of the 
program refreshments of sandwiches, 
coffee and candy were served. 

Buffet Supper 

Carl Boyd was host at a buffet sup 
per at the Country Woman's Club at 
intermission of the donee last night 
J complimentary to the members of his 

n un- bousP party H,R * ue8ts were: M ' 88 
Louise Marvin and Skinney Farmer. 

Miss Kelly Barnes and John McCor- 

mick. Miss Kdith Knight and Clyde 



Among the out-of-town people here 
Tuesday to attend the funeral and 
burial of .lames N. Anderson wero: 
James W Tanner, Mr. and Mrs 
Frank Miller. Mr. and Mrs. John Mil- 
ler. Mrs. J. D. Poynter. Mr. and Mrs 
.lilson Whitsett. of Winchester: Mrs. 
L. G. Cannon, of Georgetown: Miss 
Susan Woods, of Stanford, and James 
Clark, of Oxford. Ohio. 

House Party 

Carl Boyd is entertaining a house 
party this week at "Fairfields." his 
tome in the country. His guests are: 
Miss Louis.' Marvin, of Midway: Miss 
Xaucy Wilson, of Versailles; Miss 
Kdith Knight and Miss Elizabeth 
Boyd, of Sharpsblirg. and Messrs 
Arthur Bradshaw. of Somerset: Skin- 
ny Farmer, of Midway, and Grant Wil- 
lis, of Versailles 

Family Dinner 

Mr. a iid Mrs. Albert Bridges were 
hosts at a family dinner Sunday at 
their home on West Main street. The 
table decorations were In red and 
green and a miniature Christmas tree, 
lighted with tiny red candles, was 
used us a center piece. An elaborate 
dinner was served. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bridges' guests were: Mrs. J. Will 
Clay, Mr. and Mrs. W C Clay, Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter Bridges and son. Mr. 
and Mrs. Marion Bridges and chil- 
dren. 




Thanking our customers many times 
for all business entrusted to us in the past 
- -and with all good wishes for Health, 
Happiness and Prosperity throughout the 
New Year. 

EXCHANGE BANK 
OF KENTUCKY 



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■jr-n--r ; - 

; .::j.'- 
•:. uWfi 
• ■ -V 



■r 



Dinner Party 

Mr. and Mrs Steve D. Pieratt were 
ho-us at dinner Sunday at their home 
on West High street. The table deco 
rations were in red and an elaborate 
menu was served 



Norris. Miss Elizabeth Boyd and 
James Bigstaff. Miss Nancy Wilson 
and Hei Oldham. Miss Pearl McCor- 
mick. Miss Elizabeth Prewitt and 
Floyd Stamper, Miss Kenney Prewitt 
anil Tom Coons, Miss Evelyn Prewitt 
and Tom Hoffman. Miss Lucile Cat- 
let t and Allen Prewitt, Miss May 
Robinson Crooks am! Arthur Brad 
shaw. Miss Mary Wagner Berry and | J 
Wes Chenault. Miss Lottieo Stone and 0 

Warren Hayden, Miss Lillian White I ] 

and Henry Besuden, Ernest Johnson. '* 
Mr and Mrs. Dan J. Prewitt. Mr and 
Mrs. Charles I). Highland. Mr. and 
Mrs. W. O. McCormick. Mr. and Mrs. 
Leslie McCormick and Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert Howell. 

Card Party 

Misses Betty Bruce VanAntwerp 
and Mary Gatewood were the guests 
of honor at a beautiful curd party 
given by Miss Agnes Stofer yesterday 
afternoon at her home oil West Main 
street. Holly and mistletoe adorned 
the rooms which were lighted with 
the red candles shaded in red. and the 
score cards were Christmas scenes in 
the water colors. Following the 
games a most delightful supper was 
■erred from the small tables. Miss 
Stofer was assisted by her mother. 
.Mrs John Stofer. and her party in- 
cluded: Miss Uatewood, Miss Van- 
Antwerp. Miss Judith Johnson, Miss 
I ill! belli Ann Reynolds, Miss Kath- 
leen Reynolds, Miss Frances Reese, 
Miss Helen Gatewood, Miss Alberta 
Coleman. Miss Lula Thomas. Miss 
Mary Bridgforth. Miss Dorothy Per- 



When a man has had a better busi- 
ness — and a more pleasant business than 
in any years previous — the least he could 
say is — "I thank you, I thank you." 

A. J. HUMPHRIES 

Florist. 



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The good year 1022 has treated us 
kindly, and we trust that you may enjoy 
the same blessings during 1928 that your 
friendship has made possible for us in the 
year Just closing. May Good Fortune 
smile upon You and Yours, is the sincere 
wish of the 

Mt. Sterling Lumber Co. 



* 

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* 

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ry. Miss Frances Howell. Mis^ Ruth 



Covers were laid j I) Turley. Miss Louise Hardy, Miss 
for the following guests: Mr. and 1 Nola Highland, Miss Elizabeth 
Mrs N M. White, Colonel and Mrs 
John C. Hopkins and John Hopkins. 
Jr.. of I'restonsbiirg: Mr. ami Mrs. S. 
C. Carpenter. Misses lluth und Vir- 
ginia WoOMCk, of Millersburg; Mr.! 



1 1 ighland, 

Sirossman. Miss Henrietta Howell. 
Miss Laura Gill Hoffman. Miss Eliz 
■Beth Bogie. Miss Agnes Clay, of 
Lexington; Miss Frances Turner. 
Miss Virginia A\ res. Miss Elizabeth 



and Mrs W T. Perry. Mil 
Kendall and Joseph M. Kendall. of 
Winchester; Mr. and Mrs. Jai... 
Nesbltt. Mrs. Itose Pieratt and Mrs. 
Lilian Kendall. 



Dinner For Mra. Mary J. Peck 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben T. Wright de l 



Vivian ; Colli, r. Miss Lucy Montjoy. Miss 
Frances Mark. Miss Margaret Robin- 
son, Miss Elise Derrickson, Miss Ro- 
berta Dale. Miss Thelma Dennis. Miss 
QbWtyi Tubor. Miss Rosemary Punch 
and Miss Teiiuie Hl. vins. 



(Additional Society on page four) 



| Sincere Good 
Wishes 



To all our friends we extend Sincerest 
Greetings of the Season. The good year 
1922 was kind and good to us, and to all 
who made this possible we wish the Hesi 
Things of Life during the New Year. Mav 
a Kindly Providence guide your happiness. 

