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LOUISVILLE, KY.: FRIDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 29, 1865. 



NO. 216 



Execution ot 
.-lie 



Ison for the 
place at Gen- 
ugements by 
the accomnio- 
A.n in- 



tm 



92 Ml 
£l Ml 
Ml  «  



*1 



kCLL'B 



every CLIBI 
BOt'TWtM 



KI'H UL MM l  I 

ALL LETT EES relatia* to the Subscription, Adver- 

be 




TO CORK 
  ommonicatione to the paper should he addressed 
Hie Editor ol the Union Press, Louisville. By." 
Care*' uld to taken to write on oulr one side of the 



-V M . will betaken of A Don j m  
Wnauv.i is intended for insertion asust be authenti- 
cated by tiie L*m. and add reus of the writer— not necee- 
1 a* a iruarant) of hisgood'faitb 




rive hue* i forty worda I or lea*, in column of 
•Kor Sale." "for Kent." "Boardim." "Lost." 



'WanU,' 
'Fouud,' 



Exhibition at Xazaretli Academj. 

From Bardstown, Ky., to Nazareth Aca- 
demy, the distance is two or three miles, 
over a splendid turnpike road, und through 
an excellent part of Nelson county, I then, 
very readily consented, on the night 21st 
inst., although it was bitter cold, to attend 
an exhibition that was to be given at the 
Academy by its graduating class. I antic- 
ipated a rich treat, because 1 know that the 
Sisters of Charity aie ever celebrated for 
their good taste and thoroughness as teach- 
ers, and further, because ol my knowledge 
of the proficiency of those who graduate at 
Nazareth. I was not disappointed, and 
came away satisfied that the evening's 
pleasure would have fully compensated me 
for my suffering, had I have been frost- 
tten. 

pacarelh I may say, by-the-by, is a most 
jtil' ul place, r* t hid by the foliage of 
 om the bustle and 
ng a healthy loca- 
vge of the best of 
.dent and careful 
umerous young 
*  - u. appear cheer- 
tch fur their 
i ing an au- 



ither 
les who ait«   ■ -* 
ful and hapi 
proficiency in 
dience. 
The exhibition 
itire success 
 niums bee 



.ist inst. was 
.1 deserved the 
by those persons 
  present. aat most charming ot 
stories, "Fabiola,' - was presented 
[ admirable manner. It was well 
ged, the scenery was good, the cos- 
appropriate, and all of the characters 
to those who Lily filledtheui. "Fa- 
as a successful Roman daughter of 
and performed her part to perlec- 
"'Syra,' "Agnes' and "Cecilia, ' each 
at ease in their selected chaiacier. 
Their enunciation was clear and most dis- 
tinct; their movements graceful and their 
actinia perfect. -Fulvius,-' the polished 
villain, was never presented upon any 
stage better than here. His actions were 
those of a Roman; bis talk, walk, and acts, 
were what you would have expected from 
a knowledge of his character. The charm- 
young Miss who tilled with so much 
■e this really difficult character, was 
ally as successful as all ol the charac 



The execution of Hen 
murder of Heury Devo* 
eseo, yesterday. Th 
Sberiil Chase were -mi- 
dation of the nec 
closure capable aining from 150 to 

200 persons hs Duilt on the east side 

of tne jail, a« gallows erected in the 

south end   

An in*t» for taking a photograph of 

i be prise a been placed in front of the 

i □ and k urn his notice by arranging a 
'ion ol Ue crowd in front of it. When 
 t by the Sheriff and assistants, upon 
■BBM of the jail, the screen of humanity 
.ivided, so that Wilson confronted the in- 
Mrument. But he had no idea of leaving 
any likeness by which he could be recog- 
nized. Instantly discovering the object of 
t hi- arrangement, he as quickly foiled the 
artist by jerking his head to one side, and 
remarked that they would have a d— d good 
time taking his picture. He walked with a 
firm step and unconcerned air into the In- 
closure, turning his eye carelessly up at the 
gallows, and surveying for an instant only 
the arrangements made to carry out the 
righteous sentence of the law and carry 
bim into eternity. lie stood upon the 
ground covered with snow, directly under 
the rope. In front of him was the crowd, 
among them the son of a man he murdered 
in Syracuse, a nephew of a woman he mur- 
dered in Lancaster, and a son-in-law and 
other relative* of the man for whose mur- 
der he was about to suffer. 

The death warrant having been read, 
Wilson said: 

" I had made a request not to have my 
photograph taken, for fear my friends 
would recognize me. Somebody else made 
a request that it should be taken, and Chase 
the Sheriff, paid more attention to them 
than to me, and let them try to take it as 
1 came out. You can see what kind of a 
man this Cuase is, and if I had a chance I 
would take his photograph d— d quid . 1 
don't think they got a good one. So my 
friends will not know iL Perhaps my pho- 
tograph will be the means of finding out 
who I am, but I doubt it d — dly. I have 
nothing more to say, and you may go on 
as soon as you please, for it is no consola- 
tion to me to be kept standing here iu the 
cold." 

The cap was drawn over his face, the 
rope adjusted, and he was informed that 
his time was jp. His only reply was "go 
ahi ad."' The catch was slipped, the weigiit 
fell, and he who was known as Henry Wil- 
son here, but by other names in other 
places, was ushered into the presence of 
his Maker, to answer for at least live con- 
fessed murders, and other crimes for which 
the death of a thousand such wretches 
could never atone. There was no shudder 
among the witnesses, no blanched cheeks, 
nor tearful eyes, but rather congratulations 
and rejoicings, that they had seen fhe earth 
rid of such a monster. 

The murder of Mr. Devoe was committed 
soon after midnight following the 15th of 
May last. The murderer came in at the 
tiack door of the house, the door not being 
lastened. The object was money ; he hav- 
ing been informed that Devoe had a consid- 
erable amount in his possession. He de- 
manded his money, and Mr. Devoe ordered 
him to leave the house. The murderer re- 
plied: "keep still and you shau't be 
harmed.'' Devoe then called to his son, 
and was told if be called Nelson again he 
would shoot him. Hevoe then called and 
was instantly shot, the ball entering at the 
side of his nose, coming out at the back of 
his head. He was shot sitting iu his bed, 
with his wile lying beside him. 

A young womau injthe bed-room adjoin- 
ing pounded on the door with her hand and 
called Nelson. HeBaid: "That's right, call 
your brother. I'm ready for him. I've shot 
one in the house and 1 can shoot another." 
Nelson did not appear, and the muideror 
proceeded to the bed-room of the young 
woman and demanded admittanco. She 
refused to allow him to enter, when he 
threatened to force the door. After some 
parley she agreed to opeu the door, if he 
would wait uutil she could put on her dress. 
He did so, and when the door was unfast- 
ened proceeded to blindfold her and tie her 
hands with a cord. He then searched for 
money, but found none. Returning to the 
young woman betook her by the throat and 
threatened to kill her it she did not inform 
him where the money was. A little girl, 
twelve years ot age, a grand-daughter of 
Mr. Dovoe, who was iu t he same room, said 
to him, "Won t you kill llattie il I tell you 
where the money is?" He said ,'uo, where 



that she represented during the even- I is it?" She answered, "grand pa keeps his 



If avarice and cruelty should always 
eaected by a "Fulvus" equal to this 
ts and ministers would have to 
eir labors. After the presentation 
la," we were pleased with a few 
bleaux. which were beautilul, both 
ption and action. During the time 
y were beiuK presented, several 
nade admirable music on the piano 
ificalion. indeed we were favor- 
most excellent music, both vocal 
strumental, during a greater part of 
eniug. Thus while our eyes were 
ed with pleasing scenes, our ears 
ravished with most excellent music. 
I connection I must not forget to refer 
ularly, to the "Indian's Prayer." a 
rhich was sung -most creditably by 
the graduates. The deep parts of the 
- was most admirably given. .In 
I was at a loss to know whether it 
ung by a student in music, or by a 
er so well was it executed. 

xhibitior. closed with "The Guard- 
gels of the different Nations" in 
ch-angel bestows crowns upon 
rdians of nationalities. The ad- 
in this little drama, was pre- 
by the teacher of the graduating 
and was presented* by her pupiN 
 ne. 1 confess candidly that it was hard 
me to judge which one of the angels 

SSL - 1 drank healUi!4 lo 



"Bright ev- 
Ti i ban' I 



i abound, boy 
joae. 'tin hard to   



boo*' 



ie claims for each angel for a crown 
■ eloquently presented, the appeals of 
'Angel of Charity" were well sustained 
lile the blessings of the beautiful "Arch 
kgel" were beautifully spoken. Each na- 
was well represented. I have not ful- 
ler mined whether I shall emigrate to 
ind, Italy, France, Spain, Scotland. 
Syria, or Poland, I shall go to one — 
pa, if the arch-angel and charity will 
ik upon me propitiously I will go to 
i fraternal laud! 

'he exhibition, as I have said, was a 
ete success, and did great credit to 
*n who superintended it and the 
fadies who were actors. The school 
pate in having skillful teachers and 
liutellectual pupils. I left Nazareth 
fully; bu^left determining to re-visit 



money in a pocket book in his vest pocket, 
and his vest nnder his pillow." He took 
the money and left the house. The son 
Nelson, who was called, was a youth of 
about thirty-five, lying in bed up stairs, 
and hearing the whole. When on trial, and 
asked by counsel why he did not com- 
down at the call of his father, he answered, 
"1 thought I was better off where I was." 

Wnsou wrote a history of his life while in 
confinement, and gave the manuscript to 
Mr. Olnay, his counsel. He confessed to 
the murder of Mr. Burr Burton, of Syra- 
cuse, In May last. Mr. Henry Burton, sou 
of the deceased, and the District Attorney of 
Onondaga county, passed several hours with 
Wilson the night before his execution. He 
reiatt d to them all the incidents of the mur- 
der as coolly as he would the most com- 
mon-place narrative, and gave Mr. Burton 
some tobacco, saying it was all the amends 
he could make him for the murder of his 



Kentucky a Ixnal State. 

prnor Bra m let te says she is loyal— 
■lature says she is loyal — every 
r says she is loyal. This is true, 
with reference to a majority of 
particularly in the poor ami 
counties; but how does the ac- 
■tand with the politicians, and the 
rass counties? Not doubtful. After 
i of battle is over, and the rebeUion is 
1 — the very men who were first, for 
lity; and secondly, for armed neu- 
; and thirdly, for "the last man and 
st dollar;" and fourthly, for "shooting 
who attempted to enlist negro sol- 
id fifthly, resolved in the Chicago 
[ion, that after three years hard 
the war on the Union side had 
"signal failure," and all the lime 
ing Mr. Lincoln as a tyrant and 
-now talk loudly of the loyalty of 
icky. We aay emphatically, the peo- 
' be, but the rulers are not. If this 
is controverted, let gentlemen ex 
In all the above changes, squirming and 
twisting of politicians for the last five 
The truth is, the mountain counties 
■ ved us. God 



He also confessed the murder of Mrs. 
Lewis, of Lancaster, about the 1st of No- 
vember, LM4. He said he and his accomp- 
lice walked lrom Buffalo a distance of ten 
miles. They entered her house through the 
chamber window by means of a ladder 
w hich they had brought a mile, and which 
they had picked when on a reconnoisance. 
Wilson entered the house, his friend watch- 
ing on the outside. I'assiug through the 
room he came in contact with a bird-cage; 
the ll uttering of the bird awoke Mrs. Lew- 
is, who got up, lit a lamp and went to see 
what was the matter with the bird. Wilson 
secreted himself behind the door, and Mrs. 
Lewis returned to her room, but hearing a 
noise came back, and Wilson again secreted 
himself. After some deliberation he con- 
cluded to prosecute the job without regard 
to consequences. Mrs. Lewis seeing him, 
commenced screaming, when Wilson seized 
her by the arm and presented a pistol, tell- 
ing her if she did not desist he would shoot 
her. she continued the screaming, and he 
bred, the muzzle being so near her head 
that her hair was scorched by the blaze. 
There were two young ladies in the rhtlTB- 
ber above, who, hearing the disturbance, 
got through a window upon a low piazza, 
with the intention of escaping. Wilson 
went outside and ordered them to go back 
or he would shoot them. One ot them went 
back, the other fainted. Missing the faint- 
ed one, and supposing she had escaped and 
dd give the alarm, the robbers left with 



Methodist -tatiati. 

The general minutes of the Annual Con- 
ference of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
have just been issued. It has 00 Annual 
Conferences, and a membership of 02!',iij!i, 
being an advance over last y ar of 039. It 
ha  7,175 traveling preachers, being an in- 
crease of 354 for the year. The local preach- 
ers numbered 8,403, an increase of 288. Its 
total value of church property is estimated 
at »13,147,233, which is »4  3,157 more than 
last   ear. All the benevolent contributions 
•how an advance of more than one-fifth. 
In the Sunday School department there has 
been about the same advance. 

It will be seen by the above that the mill- 
ion of dollars which the church 
raise the coming year for 
cause is only a fraction over 
mem uer. 



to 



; Francis Johnson, alias Francis 
was hung on the 22d instant at Watseka, 
Iroquois county, Illinois, for the murder of 
D. W. Nelson, of Munice, Indiana, on the 
2d ulu, near Oilman Station, on the Illinois 
Central railroad. 



Preediuen's Bureau in Kentucky— Ad- 
dress of General Flsk to the Freed- 
men— Circular. 

Bub'u Rkfuo's, Fkekd'na Akand'dL'd^, i 
States of Kentucky and Tbnn., ! 
Assistant Commissioner's Office, 

Nashville, Dec. 20, 1«05. J 
Freedmen of Kentucky: The Constitu- 
tion of the United States has been so 
amended that hereafter no one can be held 
as a slave anywhere in this country ex- 
cept as a punishment for crime. All the 
colored people, therefore, iu the State of 
Kentucky are free; and your friend, the 
Assistant Commissioner of the Freedmen's 
Bureau, desires to address you a few plain 
words. • 

I. First of all you should be grateful to 
your Heavenly Father, who has broken 
your bonds and conferred upon you the 
inestimable boon of freedom. 

II. You should recognize your high ob- 
ligations to the Federal Government, 
which, in its mighty struggle with the 
great rebellion and in its triumph, has been 
true to the interests of freedom, and has 
fulfilled its pledge to the oppressed. 

III. You should love Kentucky, for it is 
a noble old State — your*iative State— your 
home and the home of your children, and 
now a free State! 

IV. I advise you to remain in your old 
homes, and that you enter into good con- 
tracts with your former owners and mas- 
ters. You have been associated with them 
for many years. You are bound to the old 
home by many ties; and most of you, I 
trust, will be able to get on as well with 
your late masters as with any one   Ne. 
But if your former owners will not make 
fair contracts with you, giving you good 
wages or a share of the crop, you will ha\ e 
a perfect right to go w here you can do bet- 
ter. 

V. Let me warn you specially against 
flocking into the towns and cities. There 
are too many people in the towns and cities 
already. Hundreds, unless they speedily 
remove to the country, will, I fear, lull 
victims to pestilence. The small pox is 
now prevalent, and in a few weeks the 
cholera may be among u». In the crowded 
cities you will wear j our lives away iu a 
constant struggle to pay high rent for mis- 
erable dwellings and t.. aiity allowances of 
food. Many of your children, I greatly 
fear, will be found wandering through the 
 treets as vagrants, plunging into the worst 
vices, and tilling the w orkhouses and the 
jails. By all means seek healthy homes iu 
the country. 

VI. Now that you are free, and will enjoy 
the fruits of your own industry, enter upon 
your new life w ith a hearty will. You 
begin it with little besides your hands, but 
by patient industry and economy, you may 
soon earn and save enough money to pur- 
chase a home of your own, and furnish a 
with many of the comforts of life. 

VII. Let each man turn his heart and his 
thoughts toward providing a good home far 
his wife and children, and to aid in the care 
of his aged parents. Carefully guard and 
keep sacred the marriage relation. Be 
lawtully wedded. "Taking up with each 
other" is an abominable practice, and must, 

Cerish with the institution which gave it 
iith. 

VI II. Early attention should be given to 
the education of your children. Purchase 
books for them, and employ good teachers. 
You have numerous friends in the c mutry 
who will aid you in the establishment and 
support of schools. Be resolved that your 
children shall be taught reading, writing 
and arithmetic at least. 

IX. Let the past be forgotten. Treat all 
with respect. Avoid disputes. Eamon^rate 
to the people of Kentucky, and to the world, 
by your faithful observance of the laws, by 
your sobriety and good inoiulj, and b3' 
your thrift, that you arc not only qualified 
for the precious bleseiug of freedom, but fat 
the high and responsible duties cL' ^iti..^:. i 
of the Commonweulth. 

X. Until the enactment and MafaroaBMOt i 
of State laws, gi.ing you lull protection in 
person and property, impart:..! uatiOB v. ill 
be secured to you by the Btsong ar^.1 of tLo 
National Coierumeut. 

Clinto;; L. VUk. 
Brevet Mpjor Cen. aud Ad't CuLi'r. 

Circular. 

Bur'i' Reito's, Freed' n A::and'i  E'ds, 
States of Kenti « kv ani Tknn., 
Assistant Commissioners Omi e, 

Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 26, 1S05. , 

CIRCULAR NO. 10. 

The ratification of the Constitutional 
Amendment forever abolishing and pro- 
hibiting slavery in the United States hav- 
ing been officially announced to the coun- 
tr y by proclamation of the Secretary of 
State, dated Dec. 18th, 1805, this Bureau ex- 
tends its supervision over persons recently 
held as slaves in the Stale of Kentucky. 

Outhebasisof in, part, ol justice this Bu- 
reau will promote industry and aid in per- 
manently establishing peace and securing 
prosperity in the State. 

Agencies of the Bureau will be establish- 
ed at points easy of access, aud while Su- 
perintendents will be cautioned against su- 
pervising too much, the fair adjustment of 
the labor question will n reive their earnest 
attention. They will see that con tracts are 
equitable and their inviolability enforced 
upon both parties. 

No fixed rates of wages will be prescrib- 
ed by the Bnreau, nor will any couimunitv 
or combination of | eople be permitted to 
fix rates. Labor must be free to compete 
with other commodities in an open market. 

I'arties can make any trade or agreement 
that is satisfactory to themselves; aud, so 
long as advantage is not taken of the ignor- 
ance of the freed people to deprive them of 
a fair and reasonable compensation for 
their labor, either in stipulated wages or a 
share of products, there will be no inter- 
ference. 

Until the enactment and enforcement of 
State laws guaranteeing to the Freedmen 
ample protection in person and property, 
Freedmen's Courts will be established for 
the adjudication of cases in which they are 
involved. 

The Assistant Commissioner earnestly 
invites the cordial and hearty co-operation 
of the civil authorities, and of all good citi- 
zens of Kentucky, in the important work 
of adjusting the new relations arising from 
the total abolition of slavery. 

Clinton B. Fihk, 
Brevet Major General, 
Assistant Commissioner. 



ITEMS. 



DQUARTERS Di:r'T OF kv., I 

Louisville, Dec-. 27, L86S.J 
The foregoing "Circular" of Brevet Ma- 
jor General C. B. Fisk, Assistant Commis- 
sioner, meets my cordial approval, both in 
its spirit and iu its excellent suggestions. 

• John M. Falsi er, 
Major General Commanding. 



Dr, John W. Hughes was convicted, at 
Cleveland, last Friday, of murder in the 
first degree for shooting Miss Tamzen Par- 
sons at Bedford, (a few miles from Cleve- 
land,) on the »th of August, 18G5. The cir- 
cumstances of the crime were peculiar. Dr. 
Hughes, a married man with one child, 
had settled in Bedford where he 
gained the affections of Miss Parsons, a 

firl of seventeen and effected her ruin, 
hey fled to Pittsburg, in December, Istit, 
where a forged divorce was exhibited and a 
form of marriage gone through, and where 
Hughes was arrested for bigamy. He was 
sentenced to the penitentiary of Penn- 
sylvania iu January, but soon pardoned 
through the agency of his deserted wife. 
The infatuation for Tauizen Parsons still 
strong upon him, he sent his wife and child 
to England, their native country, and con- 
tinued his illicit suit, meeting, however,! he 
opposition of Miss Parsons and her family. 
Ballled, disgraced, and . stung to mad- 
ness, he took to drink, and ended the com- 
plication in a murder committed in open 
day upou the main street of the village. 
Dr. Hughes is a man of tuirty-nitie years, 
of superior education and refined manners, 
and has borne himself ^through the trial 
with a firmness that was not shaken even 
by the dread sentence. 



jB^Gold Pens and Am* 
reduced prices 



an Watches at 
nufactory, 4( 



A United States revenue officer iu Spring- 
field, Mass., has received the following 
"noat," which se«'ins rather a load oue: 
"To Mr. Adams, i hav bin sellin chesuuls 
by the kwart to sum of the naburs an the 
boys says i shal bo prosekutid if i dont hav 
a lisens or git my chesnuts stamped onto. 
How much hav I got to pay for sellin a few 
chesnuts." 

A Western farmer who wished to invest 
the accumulation of his industry in United 
states securities, went to Jay Cooke's office 
to procure the Treasury notes. The clerk 
inquired what denomination he would have 
them in. Having never heard the word 
used except to distinguish the religious 
seels, he, after a little deliberation, replied: 
"Well, you may give me part in Old School 
Presbyterian, to please the old lady: but 
give me the heft on't iu Free Will Baptist." 

A vote was taken on an important meas- 
ure in the Indiana Senate the other day. 

Mr. , a grave and reverend Senator, 

Lad not been attending to his "biz," afid 
didn't know what the question was. His 
name was called by the Secretary. He 
looked puzzled for a moment, and then 
rapping the desk with his knuckles, after 
the manner of card-players, said: "1 pass!" 
An audible titter ran through the hall, and 
the President of the Senate' 'took it up." 

In the South Carolina legislature the 
other day, Mr. John Harleston Reid, of 
Georgetown, offered a resolution in the 
house looking to the r  yival of the time- 
honored custom of anaying the speaker 
iu the garb of olfice, w hich is the parlia- 
mentary blue gown. It has been the cus- 
tom in South Carolina from her birth as a 
State, and ceased only when the approach 
oi Sherman's army endangered the safety 
of the robe, which, for security sake, was 
removed to the country. 

An election for city oflieers took place at 
Pithole last week. Although the city 
claims from 10,000 to 12,000 inhabitants, 
the "oldest inhabitant"' has not been a 
resident long enough to qualify him for 
oilh;e under the Stale law, and but few- 
have been in the place long enough to vote. 
Two polls, wero opened, at one of which 
those only were a!. owed to vote who hud 
resided the legal tiuie ; Unvotes werecast 
at this poll. At the other, all bona fide 
reaidenta -of the borough were permitted 
to vote, and tilti votes were polled. As' 
different candidates were elected at the 
several polls, a kindly question has arisen 
tor settlement. 