HEINRICH & SON 



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Greene & Duff 



To all citizens of Mt. Sterling and 
Montgomery County we extend Greetings 
of the Season, ami our sincere hope is that 
all of them will be Abundantly Ble . I 
with all the Good Things of Life during 
the New Year. 

G. D. SULLIVAN & CO. 



We desire to extend cordial good 
wishes for the coming year and to thank 
you for. your valued business in the past, 
«nd solicit a continuance through the year 
to 



Mt. Sterling Laundry 



L 



— ■ 



— - 



SCHEDULE 

Reo Bus Lines Co. 

E. R. Webb, 



-jIbiautiful 

OCA 

of^nX'r' 



MT. STERLING 

Lv. »:30 a. m. 
Lv. 4:30 p. m. 

LEXINGTON 

Lt. 7:30 a. m 
Lt. 2:30 p. m 



WEST BOUND 

WINCHESTER 

10:30 a. m. 
5:30 p. m. 

EAST BOUND 

WINCHESTER 

8:16 a. m. 

3:16 p. m. 



LEXINGTON 

11:15 a. m 
 :15 p. m. 

MT. STERLING 

»:1B a. m. 
4:16 p. m. 



SCHEDULE SUBJECT TO CHANGE 



Large 



BEVERAGE RESEMBLING TEA carbonated beverage*. Carbonated 
MADE FROM CASSINA PLANT b. .tiled beverages of three distinct 

Laboratory inv. stigations by the '. v P« ,!i h * ve D, ' n m * dp 1 nthe '*bora- 
bureau of CBOBllHry, I'nlted States «ory from flavoring syrups contaln- 
Department of Agriculture, have In* carina extract. Formulas have 
fhowii that a v.r  .lelfghtful bever- been prepared for the manufacture 
age resembling tea In many respects j of cassina flavored bottled sodas. 

wild ~ 

WANTED— FURS! FURS! FURS! 

Will pay the highest market price. 
Ask your neighbor who it Is In Mt. 
Sterling pays the top prices — H. Gor- 
and Locust streets. 

(10-12O 



can be made front casslna. a 
plant that grows abundantly in the 
south Atlantic ami gulf states from 
Virginia to TtW when the leaves 
of the plant are treated by processes 
similar to those used In curing tea. 
The cassina plant has been used to a 
limited extent by Indians, and. during 
the Civil war when tea and coffee 
could not h  obtain. •(! Iiy people of the 
southern states to make a beverage. 
Unless properly cured, however, cas- 
sina does not make a god beverage. 

lt has been demonstrated in the 
laboratory that cassina could be 
treated by processes similar to those 
used in the tea industry and an excel- 
lent beverage made froai it, work 
has been undertaken to produce it on 
a larger scale. An experimental 
plant has been installed near Charles- 
ton, S. Cm and preliminary reports 
indicate that the laboratory results 
can be duplicated on a commercial 

laboratory experiment* have been 
conducted on the use of the hot-wa- 
ter extract of properly cured cassina 
leaves as a base in the production of 



If Uncle John ltuddy can sell his 
interest In the White Horse still and 
his crap game he'll engage In jury 

Cat. 



If you don't understand a law. how 
do you expect to obey one? If you 
don't understand life, how do you ex- 
pect to live one? 

The bill collector is a jay— Who 
never has been scared— And he'll be 
round most any 
keep him squared 



JOHNWHTTE&CO 

LOUISVILLE, KV. 

ItUbLnaxl in 1S37 




Liberal MHrtrnwl 
Full Value paid ' 



«^x-4^x~:~x~:~:~xk~:~k~xk~x*^^ 

Cream Wanted 



We pay the highest market price for pure sweet cream, 
and are in the market for all you have at all times. 

BRING US WHAT YOU HAVE 
AND NOTE THE AMOUNT OF YOUR CHECK 

BUTTER! BUTTER! 

Butter made at our plant goes to the housekeeper fresh 
from the churn. There is no better made than what we 
produce, and our price is most reasonable. It is made 
from high-test Jersey cream — and if you once try ours 
you will have no other. 

MAKE A REGULAR ENGAGEMENT WITH US— 
WE DO NOT DISAPPOINT! 



We specialize in • 

ICE CREAM AND ICES 

Let us have your order. We can supply whatever you 
want and at a price that will please. Our products are 
all guaranteed to satisfy and be as good as the best. 

PATRONIZE A HOME INSTITUTION— 
YOU'LL LIKE OUR SERVICE 



"We 



Right to Your 



JERSEY MILK COMPANY 

; Ea»t High Street. Phone 399. I 

1 i  ««*»»«^x^~x~K^-x-:~:~x~x~:-x-:~:^^^ 



Florida 

Three Through Trains Daily 

Lexington-Florida 

Southern RailwaySystem 

Royal Palm Ohio 



Lv. Lexington 823A.M. 

Ar. Chattanooga 3:40P.M. 

Ar. Atlanta . . (C.T.) 8:40 P.M. 

Ar. Macon (IX). 12:15A.M. 
Ar. Jactoeavile 7:50 A.M. 

Pullman Sleeping Can and Coaches 

to Jacksonville. 



Lv. Lexington 10:40 A.M. 

Ar. Chattanooga 6:15 P.M. 

Ar. Atlanta ... (C.T.) 11:10 P.M. 

Ar. Macon (E.T.) 2:55 A.M. 

Ar. Jacksonville 11:15A.M. 



ad Conches Pullman Sleeping Care and 
to Jacksonville. 

Suwanee River Special 

Lv. Lexington 10:40 P.M. 

fl * "' -' ' * A.M. 

Ar. Adanu (C.T.) 11:28 A.M. 

{'••'•eon (ET.) 1:10 P.M. 

A/-J«*«»* 5:30 A M. 

Ar. Oearwater 7:03 A.M. 

*£_*«- Petwe tnirt, 7: 55 A.M. 

* 7**1 S A M« 

•wejneeg 7:45 A.M. 

ICII(*iilTI« «.TJ bMraTBjt 

t Cue and Coach— fa  Tamea— Petersburg audi 
Dining Care oa All Trains Serving All Meali 



l»« Mart*. 



. atuu. Mi ej In I Pasasaaer Aa««t, 

LasasMSAs Merest. I n laytna. k/. 



•IAUTIPUL WORDS ABOUT 

OK ATM OF MIM BARNES 

l  vV Va ) Q*s*tte 
of December is had the fnllowlnn 
concerning the deeth of Mlsa Paulina 
Barnes, well-known In Mt. 8terllng: 

"Miss Paulina tl Barnes, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs. Henry H. 
Barnes, of the Ruffner Hotel, died at 
the Charleston General Hospital at 
dusk last night, after ; !.erotr battle 
with death covering a period of six 
weeks. The end rame at the close 
of a day In which everything known 
to science was done to save her life, 
and Just a little after the darkness 
caihe she paased. ending one of the 
most tragic cases in the history of 
Charleston. 

"Beautiful »,« are few girls, super- 
iorly . educated, only eighteen years of 
age. one of the most widely known 
and most popular girl? who ever lived 
here, and one who reveled In the 
sheer joy of living, she was distinct 
in a city which has been famous for 
Its beautiful girls for two 
lions. Her rather. Mr. II II 
is nationally known M h hotel man. 
and one of the most amiable in the 
country. Her mother, ns Miss Rose 
Hudson, was a beauty or St. Albans 
of two decades ago and for genera- 
tions her progenitors were gentle 
people. Miss Barnes was one of three 
beautiful sisters, the other two be- 
ing Mrs. Charles Smith Decker, of 
New York, and Mrs. Lipscomb Nor- 
veil, of Beaumont, Texas. Her bro- 
ther Is Robert Barnes of Parkersburg. 
one of the most popular of the youim 
er men of Charleston when he lived 
here. 

Miss Barnes was the youngest 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry II. 
Barnes, who have lived here for 
three years. Her mother, however, 
was widely known In the valley for 
years, and when the family came to 
Charelston to live lt was Just resum- 
ing an old residence. Miss Bane- 
was educated in the public schools in 
Bluefield. Ursuline Convent, Cincin 
nati; Chatham School at Warrenton. 
Pa.; Stuart Hall. Staunton. Va.. 
where she was graduated last \car 
with honors, and Sweetbrier College! 
where she was In school when taken 
ill. 

Mrs Barnes, who has kept a con- 
stant vigil at the bedside of her 
daughter, was in a complete state ol 
collapse last night and is being at- 
tended by a nurse, while Mr. Barnes 
and brother, who were with their 
daughter and sister, were both pros- 
trated Mrs. Charles Decker, of New 
York, will arrive today, but it is 
doubtful whether Mrs. Norvell. ol 
Texas, will be able to come. Funeral 
arrangements have not been complet- 
ed. The death of Miss Barnes, be 
cause of her personality, her position, 
her beauty and her culture, was a 
shock to the community and one of 
the most tragic incidents in the his 
tory of the city. 

"Miss Barnes' illness, which result- 
ed so tragically, dated from last sum- 
mer, when a diagnosis indicated she 
was suffering from appendicitis. Only 
sporadic attacks influenced the physi- 
cians not to resort to surgery, and ap- 
parently in abundant health she en- 
tered Sweetbrier College. S\\ eetbrier, 
Va. She was taken ill late In Octo- 
ber and her mother took her to a hos- 
pital in Lynchburg for an operation, 
but she recovered sufficiently to be 
brought home. and. on November 8, 
she was operated on at the Kanawha 
Valley Hospital. The operation seem 
ed successful in . very way, but she 
developed what is known as a stitch 
infection, something rire and a condi- 
tion that does not develop once in a 
thousand cases. She showed indica- 
tions of convalescing, but at no time 
was her condition such as to indicate 
M early recovery, ultlioiigh it was be- 
lieved because of her splendid physi- 
cal condition she could successfully 
combat the infection. But she grew 
gradually worse and, following I MO 
ond operation of a minor nature, she 
was brought to her home in the Run- 
ner, where she showed improvement, 
probably largely psychological. On 
Friday night she suddenly developed 
three degrees of fever and the physi- 

operation" IT^H^J^' 
taken to the Charleston General Hos 
pltal on Saturday morning and it 
was discovered that the infection had 
spread to such an extent that her r. 
covery was doubtful. She had a 
sinking spell on Saturday night and 
she Just hovered between life 
death. On Sunday morning her 
brother, Robert, who had been culled 
from Parkersburg. submitted to blood 
transfusion, but even this was In vain. 
She rallied following the transfusion, 
but then grew worse, and lacking the 
vitality which had been drained by 
of Illness and inability to re- 
mrlshmeut. she died at the 
close of the day. the period when the 
vitality of human beings is at its 
lowest ebb. One of the physicians 
who had diagnosed her case and lain 
attended her during her Illness, best 
described her passing when he said: 
•She waa conscious to the last But 
she was very, very tired, and not be 
ing able to resist an 
fell asleep.' " 



♦ FARM AND HOMI NfWS • 

• FROM OV.R KINTUCKV • 



Twenty-two Crittenden count* far- 
mers and their wives are cooperating 

with County Agent John R Rpencer 
and the extension division of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture In keening records 
on the number of eggs laid by their 

hens In order to show their aetgh- 
hors how good feed and the right kind 
•of care helps hens lay mere eggs In 
winter 

Limestone as a means of betiding 
up soils and boosting crop  t«Ms ts 
getting increased altentton from Web 

ster county farmers living In the 
Slaughters community. County Agent i 
Lloyd F. Cutler says Sex en of them; 
this fall ordered SO tons whlrh will 
constitute the first limestone they j 
have ever used on their farms 



I t * 

WHEN BETTER BREAD IS MADE, 
WE'LL MAKE IT! 



OLD FASHION SALT RISING 

and CARNATION MILK LOAF 

Don't take any substitute. The only uniform Salt-Rising 
Bread on the market today. Look for the name on the 



WINCHESTER BAKERY 



WINCHESTER, KY. 



— 



Demonstrations on striping and! 
genera- ] grading hurley tobacco put on in Pu # 
Barnes, j laski county through the co-operation | J 
of the Hurley Tobacco Growers' (V J 
operative Association and the exten-'f 



» 



slon division of the College of \cn 
culture at !  xlngton furnished 
means of showing scores of farm  r» 
In that section of the state how to 
strip and grade their leaf crop to the 
host advantage. County Agent W C 
Wilson says. A total of «3 farmer* 
attended the six demonstrations h-'ld 
in different parts of the county 



MILLERS CREEK COAL 

AND FEED 

RAMSEY & MASON 

Phone 3 McDonald Bros. Old Stand 83-12t 



* ^  -* -f- -:-."-x~ -:'« ~ - «:~:-:~:~ 
a 



Wayne county farmers are continu 
ing to take steps for the improvement 
of their poultry floik*. County Agent 
II. J. Hayes says. Klght purebred 
breeding cockerels recently were 
placed on farms of the county while 
another model poultry house was 
CO 



are eo tin u * Wf A 
mnrovement X ' **' 




6 



•:-:-:-:-:«x-:- "  



    

■   




Purebred livestock is gaining in 
numbers in Leslie county. County 
Agent T. H. Britton says Four bred 
purebred gilts are among the latest 
additions to the list. 