CIGARS AND TOBACCO. 

j MI'OKTKD, HAVANA AM MM0IIO QMM us 

Tti.' lament stuck iu th.- citv ju»t i.ceiToH, tog. tin r with 
tho la** ViiKiuiaaml Hh—ll Clu-wing auJ 8iuokin« 
TOBACCO, 
titiuuiup Mt  Tschiiuni ami Bii. r rW| 
aud a largo assortment of euioker's articlex, lor Hale 
eta ap, by 

a G. TACHAU 4 CO., 
Ho. 171 Main rtrest, 
d.U-lm Betwe 



THE BOOK TRADE. 

AGENTS WANTED! NOW READ il 

rpHH ngg" QOJHPLBTK MI«TOKY ok tuii 
1 M KICK 1. 1 JON ! hy ttal Auburn 

1'itliiinliina- Co. 4110 I'.molut.-. Maps, Dhuhami 
i n . llie fbeniieHl ulu! bowl rumpTctt* HMTOBI rub- 
lislied. A ran chuue for Ateuls. ThesAi.Lw verv lar«, 
and tbsms Tary liboral evfor Cibculas. 
arit* to K. M HTORK.lt, 
DOW-4AW4W* 



I AS, TEBU8, ETC.. 

N. If. 



BliNNETT'S PRACTICE; 
TANNER'S PRACTICE, 

(New 

lOW IMiVn ID FOR SALK BY 
cU ILL il C AIiYEKT, 

i .. M.i... W.. Roafea I'ew. 



NEW BOOKS! 

BlOaBAPHY OF RIO&JLRD COBDEN; 
. 1 HS FROM IX. WARD BKECHER; 
II ISS CAREW— A Nov ki.: 
Just receivid by 
Cl\ ILL CALVERT. 



MAGAZINE. 

ECLECTIC MAGAZINE. 

LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND ART. 

New Volume Hegi-is January, 18GH 

rpHI KCLCCTKJ MAGAZINE IS, AS ITS N A M K IN- 
1 dicates, a selection lrom . ther magazines aud peri- 
odicalH. These nelectiuns ;ir» carefully made each mouth, 
from the entire raugx of fo-eixn I'l- iolicals. in this re- 
sfact it ii urtiam i nuki; otueu Monthlies, and lias no 
rival. The following are some ol the works from which 
select ioni are made: 

boMou Quarterly, V. vuc de Deux Mondes, 

Briti«li Quarterly, Lou u u Society, 

N irth Brute} Berk », Ben tier '■ Miecoilany, 

i cMiUr .-tit m- • Beview, t'orubill Magazine, 

Patnr.lar lievuw, Kraa.-i's Magazine, 

Lateen Hour, Temple Bar 

v\ • •!•:■! ster Seview, Chamber's Journal. 

Dill, in t'.iiversii) Magazine, Kdiuburgb Review, 

An IobtmL London National Ber4ew. 

We kvava also arranged to secur« cho ce selections from 
;h" Preach, limn, aud other UontineutaJ Periodicals, 

transla ed especially tor the KCUOMC, and it is hoped this 
new feature will add greatly tn the vuriety aud 

8Wor * mm ■■■mum 

Each number is embellished with one cr mi 
Steel K-Vi&a\ in«.s purtiaiis of eminent miu or 
tun of iinportaut hi-torical events. 

Volumes commence in January 1 
subscriptions can commence with 

TKlCM«d £5 r «-r Year; 
eeate  Five Cokich, JWO. 

The Trade, Orgyeien, Teachers, and CluDa supplied on 
favorable terms. Addreas. 

W. H. KIDWELL, 

| |ll — II mtt I B ekman street. New York. 



COLDPENS. 




COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

J AS. C. M'VERSAX. a. J. MkNEFEE. JNO. B. M'FERRAN. 

UlcFerran & Ulenef ee 

(Late of LouisTille.Ky.) 

Commission Merchants, 

COTTON FACTORS, 

Aud Manufacturers' Agents for sale or Dale 
Kope, Bagging and Twine, 
NOS. 104 AND 104 WEST (JOLDMHIA STBIET. 

(Between Viue and Race.) 
CINCINNATI, (). 



MEDICAL. 



HUNNEWELL'S 



UNIVERSAL 
COUGH 



'PEN Y E A 11 S HAS 
L clearly proved that the 



the 



simplicity, .. 
_. Jt of this  plen 
i did preparation, which al 



theory of _ 
great element 



! lows its use whenever there 

i» tickling or Irritation in 

the Throat, and producing uo debilitv, is the ouly and 
tree theory by which a true leuiedy for Colds, Cmghs, 
Hoarseness, Bronchial Complaints, and all Throat Affec- 
tions, which, it neglected, eud iu Cousumptieu, can be 
offer, ually cared. 

IWffore Throat the great origin of Diptheria, when 
a . glected, is cured by making a Cargle with equal parts 
of water. 

aHT ■ i estimontaU of und .ubtod character can be .ceu at 
m  i Ihce by all. 

small bottles *r,c, Large do- 

■ar-Sold by all wholesale and retail dealers ta medicine. 
JOHN L. HI NMiWKLL. Proanetor. 



MAGAZINE. 

GODEY S LADTS BOOK 

FOR 1866. 
THE 

Fashion Magazine of the World. 

TITKKATUBE, KI NE ARTS AND FASHIONS. THE 
j most mHgniflcent St. 



I engravings Double Fashion 
Plates. Wood engraTiixs on every subject that can in- 
terest ladii".. Crochet Knitting, Netting, Embroidery, 
A^rtic^M for^the^Tonet^^or the^Parlor. the^Boudoir.^and 





aoDers RECEIPTS 

for every department of a hoi 
worth ti « price   t the Book. 

MODEL VVTTAOES.V 
with diagrams. 

I'll A WISH I ESSO.VS 
speciality wiftt • odey. 

oHlCISAL ML'SIC, worth S3 a year, 
line* puidish old woru-»ut music; but the 
(iOdey get it lie tore th« inusic stores. 

QAJtDMNINQ FOR LADIES. Another peculiarity 
wi:h (iodey. 

Kasbious from Messrs. A. T. Stewart A Co., of New 
York, the millionaire merchants, appear in (Jod-y.the em- 
ir Magazine that has them. 

Ladits' Bonnets. We give more of them in a year than 
any other Magazine. In fact, the Lady's Book enables 
every lady to be her own bonnet maker. 

MARION HAKLAND, 

Author*, of "l*™^ "f^r.'^™ *•» " Mom Sid *'" 

also retained all our old and favorite contributes. 



TERMS OF 

Godey's Lady's Book 

\ " *  l i ' I I i / ( / t, lU/( L/C fiW 



The following are the terms of the Lady's Book for 1866: 

One copy, one year a 3 00 

Two copies, eue year 5 50 

Three copies, one year „ _ 7 50 

Four copies, one   oar 10 00 

Five copies, one year, and an extra copy to the per- 

sou getting up the club, making six copies H 00 

Eight copies, onu year, aud an extra copy to the per- 

8 u getting up th. club, making nine copies. 21 00 

Elcveu copies, one year, aud an extra copy to the 

pet -on getting up the club, making twelve copies £1 50 

*» All additions to clubs at club rates. 

aa~liodey's L.ady'8 Book and Arthur's Homo Magazine 
will be sent, each oue year, on receipt of #4 50. 

•*"We nave no clnb with any other magazine or news- 

iBrTn MaHUVitta sent at one time roa ant 

or the Clubs. 

ast send 2K ceuts additional 



1 . A. (iODEY, 



EDUCATIONAL. 

Robinson Institute 

roa 

YOUNG LADIES. 
LEXINGTON, KY. 

rpHIB SCHOOL WILL BE 
L Samuel Q. Mullins 
ficient number of his 
sons, W. H. Mullins, M. u., at 

\- ft J he Tery elegant aud commodious school properts 
of the Miss Jackaons has been puscbased for the perma- 
nent use of the Bolnnson Institnte. The flr-t session will 
commence on Monday, the 1st ti of September. Apply for 
circulars to learn particulars. 

•el-tf WILL A K D DAVIS, General Agent. 

[Journal and Democrat copy lot and charge this office.: 

University of Louisville! 



_ 'ONDCCTKD 'BY PKOF. 
— M ., who will be aided by a suf- 
„ highly competent ladies, and by his 
sons, W^ H. Mullins, M. D., and the R«v. O. G. Mullins 




N. I 



DIVIDEND. 

OK KICK OK LOUISVILLE CITY BAILWAY COM- 
ran\ , Louisville, Ky , Decetnb. r 8, 1365. 
A dividend of rii k i-eb cent, (free of Government tax) 
is hereby declared on the Capital Stock of this Company, 
in Louiiville on and after January 
of stock will be clo»ed after 



hereby 
aaj ible aj their oC 

lk«Bof December 



dll-tf 



President Louisvii 



MILLS. 



J. T. BOYLE, 



High Street Planing Mill 



MUNR0E & HATCH. 



CONSTANTLY 

Weather Be 



ON HAND FLOOU1NG 



HAVE 
Weather Be. din , I'ineuud Poplar Joist aud Scan- 
tling, and Lud.liug Kattii'uJ youeially. Sawiue, Re- 



flitting, I lam... , 
Sashes and BUlMU mad* U . 
f Tobacc u..d other boicj 



. dono promptly. Also I)oors, 
Sashes and Bi.uuJ iwlo io oid r, together with all kinds 



O.uers solicited Postofflc* 
-tf 



INK. 

DR. CELL'S WRITING FLUID. 

Di. Cells' W ruing Fluid. 

The iuk manufactured by Dr. S. W. Eells 
at tbia place, is fast working itself into pub- 
lic favor. Wherever it is tried, it is pro- 
nounced the best made in this country, and 
equal to Arnold's celebrated inks. Bead 
the following certificate from the Fourth 
Auditor of the Treasury Department, at 
Washington. The Dr. has shown us the 
original certificate, and we can vouch for 
its genuineness. — Mansfield (O.) Herald. 

Tbeasi-rt Department, ■» 
Fourth Auditor's Off sua, July 14, 1S65. } 

1 hf reby certify that I have been using, for some time 
past. In my office. Dr. S. W. Eells' Ins, both his writing 
and copying lluids, manufactured at Mansfield, Ohio; 
and that I am highly pleased with it, and consider it 
equal in every r. spe t, if not «uperior, to Arnold's im- 
ported ink, and I think less liable to mould. 

1 therefore rsconsend it as worthy the attention ol 
the Government Departments In Washington, and all 
persons who desire a really superior article of ink ol 
Amen, .in luaniitacture. 

STEPHEN J. W. TABOR, 
« Mf Fourth Auditor. 



HARDWARE. 

NEW IRON STORE! 

JOHN C. NAUTS. WM. C. REAMER 

NAUTS & REAMER, 

NO. 234, 

N. S. Main Street, bet. Sixth and Seventh, 

Loiii** villa. TriTv. 

AGENTS rOK THE 

New Albany Rolling' Mill 

AMD DEALERS IN 

Iron, Nails, Steels,Spikes, Rivets 
Springs, Nuts, Washers, 
Axles and Bolts, 

"Brinly" Plow 



! 



rpHE TWKNTY-NINTH SESSION OF 
X wlB commence as mual on the first ' 
her next, and continue four months. 

The lee for admission for the entire Course of Lectures 
s one hundred and live dollars, payable in advance. The 
Matriculation Fee ol live dollars irives thes tudeut the us* 
of the extensive library. The Demonstrator's Kee is ten 
dollars. No char*- is made for Lectures at the Hospital 
For circulars or further information address 

O. W. HA YLEjSd, M. D , 
•n«-o-tf Dean or the Faculty. 

mmm of \asuville. 



THE KEGULAK 0ODB8I OK INSTRUCTION WILL 
begin on the tirst Monday of November, lsto, and ens' 
ou the first day of Man h, l^vl. The Museum. Cabinets, 
Library, Buildings, and appurtenances, are still as per- 
fect as ever, and the . Id corps ot teachers each iuhis place 

of Practical Anatomy . 

The Anatomical Room will be opened on the first Mon 
day in October, and every facility afforded for the prose 
cution of that corner-stone study. 

Fees for the full Course S10S  » 

Matriculation fee. j on 

Graduation fee „ 25 00 

To Demonstrator for Practical Anatomy _ 10 00 

Boarding in rood houses about In uo a week. 
Kor further particulars apply to Dean tor catalogue. 
W. K. Bowlino, M. D., Professor of Institutes and 
f the Faculty. 



Practice of Medicine and De, 



Best 



Thomas h. Jmdm, M. U I. 

J. BlIIRIEN Ll.NOSLtY, M. v., 

and Pharmacy. 

(J. K. Winston, M. I)., Pto 
Medical Jurisprudent S. 

Wii. T. Brio.18, M. D.. 
and Physiol 




and Physiology. 

John M. W atson, M. D 1'ioi.sjor of Obstettrics and 
Diseases of W unien and Children. 



of Principles aud I'r ic- 



Pail F. Eve, M. I)., 
tice of Surgery. 
, J. B. Buchanan. M. D., Curator of Museum. 

\ B. LisnsLET, M. D., Demonstrator of Auatomv. 

Nashville, July 1.,, JyiS-tfAwlt 



RELICIOUS NOTICE. 

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

IN UN VOK . 

WEST TWENT¥-E;GUTU ST.. NEAR BROADWAY 

To our Brethren iu Christ Je.us, to whom these presents 
may come, we send Love ..nd Christain Salutation: 
Dear Brethren: By the gracious providence of our 
H  avenly Father, we have succeeded in getting a new and 
commodious house of wor hipm this great city. 

Our new edifice is on  ue OS the most pleasant and acces- 
sible localities, being between the Fifth sn . Sixth Aven- 
ues, undisturbed by the din ol Lusinoss, sad yet conveni- 
ently near to all the prtu iial stopping pi i^es, by means 
of street railway and omnibus couiinunictti n 

' he building is a hue • .ue and well a'.ai I d to our neces- 
sities, and we deoire th..l It st all be a pleasant place ot 
worship for all our brethren who m-iy \ iait the metropo- 
lis. The object o' th s circular is to tivite our brethren 
from every bait of the country, who may visit New York, 
to come and worship with us. We Invite the attention of 
all to the grand euterpise »f building up the interests ol 
the Redeemer's Kingdum iu this, the largest, city ou this 
continent. 

We desire to make the Christian Church one of Heaven's 
"oou EN CANOLtSTic k.« for the illumination of this great 
commercial center, and in this behalf we «sk the prayers, 
and, as far as it is possible, the co» operation ol the Chris- 
tian brotherhood everywhere. 

Praying that peace aud prosperity may at 'end all who 
love our Lord Jesus Christ iu sincerity, 
We are, iu Gospel bonds, ever an I fr i'eruall, vours, 
URBAN B. BbEWEB. Pastor. 
DAN I EI Ml N Kile", , 
ELKAZAK PARMLY, „,. 
(DO A. UkiiV. If, Kiders. 
IfRAN^lS Ul NCs.N 
New York Oc. , . - 

•WPIease read the ..Ui.- t^ ...... c n„.. ^.^.h, pi t 



OIL WELL MACHINERY. 

NL WILL IWHWal! ! 

Portable Engines, Boring Tools, 
Pumps, Tubing, Driv- 
ing Pipes, 

All of the latest improvements always on hand 

DAVIE S & CO.. 

ol Ninth and Main street! 



OIL WELL 




TOOLS & MACHINERY. 

1AM MANUFACTURING AND KEEP CONSTANT- 
ly on hand Portable and Stationery Steam En. ines. 
Boring Tools, aud other machinery used iu boring for OK 
and Salt. 

• GLUTS HA it HA KOI ' X , 



st* I dlv 



VILLI, aw. 




GROCERIES. 

Jas. A* Frazer & Co., 

WHOLESALE 0R0CEBS 

commission" "merchants, 

Noa. Htf and 6M Walnut (*(., 

Oinoiunatl, O. 

ClOFriXS. TEAS. SUGARS, 8IRUPS. SPICES, Ac. 
J Fisn of all kinds and all susalpack— ss. 
Lone continuance in the trad* enables us to offer 
special inducement* to bnvev.  •« f 



THE HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID 



Wrought and Cast Iron Scrap. 



Or. BATJRMANN 

roiufii ii idmbto unm, 

ALSO 

OLTN8 AND PISTOLS. 

IKJS Mala fltrwwt bstwsss Sixth u. Rwvwa* 
f nriawit.i.B it 



BREWERY. 



ALE AND BfifiR. 



WM, F ADDON A SON, 

HREWBRS OP PURE 

XX AND XXX. 
ALES AND BEER. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO ««H 1 1' »l K T*. 

CITY BREWERY 

SIXTH ST.. 



BBLS ONIONS 



MO ACRES OF LAND FOR $20. 

A LL UNION SOLDI KRS, BY CALLING ON MR 

r. hah. 



PROFESSIONAL. 

Dr. F.H.Gibson, 

OFFICE-JEFFERSON STREET, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 



•tf . JfM. S T O UT y 

(Late Col. 17th Regt. Ky. Vol. Inf. 

ittorney «,t XaAT*r, 

LOUISVILLE, KY., 

TT AS RETURNED TO THE PRACTICE OF HL  PRO- 
" heill'lnVhe'ctt^'and Ir^Si^'V^ 



and 

against th 



School 
14- tf 



ISSION MERCHANTS. 



H. BURKHARDT, 
Wholesale Grocer 

COMMISSION MERCHANT 



CONS 



ABNER COOPER, 

COMMISSION MERCHANT 

and We»teru Prodae«, 

■ Third us Fourth sis. 

L»rd, White 




J. M. DAVIS & CO., 

Comnussion Merchants 

A nd Wholesale D 

•3 OcKELBS, J70EJSIGN AND 




DORN, BARKHOUSE & CO. 

C*KJN KKAL 



LOOISVILLB, KY.. 
QRNTB for different brands of nam Tofaamn 
£^,SJ W "1 B VP , t2. p W^i^OailpsSnf "d 
Upariclliiu Catawba Wfnss. ^^^^SStm 



Xo. 



J. C. R0DGERS & CO., 

COMMISSION ^MERCHANTS 

a.id wholesale o«ai.xas IX 1 

PRODUCE, PROVISIONS, BITTER, CHEESE, 106 S 

BEANS, OKI ED FKl IT*, 

S«,lt ttLYcl Ooal. 

Main Street, bet. second »nd Third 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Kefer br PrrmU.lon t*  

ti. M.' ' vn.n ,hasi. Cashier Tirst National Bank. 

»o Mocfc. Wicks A Co.) 

TOBACCO AGENT 

ABO 

4i«ierai (tiiyn Mmiaals 

W*. Ml Mala st., bat. Third ass Faarta, 

LOUISVILLE. ET. 
■■TA^sht f^r the sale of 
VAKNjI. twink. mo 



CLAIM AGENCIES. 

to Soldiers and their 



PROTECTIVE 

WAR 



AND 



PENSION AGENCY, 



ESTABLISHED BY TUB 



U.S SANITARY COMMISSION 

SOLDI EES AND Till IE F AM I LIES ASSISTED IN 
TUE COLLECTION OK PENSIONS PAY AND 
BOUNTY, WITHOUT (.'UAEOE 
TO OLA I MA NTS. 
Office— No. liw Jefferson street, up stairs, bet. Third and 
Fourth. 

H. 11. Burkholder, 

MiM-tf CLAIM A.;KNT FiiKTHK V S. SAN. COM. 



COLD PENS. 



«Lii m m 

JWANIJFACTORY. 



that Mauufi 
of the Ohio River 
Call aud Satisfy Yourseu 




i nr pens are equal, if not superior, to anj In nee. The* 
are U carats flne, and warranted perfect in every reaaaaA 
The trade supplied. Old pens repaired in .he best maaV 
ner tor FllrTY CEUTS each. Pen circulars sent i BBK 



tttit) R. C. HILL & CO. 



julf-tf aiTl 



Gold Pen Manufacturers 



— 




'FHE FIEM OF W A H Bl BKUABDT IS 
A ed by the death ot William Bnrkbtrdt. 

The sunriror. Henry" 
from and after 



urred 
contin 
1S6S. in 
the 



 n the 12th inst. 



UENEY B 

Kj., Sept. 71st, lues. 




THE UNDEBSIONBD HAVING II ■ K \ APPOINTKD 
administrator ot William Burkhardt. deceased, re- 
quests all persons having c I alms irslast decedent to pre- 
sent them properly authenticated for payment. 

II EN K Y BTBEH ABDT, 
■M ' A'lm r of Win. Burkhardt, dee'd. 



PAPER WAREHOUSE. 

A. V. DuFONT & COa, 



rata 




500 Keama Straw Boards; 
SSO jrross Bonnet Boards; 
UMl cases assorted Letter Paper; 



3,(NJO,000 fenveiop 



THE DAILY PRESS 



BUILDING 



JEFFERSON STREET, 

LOUWVlLLKi 



, in ,, letter Ir.uu 
Press, »iat" l 



c.hlllc-c". I lie- 1 



quality of the Unionism of Mr 




several weeks here in a style ot i 
joviality and luxury, the honor* 
some of our wealthiest and most 



Bitterness of feeling between the Mor- 
mons aud the Tinted Stales troop- .011- 
nnue* to .n. reaae, and there are prospects 
of a colltaiou before the » .uter is over. 

Kx-Attornev-^*eneral Klaek. ot Mr. Bu- 
chanans Cabinet, ha* formed a law partner- 
shin in Washington with Mr. Lamou, 
formerly law partner with Mr. Lincoln. 
*f A delegation from the Cherokee*, Semi- 
nolea, aud Creek*, ia en route for Washing- 
ton to .-ompielf treaties relative to the 
session of lands and confederation ot the 
Indian tribes. 

Five men, occupying the same room in a 
hotel in Chicago, were suffocated on Satur- 
day night bv the escape of ga». A sixth 
also inhaled "the gas, but, although insensi- 
ble, has not yet died. 

There is said to be no truth in the report 
that the Southern members of Congress had 
resolved to go to their homes and await 
action upon their credentials. They will 
doubtlesTreturn next month to prosecute 
their claims for seats. 

A N. Orleans correspondent says: "Poor 
old General Scott has left us in 'a big dis- 
gust.' Five years ago the General spent 
— le of unbounded 
est of 
tabl 

citizens.' 

The Detroit Free Press publishes a list of 
the 421 disasters to shipping for the past 
vear and has incomplete memoranda ot 
between 60 and To more, making a little 
overTrftOin all. The total number of dis- 
asters in lH60wasl377; inl»U,275; 1*12,300; 
186S, 850, aud in 1864, 379. 

There is much ill-feeling between the 
Mormons and the United SUtes forces sta- 
tioned in Utah, and apprehensions are en- 
tertained that trouble will occur before the 
close of the winter. Some army officers are 
endeavoring to induce the President to em- 
ploy our military lorce against tne Mor- 
mons. 

Jonathan Green, of the lJOth Illinois in- 
tautrv, was murdered iu St. Louis on the 
night* of the -1st., by some person as yet 
unknown. His skull was broken by a long, 
sharp instument like a sword. Green 
had been sentenced to the Missouri State 
penitentiary by a court-martial, but,having 
been pardoned by the Preside 
his way to Springfield, Illinois. 

The relation of the parties engaged ^n the 
Brooklyn tragedy is stated to have been 
merely that of friends, though the young 
man buss seemed determined that Miss 
Dayton should become his wife, aud on her 
declining to do so he attempted her life and 
bis own. Both of them are doing well.and 
little doubt is entertained of their recovery. 