Undertakers and Embalmers 

MT. STERLING. KY. 
Day Phone 481. Night Phones 23 & 381 



SALT LICK W. C. T. U. 

PASSES RESOLUTIONS 

The following r «n' 'ions were pass- 
ed by the V.'. C. T. I", of Salt Lick: 
Inasmuch the I'li'alTaOJ of the 
18th amendiP' nt has recently caused 
the death of three of our brave and 
noble citizens. Prohibition Officers 
RObOTl Duff. Owingsville: David 
Tread way. Mt Sterling, and Guy 
Cole. Bowling Creen. and as the \V. 
C. T. I'. assisted in getting this 
amendment incorporated in our na- 
tional constitution. 
Therefore, Be it Resolved. 
First We pledge ourselves anew 
as a body to aid in the work 01 en 
forcing prohibition and in aiding the 
officers and citizens in their efforts 
to enforce the prohibition laws by 
any and all lawful means. 

Second That we deeply deplore 
1 ■ deaths of these three me nwho 
AM in an attempt to uphold the laws 
of our lair land, the violation of 
\. liich has again added the awful 
tragedy of bloodshed against the fail- 
name of our beloved state. 

Third That we. the members of 
Salt Lick W. C. T. IT., extend Jur 
most sincere sympathy to the bereav- 
ed families of these men and com- 
mend them to the Father on High in 
this sad hour.- Mrs. W. H. Dooley, 
president; Mrs. A. H. Points, secre- 
tary; Mrs. G. North, treasurer; Mrs. 
P. Jackson, press correspondent; 
Miss LOMfl* Kautz, corresponding 
..Mietary. 




Fine!" 



"1 was pale and thin, hardly 
able to go," says Mrs. Bessie 
Bearden, ol Central, S. C. "I 
would suffer, when I stood on 
my feet, with bearing-down 
pains in my sides and the lower 
part of my body. 1 did not rest 
well and didn't want anything 
to eal. My color was bad and 
1 felt miserable. A friend of 
mine told me of 

CARBUI 

The Woman's Tonic 

and 1 then remembered my 
mother used to take it. . . After 
the first bottle 1 was better. I 
to fleshen up and I re- 
my strength and good, 



GRAYSON FARMERS ORGANIZE 
FOR IMPROVED DAIRY HERDS 

A big step toward the building up 
of dairy' herds has been taken with 
the organization of the Grayson Coun 
ty Co-operative Purebred Jersey Sire 
Association, according to County 
Agent R. W. Searce. who co-operated 
with the extension division of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture at Lexington in 
getting the association started. The 
35 charter members ot the organiza- 
tion, who are the owners of 152 grade 
and purebred Jersey cows, will grad- 
ually build up their herds for higher 
milk and cream production through 
Mo- cooperative use of three purebred 
Jersey bulls. 

1). M. Young has been made presi- 
dent of the association ami W. J. 
Harrell, secretary-treasurer. The 
board of directors of the new organi- 
zation is composed ot these two men 
and W. R. Greene, J. F. Stone and 
T. A. Glenn. Practically all members 
of the association live in the vicin- 
ity of Leitchfleld and Caneyville. 

The three Jersey sires to be used 
by members of the association in the 
work of building up their herds al- 
ready have been selected and brought 
to the county by a buying committee 
composed of Mr. Harrell and Mr. 
Young. Bis nil of the animals, which 
were purchased In Christian and 
Todd counties, has a long line of high 
producing ancestors behind and lt is 
expected that their use on dairy 
cows belonging to members of the 
assoc iation will have a marked effect 
in building up herds in this section. 
One of the sires has as his mother 
a sow that has not yet finished her 
register ol merit test, but who prob- 
ably will produce a total of 600 
pounds of buterfat before her year's 
MMWi is complete. The second sire's I 
mother produced .'{86 pounds of but- 1 
teriat as a three-year-old, while the| 
mother of the third sire produced 585 
pounds of butterfat as her official 
record. 

The membership of the association 
WW he divided Into three districts, 
; or "block." and one sire plaeed In 
j each district. At the end of each 
| two years, the three districts will ex- 
, change bulls, thereby making lt pos- 
sible for members of the association 
to have the use of a well bred aire 
over a period of six years at | 
puratively small cost. 



CASC0 KILLS COLD: 



bade 

Positive!/ Contains no 



CLASSIFIED 



OXY-ACETALYNE WELDING — We 
repair anything in metal. Best equip- 
ped shop in the South. Phone 17*. 
Lexington Engine and Boiler Works. 

AUTOS FOR HIRE— Touring cars 
driven by licensed chauffeurs. IU 
gan-Gay Motor Garage. (38-tt) 



HOG KILLING TIME 

We kill your hogs, trim the meat 
like it ought to be, grind the sausage 
and render the lard In a sanitary way. 
V per killing; $2.50 for killing and 
work.— Hon Packing Co. (11-tf) 



There is also a grain of sympathy 
for the wanderlust victim who must 
remain at home all his days and 
travel literature. 

■ m t 



The height of 

ig. 

___ 



Ion Is 




See The Advocate for printing. 



ia  

~* SOLID SILVER « 




for 

The Brideof Today 

The delicate 

with the 
distinction. 

Each piecs* 
marked STERLING 
the guarantee lor 
SO LID SIL VER. 

Tat. NEW PATTERN 

»«••• 



I. W. Jones & Son 

J SOLID SILVEl 



began to 
gained m  
healthy cd 



ly color. I am feeling line, 
since." 

Thousands of other women 
have had similar experiences in 
the use of Cardui, which has 
btought relief where other 
medicine!; had failed. 

If you suffer from female ail- 
ments, take Cardui. It U s 
woman's medicine. It may be 

i 1t W yo 1 ur«S.orarale,s. 

ISJ 



W. A. Bondurant's 

Repairing, Pressing and Tailoring Plant 



is bow over 



316. 



The WalBh Co. Clothing 
Maysville Street. 



Priee; Quick Delivery. 
We Call for and Deliver. 