The Montreal Witness ot Friday says the 
intelligence had been received by Mr. Dev 
lin counsel for the prisoner, that the Court 
of Appeals at Quebec had decided in favor 
of the application of Wayne W. Blossom to 
be admitted to bail. This settles a long 
vexed question, which arose out of the al- 
leged attempt to abduct George N. Sanders. 
Blossom belongs in Maine, and has been 
refused bail during several months, after a 
jury had failed to convict bim on trial. 

In Springfield. PL. on the 25th, a party 
ot 40 or 50 soldiers belonging to the 3d Reg- 
imeut of U.S. Veteran Volunteers, being 
inflamed with liquor, broke open the cala- 
l ooee. and released one of their comrades 
who had been osnfined therein. Subse- 
quently thev created a row with citiaens, in 
which brickbats were thrown in profusion, 
and about forty shots were tired. The ring- 
leader of the soldiers, named Charley Per- 
kins, was killed, and several persons sus- 
tained more or less injury. On the same 
day a gang of Copperheads attacked a bar- 
by a colored man. and did 



nUKDHBl LIBOK. 

The other day in Brooklyn, New York, a 
Mr. Allslou, lately a Colonel iu the rebel 
armv, speaking iu behalf of the suffering 
itoor iu the South, remarked that he had 
divided his lnrge plantation into farms of 
fifty acres each, with a house and a black 
family on each farm. They gave him one- 
third of the product of the land, and kept 
the residue, and he had reason to believe 
that he would make more money in this 
way than he had ever done before. 

It gives one peculiar pleasure to record 
such instances of wise generosity as that of 
Mr. Allston. for it is certain that if his ad- 
mirable example were generally followed 
throughout the South, the question of re- 
storation would speedily cease to be a prob- 
lem, and insurrection rumors would cease 
to be fabricated; the South would flourish 
and all mischief makers would retire to 
their dens and die of envy and dispair. 
Mr. Allston has made a direct appeal to the 
best and noblest feelings of his tenants, and 
we doubt not that they will respond grate- 
fully and industriously so as to put monev 
into their landlords purse while they make 
comfortable living for themselves. If such 
a noble spirit were more generally exhibit- 
ed in the South, we would hear less of the 
cry that the negro will not work. 

We have no faith iu the statement that 
the negro will not work. Such an assertion 
is at variance not only with the past history 
of the race in this country, but with the 
principles which govern human nature. 
Human action is controlled altogether by 
motives. While the negro was a slave he 
worked because he knew that a refusal to 
do so would ensure punishment. Then he 
was impelled not by a sense of duty, but 
by his fears. Now, that he is free, he will 
receive the reward of his toil lor the benefit 
of himself and those around him, and iu 
thus course he is controlled by his hopes. 
This is the great difietence between free aud 
slave tabor. If the freed men refuse to work 
it is because they do not receive the terms 
and treatment which other laborers would 
demand. In that case the fault is not with 
them, but with their employers. What is 
w anted is confidence between the employer 
and the laborer. That this should be 
wanting upon the part of the freed men to- 
ward their late masters is perfectly natural. 
It should be the aim of the latter, as it is to 
their interest, to act in such a manner as to 




Col. 
to the 
21, 
the 

Hie Hon. John It Botts: 

John M. Botts of Virginia visited the 
Capitol this morning, and looked as hale 
ami as happy as when, more than twenty 
years ago, he slept iu the same bad with 
John Tyler. Whatever may be said of this 
iemarkable man, nobody doubts that his 
course was as fearless and loyal to the Na- 
tional Government as that of any of the ear- 
ly Southern opponents of the rebellion. 
John M. Botts imbibed hatred of the au- 
t.i rsot the insurrection from his opposi- 
tion to the Southern Democratic leaders. It 
was, therefore, natural for bim, as an old 
Whig, to take issue with the so-called Dem- 
orrais who bad so long rilled the nxist in 
Virginia. 

Turing four years of war his plantation 
has been ravaged by the couteudiu^ hosts, 
and he said this morning that he would, 
rather than go through the same rough and 
bloody experience, endure the horrors of a 
double Bull Run defeat. It was refreshing 
to hear his warm, bold words of honest de- 
votion to the country and his earnest de- 
nunciations of the classes who are seeking 
umlesei \ed admission into Congress. Just 
now the hated obstacle iu the way of this 
class is the test oath. In support of this 
essential protection Mr. Botts has prepared 
sev. ml powerful arguments. His reason- 
ing, derived from his sincere and unfalter- 
ing loyalty, and his knowledge of the trea- 
son of traitors, goes to the very root of the 
question. In one of his letters he contends 
with masterly ability, not alone for the con- 
stitutionality, but for the necessity of this 
oath. 

Some ofihis points are opportune and pow- 
erful, ana may well be profitably read by 
our law-makers and those who expect the 
oath fco be repealed for their especial benefit. 
In reply to the allegation that one Congress 
cannot bind a succeeding Congress, and 
that the oath is therefore inoperative upon 
persons applying for admission to the pres- 
ent Houses be says : "If Congress cannot 
bind its success rs, then we should have no 
laws beyond the period for which Congress 
was elected, and there would be an absence 
of all laws until each was re-enacted by the 
succeeding Congress. '' 

With keen discrimination, bo finds the 
constitutional power to make and force a 
political test oath in that clause of the Fed- 
eral compact which says "that Senators and 
RaptH sentatives in Congress, and members 
of the State legislatures. Ac. shall be bound 
by oath or affirmation, to support this con- 
stitution, aud no reiigimt* test oath shall be 
required as a qualification to any public 
trust under the Cnited States.'' Thus, in 
the very prohibition he finds the full power 
to create precisely such a political obliga- 
tion as that which now stands, like an 
angel with a flaming sword, barring the 
admission of bloody-handed rebels. I 
mention these two points, not so much be- 
cause of their novelty as because they are 
timely, and indicate the existence of that 
sustaining patriotism in the South which 
looks to strong measures as the surest se- 
curity for a lasting reunion. 

The Kentucky Fenians— Convention at 
Covington— Roberts Indorsed, 

The Fenians of Kentucky met in conven- 
tion at Covington Wednesday, and adopted 
the following report: 

Tbe Fenian Brotherhood of the State of 
Kentucky, in convention assembled, hav- 
ing oarsfolly and minutely examined into 
the recent sad occurrence iu New York, 
. e to the deposition of John O'Ma- 
hony from the Presidency of the Fenian 
Brotherhood, and of B. D. Killian as Sec- 
retary of the Treasury, and after such care- 
ful, minute and impartial consideration of 
the entire subject, have, therefore, 

II— ill f art. That while we sadly deplore 
( more in ml ma! hail in anger) the necessity 
ol thf St-t. ate taking the only honest stand 
that|their dictatt s of duty 10 themselves, tlieir 
constituents and their conntry prompted 
them to take, we do fully indorse the action 
of said Senate, believing the Senators to be 
•  -n of unquestionable integrity, aud 
clothed with the constitutional power for 
acting in accordance with their sworn dutv. 

Resolved, That we pledge to Col. W. k. 
Roberts, the newly and constitutionally 
elected President, and the Senate of the Fe- 
nian Brotherhood, the limited support of 
tbe Brotherhood of Kentucky, to the end 
that the President aud Senate shall use all 
the power and energy at their comniand in 
such practical a\ rk as may speedily realize 
the hopes and expectations of our race. 

ResolveJ, Th.it we have implicit confi- 
dence in the ability, integrity and patriot- 
ism of Gen. T. W. Sweeny, the constitution- 
ally appointed Secretary of War of the Fe- 
nian Brotherhood, and that we pledge our- 
selves to labor with earnest zeal in the per- 
formance of the duties which he may be 
pleased to require of us, fully convinced 
that all his orders will be prompted by an 
honest and earnest desire to co-operate with 
our brothers at home in carrying out their 
long and fondly cherished hopes for free- 
dom and fatherland. 

Resolved, That we repudiate the conven- 
tion called by Col. O'Mahony, to meet in 
New York on Jan. 2, 1666, believing said 
convention to be illegal and unconstitution- 
al, it having been called after the deposition 
of said Col. O'Mahony as President of the 
Fenian Brotherhood; and that we do cau- 
tion our bretheren throughout the country 
against this unwarranted usurpation of au- 
thority. 

Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing 
resolutions be forwarded to W. R. Roberts, 
President of the Fenian Brotherhood, and 
that the same be published. 

Signed, Kentucky Delegates. 



C1TT AND GENERAL NEWS. 



A Mkan tar. A thing called John 

by officer 



work-box and 



jewelry. 

Horse Thieves.— A colored man by the 
name of Alford Woods was arrested yes- 
terday by officers Glass aud McKiuney for 
stealing a horse. 

Lafayette Collins and R. K. Shuck, were 
also in prison for horse stealing. 



%^,Mayor Lithgow, in his remarks at 
his inauguration, thanked the members 
very kindly for the honors they bestowed 
upon him, aud only asked them to lend 
him their co-operation, and matters would 
go on smoothly. 

Wcoo'h Theater.— Mr. Barrett takes his 
farewell benefit to-night, and appears as 
Claude Melnotte in the beautiful play of 
the "Lady of Lyons." The afterpiece is 
"Kiss in the Dark," in which Mr. (J raver 
will lend a helping hand to amuse the au- 

New Music— "Hark, the Herald Angels 
Sing,"' a Christmas anthem, composed by 
W. L. Plato, and dedicated to Rev. James 
Craik, D.D., Rector of Christ Church. D. 
P. Faulds, No. 70 Main street, dealer in 
pianos and sheet music, has published it iu 
handsome style. 

Quick WoRK.-Last night the General 
Council nominated and elected a new 
Mayor, appointed a committee to wait upon 
him and inform bim of his election; was 
introduced, presented with a certificate of 
election and sworn in by Judge Harbeson; 
the new Mayor making a few appropriate 
remarks— in the astonishing short time of 
half an hour. 



by General 
men's Bureau for 
The General is 



A sister's Betrayal Revenged. 

The Detroit Tribune of December 20th 
says : 

A terrible murder was committed in the 
lumber camp of Charles McBride, on Pine 
river, Midland county, Michigan, last week, 
the details of w hich are most shockingly 
cruel. John Conart, a man employed in 
the above named camp, was found dead, 
aud fearfully mangled, under the roots of a 
tree, having been murderd by a man em- 
ployed in the same camp, whose name is 
Camden. The details are substantially as 
follows : 

About a year and a half ago Conart 
made the acquaintance of Camden's sister, 
whose parents are Canadians and highly 
respectable, and, ou promising to marry 
her, succeeded in betraying her, after which 
he left for parts unknown. 

About six months since, her brother who 
had been a soldier in the United States ser- 
vice, returned home, and learning of his 
sister's disgrace, vowed vengeance on its 
author, who, by the way, he had never 
seen. Accordingly he started in quest of 
the object of his vengeance, and succeeded 
in tracking him to Saginaw, where he 
learned that a company of Canadians had 
just gone to the woods, employed by Mr. 
McBride, a Cauadian lumberman. He 
then started for this place, and soon learned 
tbe location of McBride's camp, where he 
found the object of his search, whom he 
knew from description, and then feigned 
want of work, and easily hired out for the 
winter, went to work wi»h Conart for his 
partner. Matters progressed thus for a 
time, till, one afternoon Conart and Cam- 
den were sent to cut timber some distance 
north of the shanty. Camden came up at 
night as usual, but not his companion, who, 
be said, had gone to a lumber shanty a 
short distance across the woods, and would 
not return before nine or ten o'clock. After 



■ for the pur- supper Camden went from the shanty un- 

, „____:_:_„ ,t,_ D „_ noticed. Being missed in the morning, and 

pose of thoroughly organizing the Bureau Conart not ha * ing turned, suspicion be- 
in this State. What he says in his address, came aroused, when two men were sent to 
will meet the approval of all good citizens, where the two had worked the day before, 
snd 1* well received and heeded by those There they discoveredt races of blood, and 

■uu »^ ^ ' m looking around discovered an upturned 

whom be addre aaas. tree, which had been cot off and let back 

. . „, ...ITsa— ~J a naur uini. ' to its former bed, aud on digging under 

A « mr-t A»H|OM.n Shoe.— A ne w st y le ; thi , h found tue remain8 of f he inissing 

vent ion iu simple. 1 ne U PP« J *™ 01 tbe if done wit b an ax. Camden was in mi edi- 

boot or shoe iscu tout in almost ordinary pursue d, but as yet not the tfigl test 

fashion by s regu lar shoemak er. The sole £ £ bim hag bfcen K W vWai. 

and heel are made of hard maple wood, 1 , sj», ■ 

and are joined by a "bank of sole leather, Slavery and Southern Methodism 

which gives all needed elasticity. The up- This is the title of a 
per* are fastened to the sole by a thin band 
of iron, which encircles the rim of the sole, 
snd Hastens 



neatly printed pam- 
phlet containing two sermons preached in 
, the Methodist Church, in Newman. Geor- 
sole and upper together in a | gia, by the Pastor, Rev. John H. Caldwell, 



manner far more effectual than any sewing 
can do. When put together, the shoe makes 
s handsome appearance, and is as light as 
a leather shoe of corresponding size. The 
aaala are comfortably hollows*" out on the 
upper skis, and the soles have 'the proper 
carve to insure easy walking. 



of the Georgia Conference. Our readers 
have had a taste of these remarkable dis- 
courses in the extracts we gave them a Short 
Ume since. Civill & Calvert have tbe work 
for sale at 25 cents. Printed for the author, 
and offered at so trifling cost it should have 
a^arge 



^..The resignations of all the dissatis- 
fied members were accepted by the Council 
last night with the exception of one — Mr. 
Phil. T. German. His case was deferred 
for one week, and it is very probable that 
it will be inquired into more minutely. 
"There is something rotten in the state of 



The New York Triiiune.— This radical 
journal advertises its prospectus for ISM 
in our columns. The Tribune contains 
during the course of the year a vast amount 
of valuable and useful information. No 
paper, perhaps, in the country devotes so 
much space to the interests of the working 
men and farmers as does the New York 
Tribune. 

*£,J' eu. G. Saltkill was arrested at 
Providence on Wednesday for placing ob- 
structions upon the track of the Louis- 
ville, New Albany and Chicago railroad. 
He was tried before a Magistrate at Provi- 
dence and ordered to prison at Charleston, 
to take his trial before tbe Clark county 
Circuit Court. He deserves to spend the 
balance of his life in the penitentiary. 

Masonic. — At the annual election of 
officers of Robinson Lodge, No. 266, An- 
cient York Masons, held at their Hall on 
the evening of tbe 27th inst., the following 
officers were elected and installed, for the 
following year : 

Dr. N. B. Anderson, Worshipful Master; 
John King, Senior Warden ; J. Freeman, 
Junior Warden ; Win. W. Crawford, Senior 
Deacon; John Marts, Junior Deacon; L. 
C. Lothrop, Secretary ; Frank Mestiniaker, 
Treasurer; James Harrison, Steward and 
Tyler. ' 

%S*vThe official returns of the special elec- 
tion held in Keutou county on Saturday 
last, lor a member of the Legislature, are 
in. The vote stands as follows: Shutt 
(Union), sitf; Wilson ( Democrat), KL Iu 
three precincts in the county the polls were 
were not opened, aud the vote of another 
precinct was thrown out by the canvassers, 
for informality in the poll-book. We un- 
derstand that Mr. Wilson, the Democratic 
candidate, has signified his intention ot 
contesting the election. 

1 NyUEST No. 448— Held December 26, 186" , 
at the residence of the deceased, on Madi- 
son, between Eleventh and Twelfth streets, 
on the body of George Ruffner, sr., aged 
about torty -seven years. Verdict— Came 
to his death at the above place at 3 o'clock 
p. St., Dec. 25, 1865, of traumatic peritonitis, 
caused by a knife wound in the abdomeu, 
inflicted by George Ruffner, jr., on the 
night of the 9th of December, 1865. The 
jury also find that the said George Ruffner, 
jr., is insane, and has been so for at least 
one year last past. 

J. C. Gill, Coroner. 



Inquest No. 449. Held December 28th, 
ls6o, at the stables of the Louisville Rail- 
road Company, on Rowen and 12th streets, 
ou the body of a negro woman, (name not 
known,) aged about 30 years. Verdict 
came to her death in car No. 33, on Jeffer- 
son between Ninth and Tenth streets, 
at or about one o'clock p. m , Decem- 
ber 28th, 1865, from natural causes and 
not otherwise. Deceased is about live feet 
five inches high, dressed in black calico 



J. C. Gill, Coroner. 



Our Work House.— This great nuisance 
ought to be improved or abolished. Judge 
Harbeson visited the Council meeting last 
night for the purpose of explaining the 
facts connected with this peculiar institu- 
tion, and asked for a better place of confine- 
ment for persons guilty of only light mis- 
demeanors. When parties are unable to 
pay the fines imposed, the only alternative 
is the Work House, where the prisoners 
must work the fines out at the rate of sev- 
enty-live cents per day. The other day the 
Judge was compelled to commit a woman 
to this place, whose entire wardrobe con- 
sisted of a pair of soldiers' pants, and a 
gum blanket, thrown over her shoulders, 
was her only upper gcrinent. In this scanty 
covering the woman was compelled to work 
out in the open, bitter, cold air, breaking- 
stones. The Judge told tbe General Conn- 
ed, in a pathetic manner, that he saw this 
with his own eyes; and prayed that they 
would do something to alleviate the suffer- 
ings of this class of persons. 



Italian 

Opera.— The house was not thronged last 
night, but, nevertheless, a large number 
were present. We were not completely 
carried away by the opera of L'Elisire 
D'Amore. In fact, we have no particular 
hankering after any comic opera. The 
main arias and duetts, however, were sung 
with remarkably good taste. Miss Lucy 
Simons, the young American prima donna, 
in her role of Adina, exceeded our expec- 
tations. Signor Orlandini seemed to be 
perfectly at home in hii role of Doctor 
Dulcamara, particularly in the duett of 
He was loudly cheered 
last part. The woman's 

cutr t wMbad ' ando,,gbt 

To-night Meyerbeer's world-renowned op- 
era of Roberto II Diavolo is the programme, 
a great cast. 



to have been 



f»F t h ■ (iENkRAL Council, 
I h, Council chamber was crowded lasi 
night with persons who have the in- 
terests of the city at heart. The attendance 
ofCouncilmen, however, was meagre, bare- 
ly a quorum being preaeui, 
A resolution was adopted providing for an 
election of Councilman 01 the Seventh 
Ward, iu the place of Mi. ,.l  re, expelled; 
and a Mayor iu place of Mr. Tomppert, 
deposed. 

Several petitions wero reud and referred 
to the committees. 

A petition from the Ceutral Passenger 
Railroad .Company, "asking [the right to 
construct a separate street railroad, double 
track 011 Walnut street, from Garden to 
Eighteenth streets with necessary turnouts, 
cars, Ac., to run in connection with the 
Fourth street railroad, granted to H. A. 
Duuiesnil, and his associates, and which 
road the Central Passenger Railroad Com- 
pany, composed of said Dumesuil and hiB 
associates and the other citizens incorpor- 
ate capacity assume to build and assume 
the liabilities of the said Dumesnil in his 
contract with the city. The Central Pas- 
senger Railroad Coin puny request the Gen- 
eral Council will authorise aud approve tbe 
transfer of the contract of said Dumtsnil 
to this company." Referred. 

The petitiou of the Fire Alarm Telegraph 
operators, asking for an increase of their 
salaries, was referred to the Finance Com- 
mittee. 

Marc Mundy's petition asking the Coun- 
cil to reduce the assessment of the Theater 
property, was laid on the table— yeas 8 and 
nays 5. 

J. W. Ehrich, Councilman from the 12th 
Ward, tendered his resiguatiou, the peti- 
tioner expressing his dissatisfaction with 
the course the majority of the members had 
taken in the Tomppert affair. Temporarily 
laid aside. 

J. D. Orrill sent in his resiguation, plead- 
ing sickness as his reason. Ordered to be 
placed with the other batch, 

MM NT SESSION. 

Mr. D. Spalding was unanimously elected 
Councilman of the 7th Ward iu place of Mr. 
Glore. 

James S. Lithgow was theu nominated 
for the office of Mayor and elected unani- 
mously. Twenty-three votes were cast. 

It was. then moved and seconded that a 
committee be appointed to wait upon Mr. 
Lithgow and inforui him of his election. 
Messrs. Tucker and Kaye were appointed 
from the Lower Board, and Baxter and 
Caruth from tbe Board of Aldermen. 

A recess of fifteen miuutes was taken. 

The resignations of the rebellious^mem- 
bers were then taken up, and agreed to act 
on each separately. The first was that of 
Mr. Maxwell, of the 1st Ward, accepted; 
Mr. Vissman, accepted; Mr. Orrill's resig- 
nation was also accepted. 

Phil. T. German's resignation was order- 
ed to be deferred for one week. In the 
meantime some inquiries will be made in 
his case. 

Mr. Spauldiug was theu introduced and 
sworn in as Couucilman by Judge Muir. 

R. A. Shrader s resignation was received. 

The resignation of J. A- Gilmore was re- 
ceived, 

Henry Dent's resignation was received 
after considerable discussion. 

Arthur Peter's resigua.tiou was theu acted 
upon and received. 

Mr. Ehrich's resignation was also re- 
ceived. 

Mr. Kaye theu moved to .accept the resig- 
uation of Mr. Oerman, but it was not car- 
ried. 

The Upper Board sent down an adjourn- 
ing resolution, to meet again to-night at § 
o'clock, in joint session, to elect members to 
fill the vacancies. 

Mr. Caldwell introduced a resolution to 
appoint a committee of five, three from the 
Lower and two from the Upper Board, to 
inquire iuto the condition of the Work- 
house, and report by ordinance or other- 
wise, such improvements as can be made. 

Adjournment until this evening at seven 
o'clock. 

Police Coubt — Thursday, December 28. — 
The following business was disposed of thvs 
morning: 

L. Dinkelspiel, carrying concealed a 
deadly weapon; discharged. 

Henry Rountree aud Sarah Rountree, 
living in adultery; discharged. 

John Hopkins and Alue Morehead, free 
negroes, stealing |3o0 from George Wash- 
ington; continued until to-morrow. 

Frank Liudsey, stealing a coat from Jno. 
Magness; discharged. 

James Locker, passing a 5v  counterfeit 
bill on the Bank of Louisville; conti uueil 
until to-morrow. 

Bridget Gorman, stealing a gold watch; 
discharged. 

I (Ellen Coous, stealing dry goods from 
Louis Simmons; discharged. 

Julia Brewner, drunkenness and disor- 
derly conduct; fined $5. 

James McDonald, stealing a cai -pet-sack 
and a lot of shoemakers' tools fr om Danl. 
Murphy; discharged. 

Richard Smith and Delia Smith, free 
negroes, stealing furniture lrom Mrs. R. J. 
Ward; discharged. 

Jos. Young and Edwin Dugan, robbing 
Peter O'Connell of ft discharged. 

Jefferson Sampsou, stealing a pair o 
shoes from Nancy McGuire; discharged. 

Geo. Ruffner, jr., killing his father, Geo 
Ruffner, sr.; tbe charge was dismissed on 
account of the lunacy of the accused. He 
was then presented as a luuatic, fouud to 
be one, and ordered to be taken to the 
asylum at Hopkinsville. 



RIVES MATTERS* 

ARRIVALS. 

Tin usdav, December M 
State*. Cincinnati, S'lver Laks. Pittsburg; 
«!oal City. 
Leui Leo: I, 
*oUrt " 
DEPARTURES. 

DaiM siaton. ♦ I 

OM. Knoll, 
HI ' hM.rl.-3, 
L»nl Ltstt, 

The River duriug the last twenty-four 
hours has risen about two feet, and there 
are strong indications of a further rise. All 
tbe wharf, from Fifth to Sixth street the 
water is nearly up to the pavement. The 
weather has turned quite cool and clear. 
Business brisk. 

Wild Wagoner for Cincinnati.— This 
splendid packet of the People's Line de- 
parts for Cincinnati at 12 o'clock this day 
from the Fourth street landing. 

Gen Krai. Lytlk for Cincinnati.— The 
sumptuous aud reliable Gen. Lytle is the 
morning packet of the Mail Line for Cin- 
cinnati to-day, leaving the fcot of Third 
street at 12 o'clock. 

The Major Anderson is the regular Mail 
Line passenger packet for Cincinnati and 
the East to-day. She starts at noon, con- 
necting with all the early trains for the 
East. 

The following tow boats with coal barges, 
have arrived at this* port within the past 
three days: Shark, eight barges, 90,000 
bushels; Whale, ten barges, 100,000 bushels; 
Lion, nine barges, 100,000; Tigress Nq. 2, 
nine barges, 85.000 bushels; Coal City, ten 
barges, ll." ,o00 bushels; Storm No. 2, two 
barges, 35,000 bushels: Coal Valley, seven 
barges, 70,000 Petrel No. six barges, 06,- 
000 bushels; Keystone, five barges, 50.000 
bushels. Total, 66 barges, 711,000 bushels. 

RlsiNc Auain. — The Licking river was 
rising again yesterday at a very rapid rate, 
caused by the heavy rain of Tuesday night. 

Bars on steamers furnished promptly 
with all the rtquMtt Kflraai a corkserew to 
a bottle of champagne) and on reasonable 
terms, by J. H. Schroeder Jc Sons, 
■25-6BI Cor. of Main and Fourth sts. 



THE 



NEWSPAPER. 

h£W YORK TRibU*tf. 
1866. 



yj b»n a 1 



MACHINERY, 

ZINKSVILLK, 0H1D. 



urn ooi sraruoLE 

it -nit. I .1. t iuiupli t.i Aiut-n. 111 r-»tn n 
»H»S. Ike UU«T jiacoii.lilntt. run t.o rtbr. » »t S c*«iou 
in. I - i . 1 . , I 10 I k,, 1 n . 1 : 1 uii.l v rojciiciug in tbU 
rt-uult, will !aU)i Iu cniuervr lliu l.  itiuiKt iruin or 
thi* crand, beni.'uuiit vii 1 i  i.y r n.l. rinK l.iLmy mud 
Opportunity tin- c..mni ( 1 b. rilagw of the. wlcoe Auu o- 
c n reopv now ami i tn ore. 

I i-countt'uarciDK all uuiutnly extiltaliou HH ■ 
nttxtleiM indictioQ 01 pain or privation 011 tlit upuoltiei* 
of Ik lout ounite, it will insist  n tl.* earli at p»mil !tt 
re-location o tin South* ru stales to lueir loru»fr powt-r 
and inttarBce in oar t'uiou ou the buxia of All Sight* f r 
All tbaiff People. 

It w.ll labo- ir hop- to proTe tk tt tke mit«tituti m of 
Free 'or Slave l.j|«,r m »t iucvilab'y and nmve-aa'ly 
conduct to th« incieaas of i .Juatry, Thrill. !'io*|4*rity 
aud Health, M rt.nt Ifeti South, within the u. it las 
fear*, must lock I ark am tsod ou ln»- locx peraist  uee in 
a practn e ao baletu. aa the cb.ittelizing ot Man. 

It will lalwr foi of l onim  u ft hool Kdn- 

catit.n. Manufacture!, the I »eul Art*.  tc,  tc. through- 
out every portion of our count v, but eapecialW throuxh- 
out the aectiotu hithertc devoid of them, heli-ving that 
• very good and will the. t in be IBSwarWcl ami the inter- 
est of every useful and woril-y claaa promoted. 

It will urge tho Protection of Home Industry by tlm- 
criminating dutiee on Foreign Proiturta imported, with 
a view to drawing hither the dhI capable and skillful 
artificers aud artisan* of Kurop., and the naturalizing 
on our soil of many brm cura of piodiu tion hitherto all 
but confined to the Old World, white it would strength- 
en aud extend those which have already a toothold 
among ua. 1, 

It will givr careful attention to progroa «n 1 mpro»e- 
ruent in Agriculture, doing its best at on. ■ to bring 
markets to the doors of our farmers aud tea o them how 
to make the most ol the opport unices thus afforded them. 

It will devote constant attention to M .rk U, espe- 
ciall' for Agricultural Products, with int. ut to *i»ve 
both producer aud consumer from being victimized by 
tb- speculator and forestalled 

Aud g|ving fair re ipe to Current Literature, to tbe 
proceedings »t C. n:;r ss. and to t tie general News of the 
Day. it hoies to retain its Id patrons and attract many 
new to bear them compauv. 




^r-The Catholic Telegraph giyes the fol- 
lowing account of the murderous assault 
made upon Bishop Hosecrans : "The Bishop 
had been attending to his duties in the con 
fessional at the Cathedral until a late hour 
Saturday evening. He then left, though 
urged to remain, and intended to walk to- 
ward the Seminary until he met the car- 
riage that he directed to be sent for him at 
10 r. M. At the bend of the road, near Mr. 
Wilder's, less than a quarter of a mile from 
the Seminary, he was set upon by two rob- 
bers, who demanded his money. The 
Bishop refused to comply with the 'modest 
request,' and sought to escape by running 
from the thieves. He was then shot, the 
ball (from a navy revolver) passing through 
the fleshy part of one leg, and lodging in 
the other. The Bishop continued on his 
way to the Seminary, when a Doctor was 
sent for, who extracted the bullet and 
dressed the wounds. We are happy to say 
that the excellent prelate was able to say 
Mass last Sunday, and ou Christmas day,, 
and that there is every reason to hope that 
in two or three weeks he will have perfectly 
recovered from an outrage which, had it 
not been for a special protecting Providence, 
might have had the most deplorable conse- 
quences." 

Opera Tickets.— Choice seatsjfor the Ital- 
ian Opera can be procured on application 
at Tripp's Music Store, Nos. 92 and 94J efler- 



S. Lituoow.— 
we make the 
mes S. Liikgow 
ce ol Mayor, to 
by the removal 



We rarely employ 
rostoia arc habitually 
of solicitors forjoor 
shall pay their money to 



trave.iug agent*, 
ly prowling in t*e 
imls. we prefer th 



Our New Ma yob— J. 
With true gratification 
announcement that Mr. Ji 
has been elected to the of 
till the vacancy occasionei 
of Mr. Tomppert. Mr. Lithgow's was th 
only nomination, and he was elected unani 
niously. No better man could ha\o been 
selected, and every true citizen of Louis- 
ville will feel proud at the thought ol hav- 
ing Mr. Lithgow at the helm, aud our 
experienced Council in harmonious co-op- 
eration. All squabbles and misunder- 
iu our municipal attairs are at 
The resignations of the obstreper- 
ous members of the Council have beeu re- 
ceived, and decorum and dignity will here 
after characterize the proceedings of our 
city government. 

*»~ jien. Dudley, lately at the head of 
the Freedmen's Bureau in the city of Mem- 
phis, is at present sojourning in this city. 

^g,Mr. Louis Tripp has just received 
the Piano, and respectfully invites profes- 
sors and auieteurs to examine it at his 
piano forte rooms, Nos. 02 and 94 Jefferson 
between Third and Fourth. tf. 



"The Family Letter Scale."— For as- 
certaining the amount or number of postage 
stamps required to be affixed to a letter, is 
the* simplest, most reliable and durable in- 
strument of tbe kind yet introduced to the 
public— requiring no weights, having no 
spiings or complicated movements— it can- 
not get out of order. 

The family letter scale is not only the 
simplest aud most durable, but also the 
cheapest scale ever offered to the public 
Price 75c, or sent by mail to any address 
for $1. For sale, wholesale and retail, by 
Civill & Calvert. tf 



as so many ini- 
aa umed capacity 
that onr subscribers 
tbey know and of 
hose 'integrity they "re assured. Auy friend who be- 
lieves he will do go .1 by increasing the circulation of 
Tnr Tribvm: .s authorized to solicit and receive sub- 
scriptions. Specimeu copies wili be promptly sent with- 
  ui charge to those retiuiriux th m, aud we trust many 
Mends will be moved to ask their neighbors and ac- 
quaintance* to |oin in makipg u? their clubs. 

The ttreat Family Newspaper. 

n  m is the ma to whirih 

NEW YORK WEEKLY TRIBUNE 

is priu'ed on a large double medium sheet, asking eight 
page* of six columns each. It contains all the im|K rtaut 
editorials published iu The Daily I rui ns, except those 
of merely heal interest ; also Literary and Scientific In- 
telligence : Reviews of tbe must Interesting and import- 
ant new Books; tho Letter* from our tariff corps of cor- 
respondent ; the latest n. ws received by Telegraph from 
Washington and all other part .-. of the counti j , a 3am- 
nwry of all important intelligence is tMs city aud else- 
where, a S nop*bi of tbe procee m?a f Congress and 
State Legislature when in sessi u; the t'oreigu new- 
received by . very steamer ; Exclusive Ueports ol the 
Proceedings of the faim n I'lubaf the American In- 
stitute. Talk* ah .t I- run ma other Horticultural and 
Agricultural iii:oruati m esseuti.il to c untry r sidenis, 
Stock, financial. Cattle, Dry Good* and Ueneral Market 
Reports, making it both tor variety and completeness, 
ail. c ■• li -r the most valuabl , interesting and instructive 
Weekly N • »« •  m published in Ihe world. 

The Full Ueports of th« American Institute Variutr*' 
l lub, an 1 th.- tsfkMM Ann nltural hVpoits, iu each 
number, are richly w*,rlh a year'* subscription 
TtMMS. 

Mail subscribers, si' gle copy. 1 year—.,.' numbers... fc  (sj 

Mail subscribers. Clubs of five 9 00 

Ten cop i s, aUdresse 1 SS names of subscribers . 17 flu 

Twenty copies, ad 'r eased to names o: tubsciibers... 34 00 

Ten copies to one address I* UO 

Twenty copka, to one addrt _ 30 U  

An eltia copy will be *eut for each club of ten. 
For clubs ot twenty, two extra copies, 1 r one copy of 
tbe Semi- Weekly, will bo sent gratis. 

For clubs of ttlty, live copies, or one copy ol the Daily 
Tribune will he sent gratis for one year. 

Subs crilit r* in Canada must send .11 cent* 1 ach in addi- 
tion, to pay V . S. postage. 

THK Nta \   iK  KMl-\  KKKLY THIBL'SK is 
published every 1 U ESDA X and FK. DAY", and contains 
all the kditorial articles, not merely local in character: 
Literary Beviews aud Art Criticisms; Letters fr m our 
large corps of Foreign ami Domestic Correspondents , 
Special and Associated Prest Telegraphic 1 ispatches; 
a careful aud complete Mimmary of Foreign and Do- 
mestic News; Exclusive Reports of the Proceeding* of 
tbe Farmer*' Club of the American Institute. Talks 
ai out Fruit, and otht r Horticultural and Ag i. ultural 
Informal 1011 ; Stock, Financial, Cattle, Dry Hoods and 
General Market Reports, which aiu published in TUB 
DAILY TKIHIN*. TUB SUM 1-W kKKl.V TKII1I NE 
m the course of a year. TIIRBB or FOl'R of 



r 

m 

 /} 

H 

m 
  

I 

  
  

2 



BLANUYS rVRlABTK TEAM BMil.NK.-, 
from 1 to '0 Hone Power each Engine ia 
one piece— siniph at possible consti uctioo— no 
brick or masonry in setting- born any kind of 
fuel— transport i-d ■ a any stout wagons adapt-*, 
t all purpose s where a cheap, dural le and esu- 
rient power is wanted- are the leoplc s engine 

BLANDlS Pi UtTBLB STEAM SAW MILL 
the most popular sad laccesaful in th 

world— are oa.eo and operated all ovsr the 
world— strictly portable— no brick or masonry 
in setting— transported on stout wagons— waa 

RANTKD to cut from *U (•   *» fVms.ia.1 fttt f*T 

t/tiy— indeed by their rapacity to make money the 
cheapest thing iu the world— pay for t k emselve« 
ami -xpensea inside of a year. Mills I ave 1   
in operati' 11 ten years and still almost as g 
as new. One Mill and Engine made per clay. " 

For Illustrated Circulars, ailh I-. script 101* ~ 
prices and reports »f operator*. 

Addre-s the Manufacturers, . 



  ■ 



HI, 



H. & 



^ar-Harper's Magazine and the Eclectic 
for January, at Civill & Calvert's. 6t 

Not a Debatahlb yi K.sri n — Some Questions are sub- 
jects of debate, others are past all controversy. For ex- 
ample, there is no room for argument as to whether Pha- 
Ion's "Night Bloomiog Cerent" is or is not the most pop- 
ular perfume in thi* country. The sovereign people, as 
I rl.it. 1- in matters of taste, have decided that jue»ti. n 
by it unanimous affirmative. Sold everywhere. 

of getting into good odor again 
rs, is sending on large orders 
for Phalou'8 "Night-Blooming Cereus," which, for four 
years, has taken the lead of all other extracts for the 
handkerchief iu every city and State ou this ride of the 
Potomac. Sold everywhere 



ugine Works, 

ZANESV1LLK, OHIO. 



r itlauujV Portable 

m [ dZMUwtf 



Works, 

ABK.OBIO 



NEWARK, OHIO. 



and Latest Popular Novels. 

by livine authors. Th ■ -   alone, if bought in 

book-fornc, would kg tr. m six to eight dollars. It pur- 
chased in t .e KNcJLlSU .tlAUA/.lMaB from which they 
are caretu!l  - m lect-l, th co t wwM be three or four 
times that .sum N-'Win re  • can so niu' h current in- 
telligence aud permanent literary mat er be had at so 
cheap a rat. „ r. ;il»; .- K H 1 v\ KICK I.Y TKIBl'dK. 
Those who b-liev • in the pr.n u 1- s an I approve of tbe 
chaiacler of The 'Ikisi'm: can increase its power and 
influence by joiniuu vtiili thci- u.-ixnbor* in toronng 
clubs to sub-c! die It i The hi-Wuki i Edition. It 
will in that way I- supplied to tie m at the lowest prut- 
for which »ucn a paper can be printed. 

TEEMS. 

Mall subscriber*. 1 ropv, 1 year— l')l numbers. ■ 00 

do. I copies. ,1 



. C pi  



.v. r, f.. 



 »y. 



SPECIAL NOTICES. 

Omk Coo Live*. Oil or PgnKc-r Purity Exists.— It ia 
manufactured by John C. Baker A Co., No. 718 Market 
street, Philadelphia. For eighteen years it has been con- 
sidered the tin- st preparation of its kind in the market. 
It* guara itees are the written testimonials of the moat 
eminent ph.vsicians in America. They are open to the 
public at the manufactory. Consumptives and all who 
suffer from coughs, colds, bronchitis, trachitis, scrofula, 
or liver disase are invited to try the article. 

jy27-ditw5m 1 

Marriage and Celibacy, an Essay of Warning a^d In- 
struction for Young Men, just published by the Howard 
Association, and sent in sealed letter envelopes free ol 
charge. Address. DB. J. HKILLIN HOUOUTON. How 
ard Assoc ation. 



On receipt ot i:in l«.r tc-u c pi.-, an .-xtra  op  will be 
seul six luouih-. On receipt of Hi for fifteen copies, 
an extra copy a id be tent ou • year. For 
send thirty-four copi ag, aud on. co| 
gratis. 

• aoada must send 10 cant* in 



■ MB, 

we will 



TA1LY TRIBUNE. 
110 per annum. 
Subscriber* in Canada must send tl 20 in addition, : 
prepay United States postage. 
Terms, cash in advance. 

Drafts on New York, or Post-Office orders, payable to 
tke order of The Tribune, being safer, are prefeiable to 
any other mode ot remittance. Address 

dec21»-d.'t 




GRAND ITALIAN OPERA! 



DIREiTOR 



I. ORAL. 



A Card to Invabidb.— A clergyman, while residing In 
South America as a missionary, discovered a s&le aud 
for the cure of Nervous Weakness, Early 
of the Urinary and Seminal Organs, and 
the whole train of disorders brought on by baneful and 
vicious habits. Great numbers have been already cured 
ty this noble remedy. Prompted by a desire to benefit 
the afflicted and unfortunate, I will send the recipe for 
preparing and nsing this medicine, in a sealed euvelope, 
to any one who needs it, free or cuarue. Please iucloae 
a postpaid envelope addressed to yourself. Address JOS. 
T. 1NMAN, Station D, Bible House. New York City. 
sev-tl 



■ INOTICE. 
A C .ill for a State Convention of 
the Colored Men of Kentucky. 

IvRIENDb AND FELLOW-COUNTRYMEN : - WE. 
the colored citizens of Louisvile, on this, tbe :-th 
day of December, IS65, do most earnestly invite the col- 
ored V -opl«*ot tue Mate of Kentucky, to elect delegates 
to ret reeeut them in a State Convention, to assemble in 
the cit v of Louisville, on WEON KSDAl . the 24TH DAY 
(IF JA MARY, MS. at 10 o'clock, A. M., la Centre 
Street i 'hun li, to take into consideration the present 
and tutu 'e " ur race, and to devise such means as are 
ia our do wer to educate aud elevate osr people. Dele- 
gate, are i nvited fiom all parts of the State. t ome one, 
come all th e true, faithful &— » - 
Washington i pradllag. 
Willis 1 .tl   t. 
Jesse Merrlv ealher. 
Horace Morris, 

A 6 j r Bfbb"' 

Lawrence Minor, 

lhurcne. e ™nd.,»cietie. throughout the State are rc 
quested t ) send d legates. dec29 tf 



Sev. M. M. Clark. 
" W. F. Butl. r, 
•; N. Adams, 

RlcTardJottn': 



JEWELRY. 



WATCHES. JEWELRY, CLOCKS 

CONSTA WTi.Y ON HAND AT 



NO. 8* 



to J. J. 

one door above Third. 



MASONIC REOAL1B3, LOLHsK, CHAPTER AND 
other Masonic Jewels; also a large assortment ol 
Pistols and Military Goods. 

Watches, Clocks. Jewelry and Music Boxes carefully 
repaired and warranted. , ii-l v 



PRINTING & BINDING 



Beguiling an 
please give us 
Orders from 
attention. 



of Printing N Binding 

« attended to with the a* 
I prices as if 



CIVILL & CALVER'ff, 



•Til, LAST 
■ presented 



riiHIS FRIDAY) KVKNINO. DEI'. 
X night but one of the opera, wheu will 
Meyerbeer's world renowned grand opt ra, 

ROBERTO IL DIAVOLO. 

With th. following great cast i Alice, M'nie NOEL 
CI 11)1 Itabelle, M ile BOSCMETTI ; Rcberto, fig. 
MUSI AN I ; Ramtaldo (kindly consented to sing this 
part to perfect the cast), big. LOTTI , Bertram. Sig. 
M I l.LKKl , Alberto, Sig. ( OL.LKTTI , Elena, M'lle AN- 
TuMNl. 

Conductor aud Musical Director Sig. MLZlo. 

To-morrow (.Saturday ), Grand oala Day, close of the 
season; two performances ou the same day— afternoon 
and evening. U.-. the afternoon at 2 o clock:  t  ers open 
at 1 o'clock. Grand Gala Matinee, wbeu will l e pre- 
sented Flotow s charuiiug opera. MARTHA Boschetti, 
Lady Henrietta, Olgiui. Nanc  ; Mg. Polini (his first 
appearance.. Plunk. It ; aig. Lolti, Lionel. 

Ou the same evening, Donizetta's tragic opera, IL 
POLlLTO, with its great cast aud great mist eu scene, 
•at* . I. e only correct l iprra Librettos for sale at tbe Box 
Office aud in the evening at the Theater. 



rOpera Glasses for hire at the door. 
unUI alter the close of the Theater. 



•tsTln active preparation, aud will be 
u try I, the grand -.astern pageant, 

THE CATARACT OF THE OANQIS. 
introducing a grand cataract ot real water. 



d on J an 



WOOD'S THEATER, 

Drj FIELD «s Fltnv 



N. 

C. C. Adams. 



. Ac ling and I 



tteKsr w U Benefit of Mr. L P. BAKU KIT. 
*sJ"Frida  Ev-niLg. Dec. 29, will be pres. ... 

LADY OF LYONS. 

riaude Melt., tte _ ....Mr. L. P. Barrett. 

P-uline _ Miss Julia Nelson. 

.Orchestra. 




Pettibone 

MwR-r y 

asrBArtKfc.TT M ATI NEK 



the Rule I all. 

Prices or Ausis- ton. —Dress Circle and Parcju. | 
Private Boxes. S ; Second Tier. 4(tc; Stats may be secured 
in the f.resa Circle without extra charge. A portion ol 
the Second Tier Majsai •* span for Kespec table Col- 



Ssariyoon i 



i at e ■ j, to begin at 7S o'clock. 



MASOTV IC T EMPLE. 

CONCERT 

FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE 

Chestnut St.Baptlst Sabbath School 

under direct ioh or 
MR. J. W AT. LURTON, 

TUESDA Y MVMMWrQ, J . IX. % 186»5. 

MR. AND MRS. ME1NINGER AND MR. HARTMAN 
J have k ndlr volunteeied their assistance tor theoc- 
casion: hIso, cieut.D . W. Daley, formerly of th. cele- 
brated Post Kai. 1 . f this city. 

hi Id. en, 23c. Doors open at seven 



in rise 



fight o'clock 

ALU" . B. HEWETT, Supt. 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



WARD & DUNG AN, 

AUCTION 

AND 

Commission Merchants, 

NO. 

Malu St., N. S., bet. 1th snd 8th, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

ill. -.!m 



NEW BAISIN8— 
100 boxes received this day 



FANCY COODS. 

Christmas ! Christmas 

elegahtTresemts ! 