ENTERS 

GOVERNOR'S RACE 



Seventh Duirict Congressman Announces Can- 
didacy For Nomination 



$ of Hit Position on State 
ute to Woodrow Wilton 



TO THE DEMOCRATS Or | dldate* themselves, and I consider It 

KENTUCKY: I proper Id my announcement to very 

I have bwn mwk impressed with briefly state some of the loadinic li- 



the campaign conducted by naroereus 
Kentucky newspapers demsndJag 'lut 
« baslness nin only should be aorn- 
mated for Governor. I in in syrnpt 
:hv with this movement t have wait- 
ed for weeks for some outstanding 
■Democrat and binlnesa man to mi 
nounee 4ii« aaateltdacy. In tact. I save 
•a numerous +** asloa* talked with 
«ne (ft the snout successful 
men.aavtl-aav -wf «h« -aaa«t Wysl Demo 
♦ rata In the State, urging him to run 
for the Item or ratio nomination for 
Vovernor, and offered nxy .tippnrl ;n 
case he should make the race. This 
gentleman declined to enter the race. 

Many active Democratic men and 
women in all sections of the State 
have asked me to stand for the Demo- 
crats nomination for Governor. I 
hiivr doclileil to announce an a can- 
didate. 

The fact that I own and oper«te 
apvmaJ farms In Scotl and Fayette 
Counties I believe entitles me to be 
classed as a business man. If I tin 
Dot come under the elassifti utlon of 
a business man. then the newspapers 
demanding a business man for Gov- 
ernor have shut out of political ■■  n- 
Mderatlon every farmer in the State. 
The farmor of today is a* much t 
Moines* man as the merchant, broker. 
»»nker or manufacturer. The grout 
majority of the business men of Ken- 



sues which are of interest to the elil 
sens of Kent in ky In announcing my 
self as a candidate for the Democratic 
nomination for Governor. I wish in 
emphasise the fact that I consider 
the Governorship of our State the 
highest honor which can he given a 
Kentuckian. and I pledge myself tn 
the people of Kent in ky that 'I 
business elected Governor, under no clrcum 
stances would I seek the Senntoish | 
or any oilier office but would fill nut 
the term completely for which I was 
electeil. No man in the Governor's 
ehMlr can give the State his best ser 
vice when be has his eye on some fit 
tart political preferment. 

1 favor a Primary Klection to deter- 
mine the nomination of the Deino- 
oratio l andidnte for the Governorship. 
I believe it would be political sulcld- 
for our Party to make the nomination 
in any other way. Only In a Primary 
Klection rati the women voters of the 
State give full expression to their po- 
litical opinions. 

I think tile greatest service a pub- 
li. ofli.er can render the State at this 
time is to attend strictly to the busi- 
ness of the State and to leave It to 
the business men to handle their own 
business and to tlie people to regulate 
their own affairs, so long as they do 
not violate our present lawa. To make 
it still plainer. I think we have enough 



the rawena* of the state. If I* 

to *• So 

I em heartily In favor of ttie , on- 
Mnartlon  rt a highway syetem which 

will cloaely tie together our peoi " 
In all sections of the State. As 1 
matter   f fact. Kentueklan* do not 
know sji'lt other hs they shoeW and 
we hare three distinct sections In our 
Commonwealth. Many of our problems 
would be solved If the tliree sections 
of the State were linked together h« 
good roads, so that our people (Mid 
really know each other and work to- 
gether for the common good. I am 
Informed by expert men who have 
studied thla question that thla plan 
can be carried out without lacreased 
taxatloa on existing property. 

roads and good schools go to- 
md every cltlaen will agree 
that everything possible should be 
done for the education of our chil- 
dren. I would like to aae oar public 
echooU the equal of those of any 
State la the Union and I will work to 
that end. I am also of the opinion 
that every encouragement possible 
should be given to our State Unlver- 
alty and that It be placed on a plane 
equal to the Univeralty of any other 
State. If I am elected Governor I 
will stay on the Job and give the State 
• baslness administration, and the 
best that is within me. 

If elected Governor, I will call 10 
my aid some of the leading busln»;s 
men in different lines and seek the r 
counsel and support In solving the 
many rllrflciilt problems which con- 
front our people. No man can solve 
these prel.leiu. alone, and the CBa  
dldate who promises to do so Is the 
worst type of a demagogue seeking 
votes. If elected, I promise to do the 
very best I can with the counsel and 
advice of leading men and women 



FARMEan orc 




LEE FASMEaig ORQANfM 

IMPROVE FARMS AND HOMES 

Farmers and their wires In Ave dlf- 
of htm county 
with the extension divis- 
ion of the College of Agriculture at 
Lexington, have organised community 
clubs and mapped out dot nit* pro- 
grams of work for their sections of 
the county in an effort to better their 
farms and homes, accordingto Ooun 
ty Agent T. H. Jones The communi- 
ties Involved In 
Belle Point. Kash 
Hill and liong Shoal. 

In planning the programs of work 
for the coming year, representative 
farmers and their wives In each of 
the communities met at different 
times with County Agent Jones and 
decided among the main farm and 
activities In their particular 
le of the big fac- 
tors that limit the results from I 
activities were then decided upon af- 
ter which remedies were outlined 
and demonstrations planned for the 
community to show how these reme 
dies could be applied. Some farmer 
or farmer's wife was appointed in 
each case to superintend the deme 
strations that will be conducted in 
connection with the various activi 
ties. 

Corn, soybeans. | oultry and junior 
agricultural club work will get atten- 
tion In the Itelle Point community 
Zack McGuire. James Durbin and 
Miss Belle MeOuIre were selected as 
the community leaders in these pro- 
jects. Fruit growing hogs, poultry 
and soil building will get attention in 




our Slate to solve our business ditli- 

culties for the best Interests of the | the Kasli community with Elvln Hoi 




Cantnli, Candidate For Governor 



leiieky are farmers, and being one of 
them I believe I know their trials and 

.u.lships, and thai if I am elected 

..■veraor 1 ( 'an °e of service to them 
nil to the State as a whole, fcjkBWH 
when the farmer prospers all Hues of 
l.nslneas share la that prosperity. 
The chief problems to be solved In 

vontucky are la the main of an agrl- 
-itltuial nature, and Kentucky lias not 

■d a farmer Governor for almost 
iorty years. The Governor of the 
state can personally attend to but a 
-mall part of the State's bualness. 
Most of the business of the State is 
.dually transacted by those whom the 

eivetnor appoints under the laws 
„.ssed hv the Legislature. The busi- 
ness of organization is the chief du:y 
ot ti e Governor, and it is absolutely 

is try for the welfare of the State 



laws at present regulating the busi- 
ness and the etery-day Ufa of tin 
people. 