F. II. HEG AN, 

I 3h old 4 1 1 1 Main St., bet. Ith aud fttb 

LOUISVILLE, IVY., 

Respectfully invites his friends and tbe public generally 
to call and extmine a 

RICH, RARE AND VARIED ASSORTMENT OP 

BEAUTIFUL PICTUBES 



SUITABLE 

PHOTOGRAPHIC 

MMOt In trrrat variety and at low 



Is-u 




CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEAR 



BKAOTIPUL VBENCH Ro.iDs* OF OUR OWM . , \tt 
portatiou. Ladies' and Gent*' Dressing- Cases, Wd^s 
Boxes, Cabas. Glove Boxes. Toilet Sets aad Toilet Aril 
clea. Card Cases, Ba*r*. Ka.s, pearl and shell TucB 
Combs, and a thousand other articles. \ 
at 

  .v in ran m 



THE SURPRiS 

A novel an I amuaiujf sAyle of 

BRONZE INKSTAND, 



We have a 

BRONZS 



CRYSTAL, et 



PRESENTATIONS 




Magnificent Gold Penaj 

SEW STYLES, ETC. 

A. Splendid Line 
PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS. 

RICH DESIGNS IN 



H VHOt. IN Y. ROSEWOOD, OKI 
WOOD'*, MOROCCO, etc. 




PROBABLY TUE GREATEST VARILTT 

JUVENILE BOOKS 



ALL AT 

CIVILL & C ALVERT 

ills-tranl 



SAVINGS BANK. 

Sa  (nigs Bank lor Colored People 

IMW 1 1 I I . ItK VM II 

OK FREEDMAN'sj SAVINGS AND TRUST CO. 

Chartmd by K A tV-.i^e**. Appr.trrd March \ 1*S 
\OWOPM FOR BISIMESS FROM s^^.tq, p . 
" "»,»«'■». iu the rear r. omit Gea. 



k's. 



S A. PORTER, Cashier 



FUEL. 

COAL! COAL! COAL! 




A LARGE SHIPM'sNT HIT THK VERT BEST gDAi 
J\ ty Af Plttshnrg Coal, which he. fTers f..r sale in auj 
Utiea, from ai.iHO bu-hels to one cart load, at thee 
l. wtMt market price. N. B.— Particular attention a 
to all orders by railroad.  BV 



COAL! COAL! 

JN COLLIES 1- -KLLINO BEST P1TTSBI Rti 
OTtoaA C«ce, No. li; rairtstjiSJ 



I. T. MURPHY. F. VAN  EUOEK 

MURPHY & VAN SEGGERN, 

Wholesale iad Retail Dealer* ia 1 

PITTSBURG AND ¥0161 

COAL, 

orriCE-No. 99 Last Side at TWiw street, between Marl 
Est aad Jefferson, and Bo. •J3S Sesjta akin Mar- 
k-t street, bet. Jackson and Uaaocch. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



BODY TAKE NOTICE! 




for cubi or CO* RT 

K. U. BULLING U a   
. f Apj.-aisat Ihi- Ac 



F  R STATS 

H. M. MoCARTt respectfully anaoances himself to 
■ DHwbiri o! the Kentucky Stat* Legislature a* a caa- 
date tor le-eiection to the office of Stat* Binder. s»7-le 



WANTED 

ANTED. — BOOM — A -MA.: DWELLING 
I*  'ae, in a good in ighls.rhyod, fir which a reason - 
r- • will be paid. Addrc-s. CARSON rJ BELL, 
-yi.'  J d27-3f 

FOR SALE. 

FL^ Engines for Sale. 

Kaon i o» rai general ocncil. i 

 ll lour hand tire engines and two boar car- 
ngiug to the city. for term*, etc„ call at my 



ay. Alao, -  Ur 
"Be Kjuare son * 



f OR R-.ii. 
HOTEL & BOARDING HOUSE. 

1/ K RENT, THE EAoLh H TEL, M.AB BAIL- 
1* road Depot, la Jeflersouv Uc Possession given i.t of 
V T Aj l  to   



EOAwDINC. 



B 



UA' niMi.-TWO VINE VN-rCKNISUBD ROOMS 
«• had mith board in a uuiet au.l agreeable 
»o1. aad within 2 L » square- of the p *t office, 
ittea with w ire* » II find the romlorta of a 
leva I . b  calling at Mo - - Kaet street 
A tew single gentlemen can also be accom- 
itb board, by day or week. oc2Vtf 



LACE COODS. 



»■ u HHfl) 
IX r VKMSE, aud 
Ol NT kPHBtji ■ 

HANDKERCHIEFS. 
EmprejandCati k« O.LLABS, at 

MBS T. C. IMHM 8 
IS- It W A Waul 315 Fourth atreet. 

IAA/i aR* tetiou LACE -KiS, COL- 

,UUU LABS, and IIA.% DKKEt TIlEfS. 

 • plain Unen COLLAR* si d 01 ft*, at 
MRS. T. C. M 

delli-M WAFQaul 



.AKuE ASSURTM fcM OF 



and Urtts CapB. 



locid price*, at 



t Ft jj.nl 



T. C. MI DDL ETON'S, 

313 Fourth street. 



..CSlON WAISTS, 

LACE SASHES, 
PKLTINGS, BCCBLES, FANS, 
■ ECK-TIES. and Alexandre * KID OLOVE! 



RNISHINC COODS. 

•ft, DAVISON & CO 




nrra tocessore o Soott, Keen A Co.,) 

and Retail 

i Tfr is 

iit\ u. BOYS* PI\E CLOTHING 

rURNISHIMG 0OODS, 

Corner of Six lb and Main Streets. 



LOTHING. 

tei. 
ing. 

LARGEST STOCK 



double I 
of "Fab 
choice l 



OF 



CLOTHING 

ladies AND 

. w 'uaien's l^nisliing Goods 
± S THE CITY 

1*AT 



v 



HOILE it MiNBBVILLK, 




BH1S 



EDVr . HUGO. 



A. OOWDY 



It be gll  

  IK. MORRIS 4 CO. 



t ISVlllE, KY, 

wiout. La natLasa a 

NOTIONS, 
TATIOLSTERY, 
IJKNISHINQ OOODS, 
& GOODS, 

J-ng' 

\ *  
io"^ 5 
■ 



OIL 



ISVLLLE CARBON 

Corner of sixteenth 
ISTABLiIS 

wvm . ski: 



m DAILY PRESS 




™ 

B \ TELEtiKAPll. 

~fc  L AB M1DN1CIHT BKPOKT. 

m Wanted by the War 
Department. 







I  m circulation ia rapidly lucre** 

^« zb renders tqe Press one of the best 
wrcrtteiuff mediums in the State. We 



dtlress of 



OUR AUKNTS. 

Hale A Uro.. L.. N. A. A C. B. R. 
uuh. A.. Vt milling, Atty. at Law, 

Rockpor I' 

: Sa:n., Troy. lnd. 
Samuel F. land. Postmaster, Hoptlm 

•' 'tt.iKiill A Co., l'arc Bow, Maw K l 
D.O. V enable. Frankfort, By. 
J. S. \Umu, Bowling Oroen, By. 




Til B 



■ PRESS 1 



* Sternbrra, 



Our former a#- * *«lt*riibrra. has tlla- 
poeed of hi* ksati - • C 11. Paddock, whose 
headtnarter . Carr's store, aontheaat 
corner of I .ad Frant atreet*. Mr. Pad* 
unci la j 0 and responsible ceotlemnn, 
p ■ t ea himself a cood soldier of 
 -pu k deserves the eacoaraaement 
.-h he will doabtleas receive front our trans- 
nlo friends. 

Jaat* By referring to the printed terms on 
our first page, it will be seen that we have 
reduced the price to both city and mail sub- 
scribers. 

Mail, one year $9 00 



•vVJSW* BOOKS 

AMD 

DNTo-w Supplies. 



CUBAN PICTUEES. 
SOUIBOB I'APKBS. 
ABTEMt'S WABD. (New volume.) 
HBSPEBl'S OF J. PAUL B1CHTE1 
ENOCH ABDEN. (Blue and gold.) 
AUTOOBiT OF Tl 
indgold.i 
MABOABET AND ilKU B] 
WEST ON CHILDiik.N. 
BEVEBIES OF A UACHELOB. (in 
DBEAM LIFE. (In vellum.) 
POCKET MAP M BENTUCBY. 
POCKET MAP OF TENNESSEE. 
POCKET MAP OF THE SOtJTHEBN STATES. 



,Blue 



CIVILL CALVERT, 



T. t«et rourth and Fifth 



FURNISHINC COODS. 



Mink Mantillas; 
Plnsh Hoods, fnr trimmed; 
Shirts made to Order; 
Imported Brush Hats; 
Siberian Squirrel Furs; 
Wool and Silk Underwear; 
Gents' Otter and Beaver Caps; 
Ladies' Skating Caps; 
Alexandre's Kid Gloves; 
Russian Sable Sets; 
Boys' Winter Caps; 
Scarfs and Mufflers; 
Swans-Down Trimming; 



Party 



Ge 



Fur Trimmed Waterfalls; 
Linen and Silk Handkerchiefs; 

AT 

GREEN & GREEN'S, 

MA IN A WD FO Vlt TH. 



OEO. M KK1M1T 



WM. COCOHLKN. 



Minister Adams to Return Home. 



MERRITT & COUGHLEN, 

WOOLEN MACHINERY 



mm 
the te* 
young 
is fortu 
highly 
regrel 
itint 
I 

th?°iV FFICK - BULLITT STREET, BE 
Stump C p &TpAKI n TO 8UPPLT THE TBADE 
jK?r hap* .. ult , Uichest anoe paid tor good Crude Pe 

tSaiS CRUDE PE 

count oaM ^ waU ^ p Tt oa m call, aa we can increaie 

Jn" e dT THREE HUNDRED 

lid require It Lnbricatinx oil and Ben- 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



/~1 ABD CI.EANEBS, OABD CLAMS, SHUTTLES, 
Vy Headle Frames, Patent Temples, Beed Hook., Satinet 
Warpp, nil Oan^, Bobbinc, Pick 01as*P8, Belt Awlg, Cloth 
TaaM, Cemb Plates, Tenter Hooks, Pickers, Ijne Leather, 
Beedn, TeaHels. Belting, Press Paper, Je*ns Wards, K lis r 
Leather, Card ClothiuR. Wind Headles, Burling Irotis. 
Barnass Hoots, Tack Hammers, Snipping Tugs, Boll 
Carding Machines. Carding and Spiuuing Machines. 
 :ws and Second-hai.d Machu» ry. 



WORKS. 



AND COAL OIL WORKS 



and High street*. 



ueutp**^ 



train* 

the ir 
(ithoei 



C. L RAD 
CLAIM A 

ftCTTLE ALL OFFICEBB', QUABTEB 
as' Midi sal Beturns and ArrounU, and 
the pres -nt War of the Bebei 



•arposos, as 



well as every oth 



g*,^j|?*Jje i*iiis the General Land Office duly attan 
I f "* — • ^jffli aTT 



wVJS #f CO. 

TWEEN MAIN AND RIVER. 

WITH A SUPEBIOBQoaLI 
trolenm. Persons ha vlnt 

TROLETIM 

the capacity ol oar works to 

BARRELS 

sine always on hi 



stork Market. 

j Nkw Youk, Dec. 28.— The Commercial 
Bays: The stock market shows rather more 
activity and firmness, the result apparent- 
ly of the growing ease in monoy. Thare 
are, however, no indication ol any import- 
ant clique movement, everything of the 
kind being left over to next week, where it 
is, as generally looked to, for active specu- 
lation. In the list the chief movement was 
upon New York Central, the purchasers of 
which were quite large, in anticipation of a 
favorable result of legislation at Albany 
relative to the road. This, however, is the 
old i ry, and no better grounds for couii- 
dence apparently than heretofore. QovaMtV- 
ment stocks are not effected by the adverse 
tones of London advices. There is a .stead v 
demand for Government stocks from ail 
parts of the country, and large dealers an- 
ticipating higher quotations. Railroad 
bonds continue dull. Bank stocks Arm 
and held out of market in anticipation ol 
January interests. The money market 
continues easy and the demand from stock 
brokers is quite moderate and is largely 
supplied at ti per cent, on priuie collateral, 
7 pt r cent, being an exceptional rate. The 
increased supply of money, although ac- 
companied with a reduced supply of paper, 
has produced no quotable change in the 
rates of discount, though there is more dis- 
position to take bills at the old r-tte. The 
banks are not receiving any large amounts 
of endorsed paper from the VVe terni banks, 
and indeed the indications all around be- 
token a general quiet of busines. Prime 
bills are quoted at 7(u.!» per cent. 

The advices of a growing stringency in 
the money market in Lcudon hus rather 
strengthened rates for foreign exchange. 
There is however no pressure for remit- 
tances lrom this side, and consequently no 
increased demand histi resulted from tie- 
tenor of the news. The leading bankers are 
askin lO.'t tor 60 day ..tiding, but sell little. 
Francs are weak. 



Soldiers'' Attention imoiuiatiou Wauled. 

\ V a ■ 1 1 1   ( 1 1   i n , I tece m ber ^S. -Information 
in wanted by the War Department of the 

names and residences of the twenty-seven 
soldiers belonging to what was known 
ajaBOMj the rebels as the Foreign Battalion, 
and who escaped at or about the time of 
the execution of the seven soldiers by or- 
der of the rebel General Mercer, at Savan- 
nah iu December i-'JI. It" any ol those sol- 
die;-- iiiay Be reached by this paragraph, 
they are "requested to communicate with 
Uc' Judge Advocate, at Washington, the 
names and residences, together with such 
iulormatlon as they may possess in regard 
to the above referred to execution. 



lbla 
Tom. - 

Nashvii.k, Decern btr lib.— The river is 
still rising with thirty feet of water on the 
shoals. The indications are that the river 
will overflow its haul. . 

Cotton is beihg shipped actively to New 
Orleans at the rate of four dollars per bale, 
and from this port to Cincinnati one dollar 
per bale. Price of cotton to-day is from !n 
to 42 cents— firm at that price. Reeeipta 
to-day, 121 bales ; shipments, 250 bales. 

A negro was killed by a soldier of the l» lh 
regulars, on the street last night. 

Rumors of a terrific tornado at Pulaski 
reached here this morning, but were not 
tangible enough to report. Reliable inform- 
ation from the operator at Pulaski says 
that a tornado visited that town blowing 
down a number of houses and killing a 
number of persons, burying them in the 
ruins. One lady was killed whose body 
has not yet been recovered. The wires l e- 
ing down between here and Pulaski, we 
can obtain no further particulars. 

No colored persons were arrested on 
Christmas day, though hundreds of them 
were perambulating the streets all day. 
The transferring of the jurisdiction of pun- 
ishment from civil to military law causes 
fewer arrests than formerly. 

Habeas Corpus Cttafa 
PHlLADBLrniA, Dec. 2*. — A special dis- 
pau.-h from Baltimore to the Evening Tele- 
graph says Judge Giles, iu the United States 
District Court, this morning had up the im- 
portant habeas corpus case ol Ralph Aber- 
crombie, who is held by Gen. Wooley, 
charged with being a spy and desertion to 
the enemv, also with gi' ing teaUaaonj be- 
fore a rebel court martial in Uichmoud, on 
w hicii testimony Capt. Denton, of the L uit- 
ed States army, was wrongfully convicted 
and executed. Judge Giles da . .. 1 in favor 
of the military authority romnndiug him 
back to custody for military trial, ;is he be- 
longed to the United tStatcs .service and he 
could not set aside the hab*-..s orpua. Ab- 
ercrombie will soon be tried by court mar- 
tial. He was Lieutenant iu the old United 
States army. The court martial, of which 
Gen. Feasenden is President and Col. Bing- 
ham Advocate, adjourned -M having 
disposed of the important trial of private 
Thomas Murphy. A new court martial 
will probably soon be formed to try Aber- 
crombie. 

1 SB) l 

Cotton Sales— Secretary Harlan. 

Nkw Yore, Dec. 2S.— Nearly ."000 bales 
of Government cotton were sold to-day at 
auction in Memphis. Middling fair brought 
67%c, strictly middling r»2 , 4 c ) low mid- 
dling 50!^c, and ordinary 45*c. 

The official reports of Simeon Draper, 
as Collector of this port, to September 
have been aupited and approved at Wash- 
ington, and the bonds given by his sureties 
have been released. 

A correspondent, whom the editor ol the 
Evening Post savs is responsible, writes 
that paper that Secretary Harlan has no 
intention of resigning, and Mr. Doolittle 
will not, under any circumstances, leave 
his place in the Senate. 



Paymasters Department. 

Wasiiim; rox, Dec. 2S. — A special to the 
Post says it was recently decided by the 
paymaster Generals department that pro- 
vost marshals and other members of the 
board of enrollment are not entitled when 
dial barged to the three months pay proper 
under the act of March id 1863, nor to trav- 
elling allowances to their home. The ne- 
eaeaarj papem are i»eing p t apa ia d at the 
pavmaster Generals department for pay- 
ment in all the military departments. 
About faViOBOyOOO will bo required for pay- 
ment in this vicinity. Quite a large num- 
ber of meritorious officers have been ab- 
sorbed by the freedmeus bureau and sent 
off South to relieve civilian agents. 

B e*/et Mai. General Riley, fortieth U. S. 
infantry, and one of the participants in the 
Rush barracks riots last summer, has been 
cashiered. 



Mayor Hoffinan Inaugurated— Prize Fight. 

New Yohk, Dec. 2*.— Yesterday Hon. 
Jno. T. Hotlinan, Mayor elect, took the 
oath of office. To-day Richard O'Gorman, 
Corporation Obaaaet, did the same. 

This morning a large gang of Ruffians 
left the city to witte H I prize tight near 
fashion course between two plugs named 
Win. Kaalar and Jed. Potee. Hearing of 
the affair tlM authorities succeeded iu ar- 
reting i .eeler and brought him to the Ottjr, 
where he is held for examination. His ar- 
reat intimidated Jeff and the roughs who 
s,.. ceded in making their escape. 

I r.iui i»u \l  ( . 

San KuvNcisc... P»e. 2^.— Advices from 
itcapulco state that Alvarez's forces were at 
Providentia, t went v-ei- lit miles east of that 
place on the Mth ult, Alvarez was confi- 
dent of the Liberals whether assisted by 
arms or not. He Larrasse.s the French at 
Aoapaleo terribly. They get no provisions 
ofthe Liberals. 

Gee* Worth Kilters upon his Duties. 

L.w.Kit. n, N. C, Dee, 28.— J. Worth, Gov- 
ernor elect, look charge of the Executive 
office to-day, relieving Provisional Gover- 
nor Holdeii. Gov. Worth has telegraphed 

Secretary Beward that he has assumed the 
duties of the office. 

i i ciii Fortress  Iunroe. 

Foktklss MoNitoio, December 2S.— The 
weather for the past ten days has been 
thick, with constant gales. Mrs. C. C. Clay 
has arrived from Washington to visit her 
husband. 

SflCUL N WUTin PRESS 

December iifl — 3 A. M. 



Our Commerce and the Chilian War. 

New York, Dec. 29.— Several merchants 
of this city are largely interested in the 
trade between the United States and Chili; 
they have recently addressed a letter to Sec- 
retary Seward, soliciting friendly inter- 
course of the Government of the United 
States, with the view of anliiaating the 
heavy loss of the commerce to the citizens 
of this country, likely to arise from the 
Spanish and Chilian difficulty. The Secre- 
tary replied, the offices of the 1 ioverument 
of the Unitea States have already been ten- 
dered to that effect, and are continued with 
deep interest, and not without hope event- 
ually of securing a result satisfactory to 
their interest, and to those of the United 
States. 



Freedmeu's Saving-" llauks. 

Nkw York, Dec. 28.— The Tribune's 
Washington special says the Treasurer of 
the schools and finances of the Freedmeu's 
Bureau haa just returned from a tour 
through the Southern States, baying es- 
tablished freedmen's savings' banks at 
Richmond, Wilmington, Charleston, Beau- 
ford, Savannah, Mobile, New Orleans, 
Vicksburg, Huntsvilie, Nashville, Mem- 
phis and Louisville. He states that all 
classes in the States lately in rebellion are 
fast becoming reconciled to their new rela- 
tions, but it will be necessary for the 
(ioverument to keep a strong force in these 
States for some time longer to neoure jus- 
tice to all- 



— 



ACENCY. 

WAY & CO. 



_JCE, COMMISSARY. ABMT 00 
of N on- Indebtedness, with despato 
of supplies by the Army, for Quarte 



Procure Cer 
lion; for the w*s«r« «■ 
er kind of Claims, prepared sad collected, 
dad to, and money advanced on officer's I 



BjasnanfJ 
twos* I* 



Consecration of a Bishop. 

Boston, Dec. 28.— The consecration of 
Rev. George M. Randall, D. D., Rector of 
the Church of Messiah in this city, the new- 
ly elected Missionary Bishop of Colorado 
and parts adjacent, took place in Trinity 
Church, in Summer street. Rev. John 
Henry Hopkins, Bishop of the Diocese of 
Vermont and Preaidiug Bishop of the Pro- 
testant Lpiacopal Church in the United 
States, acted aa consecrator. The OODMOre- 
tion service was exceedingly iutenistipg 
and impressive, and attended by a great 
congregation, the aisles and galleries of the 
Church being crowded. 



Commercial Matters In New York. 

New York, Dec. 2S.— There was firmer 
tone to railway speculatian this morning, 
and a general improvement In prices. There 
was a demand for stocks, and considerable 
excitement in New York Central, Fort 
Wayne and Pittsburg. During the day the 
market was firm, w ith heavy sales of New 
York Central. At the last board there was 
some activitA', with very slight lluc'ua- 
tions. 

The market is largely over sold, and any 
effort to cover, on the part of the leading 
bears would produce a rally. 

The following were the closing {. rices at 
4::$i» P. m.: 

Ohio eertifteataa 28){, New York Central 
W , Erie 95 [, Mudaon River 108, Reading 
106 i, Michigan Southern Cleveland 
and Pittsburg 82, Chicago and Toledo 113, 
Rock Island 10'i., Northwestern :ili, North- 
western preferred til, Fort Wayne iOSJ*. 

It is stated that Bearing Bros, have taken 
t\. o millions of the ."  per cent, gold bearing 
Lo..dt; of Massachusetts, at about 07 per 
cent. 

Gold it; active, with strong feeling; slight 
Qui tuatiOM for use, closed at 145%. 

] i. supply of Government securities on 
sale is small, while the demand is fair; pri- 
ces steady and well sustained. Large or- 
ders' have been received from the country 
in the past two days. There is some a etiv- 
Uy in Bennehoff Run and Pithole Cieek, 
but the balance of the petroleum stocks 
were quiet. Bennehoff Run 1000; Bradley 
60* Central IS'JOO; First National 50; Mount 
Vernon 35; Oil Cieek 175; Pithole Creek 
PMnj U s 27; to. 

Petroleum is dull at a decline; 1000 bar- 
rels crude sold at 41o, and :iu00 barrels re- 
fined in bond at 03c. 

The following are the quotations from 
the Dry Goods Exchange: Brown sheet- 
iugs— Appletou 33%, Bedford S,, Pittsiield 
■27. BleacheJ shirting— Bates 37%, Colum- 
bia 27', Reynolds 32%, Prints -Merrimac 
2S, Sprague 20%, American 25, Briggs 24, 
Freeman 22%. Delaines — Manchester 2y, 
Pacific 2o. Brown Drills— Pepperill 35, 
Wiiu hrop 80. Corael Feana— Amoskeag K\ 
Newmarket Canton Flannels^Laco- 

nia 48%, Hamilton SO, Kentucky Jeans- 
Richmond 89}. Cassimeres— New York 
mills 80. 

The Exchange is now publishing daily a 
price list of all varieties of dry goods in the 
New York market. 

The following dispatches woro received 
to-day: 

Philadelphia — Market firm but quiet, 
without any particular change iu prices. 

Providence — Market quiet but prices firm 
for print goods. 

Baltimore— Market rather inactive, but 

goods firm. 

i—i 

From Jamaica. 

Ni:\v Yokk, Dec. IB.. . M en u to the 15th of 
December lrom Jamaica has been received. 
 )u the 13th Governor Eyre transmitted to 
the Colonial Asi-enibly a message, in which 
it was stated that the home authorities had 
intimated that, if necessary to preserve 
tranquility iu the Island, they would dis- 
solve the Colonial and Constitutional Gov- 
ernment and inaugurate a stronger one. 
The Governor recommends that the Assem- 
bly so far rescind and moderate decrees as 
to leave the home government perfectly 
free in deciding the character of the pro- 
proposed BliniinirtllalTI machinery by 
which to conduct the business of the coun- 
try. The recommendation mat with an in- 
dignant reception, and was ordered to lie 
on the table. 

News from St. Thomas to the 21st says : 
The ex-Emperor Solon me, of Hayti, has 
obtained permission to reside iu tne Island 
of Curracas, and is about to leave St. 
Thomas. 

The cholera was still raging in the Island 
ofOnodnloope with considerable severity. 

By Royal decree of Spain the ports of the 
Island of Porto Rico have been closed to 
all iuiportatious, though open to exporta- 
tion. French vessels passing St. Thomas 
for Vera Cru/. carry large numbers of 
French troops sent to ro-euforoe the Imper- 
ialist in Mexico. 



■rpHr. 

New York, Dec. 28.— The Post's Wash- 
ington special says it is reported that Gen. 
Butler will make his reply to Qen. Grant's 
corked-bottle criticism in a speech to be de- 
livered at Lowell belore New Year. 

Auger is making diligent inves- 
conceruiug the Alexandria riot. 



Mexican Newi 



hold 



River. 

Cincinnati, Dec. 28.— The river has risen 
two feet four inches w ith 30 feet 11 inches 
water in the channel. Thermometer 40. 

Pittobubo, December 28.-River 11 feet 7 
inches by the pier mark and rising. 
Weather cloudy. 



i— Imperialists 
Chihuahua. 

New York, Dec. 28.— Advices from Vera 
Cruz to tbo 10th, by way ot Havanna are 
received. It is reported that the Imperial 
troops had again occupied the city of Chi- 
huahua, and that they were also in posses- 
sion of Peidros Nepros. A number of ac- 
counts of additional defeats' of the Republi- 
eana in the interior are given, The most 
important is one announcing that the army 
oi Qen, Escobado had been attacked some 
distance from Monterey and utterly routed, 
and that Escobado himself had escaped 
with an escort of qnly twenty men. From 
Republican sources we have Gen. Hsooba- 
dors report of recent engagements between 
his own and the Imperial troops at Monte- 
rey, presenting a strong contrast to the Im- 
perfianat accounts heretofore re.;»lved. 
— '•» ' • 
Kustda and Lug la ml. 

New Y'ork, Dec. 2*.— A special despatch 
from Washington says, it is positively as- 
serted teat Mr)Adams will a •turn home in 
the spring and the friends of secretary 
Stanton are prophheying that he will be 
sent to till the vacancy. It is alsa rumor- 
ed that Mr. Hill may be tendered the Rus- 



VddiesM or Ptesideut  »'!Hah»ue\. 

New York, Dec. 28.— President o'Maho 
ney issued a brief address to the Feuiau 
Brotherhood, stutinp; that evil disposed per- 
sons are desiring to perpetuate dissention in 
our ranks, and seek to prevent the healing 
effects of the second proximo, by inducing 
delegates to remain away from ignorance of 
its deliberations and interests with you. 

He says to form our columns, to cover 
our endangered good name, and to send 
hope and cheer to our brothers in Ireland. 
Do this and your Executive abides the result 
with j erlect confidence in the Broterhood 
and the cause. 

Advices from St. Louis received here 
state that the Feuians of that city intend 
to send a full representation to their 
Congress on Tuesday. A cabinet council was 
held yesterday at Headquarters, two 
general officers, members of the military 
council of the Irish Republic, who arrived 
during the week on a special mission, par- 
ticipated In the deliberations which are 
said to be of a very important character. 

Iki mlZmm 



City. 

Kansas City, Deo. 28.— Three 
Main Street were burned last night. Lose 
820,000. Partially insured. 

Cincinnati Grain and Produce Market. 

Cincinnati, Dec. 2S — ftora— Firmer, and in good de- 
ataad. --upi rtiiie i7a 507; extra $7 30a9, aud family and 
iHUcyao 2Sall. 

Qaaia - Wheat steady at I 95®2 m» for prime old red, and 
for No 1 new. Corn active aud in good demand, 
■it oiuVe lor new ear, and ^Sa6 c tor shelled; oats dull and 
prices declined to 40c, iu elevator. Bye steady at 7Sc for 
prim". 

11*". s— Active and prices hisln-r; the sztreme short r | 
i.lea is gaining ground, bales of 7W0 head at $11  *i@ii 75 
net Holders asking $12 lai at the chse. Receipts 7.1H0 
head 

Pan BBjMB  Me s pork in good demand at $29 50ti)29 50 
for city, lo w held at $30; and :w  I. Is sold at this rate, 

to he delnered next month, buyer,' option. Oreen meats 
firm at •i 1 ,a i .- for shoulders. II I sides and IHS,c hams 
Hulk in in irregular ItHs UHc and ldc for sboulds, 
sides and ham- Bacon tirm, at I ". ial" '4c for shoulders, 
1 7a IT '.i- for sides, aud llaAOaa forcleaa side.. 

Lakh— In good domaud, ,.nd priees advouued li  ISJjc 
for prime city. 

Uatioa Stuady at 47c for middling. 

lilt ri:aiES -Quier. 

\Siii-kv I ui»-ttled, and prices irregular, it is 
at $1  25, duty paid. :ind $2 26 in bond. 
Oold— 14V. 

Weather cloudy. Thermometer 30. 



New York Grain aud Produce Market. 

Via Volth, I er.|2 ,— Cotton— Kirm with a general de- 
m.uid. Ha ■ Mm middling, aud by {auction to-day, on 
Co'ei uuieut account, 2£'d bales Memphis cotton, at t.^ .-a 
57 '.c for low ordinary to middling for. 

Ki oua— Rather more active, aud good souad low 
ave ruled «aiteana,«W Ma8 M intrastate; AS us 
ml Kxtra Kouud-hoop Ohio; $10 2», Trade Brands. The 
marke' closiug iiuiet. * 

Wiiiskv Hull, $2 27a2 18. 

Or. \in— Wheat rather more act i ; . aud closed more 
steady, $l Mial M for inleiior to good Chicago Spring; 
il vial "for Milwaukee Club; $1 H5al ST. for old amber 
Mil waa keel $l .o for new amber Milwaukee. Kyedull, 
$108, Barley shadd tinner for choice lots, p ime |qU of 

Oaaada West M $&, Bailey malt dull. Com altaoat a 
dec Id d change, juatMc for unsound; '■ a%   tc for sound 
mU  d Western, 'JJaiMc for interior to good yellow Soatb- 
ern. Outs tirmer, aasMc for unsouud, ijnafiL'c for sound. 

rr.utoLia vi Very iiuiet, Uc for crude • \i i for re- 
lined in bond, and Mc for tree. 

fail I bW—1, nil I firmer, and more active, closing 
at - 62 cash,  21 lor m-w prime, aud $24 00 tor prime 
mess, but quiet; $l7a20 for plalu mess, $llal4 fir old do, 
$3Sa I I'M ii' w   xira mess. $l4al7 lor old do in tieices. 
beef daii, pnau- m ss on private norms; boef hams juiet, 
llal&B for shoulders, and i3ali c for bams. Bacon, mod 
el ate demand. - il. s, 7 H Ixixe , part Cumb'Tiaud cut, at 
14*sc, ou the spot, and 14! «al4 ic for 1 ebruary deliver;, 
d SSaM Ii 'gs heavy, I7U13 sr. Beef quiet, 17a.'. c for new 
plain mi ss, Ual7c lor old mi ss. 

i uiks— t'offte quiet, sugar quiet, molasses sugar 
|$ , molasses qulwt, Orleans '.'7 4ca$l I*. 

UAAD Very h m. 16alv 4 c, very choice at 20c; also IimmJ 
bbli I t January and Febraan , ssUss' ..ptioo, at i.salsSc 

«« ' ' ■a-Oiui SUaSSo tor Ohm, aud ISaSe for State. 

Cai'UK-lKlll, lS'ialSC; 

New York 



New Youa.Dec. 2-.— Monet— More easy aud steady, 
per cent. 

DTEA1 i.no— Qaiet, lW.aloy^. 

Uold— Kasier, opened 1I5'», declining to 115 ),, advauc- 



Uoi.u— aasier. oiieniHl 11'. ' 2 , decliuin, 
iuc to 145^, and closing at U'^alts S. 
pREMHTB— To Liverpool qu-' t aud m 



OovraNMENT 8Toiks-o.ii et. 

-Hull. Hi •*• York Central 19$, United States n's, 

II, coupons. Hit ii do. 5-20 coupons '( 2, 103 'n; do. 'ii5 
Mi; do. 10-40 coupons J2' ; 7-:ai, lirst series. 'J8; do., 
secol il series, '.«s' Ohio aud Mississippi certificate . 3'.'; 
QnicksUTsi M; hew York Cehtrall96^; Brie 9 iiBUcn- 
i«au Southern 74: Krie preferred-',; Hudson lo»M; and 
ia tiwustaga Ut atafaisa U%. 



Sullerlng Iu 

An agent of the American Union Com- 
mission thus writes to the Chicago Tri- 
bune: 

With your permission I will say a word 
to your readers on behalf of the loyal suf- 
ferers of Arkansas. Ten thousand have al- 
ready been officially reported who are in 
immediate and pressing want of shelter, 
clothing and food to meet the snows of 
winter. The Bureau of Refugees report six 
hundred and forty widows with families at 
Fort Smith alone, besides there are many 
thousands in the country adjacent to that 
point and scattered over the State. These 
have never been in the rebel army. They 
are the bereaved widows and orphans of 
men who voted and fought against seces- 
sion till they sunk in death. 

In the desolate districts but little has been 
raised for two years. The greater part of 
the houses were burned, thousands of hus- 
bands were shot from the bush, many fell 
in the Union army, and others sunk under 
the bardships of war. Their widows and 
little ones are now suffering all the woes of 



. j,h miosioi. 



I » UTI 



I have traveled hundreds of miles 
through the State, and have not heard of 
one able-bodied man begging, nor do we 
intend to assist such. We are only extend- 
ing aid to the cry of those who cannot help 
themselves, those whose husbands and 
fathers were murdered in their sight by 
guerrilUs often. Every consideration of 
loyalty, humanity and religion obliges us 
to assist them in their sore calamity. To 
hear their dying cry, and send them no re- 
lief, is to invoke their blood upon us. 
Clothing and corn sent immediately would 
save many lives. The hungry children 
would be glad to get the crumbs that fall 
from your tables; the grains of corn 
wasted in the cribs of any State in the 
Noriu would go far toward? supplying 
these sullVrers. Let all do something at 
once. "Ho that giveth to the poor lendeth 
to the Lord." Surely the cry of these suf- 
fering ones is the voice of God. 

Ths Heal Antagonism of Measures. 

We believe the President and Congress 
are aiming substantially at the same re- 
sults, and that therefore there is no neces- 
sity for any break between the Executive 
and Legislative departments of the Gov- 
ernment. That we are not alone in this 
opinion is shown by the subjoined extract 
lrom a leading article in the Albany Even- 
ing Journal, well known as being the pe- 
culiar organ of Secretary Seward: 

At ths same time he (the President ) has 
thus far not only refrained from interfe- 
rence with the prerogatives of Congress, 
but has taken special pains to call attention 
to its powers in the premises. A few hot- 
headed und impulsive Representatives 
choose to mistake this conservative posi- 
tion, and assume that it evidences undue 
anxiety to propitiate the South. But the 
majority thus far fail to see anything in 
the President's career which is inconsistent 
with his repeatedly declared views, or 
with the platform of the party that elected 
him. We say this without' assuming or 
believing that a single insurgent State has 
yet thoroughly purged itself of treason. If 
Executive recognition perfected the rehabil- 
itation of Alabama or Georgia, we should 
regard it as a grave mistake, trespassing 
closely upon the borders of crime. We 
bold that this is not so, and more, that the 
President has repeatedly and emphatically 
declared that he doe i not regard his action 
a closure of tbe question. It is only a step 
toward a result which all good citizens long 
to seo hastene d. 

Romance iu Real Lite. 

Our readers will probably remember Col. 
S. S. Goode, who formerly resided in De- 
catur, was made Colonel of the 21st Illinois 
infantry at Mattoon, and was subsequently 
dropped by Gov. Yates to give place to Co- 
lonel (now Lieutenant General) Grant. We 
find in the Decatur Tribune quite a roman- 
tic story about him: 

"It seems that, after undergoing many 
strange and startling vicissitudes of life, 
and buffeting the darH waves of adversity 
and misfortune, he has at length become a 
wealthy and titled gentleman. By the 
death of his cousin, Sir Jasper Goode, who 
recently died at York, England, he has 
pUlen heir to estates, tbf rental of which 
amounts annually to 63,00(1, and also suc- 
ceeds to the title by inheritance. 

"The incidents and aaveutures through 
Which this singular individual- now Sir 
Samuel S. Goode— has passed would fill a 
large yellow covered volume. At the age 
of nineteen he was a midshipman in the 
Texan navy— then engaged in the war of 
independence with Mexico— and was pro- 
moted to Lieutenant in three months for 
cutting out a Mexican bungo under the 
guns ot the Citadel of Vera Cruz. 

"In the war between the United States 
*nd Mexico that immediately followed, he 



volunleored 11. the Auierii an army as a 
private, but by his gallantry noon won for 
himself a Captain's commusiou. Iu the 
disastrous filibustering of Lopea he com- 
manded a company — was taken prisoner at 
Cardenas, and escaped the garrote by the 
daughter of a Spanish officer, who became 
enamored of him, opening tbe prison doors. 

"Undeterred, however, by his narrow es- 
cape, he next embarked in Walker's first 
expedition; from this he alao managed to 
escape, after passing through untold perils 
and sufferings. As all our readers are al- 
ready aware, he raised a company in this 
city when the guns from Sumter reverber- 
ated through the loyal North, went to Mat- 
toon, and was elected Colonel by his regi- 
ment, the Twenty-first. 

"By some means, however, he was de- 
prived of his command, and General U. S. 
tiraut, then a plain citizen, was appointed 
in his stead. Weary and despondent, 
through this disappointment, he neglected 
his profession — the law — and by some 
chance drifted intoCarlinville, in this State, 
where, at the time he received his fortune, 
he was keeping a bar iu a drinking saloon. 
He passed through this city eu route for 
New York, there to take a steamer for Eng- 
land, honor and fortune."— Springfield j 111.) 
Journal. 



*A luinplete Pictorial 
(he Times." 



"The Best, Cheapest, aud moat 
Family Paper In the Ui 



The North 

The Legislature of North Carolina has 
unwittingly done a very sensible thing. It 
has adjourned without passing, or even pro- 
posing, any law for the government of the 
freedmen. This is infinitely better than the 
conduct of some States iu grudging freedom 
to the uegro, and in saving every little scrap 
of privilege in the way of slavery for the 
conviction of crime, severe apprenticeship, 
whipping on the bare back, Ac, which the 
Constitutional Amendment allowed. The 
North Carolina people determined, perhaps 
(whether from good motives or bad^ not to 
place such obstacles in the path of Con- 
gress, for Congress to sweep away. Slavery 
had been wrested by maiu strength from 
the embrace of the South. On that altar 
they had placed fortune and life, and had 
battled gallantly through a long war. The 
l uited States had conquered slavery, and 
Congress had demanded as the prioe of its 
restoration to the insurgent States of the 
rights they had abandoned, the surrenderof 
slavery. The surrender was made reluct- 
antly, as it might well have been. It was 
extorted by force, and we ought not to have 
expected anobsequioussmile to accompany 
the surreuder. North Carolina determined 
that since Congress had forced slavery from 
her, Congress might legislate for the lreed- 
uien- she would not do it. Accordingly, 
Congress will probably legislate for the 
freedmen in this and in all the insurrec- 
tionary States, I., citi. ,e power is given to it 
by the Constitution to legislate appropriate- 
ly concerning this subject of making the 
slaves freedmen. If Congress does well in 
this matter, it will be praised; if it does ill, 
it will deserve all the eensurs North and 
South can pour upon it.— Army aud Navv 
Journal. _ 

The freedmen in Wilkes county, Georgia, 
having been most . .amefully maltreated, 
a detachment of troops have beeu sent- 
thither to restore order. 



PETROLEUM. 
THE COLUMBIA OIL COMFY 

ol Kentucky. 
(Incorporated by the Legislature of Kentucky, Jan. 1S65.) 

BOA Kl) 0*' DIKKCTOKS. 
Hon. B. S. Ooffey, Columbia. Ky .; Oeueral J. T. Bovle. 
Louisville, Ky , H. A. \ atts, LouisvtUe, Ky.; A. U. 



ui: wnich con 
I nine hundred 



Or r'lt'Kltt. 
Hon. B. 8. Oafar, ftmU i.t; W. 
rotary; A. O. Durlaud, Treasurer. 

Capital, 

(Par Value.' 

CAPITAL. 

JS£Sf££Z% : ■.did' iut°o m twent Ah 
of the par value of twenty-live dollars ea. 

PBOPKBTY OF THE COMPANY. 

The property owu d by the Company, ami which con- 
stitutes its capital, wompri-es one thousand nine hundred 
and forty-four acres of laud, situated near 
laud river, in Kussell and Wayue counties, 
IN Pa* SIMPLE, 

There are six tracts owned in fee simple, embracing 
lime hundred and thirty-eight acres, situated on Mc 
Karland's branch of Cany Fork of Wolf Creek, aaal the 
Cumberland river. 

There are four tracts of eight huudroU and thirty-si* 
acres, situated on Wolf creek and iti bi a-'chea iu Kussell 
county, within a short distance of tho Cuiuberlaud ri.er. 

There are two tracts of seven huudted ^nd s'-veuty-five 
acres situated on th« Cuml.ei 1 11: 1 .iv. 1 nud n otter 
Creek. Wayne county, Ky., withi., .» few miles of the 
Cumberland river. 

It is the intention of the Compauy to increase tbe 
amount of lands to 2,500 aties, aud develop; every tract 
at once. 

The lands now owned uud held by tbe 1 ...... are 

confidently believed to present as favorabl. p., .specie 'or 
large yields ol petroleum as those in an  seen u of the 
State. 

They are situated abgot fouti- n miles sbovi, the llow- 
ing wells on Crocus creek and within ; a short distance of 
a well recently struck near Creelsboro, ou the Cumber- 
land river, in Kussell county. 

The Company has two wells, one of which is U-ing 
tested at the depth of one hundred and t 
with a smtll but a gradually increasing yield of 01U The 
other well '.% being bored, and has already met with 
very flattering prospects of succ ss. 

The operations of the   ompauy are under the personal 
sup- rvi.lon of the Presideut, with co 
rienced men as assistants, who have 
the success of their efforts. 




There are a number of shares of stock of this Con 

tor sale at per share, aud purchasers are not 

to further assessment. 

Apply to the SKCUETARY. at the office of J. T. Boyle, 
No. 7 Hamilton Huil.ln.a. eonat ..f Sixth and .Main 
streets, where maps can be seeu. oc!3 eedtf 



GLASGOW 



Incorporated by an act of the 



QEN. J. T. BOYLE, President. 
W. A. K LI ESSEN DO KEF, 
H. W. WILKES, Treasurer. 



CAPITAL STOCK, $400,000! 

Divided into lO,04M) Shares of *14  Each 1 



THE PKOPKRTY or THIS COMPANY CONSI.-TS 
of Nineteen Tracts, comprising eighteen hundred 
and nineteen acres, situated on Boyd's creek, Skegg s 
creek aud Peters' creek, and in the immediate vicinity of 
."our yielding wells of very superior oil, and th ee more 
wells that have just comn.euced operations. 

There are five traets, embracing sev  u hundred and six 
acres, situated in Metcalfe county, on Dry fork of South 
York of Little Barren i iver, in the vicinity of a tffl"niw 
undergoing the process of boring. 
This is co-sidere I as No. 1 territory 



The well of th's company is located on Boyd's _.. 
short d'sUnce above those yieldiug wells. Thev are 
boring, and have already gone a considerable depth, and 
havemei with very flattering indications for a good well 
of oil. 

Judge Bitter aud Mr. J. It. Bedding, of - Issgi i , both 
directors, *ill give the operations of the company their 
constant attenti ii 

There are a limited number of shares of stock of this 
company for sal-, at the low figure of Two Dollars per 
share, par value be  eg T-n Dollars, and purchasers are 
not liable to further assessment. 

SW Parties desiring to purchase can do so upon appli- 
cation to the Secretary, at the office of J. T. Boyle, No. 7, 
Hamilton Building, wnere map  of the territory of this 
tympany cau h% ^d, *a«.l any further intvrmatlon r*»  
girding the affairs of tbe company given. •e3u-ouJtf 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 

HOLIDAY PRESENTS 
HARMONY HALL 



Xos.!»4 and »l Jetierson street, 

Vl»: 

BUST PIANOS. 

DOUBl.U ACTION  .KAM  IIAKPS, 
CABINET ORf;ANS, 

And large variety of every kind, 

Of MUSICAL GOODS, suitable for HOLIDAY PKK8- 
KNTB, carefally selected and now being received, which 
I will sell vqty tow for cash. 




"The best Family Paper 
—New Loudon Advertiser. 

"The aoaaii Ncwsp.raaofourconatry-completeiusil 
the departm-nts or an American Family Pap. r-fcUaj-in a 
■ I'KilWJffSff' f'Titeeira "«ht to its title. 'A JOUB 
NAl-or i l\ ILi/ v [ i v '-BVw lark lining Post. 

"This Paper hirni hes ths best iLLl'STaaTioMS. Our 
futur- historians wu! enrich tbemselv.s out of Hari 
Weekly loug after writers, and painters, and 
are turned to dust "-New York Kvan«.-hst 
"A necessity in every household. "-Host 
'It is at once a leading political and his 



-- — — — -- — ™ ■ ■ if iiiii.i an. i i 

of the nation. '-Pliladelphu fre.s 
"The best of its class in Aawriea."- 



SUBSCRIPTIOSS. 