There Is a tendency in the iiiuntr.t 
today to keep piling on the statute 
books laws regulating the business and 
private affairs of the citizens. I am 
of the opinion that it Is the part of 
wisdom that we learn our present 
laws and obey them rather than m 
bring into disrepute all law by furthei 
reatrlctlve legislation. 

If I am elected Governor, all laws 
on the statute books will be thor- 
oughly and carefully enforced as far 
Ba my power* will reach. The chief 
concern In th State and Nation to 
day is the strict enforcement of law 
and the absolute maintenance of peace 
i and order. For the secdr.iy of the 
i Individual and for rhe protection of 
rights, law and order must be 
ned. 

If elected .Jovernor, I pledge tin 
. best that Is within me to carr  out 
' this statement. 

If elected, pardon, will he scarce  vi 



rilHt the Governor work in harmony , pr()perM 
th the State Legislature ami the or- I „,,,„,„.•„ 
sanitations of the ffjrhuis State De- 
partments. 

In recent years 1 have beeu charged 
with the duty of .etting thousands of 

r slezl t:;,/ rTUuoa. ~«-^  «* « *~ »• 

' . . hu. ness wav n 19W I vh. 'akll»g »* »*  * "'™i"» ' ' 

State' "cSffu^ ofV SSJ-rT: Htat. mua, he bettered .long tin- 

smnuigu Oomai HUM in Kentucky liu,v 

.-hiJh rolled no a luainriu ol neail, M«u taxation is (he .ore spot with 

'.My theland tor £ ^ Don, "rati- the people I. the State and Nation 

.icket. and in that organisation thete Tha legislative branch of our State 

,e ten timusaud active men and Governtueni * rites the tax law s, hu 

n in the State Far thro.  ear. if elected (love. nor I arUI work wit, 

I was State President of the Society tha l,g:sl,t„re lr. every way ,hle 

of Equity with Its thousand* of farm 1 to hi n. .i KiUI 'he lowering of our ta\ 
» iiiomners. and this was t„e organ- 
liatloo which was .me of the pioneer 
movements teaching cooperation 
, uong the farmer. Yeats ago this 
■anlzatiou did tin- work which Is 
uw being carried on on a larger scale 
  several splei.d d Kanuers' Organ 
ttiogs of todav 

twiatlon these matter, simply to 
,* thai I have had experience on a 
rge scale along organize I Ion lines, 
which make up in pari Ihc duties of 
the Governor To properly organize 
|J M ' o'uay blanches of the Sute  i.» 
hrnmetit la a Job re«iulriug experience 
in urganiagiloa work. 1 am convinced 
tli. it IU» veurs "t the Slate are more 
nicic.uM iu the plat tonus that the 
i undid..'.-.- si. .ml tor than n the can 



Commonwealth 

I inter this race free from any 
political promises and absolutely free 
from any help or promise of help !■ 
nnyway from any business firm or 
corporation anywhere. 

It Is well known to the State thai 
for years I have been an advocate of 
cooperative organization among the 
farmers Farming is the chief busi- 
ness In Kentucky and I am delighted 
that our cooperative organizations are 
proving so successful. I congratulate 
the bankers of Kentucky on the stand 
rhey have taken in supporting the 
Farmers' Ciw»l»eratlve Movement, and 
as a farmer 1 thunk them for their 
help In our time of need. For the 
past two years I have been actlvei) .it 
work in the Held to organize the 
farmers, both in the Bnrley Di trlrt 
anil the Black Patch, and I trust I 
will he pardoned when I stale thai I 
have always paid my own expenses in 
these eiiinp.iigns. This has been a 
considerable sum for a man of my 
limited means lint I was glad to make 
| the contribution of hoth time and 
means to help perfect our Farmers' 
( h-ganizations. 

I believe In equlta.t l« and living waK *S 
tor nioti and women In all line, ut In- 
dustry 'I lie best 'iiteresl. of the Matte*, 
are served when 'hose who labor own 
their own homes and can give their loved 
one. not only the necessities of life hut 
the comfurts us feraH 

I am unalterably opposed lo Hie injec- 
tion of partisan politics into the manaRe- 
ment of the penal and charitable Institu- 
tion, of the State. 

Cnder our present system of elections 
we have an election la Kentucky svery 
year. Much money could be saved lo liie 
tax-payer, in registration, and e ectlona 
and the people relieved of much worry 
If we consolidated our elections. I favor 
any plan which will bring about this 
result. 

1 have the highest ree&rd for the dis- 
tinguished gentleman who hu. aiaiuuiii-. il 
us u candidate for Governor and for 
those whose announcements 1 uin in- 
formed will soon be forthcoming. No 
act or  jtterunce of mine will roar in* 
cuiupulgii. We ' ive hud entirely loo 
much strife within .ur own party in Hie 
past and 1 am hopeful that the cumpuixu 
will be settled upon the merits of to* 
candidates themselve. and their isau.-.. 
ao that when the decision Is made ws 
will go into the Onal election with a 
united Democratic rartj' 1 am inform- 
ed by many ucttve Oemojrals in all parts 
of the State 'h"^" ' r » m awaa ln a t ad we . an 

Sud'aMer tatesllfi -"" :• refu? survey uud 
ui.e«UgaUon I uoi c.ivlnced that it 
nominated I cun butld up an organisation 
which will carry our Pat ty to success In 
the Sua! election beyond any question. 1 
am absolutely sincere In my desire ii  
serve Kentucky, bur four years in the 
I rouse of Uepre.tntutlves iu Kentucky, (or 
tour veur. in the State Senate, and lor 
fourteen years la the Congress of tbe 
i cited States t have represented u great 
and a patriotic people. In the last two 
,-..-.-i jus 1 havs not had opposition (loin 
the Republican Purt . The people of the 
Seveoth Congres.iui'.l District would not 
liuve gl.cu me this tervlce If 1 had 
neglected tbe business entiustsd to me. 
: Swve iaithruli  tried to seive them, anil 
if elected Uovernor nay ambition will be 
tu tender a full measure of service. 

1 sen ed iu 'Angles, under the leader- 
ship of th«* great t'resiSfciit. Woodrow 
WUMNt, und alwa). gave him uud ins 
policies lovul support When nt) I'ui ly 
culled me to manage the Slute t'ampu.fcn 
iu tuts or president Wilson 1 a&icep.ed 
the |aa|eerf^ll1xy. uud we carried the 
State by un -vet whelming majority. Al« 
iliouah u mua of moderate mean. I puut 
the dettctt of t.al campaign amounting 
in a good *u»l«.  thousands u/ tlollui ■ und 
nave neve r-greli^d Hte exnendituie. 
in l»JU f e National K.mocruttc foiniiut- 
bM ailed ■«  to .\ew lork to Ulie 
n work il, r e. 
day und night 
aw that conoi- 
ueuld not wlu 



Ion, Sherman Bradley. Mrs Dora 
Bradley and Gus Bradley acting as 
the leaders. Junior club work, soil 
Improvement, health and sanitation 
home beautiflcation and roadt wili get 
attention in the Proctor community 
with Albert Tlrey. Albert Hall. Mrs 
Strut Kvans and Mr. and Mrs. Wil 
MM Sternberg acting as leaders. 
Fruit growing, poultry, hogs, soil Im- 
provement und roads will receive at 
tetilion In the Rocky Hill community 
according to the program of work 
outlined for that district. The lead 
ers In tlu- different projects include 
Robatrt Brandenburg. Mary Roland. J 
W Kvans. Samuel Doneyway and Hill 
Congleton. In the Long Shoal com 
niunity. Junior club work, poultry, 
coin, hogs and fruit will get attention 
with Samuel Taylor, Mrs. Sarah Pal- 
mer, D. V. Childers. Robert Taylor 
and Walker Taylor acting as tM pro- 
ject leaders 



1» West Short Street. Lexington. Ky 

WHERE YOUR DOLLAR LOOKS THE BIGGEST 
FOR 

FURNITURE, CARPETS, RUGS AND STOVES 







w 


KEN ORDERING FLOWERS 

Let them be from 




MICHLER BROTHERS 


THEN YOU ARE SURE OF GETTING THE BEST 




MRS. LUCY WILSON 


MT. STERLING REPRESENTATIVE 




Phone 413. 



Farm & City Property FOR SALE 

1 have farms in almost all parts of Montgomery County, and 
some in Bourbon. Clark, Bath and Menefee Counties. Any size and 
price. Some real bargains. Also have city property in almost any 
part of Mt. Sterling for sale or rent. See me at my office. No 11. 
North Maysvllle Street. Office phone 65; home, 261. 

F. D. RICHARDSON 

EMPLOYMENT AGENT. 



crosses. However, they lacked the 
quality of the Southdown and Cheviot 
grades. 

The Southdown grades had excel 
lent quality and good mutton form, 
but gained slowly and required a 
longer time to reach marketable 
weights than those from the Cheviot. 
Hampshire and Rainbouillet crosses. 

Rams of the four breeds used in 
the experiment sired lambs that wen 
more meaty, grew more rapidly, were 
of finer quality and dressed out a 
higher percentage than lambs sired 
by scrub rams. 

The new bulletin, which is No. 243,! 
may be obtained free by writing the j 
Experiment Station. Lexington. 



cago was quoted one cent lower 
practically all grades of butter. 

A large proportion of butter 
showing wintry defects, in 
that more frequent deliveries and a 
greater care and attention In the nan 
dling of cream is necessary to 

I duce best results. 



See The Advocate for printing. 



MOUNTAIN SHEEP tMPROVED 

BY USE OF PUREBRED RAMS 

Using purebred rams on the com 
mon mountain sheep of Kentucky in 
tests at the Kentucky Agricultural 
Kxperiinont Station added all the way 
from three-fourths of a pound to 
more than two and a half pounds of 
wool to the average of five pounds 
which these animals generally shear 



Produce Review 



of eggs remaining in 



-tor 



Stocks- 
age in 

and Philadelphia reported December 
21, as follows: 

1922-1.148,000 cases; 1921 772.000 
cases; excess. 376,000 cases. 

The market on storage eggs is a 
little easier at the close of the we. k 

Receipts of fresh eggs are a little 




a. s faraaa* i kn  » arhai tin 
bunion of tuxatlou Is lo the furtue  
and alulae* amn and home ownei 
tjnl every effort must he m.ide u» re 
duee luxation 

The time has mine when a halt 

mm I"- eukWd la arwaeiag our stat. 

dehl. and etery elTuri hi reilme , 
be :n ide The nhllgal '»n» •  
are made by the Slate I.ol'IsI. 
tore and tnu by t o tin ern.», . Inn I 
I am eleried I will earnestly In. I 
that S:uie expend' i ure. he kapl w in 
In the ret •line mi thai UkW ilelil w.' 
llul he ini-re.i»-d n the ■Mil Viliuil 

stralti*. Hvery effort attMM ha aiavl 
(,. retim e the Si ale dehl and if I a 
fie.iel the ten. |io»*r will be use 
to the limit iu k*o;i the .ipp. ,.|.ri..ti.m, 



1 ulled 

L-iitfifie of the «.*' 
jntl lor months I , 
lo» Bartl sucoeea. We k 
tion. weir .uch that we 
out we fought as beet we coukt to the. 
lust 4IU.li i ineulioii these person. I met 
isrs to show that 1 have tried to aits 
■omaihliic la iet in n ioi ihe r.. tois 
«.,.ch iu) PeHy nas showu to me 

It is well known Hi. i (aim Isnu. .ml 
ie.1 est.tr In the cities ere tM'.llug 
lieeVWl buiUen. of t.XSIiou. If 1 IIU ele. t- 
e J tlovernoi. 1 will luake . full inv.-.us .- 
i.on of Ihe isses being p.itl by all vU .- 
*. of piopert) ...I if it is fotlltd in. I 
vanum v.eaaea »f pmpcriy «rs sscupnig 
their sasti • ol isxe.. then I will ceruuii.y 
ic.uiiimeud legislation lo remedy Ihl. ds- 
fsel m our lu.iaa syslviu. 

lie. ,ii pollll.'.l il.teloutlieul. demon* 
strata Ih.t Iheie is s splendid oppo. tu- 
rn. v unurl pmpri le.del.hip lo bring 
eu.leru Kentut;k  jikI Ihe largest clt  iu 
our t'oiiimoiiweslth 1 » into 'be In-in..- 
ci.iit luil II slsclej ijoveittoi, I will 
niake e.ei  etYoll lo s've .uth . sood 
.Jiiiiui.tiaitou .n.. to woik lu keim-.igi 
», in tas LMeaoeiui. irosn th. seclWas of 
ot.r aisle mention U abMVS, Itiat ' ere 
will be no Uout.t ubo.il Uie oilleouM la 
tutu, e eh-. Itvae. 