The Publishers 
which they can i 
ly to those who prefer to receive their periodicals 'lire, tl 
from the Office of Publication. Postmasters and other 
desirous of getting up Clubs wUI be supaiied with a haa 
some pictorial Show-hill on application. 

The postage on H tarsu s Wibklt is .0 cents a ye* 
which must be paid at the subscriber s post oaVse. 

TERMS: 

Hakpkk s Wikklt, one year $4 no 

An Extra Copy o/ritAerlhe WaaaLTor XaaAZINB will » 
assa*«sa oratH^r sssry Clae 0/ Fivit Srascarsaaa mt at at 

euc*. ia tm, remittance; or Six Coptm/or $ai 00. 
Back Humbert can l»- suprlie l at any time. 




HARPER'S 
NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE. 

It Is the loremost Magazine of the day The! 
never had a more dolig'.tful companion r.or I 
mors enterprising friend, than Harper's 
Methodist Protestant ( Haltimore. 

The most popular Monthly in the world.— New York 
Observer. 

We mast refer in terms of eulogy to the high toas and 
varied excellences of Harnes s M a..*2iNS-a y urnal with 
a monthly circulation ('about lavoo copa»*-in whoa* 
pages are to be found some of the choicest light and gen- 
eral reading at the day. We speak of this work as ansvl. 
d^uoeol the American people; and the popularity it haa 
acquired is merited. Each number contains fusW 14-4 
sages ol reading matter, appropriately illustrated with 
good wo. hI cats; and It combines in itself th- racy m uthly 
aud the more philosophical .juarterly. blend. I with th« 
best features of tbe daily joui nai it has great power hi 
the dissemination of a love ol pure literature. -Trubner i 
Uuide to American Literature, London. 

The volumvs I.. U11J constitute of themselves a lihrarro* 
auscellaaeoas rending each aa can not be found in th« 



6 UBXCRirTlONS. 
atMaV 

The Publishers have perfected a system of mailing 

which they can supply the Mad.uiNS aad ™ t Tsrn— a 

1/ to those who prefer to receive their 1 
from the Ottce of Publication. 
The postage on H anna's Mao Alias is 34 1 
1st be paid at the mbteribtr'i post ol 



TEKMS: 
Uaaraa's Mahazisx, one year.. 
.1a Extra Copy of either Ik? MauA2i« 

tuppltal jratu/ur every Club  ./ fiva 

etu-k. in was mmUcaue; or Sir Copies tor $31 im. 
Hack number* can be supplied at any time. 
A complete Set, now comprising Thirty-one Volumes, 
in neat cloth binding, will be sent by express, fr«ight at 
"ipeniie of parchaser, for $ :» per vi lusse. Sinale lnmf 
by mail, poWp.1,,1 $» is, cloth cases, lor binding, V, cents! 
by mail, postpaid. Address 

HAKPEB A BBOTUEB3, 
°o«-H franklin Square, Mew York. 

LORIM'S IhTMnnW. 

THE BOYS A CHEQUASSET. 

By the author or "Faith Oartuey s Girlhood, and "Tha 
Uayworuua." 



Eleven thousand copies of ' Faith Oartuey s Girlhood,, 
and four thousand of "The Oayworthys." have beeu sol 
already. Every reader of those charming boots will 

want to see this— written fof. -oys from ten upward. It 
is a "uealthy stoiy." ar ' "-^ ' 
1 oily and true to lite, 
aiihfuluese, order. 

PAUL PRESCOTT'S CHARGE. 

By Hoaario Algee, Jr., author or "Erank's Campaign. 

1 illustrations, fancy cloth, full gilt backs. Pries, $125. 

Next to Oliver Optic, Alger ranks as a writer for boys. 
He knows them thoroughly, and understands how to 
amuse, fa-ciuste and instruct them. The career of aa 
orsnan, with a charge given him by his dviag father to 
fulfill, is the subject cnosen; and the noble lessons ha 
teaches in so attractive a form, will tell up u every child 
aud parent. 

COUNTESS KATE. 

By Miss Yoaoa. Author of "The Heir of Kedclifle 

2 illustratioas. fancy cloth, full gilt backs. Price, 91 J3 

No writer has a greater popularity in America and Eng- 
land, or knows better how to fascinate her readers. Tha 

evil of pruleisthel 



The Little Gentieman in 

A Fairy tory for Boys and Girls. 

4 illustrations. fancy cl th. Gilt backs. Price. 91 
This is the most exquisite Fairy story yon ever read 
one t k at has fascinated many aa earueat group of boys 
and girls, in the mauuscript, and at the earnest solicita- 
tion ot their parents, is uow given to the public for their 
approval. 

FRA iK'S~CAMPAIGN. 

By HoaATio Alii , Ja. Second edition. 

2 illustral us. Neat cloth. Price, $1 23. 

This is oae of 1 e beat boy's books ever written, and 
has a great reputation with the boys that have read it. la 
their expressive language, they call it "a btllt sroaT. - 
aad you aU know how much this me*ua with them. It ia 

a real live boy's book, full or 
earnest will, checked oy jn 
narily •■■cur in laily lite, 
ways writes "healthy 



It on of 

The Adventures o French Boy. 



Neat fancy cloth. 



11 gilt b cks. Price, 91 2$. 



Jeau Del in, the hero Is a stray waH picked up la the 
str.-tsof Par.s, cold an 1 starving, iatrodaced to a hu- 
mane overseer of a large factory, brought up and 
ating with his family, joins a band of cotsnii 
Ceylon, is ship-wrecked, and. with (oar 04 
upon the coast of Africa. After a lite or strange vtctai 
tndes and tl' rilling adventures, he returns to Paris, laden 
with wordlv fortune, aud meets the reward all story lov- 
ers so delight iu— the love or a noble girl. 1  is written aa 
a companion to "Swiss Family Robinson," aad will al- 
ways receive the same favor. 

SUN8ETSTORIES 
HELEN R0THSAY. 

Neat cloth. Price. 73c. 



This is a very delightful and ingenious story for lada 



the imagination 
not relying for 
soon tire. 



DOLL LIFE. 



Price, 75c 



n^^lr^X^ou-t:*! 1 ^ 



LOUIS TRIPP, 



(LateTaupp A Caaoa,) 

isJknm 



FAITH 1 

Margaret and her Bridesmaids, 

A stot / ot the fortunes of four pretty school girls. 
IsfAll a| the e Books caa t« bought in louiarille. 



ATTENTION, YOUNG MEN ! 

AS I HE UNDERSIGNED HAS BEEN ON V VWm% in 
Europe he toek ihe opportunity to visit ths I 
of that country, and is now fully prepared te c 
most difficult cases ol Seminal Weakness aad 
vale complaints. All persons addressing t 
aud enclosing 91 will receive prompt atte 

j. n. 

sjs9» sWvt 

WRITING PAPER. 

REAMS RULED AND PLAIN FOOLSCAP 

aa rated aad stein Latter Paper; 

da do Hate *s 
lor sate low by 

William cuonia 





«2 



— 







in 



Secretary of War. 



I . 8. Attonte) 



to Watch 



COMMERCIAL. 



Interesting about C. A. Seward. 

New York, Deoeuaber 28.— Washington 
dispctchm in Alexandria on Christmas 
were overestimated. Only one white and 
two colored men were seriously injured. 

The Times Washington special says Sec- 
retary MeCullou. h (denies that he wishes 
or needs a loan of »100,000,WXi aid from the 
internal revenue of the Uoverument. as has 
been currently reported. 

An order was iMivrn yesterday trauster- 
ling the headquarters ot the Department 
of Tennessee at knoxville, Tenn.. to Mem- 

1 ''The Secretary of War baa issued an order 
forbidding the examination of any non- 
commissioned officer of the regular army 
for appointment to brevet lieutenant who 
has not served at least two years in the reg- 
ular armv. . 

The Secretary ol the Treasury and the 
Commissioner of Internal Revenue have 
made new regulations relative to draw- 
backs upon shipments to British ports. Iu 
case goods are to be shipped from a pont, or 
transported through a frontier post to any 
ol the British provin»-es, where the duties 
claimed on any one shipmeut do not ex- 
ceed the suui ot tiftv dollars, the exporter 
will tile bis entry in triplicate at the cus- 
tom house, at the lime of the export, in the 
H«me form and manner as previously lor 
shipments made to other foreign port*: one 
of which entries will be transmitted to the 
jctor or* other officer of customs at the 
tier posts through which the goods are 
to pass and he will examine the packages 
to ascertain if they agree in all respects 
with those described iu the entry. 

If the packages are found to agree, the 
officer of customs will permit them to be 
sent forward to their place of destination, 
and will execute on the back of said entry 
a certificate that the packages of merchan- 
dise described in the entry of exportation 
to Canada or other British provinces had 
been dulv inspected at that port and deliv- 
ered for exportation as aforesaid. The ex- 

Crter will then proceed in preparing the 
lance of his papers iu accordance with 
the above mentioned circular instructions, 
changing each of said forma to suit the al- 
tered circumstances of the case. The bond 
will be canceled if the exporter aball pro- 
duce within ninety days from the date 
thereof a certificate, under the bond and 
seal of a collector or other chief revenue of- 
ficer of Canadian or other provincial port, 
that the goods wanted and merchandise de- 
scribed imported into tbt province theiein 
mentioned, are duly entered at the custom 
house- , and that duties imposed by the laws 
in a foreign province have been paid or se- 
cured. , . 

Merchandise entered for exportation, with 
benefit of Government, under the internal 
revenue law, may be forwarded through 
these frontier posts, through which import- 
ed merchandise may be exported consis- 
tent with lawful regulations, and no other 
of the merchandise be shipped direct by 
sea from ports of exportation; or if shipped 
direct from a frontier post to a j»ost in the 
provinces, the regulations prescribed in the 
amended cir  ular instructions will be ob- 
served. Where the drawback claimed on 
any one shipment exceeds the sum of fifty 
dollars, a cousul s certificate will be re- 
quired, in addition to the certificate of the 
ship revenue officers for the cancellation of 
the bonds. In all cases these regulations 
will be enforced on and after the 1st of Jan- 
uary, 1866. 

The World s Washington special says the 
Secretary of State has directed the United 
States Attorney to keep a vigilant watch on 
all vessels sailing for Mexican ports, and to 
seize all contraband articles. The parties 
engaged in this business allege that they 
bave a carrier route entitled "Maximil- 
ians Express Company.' - Some tacts will 
shortly be made public showing up the 
manner more definitely. 

Some davs ago necessary papers were 
tiled in the Treasury Department showing 
that forty miles of the second division of 
the Kansas road had been completed, and 
applications are accordingly made lor the 
six hundred and forty thousand dollars of 
l»onds. Since the above the representatives 
ol another interest have presented them- 
selves at the Treasury Department, and no- 
tified the Secretary that the bonds are all 
in their possession, and ask that the bonds 
be issued to tbem, and not to the Kansas 
and Leavenworth party. The Secretary 
has all the papers and documents ready to 
be submitted, and will render his decision 
in p few days. 

The Herald's Washington dispatch says 
 »en. Wm. J. Strong, Inspector BMMnl on 
 ien. Howard's staff, returned to Washing- 
ton from a three months tour in the south- 
west. He reports affairs in the interior of 
Texas in a beautiful condition. Much des- 
titution exists among the blacks and whites. 
The blacks are willing to work, but the 
whites are not in a condition to employ 
them. The former universally complained 
of bad treatment and violence. 

A bitter hostility to the Government ex- 
ists, and universal lawlessness prevails. 
So great was the ignorance the whites did 
not know the war was at an end, and the 
blacks thought themselves slaves. 

When President Johnson's brother was 
accidentally wounded by the discharge of 
bis gun, a number of surgeons were applied 
to for protessional ireainient, and he was 
obliged to send ten miles for a Federal sur- 
geon, and died solely for want of prompt 
surgical aid. 

The World s Washington dispatch says 
the presence of Clarence A. Seward in the 
city reveals the rumor that was La circula- 
tion some time since that a Congressional 
inquiry will probably be made concerning 
the alleged fact of his being interested in the 
Mexican speculations under Maximilian 
while acting as Sec retary of Stale, and sus- 
fcc be privy to the interests of our 
t-, anient towards the Emperor. 
The Tribune's Washington dispatch says 
Gen. Augur has directed a thorough in- 
vestigation of the Christmas riot at Alex- 
andria,- and has ordered the commanding 
olfrr^ at that place not to surrender any of 
the offending parties Loathe demand of the 
civil authorities, but to refer all such de- 
mands to the commanding officer ot that 
department. 

Ci-arbbvillk. Dec. '2*.— There was a row 
on Christmas day between some drunken 
ne*r© soldiers and citizens. A policeman 
interfered and struck one of the negro sol- 
diers with a club. The negro resented, 
using bis bayonet. A crowd gathered, and 
Mksk Coony,formerly a notorious guerrilla, 
drew a revolver and fired two shots at the 
soldiers, who then fired into the crowd. 
Two white men were seriously wounded 
ana* ose soldier slightly. 

Mj#ot B  nd, agent ot the Freedmen's 
Bureau promptly quelled the disturbance, 
•.ending the soldiers to the fort; but they 
^(.ow returned in large force, and it threat- 
ened to ft* a serious affair, but as Coony 
laid escaped, it soon qideted down. Xo 
fears are entertained of another difficulty. 

WasHiNwTON, Dec. : .-The National In- 
u-liUfancer aavs, upon authority competent 
to oonelude such a question, we announce 
'hat the published statement to the effect 
Lhat a loan of *100,000, JOu was, upon the oc- 
i recent visit to New York, ten- 
, __cretary McCulloch by the Na- 
t'oMd banks, are sheer fabrications. 

The Secretory of the Treasury is not at 
,rseant in any need of such a loan, and 
iImbM it become necessary it would not 
beSpHMd'from the banks, but would be 
solkrWjT and, doubtless, without trouble, 
be immediately obtained from the people. 
'hicaoo, Dec. 28.— W. H. Crosby made 
aeaigainent yesterday. Hi* liabilities 
***s**jMg t i ii i i*m s^Mfla n *'" Crosby 's 



orrioit or tux loudjvillb union FUMM 

THURSDAY EVENING. December  . J 
Transaction* arc limited in pretty mnrb all depart- 
ment*, the clone ol the year being the man. cause for the 
present inaction. There la, however, a g «*1 demand for 
K r*iu, tut owing to tight supplies, pi ice* are higher. 

The supply of coal on the present run. though heavr in 
am- nut , will not add much to the Mock on hand for con- 
sumption here. a* the great hulk of it will ha forwarded 
orer the falls to a more Southern market. The annual 
ninwill li ii in tins city ia estimated at fully four mil 
MM of huahel.. including about 3U0.000 for the Gas 
Work*. 

Corn, owing to the demaud being in exceaa of the sup- 
ply. «» "»«t on y fully maintained, hut enhanced, with 
considerable a*t*s of ear corn to dialers, from wagon*, at 
Mtc. and sold from sUr.* at 6ftc. That, •ou.ideiing the 
large crop* in the couutry. if a high rate for the new 
crop. A aale of 17' o bushel* at the a hart, to a dialer, at 
Me, an« a lot of 400 ba bel*, inferior old. at 53c. Shelled, 
lor ihipmeut demand* sV, including sacks. Oats are in 
fair demaud, at .'0 to .Vic, with a ssle of «W bushels at the 
latter rate, sack* included. 

Transactions and shipments we e retarded by the an- 
nouncement that the Long Bridge, on the Western and 
Mlautic Railroad, between Chattanooga and Atlanta, 
away by the freshet in the river; thus 




tion. 

Ttae cotton market was a shade firmer, with a sale of 16 
bales of low middling, at 43c. and ■ bales at 4tc; holders 
being influenced by the news from Liverpool. 

The attendatceon "Change was large, but the transac- 
tions were light, including S00 bags Turk* Island salt, de- 
livered to pork-bouse: ■ bbU of Reed a whisky, at »2 25; 
M loads Hamburg ch.-e»e, at » *c. and 400 bbls flour, at 
fc, »j®7 50, for commou; superfine, at *7 15 to *7 2'», for 
letter grades. 

The provision market is somewhat excited, and prices 
advanced, with still an upward t.-ad-ucy. New mesa pork 
was selling freely at •* 00; some holders asking *29 90. 
Lard is in better request, sales or prime, in tierces, at 

Pry good* are tally sustained, and domestics at en- 
hanced rates, with a sale of Great Western sheetings, at 

Ma, h sb t d sal 

" e upward 



• at » . Mm . 



ot new were I 
teudenc. . 
The Mew Yi 

quote cotton iu good demand, at lc advance, with sales 
..f naju bales at 52 to 53c The grocery market was more 
active, but prices unchanged. Flour was firm, and a 
shade better. Hess pork had advanced to S30 25, but de- 
clined iu the evening to •» 67*. Lard was firm, at 19*c. 
Whisky dull at *2 28. 

He Cincinnati dispatches note a material falling off in 
MM supply ofhoga; the receipts in the twenty-four lioui* 
being only 7"' The market wa* firm, at 9U to .-c gross. 

Hogs are held higher, and the market is firmer, with 
s.ile. ot "... I a pa. k.. i . at ftc, gros*; also sales iu peas 
•t»!40V*c. gross, equal to til 50® 1 1 75, net. Bicketts 
A co., Jeffersinville. have commenced packing, with the 
slaughter or II0U. All the pork houses were actively en- 
gated, with nearly 7000 hogs left oveMn pen. at the close 

follows : 

Pllt 11 Killed t ia%. 1., pea. Total killed. 

o. ■ TbomasACo 90" 900 MM 

Ow*ley*Co - 700 1.600 7.30U 

Hamilton A Bro „ 1.500 1,700 9.450 

A B. White S Us '.mo 1,400 5,830 

rred Leib — 7,S* 

Bicketts A Co 1.100 SOU 1,100 



CINCINNATI, i'KK I MILD STAT LB— i. 7 vkgs. 
W E ltobiusou; -s  bbls ft. in , W Collier; 71 pk«s h ware. 
" ss A Trigs; 47 ex pkgs. Adams Kxpress co; S6 kxs 
«.»•«. H Marcus; 21u bbls flour, Brandel* A co; M do. J 
Cetera A co; 1.' pkgs. K 8 Bobinson; 2 bbls Bear, 15 do ap- 
ples, 3 bxs beeswax , 7 bbls fish, ?4 pkgs, owners. 

CINCINNATI. I'KK ST. CHARLES.- J dez keg* tar, 
J Hubbard: liti buckets do, Gardner; In bill* paper, 3 bxs 
groceries, V Keljey; 53 b«» c yam, Metcalf, Bro A oej 
do corn, Christy A co; 72* bdls paper, 27. de b boards, I)u- 
pont k co; too kegs nails, Krwin A co; 100 bale, bay, 
Christy A co; 12 pkgs, 30 bbls hominy. 5 do beans steamer 
Indiana; 56 bga rags, Moore, bro A co; 125 pkgs, J «) 
Cucklee; 5 k«* nails. H pkgs glassware. 3 bhl* oil. 6 do 
castings, 7 do tar, 10 kgs powder, '.» bbls liquor, 37 pkgs, 
owner. 

PITT8BURG, 1 1 1; PILVKK LAKB.-495 koga nail*, 4 
do rivets. 46 bdls iron, Uelkuap A co; 142 pkgs groceries, 
bolhuger A Co: 40 bbls craubearies, bg* seeds, 5 bales 
sbieting, O I! Hunter. 23 bars st. el, Nurtz; iM pkgs glass- 
ware, Morris A son; 274 pc* b iron, J Mitchell; l u i l»w , 
Pitkin, W A co; (81 pkgs glass ware, 130 kgs lead, BAB 
A co; 100 kxs nail*, Terry A 8; 2  bx* ulass ware. 41 I. his 
vinegar, '  do putty, !■* plows, 2 Cases copper, 6 pkgs steel, 
2 pes bar iron, 230 pkgs glass ware, 4 bbls oil, 10 pkgsmdse, 
owners; 231 g ware, Wilder. 



STEAMBOATS, 



FOR CINCINNATI. 

Regular Mail Line Packets. 



Connecting at Cincinnati with 
early Kasteru trains. The mag- 
nificent passenger steamers 



I NITKDMTATK* 

i;kn. LVIU 

One of the above sseamei 
o'clock A. M., dally, aud tl 

MAJ. ANDKKMOX 

 ;k . RURI.I 

will leave for the sar 
day* excepted. For 

° Office on Mail Co.'* 
may-ti 



will leav 
steauiers 



WHlTTKN. Master 
.QUI) MAN. 31 ,-w.ter 

ive pnnctnally at 12 



OA It I K.R, "lister 

Fl'LLKR, Master 

at 4 o'clock P. M. daily. Suu- 
* on botrd or 



Third 



Left over in pen... 
Total receipts.. 



.5.100 



40,3fO 
.. I..400 



7-0 



Printing pap. r from Georgia has Ik en a leading article, 
of use, and import into this market for tome time past. 

The stock quotation* at New York to-day, were as fol- 
lows : 

li. 8. *'s of 1881 107 M 

5-30 I old _ _ 103'4 

5-20* new 100 7 a 

MM8* „ 92* 

7-30-s mm 

t ertificates, old _ 9y.'4 



( ert ideates, new.., 
Erie Bailroad 



. „.. ._ 9s 

The money market is closer, and the prevailing rates 
for first-class signatures are 9 to 12 per cent. There is 
comparatively little doing iu gold, but we look for a more 
active market, now that it has assumed an upward ten- 
dency. The opening rate iu New York wn* 145 I , closing 
at 145*. Government securities remain firm. Compound 
Interest notes are in devand, at quotations. Exchange 
has betn thrown on the market very freely yesterday and 
to-day. Healer* are offering at par, aud are unwilling to 
buy freely at 1-24 discount. Tennessee money has de- 
clined, brokers refusing in one or two instances to pay 
o\ ■ r 5c for Bank of Xvnnessee. 

Bnylnc. belllnc 

(.Old 144% US'* 

fillver, dollars 



halves and 
Silver, dimes aud 
Demand note*.............. ......... 

0 coupon* .............. .. 

10-40 ** 

'.-2o BoncVOW „ 

.'.-2o Bonds, New „ 

10.411 Bonds. 

7-311 Bouds, oid 

7-30 Bonds, Now. 

MJsjsj York Exchange.. 
Kentucky — 

farmers' Bank 

Bank of Ashland.. 



.143 
.138 



.135 



HI-, 

.... 1443s 
144 i 

102 

99* 

91 

. 97 
.... 96H 
1-10 



141 



1(8 

loo . 

91. S 



All others- 



Interest 



..'i per rent, dia, 
.. * pjr cent. dia. 



2 year 5 per cen- 



! . ., 
Oct., 
Aug., 
July, 
Juue, 
notes. 



1 to 5 per ct. dia. 

100 j 

102 



1864.... 

lN 4 103 

1«64 104 

1864 104 M 

\SM 106 

1864 106 



lesale 
sa,.-s 



;Our quotation* apply exclusively to 
trade, unless otherwise stated. Betail aa 
are at an advance on these rates.] 

BAGGING AND BOPK.-LimiUii sales of 
at 29«31c for bagging, and 15SS17C f or the Utter, though 
choice lots are held higher. We quote India bagging at 
32 * 33c. 