No duo.. i ollie. i-suv. will tins* tluiiug 

the .-.illp-.Uili and »" ' ul I  t»f 

earnsd Hie) .... "p. n "id fraukly 

met 1 subuiil , d -«.  iu ihe 

geuMK-rat.'.. ul m. fit... »nn ih« nope 

thai u » ill piot « .cv t ' ti   



and in practically every instance im- 1 heavier and the market is closing 
proved the quality of that wool, ac- 
cording to a uew bulletin entitled. 
'Breeding Kxperiment with Kentucky- 
Mountain Ewes." which has just 
come oft the press at the experiment 
station of the College of Agriculture, 
Lexington. The new publication sum-. 



with lower prices prevailing than a 
week ago. 

There has been an exceptionally 
heavy movement of live and dressed 
poultry lor holiday trade and prices 
eased off, especially on live poultry. 
The supply of dressed turkeys for 



marines the results of experiments | holiday trade was generally larger 
that luive been carried on by the sta- than expected and good stock sold 
tion since 1915 to show how the nu- ', anywhere from 3 to 8 cents a pound 



tlve mountain ewes of the state 
could be bred up with purebred rams. 

Rams of the Rambouillet breed 
should be given careful consideration 
by Kentucky sheep men when they 
are considering the blood to use In 
building up their Bocks, the new bul- 
letin points out. This was found to 
be the most satisfactory breed for im- 
proving the mouutaln ewes. Ewes ward the end of 
from this cross produced heavier, , prices eased off. 
finer and more valuable fleeces and ( 
w hen bred to purebred mutton rams j 
they produced market lambs of bet ! 
ter quality and type than the lambs; 
lrom the common mountain ewes. | 
Southdown. Cheviot and Hampshire 
rams also w ere used In the expert- 1 
ment. 

The grade Hampshire lambs result-' 
lug from crossing the mountain awes 
.u.d purebred rams gained rapidly 
and were ready for market 



lower than for Thanksgiving trade. 
This in a good many instances rep- 
resented considerable loss to the ship- 
per. 

Receipts of cream at creamerl 's 
are holding up well, for this season 
of the year, and the demand for but- 
ter about equals the supply, although 
a little accumulation to- 
wheu the 
at Chl- 



Lafayette Hotel 

Lexington, Ky. 

MODERN— FIREPROOF 



RATES— $2 00 UP 



Cuiaine the beat in the 



We serve daily Club Breakfaat. 
45 cant, up; daily Noon Day 
Lunch. 75 cente; Evening Din- 
ner, $1.25; Special 

$1.50. 



L. B. Sbouae, 







No. 



Jd/atStie// Newspaper Pencils 



THE EDITORIAL PENCIL 

516 Deuble Thickneie.. No. 622 "Big Black," Extra Thick, for 

I and Scholastic Purposea. 

Philadelphia. U. S. A. 



BL AISOELL PENCIL CO. 




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STERLING 



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With many thanks for your liberal 
pationage during the past and with all 
good wishes and kindest thoughts, we are 
wishing you a Prosperous New Year. 

McCormick Lumber Co. 



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We desire to express our thanks and 
appreciation to our friends and patrons for 
^heir liberal patronage given us through- 
out the year, and for the best Christmas 
business we have ever had. 

L. M. REDMOND 



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BEST WISHES 




NK-X-9-9-KM 



For the most liberal Christmas pat- 
ronage we have ever enjoyed and your 
trade throughout the past year, we arc in 
deed thankful — and desire to take this 
method of expressing our appreciation, 
and extending Best Wishes for a year of 
unbounded prosperity during nineteen 
hundred and twenty-three. 

McGUIRE BROS- 



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BEST WISHES 





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A Happy N 



We are grateful to our friends and 
.ustomers ior their very liberal patronage, 
-.nd wish for them a Happy and Prosper- 
ous New Year. 

J. A. WALCH 



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THBN 

For the liberal patronage entrusted to 
me during the past year, both in my grist 
mill and coal and feed business, I desire 
to extend my heartiest thanks — and take 
this opportunity of wishing for each and 
all of my customers a period of unbound- 
ed prosperity and happiness during the 
New Year. , 




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H. H. COPPAGE 

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PEAff -MY-- PROSPERITY 



We desire to thank you for your lib- 
eral patronage and trust our method of 
doing business will merit a continuance of 
same and that yttu may enjoy a Happy and 
- Prosperous New Year. 

R. E. PUNCH CO. 

(Incorporated) 

T. J. Wilson Mr*. R. K. I'unch J. C. Pow» r . 

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We extend our best wishes to our 
nowly acquired friends and patrons. We 
t'tank you for your liberal patronage and 
promise our very best efforts to merit con- 
tinued favors. 

Lerman Bros. 



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BE^WITH 




Thanking our many friends for their 
liberal patronage during the past year and 
With Best Wishes for a Happy and Pros- 
perous New Year, we are, 
N Sincerely, 

S. C. BARNARD 



  • ^ " - *■ 



:: 
:: 



I am through this space thanking a 
kind people for the privilege of buying 
their produce. You find out my prices by 
asking your neighbor who it is in Mt. Ster- 
ling that pays the highest prices. 

With sincere best wishes for a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year, 1 am. 
Very respectfully, 

H. GORDON 



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That this New Year to you may be 
In other years « memory — 
Filled to the brim with happiness 
That all your future life will bless. 

CATO FISHER 

Barber and "Fiaher's Family Favor" 




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That YOU and YOUR may enjoy it— 
and many more years as good — and thank- 
ing YOU for your liberal patronage — is 
the sincere wish of 

SENIEUR'S 



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I /Sincere Good I 



You have made our business profit- 
it l - by giving us a share of your trade, 
und for this we thank you. In the future 

ve expect to show marked auvancement in 
.ill lines und to be able to better satisfy 

han in the past. Again we thank you. 

Richardson Bros. 



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The Mt. Sterling advocate, 1922-12-28

8 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt7jdf6k2x8g
 Local Identifier: mts1922122801
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/mts/xt7jdf6k2x8g.json
Location
  Published in Mt. Sterling, Kentucky by Harris and Mason
   Montgomery County (The Western Mountain Coal Fields Region)