COAL— bales or Pittsburg afloat at 19 cent*. Betail 
•ales at 2»c per bushels. Pomeroy coal to boats 20c. 

UOL'NTBV PBODUCK— We quote green apples scarce 
at t74&6 per bbl in lots, as to quality. Dried apples 
new, at l2(o 14c per pound, and dried peaches scarce 
at lN*2oc for unpeeled and 29g$31c per pound for peeled. 
Butter, J^mc, in boxes or firkins; choice. 33«35 Bees- 
wax hartal at 40sS42c. Broom*, common, *4 o-i©.', on, best 
ghaker t6 2'^s6 3 r   V dot; Best Louisville (3 75 pel 
dozen. Ubeese, Western Beaerve plenty at 2og 
Mft for selected, all at net weights. Hamburg 11. 

MHttm Dairy okeese 24 cenu. reathers dull, aud 
buyers are paying 65@70c. flaxseed buying at t2 30 
Ginseu ? buying at 8tg82c. Beans nominal at tl 75 fot 
nsw. Northern potatoes iu lota t3 25#3 5o; Neshanock* 
ffl 75 to 3 00. Unions in lots to dealer* at t2 75; small aale 
at S3 25 pe r bbl. Eggs we quote at 37039c per dozen for 
!rwh packed. 

C JTrON-fiales of about 35 bales at 43t»44c f jr low mid- 
dling. 

COTTON V ABNS— Sales iu lots at 40c per doxen for No. 
M0; 37c for No. 600. and 34c for No. 7uo. with .a. all s^lea 
at lc per dozen higher. 

OOOPEBAGE— Sales at the factory in lots, at 55c lor 
floor barrels; cement barreia, 75c; alack half barrel*. 45c, 
aud ham tierces, tl. 

CANDLES AND SOAP-Manufacturera have lowered 
their rates for star candles, with sales in lots to the tradc- 
at 19* to 20c, for 12 oz.. and 21 M to 22c. for 13 oz.; for 14 
oz. 23*c; and full weight MM, mcluding packages. Small 
sales lc advance. We quote tallow canities 16 to 17c. 
German soap 13 to 14c: palm soap MM to He, in lot*; cat- 
til? 22 to 2'. per pound. 

■DM AND TALLOW.— The buying ratea trora 



butcher* are 6c for green hides, while dry bid s range 
from 10 to iSc, and good lots of dry flint command 14c. 
Sheep skins 50c to tl 00, with the wool on. Buyers pay 
for rough tallow 7*4®c 'tc, and 1.V0H. lorrendered. 

DOMESTICS-Prices are maintained, and we quote 
brown goods, sheetings and domestic*, at 323i@33c, in- 
cluding Ureal Western. Ben. Franklin Mills, and other 
standards, which are Arm at 33c, 

lUM K AND GBAIN— Fair sales of flour at $7 00® 
t7 15 for superfine, t* 50 for plain extra, and t9 75 at 10 75 
for extra family, the latter rate for choice brands in dray 
load lots. Fancy brands til 00® til 50. tales 
ot new red wheat at tl 40@l,6o and old at 
tl :\ prime white at t2@2 10. Corn, new in ear, 55® 
60c, the buying and selling rat *, old shelled at 60®65c 
loose for mixed, and 83®85c for white, including 
sacks. Oats range from 50 to 55c for choice, with 
a sale at 53c. bag* included. Barley we quote at 85c 
(al 30. and barley malt tl 35®1 55. Offal in fair request, 
and we quote bran at t!3®14 per ton. Shorts tl5®18 per 
ton. Sbiprtuff t23®24. and middlings t25®30. Bye quiet, 
with a sale at 80c. 

HAY— We quote choice baled timothy at tl4»15 per ton 
inferior and mixed tl3 per ton on the wharf. 

GBO JEBIES.— Market firmer for Bio coffee, with sales 
of fair to good at 2 , .    *®31c. and small sales ot 
choice at 32 »c. Common Bio 28*4®29*4c. Baw sugar 15 
audard 20)4®2CSc in lots of 100 or 50 bbls; 
16 4®18 »c, and coffee sugar 19X®20*c. Bice 
l«l2*e in casks. Porto Bico molasses tl 00®l 14. and 
Eastern sirups tl® 1 75. ss to quality and package. New 
Orleans molasses tl SO. and scarce. Kice in casks 

Ma 

RAGS— Good cotton 7*c, mixed 5®fic, woolen, soft, 6e. 
bard lc. 

STABCH— Sale* orbrst Madison in loU of25 or 50 boxes 
or mote at 7c, packages extra. 

WOOL— Dull and lower: the buying rate* for unwashed 
betas; t0®SSjs, and tub washed 50®53c. 

PBOYMOW AM) l.ABD.-Tbe market is fully sus- 
tained, and we quote mess pork, new, S29.0U. prime mess 
•36 50. Green meats firm, at aft for ham*, from the 
block. Bacon in good request, at 15c for shoulders, and 
20®2k for clear sides. Sugar -cured ham* in request, with 
sales of 20 tierces at 26£®27c. Prime lard, ateam and 
kettle rendered ranges from 16 * to 20c, w th sales of 18 
Uercea, at U tc. 

SEKD — Bales of clover, in lota, at »  I0®8 25 per bushel. 

WHISK V-A sale of new raw att2 25, and 48 bbls 
Meed's at S2 25^     

IMPORTS BY THE l.ll tH. 

CINCINNATI. PEB GEN. BUELL— 58 pkgs W E Bob- 
inson 145 bags wheat, J Kennedy: loo to o»t», *  bbtt 
tluur ' Baple. A B; 350 bdls pap r Dupolit A co; 2:1 pkg*. 
— — *a fpaceri a, SteajssA a, ex uk"a 



PEOPLE'S LINE 
DAILY FOR CINCINNATI. 

l?It, . It. It. DM0MTS, Master. 

. - - WATTS. Master. 

as above from the foot of Fourth 
at 12 o'clock M.. connecting at Cin- 
I A. M. trains for all the 
cities. For freight . r 



pasaags apply on 
»p6-tf 



or to. 



B. J. CAFKBEY, Agent. 

137 Wall street. 



LOUISVILLE & HENDERSON 



D. S. MAILB0AT8, 

For Oweneboro', Bvanavlllt) and Ilendereon, 

eounectlnic at Kvanavllle with the 
CAIRO AND EVANS VI LLE PACKETS. 

MORNING STAR 
 ery Tuc^iday. Wod- 
at 5 P. M. 



NOTICE. 

ALL FREIGHTS AND PASSENGERS MUST BE AT 
the Portland wharf before 5 o'clock P. M., as the 
boats will not be delayed after that tinii under any cir- 
cumstauces. Letters, bills of lading, packages, Ac, most 
be left with the Agents, on Fourth street, between Maiu 
aud the river, before 3 o'clock l\ M. „,. vi _. t . , 
J: H. BUNOE, Sup'U 



1865. 1865. 

SPEED, SAFETY AND COMFORT. 

Louis. ille, EvansvlUe, Cairo and 
Memphis Packet Co. 

Leaves Every Wediiesday aud Saturday. 

_ -ST— ^ THE ELEGANT AND 8UMPTC00S 
A -MC PASSENGER STEAMER 

*T. PATRICK GEO. O. HART. Master 

Will leave Louisville for Memphis every WEDNESDAY, 
at 4 o'clock P. M.. POSITIVELY. 

TU t. FLEET AND ELEGANT 
LIBERTY NO. 2 . 

CAPT. WES CONNER ED. H. JUDGE. Clerk 

Will leave Louisville for Memphis every SATIIBHAY at 4 
o'clock P. M. These boatn w ill land for freight aud pus 




at all way landings at regular packet rab-s. 
and passengers for White aud Arkansas riv.-r* 
asouable ratee. Through tickets 
to St. I.oui- at current rates. For 
on bnard 



Ageu ts 



B. J. CAFFHBT. ) 



RAILROADS. 

Louisville & Nashville Railroad. 



CHANGE OF TIME. 

ON AND AFTER WEDNESDAY, NOV. L TBAINS 
will run aa follows : 
5:110 A. M. Tin u h IMfjal for Nashville and all way Sta- 
tions daily  ex. p| Sunday.) 
6:30 A. M. I'asaenuvr Train for Lebanon, Perryville, Dan- 
v i 1 1 - , BaiTOasbBrs;, Campbellnville and Colum la 
daily (except Sunday.) 
7:00 A. M. Mail and Passenger Train for Nashville, Bowl- 



^^^,^^'B,:anch 



to Bruni- 



7:15 A.M. 

fields daily (exc. pt Suuday.) 
3:00 P. H . Accommodation Train tor Bardstown daily -ex- 
cept Sunday. 



6:00 P. M. t reight for Nashville, Bowliog Green and Mem 
his Branch d " 

,r 



I'h 

9P. 
not 



BALTIMORE AND OHIO 



EOPENED. 

r |'UlS GBEAT NATIONAL TllOBOL'GUFARE IS 
X again open for 

FREIGHTS AND TRAVEL. 

The cars aud machinery destroyed are being replaced 
by new running stock, with all recent improvements; aud 
as the bridges and track are again in substantial condi- 
tion, thu. Wcll-earued reputation of this road for 

Speed, Security and Comfort 

Will be more than sustained under tho reorganization o' 
its business. 

In addition to the unequalled attractions of natural 
scenery heretofore couoded to this route, the recent 
troubles upon the border have associated numerous points 
on the road, between the Ohio river and Harper's Ferry 
with painfu' but instructive interest. 

CONNECTIONS 

At the Ohio river, with Cleveland and Pittsburg, Central 
Ohio, and Mareitta and tiucmnati railroads, and, 
through them with the wi ole railway system of the north- 
west, central west aud southwest; at Harper's Kerry with 
the Winchester road. At Washington Junction with the 
Washington Branch for Washington City and the lower 
Potomac. At Baltimore with seven daily trains tor Phila- 
delphia and New York. 

1 WO DOLLARS additional on Through Tickets from 
Baltimore or the Northern cities, give the privilege of 
visiting WASHINGTON CITY eu route— being t3 lower 
than the cost by any other line, as recently charged. 
This is the only route by which passengers can procoiw 
taokeis and through checks from Washingt on 
y. W. P. SMITH, Master of Traus., Baltimoie. 

M.Casva Gen Tic ket A tent. Bait -more. u-.m-ti 

LOUISVILLE, NEW ALBANY* 
CHICAGO RAILROAD. 



rpWO DAILY TRAINS LEAVE NEW ALBANY, OP- 
J. posits Louisville: 

9. '-if* A Af Chicago Express daily, (Sunday* ex- 
,*J\J r\. 1UL. cepted ), making direct connection 
at Mitchell for St. Louie. Cairo, Evanaville, fet. Joseph, 
Liavenworth, Kannaa City, and all points West; also at 
Green Castle and Lafayette for Terre Ua :te, Matt -.n 
Alton, Decatur, Springfield, Jacksonville, Quincy, and all 
poiut-i iu Ceutral Illinois, and at Michigan City for De- 
troit. Chicago, and all points Northwest. 

9.9fl l  lwf St - L 0 ** » nd Oairo Night Express, 
• Ld\J X • 1.YA. dai y. making direct connections 
•or all points West and Northwest, and for Ciuciunat 
and all Eastern cities. 

Only one change ot cars to St. Louis, Chicago and Cin- 
cinnati. Baggage checked through from the Hotels. 

For further information and through tickets apply to 
the office of the Company, southwest corner Maiu and 
Third stree s, Louisville, Ky. Office open Sunday* from 5 



Claims for Slaves Drafted or En- 
listed in the U. S. Army. 

CASH ADVANCES TO CLAIMANTS. 

ALL PABTIE8 HIVING CLAIMS UN DEB THE 
laws of Congress, approved February 24, 1864, grant - 
itiK compensation bsm bounty tor slavts that are now or 
have been in the m-litary or naval service of the United 
States, can have such claims promptly prosecut d by Hi - 
undersigned. They ate now in receipt of the recessary 
blsuks aud iustru  Hons from their attorneys at Washing- 
ton fur the successful prosecution of the same. Liberal 
ca«h advance* will be made on claim* intrusted to them 
for collection. Claimaat* are respectfully referred to the 
accompanying lecommeudations. 

JOHN G. LENNON sit CO.. 
Office on Jefferson street, south side, bstween Fir*t and 
Steond, No. 24 west, P. O. Box 13e. 

RErKB TO 

Col. James F. Bucknur, Attorney, Louisville. 
Marks A Co , Banker*. Louisville. 
Phelps, Caldwell A Co., Louisville Warehouse. 
t U m d m U 



250 



BAGS RIO OOF F 



' - J i ! it* toffee?' 

^re and for .aleby^ ^ 





 IBUP»— 

  so barrels assorted Sirups; 

U  kegs S:i up 



-5 



MEDICAL. 



DR. SKELYE'S 

LIQUID 

CATARRH REMEDY! 



IMPORTANT TO EVEBY BODY 

OUR CHEAP COLUMN ! 
OUR CHEAP COLUMN ! 
OUR CHEAP COLUMN ! 
OUR CHEAP COafUMN ! 

Advertise in the Press 



COLD IN 

Believed in a Few Miuut.s. 

BAD BREATH 

Canted by 

WEAK E%ES 

Caused by 

SENSE OK SMELL 

When lessened or destroyed. 

DEAFNESS 

When caused by Catarrhal difficulties. All theabove dis- 

THROAT AFFECTIONS 

Are more frequently than otherwise caused by a thick, 

during the night, and resulting from 
Catarrh, are cured by 

DR. SEELYE'S 

CATARRH REMEDY 

•sTWrite for our phaiuphl-t describing fully all symp- 
tom*. It will be sent free to any address. This Bemedy 
contains no Mineral or Poisonous Ingredients, but is pre- 
pared from Vegetable extracts exclusively, therefore it ia 
perfectly harmless, even to the most tender and delicate 
child. Price, $2 per bottle. Address 

DR. D. H. SEELYE A CO., 



DR. SEELYE'S 

BRONCHIAL SYRUP. 



COUGHS, COLDS, BRONCHITIS, SORK THROAT 
UOARSKNESS, AND IBR1TATION OF Til K 
BRONCHIAL TUBES OR LUNGS. TICK- 
LING IN TUK THROAT, AND CROUP. 
The sirup is especially beneficial in affections of th« 




Buffalo Medical Institute 



Str€ (.two 



N. Y., 
EST A BUSHED AS A 

REFUGE FROM QUACKERY, 

THE ONL PLACE WHERE A 

CURE CAN BE OBTAINED. 

1 \R. FISHB ; AT r HAS DISCOVERED THE MOST 
1 ' certain, speedy and effectual renitdy iu the world for 
\\ eahue^M 1.1 the Rack or LimbH, Mrictures, Affections of 
the hi iije H aud 11 adder, tnvolputary Di*cbarges, tmpo- 
tency. General Debility, NervOWSOSSW, Dyapepcia, Lang r. 
Low Spirits, Confusion ot Ideas, I'alpi'ation of the Heart, 
Timidity. Trembling, Dimness of Sight or liiddinea*. Dia- 
eiiHes ol the Head. Thrnat, No ■ or  kiu. Affectiens of the 
Liver, Lungn, Stomach or Bowel*— those terrible insor. 
der* arising troni Solitary llahitri of Youth— secret and 
- --lit.il   practii-e* more fatal to their victim* than the 
pong 01 byreus to the Mariner* of I ! *■*, blighting th ir 
u ost brilliant hopes or anticipations, reuderiug mar- 
riage, etc., impossible, 

YtH N ; .flK.N 

eHpecially. who have become the victim* of Solitary Vice, 
that dreadful aud wsatractH hahit which annually 
* *eeps to an untimely crave thousand* of young men ol 
the most exalted lali utsaud brilliant intellect, who might 



UIAf.E. 

Married persons, or young meu contemplating mar- 
riage, being aware of Physical Weakness, Organic Debili- 
ty. Deformities, s|H-,dil  cured. 

He who plaeea himsell under the care of Dr. F. 
ligioosly conbde iu hi* honor as a gentlema 
deutly rely upon hi* skill a- a physician. 

oitti.tMc wi ■■ nmm 

11. 111 - 1 1 1 1 1 I v cured and full vigor restored. 

Tliis distrsasiag aJbctisn, which render* life miserable 
and msrriage impossible, is the penalty paid b/ the vic- 
tims of improper ludulgenc. s. Young perron* are too apt 
to commit exces es from not bein? aware of the dreadful 
( onaequence* that may ensue. Now who that understand* 
the suuiect will pretend to deny that the powet of pro- 
creation is lost sooner by iho*o tailing into improper hab- 
its than by the prudent' B -hides, h»iug deprived of 
healthy otTsoriug, the most serious and destructive symp- 
toms of both body and niiud aii.e. The system become* 
deranged, the physical and mental fuuctions weakeued, 



! 1 pro reative power, nerv. 11- irri tnhillt \ . .l ip.-t.M i' 

" iudig.ttiou, constitur 

cay and death 



palpitation of the heart. iudig. t tiou, conatitution'af de^ 
bility and wasting of the frame, cough, consumption, de- 



DR. FISH BLATT graduated fr. ru one of the most emi- 
nent collegts in the Uuit-.i States; has effected some ot 
the mo-t astonishing cure* that Were ever known; ■ any 
trouble)! with ringing iu the head aud ears when asleep 
gr-at nervousness, being a larme.l at sodden sound*, bash- 
fulness, with ir. .j ue nt blushiug, attended sometimes with 
derangement of mind, were immediately cured. 

TAKK PARTlC'l LAll NOTICE. 

Dr. F. addresses all those who hate injured themselves 
by iroprop -r indulgence and solitary habits, which ruin 
both bodj and mind, unfitting them for either bu.iuegs. 
study, - ociety or marriage. 

These are some  ,t th" sad and melancholy effects pro- 
duced by early habitsof youth, viz: Weakness of the Back 
aud Linifcs, Paiua in the Ilea l, Dimnei-s of Sight, Loss ot 
Muscular Power, Palpitation of the Heart, Dyspepsia 
Nervous Irritability, Derangement of the Digestive Fuuc' 
tion*, Geu.ral Dehil ty , Symptoms of Consumption, etc. 

31 K NT ALLY. — The tearful effects of ths mind are much to 
be dreaded. Loss or Menu 
preesion of Spirits, Evil F01 
ty.  tt-ld*trust. Love of 
some of the evils produced. 

Thousands ot persons ot all ages can now judge what is 
the cause of their decliniug health, losing their vi*or, be- 
coming weak, pale, nervous, aud emaciated, having a sin- 
gular appnarauce about theeye?, couth aud sy mptoms of 
consumption. 

■MM MEN 

who have injured themselves by a certain practice in- 
dulged in when alone, a habit frequently learned from 
evil companion*, or at tcboel Die effects of which are 
nightly felt, tv u asleep, and.Jii not cured, renders mar- 
riage impossible, and destroy* both miud and body, should 
apply immediate y. • 
W hat a pity, that a young man, the hope of the coun- 
try, the pride of his parents should be snatched from all 
prospects and en loyment* of lit - by the consequence of 
deviating from the path of nature, aud indulging iu a 
certain secret habit. Such persons must before contem- 



MAltltlAUE 

reflect that a sound mind and body are the most ne. es- 
xary requisites to promote couuubial happiuess. Indeed 
without these the journey through lite becomes a weary 
pilgrimage; the pn.sp.-ct hi-urly darkeu* to the view, the 
miud becomes shadowed with despair and filled with the 
melanchofy reflection that the happiness of another be- 
comes blighted with our own. 

R. E. PISIIBLATT'S 

Office is 340 in street, two door* above Court, Buffalo 

Can be consult d on Rheumatic Affections, Consump- 
tion, Liver Complaint, Chronic Affections, and all Ur- 
ease* of Imprudence of whatever character, and which 
may te declared incurable by other Physicians, he en- 
gage* to make immediate cure of. From hi* lengthy prac- 
tice iu the Science of Medicine, he is enabled to offerlliim 
je f to the public as being the ouly one in the city or Buf- 
falo capable , f affording speedy relief. AH cases curable 
will be guaranteed 

He warrants a cure without the use of 
oil er daugerous melicines Bece 
or tin ee days. 

•sr.No letters received unless po»t paid and containing 
a stamp to be used ou the reply. Persona writing ahould 
stale age and send portion of advertisement deecribina 
»y mptoms. 

N. B — Letters addressed to DB. F1SHBLATT, at his 
office 3in Main street. Buffalo, N, Y., will receive imme- 
diate attention. Those at a distance cau be treated by 

mail, 

^n^JDoctor^iJHPljOS^ 



r|'A(iS.-A LABGK ASS IRTMKNT OF VARIOUS 
X Qualities and *iaes just received and for sale by 

pol7-lm 1S6 Main SC.' b it. Fou rth and FUf'th. 



A V Do 

DolT-im 13S Main St..'bei 



INCLUDING FLOUB 



UPONT a OO.. 
■ rtb aud Fifth 



H K iiv^Mdt* K r«leby P " ~ 15 *° LL8 " JUOT ** 



E^BKNCil FULlOS 
aortment of Flat Papers 



a. v. Dp pont a otA 



2a lent, for Five Lines. 
2& 1V1.U for Five Lines. 
23 Cents for Five Lines. 
26 Cents for Five Lines. 



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Have you Lost a Dog? 
Have you Lost your Spectacles? 
Have you Lost your Pocket 
Have you Lost your Horse? 



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Hare yon a House to Let? 
Have you a Farm to Let? 
Do you want to Rent a House? 
Do you want to Bent a Farm? 



BOOK TRADE. 

NEW MMkl MT.lL0.lW. 



The J*ricei here given are correct at ihi.i iltite, 
subject to any changes which nmy be 
made by the respective publishers. 

Abwtand Bloxam's Handbook of Cheat, 4vo 

A. tiuoi. the Reproductive I 
Ally's Dissector and Hrac Au 
Altbai * Medical Electricity, iL'mo... 



idica. ' vole, - v ... 11 



Anatomical Atlas, by Smith ai d Hon**, - 1 

Anatomy al Re membrancer, 32un. 

Arautt's Klement s ot Physic*. *vo 

Ashton on the R.-ttuui and Ann-, ^v  _ 

Ashwell on Disease* ot Female*. Svo... 



3 no 
1 UU 

1 75 
. 4 SO 



Barth and Borers on Auscultation and 



. svo..... 
Percussion 

lain 

Bartholow on disqualify ii;g au 1 Feignetl 

Barlow's Practice 1 Me.li,- m . 
Barwell on Hiseas -s .f the Joints, 

'• lecture* on virthopedic  urgery. sv. 
'* Book of' SON Prescription*. 

I ruggist's Receii- ltook, I 

Medical KormularyVlLlno. 

Beckys Klemeuts of M. -if*^ Jurisprudence, t vois, 

Lecture* on Materia 

8vo. 



s *a 

s Ml 

3 '-1 
i w 



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Have you Boarding for Single Gentlemen? 



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- A 1 



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Infant Therapeutics, l2mo...- 
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Principles and t*rac of Olsiterics, Svc. 

BeU ou Baths, l-Tno 

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By Revae and others. 



3 IS 
I ■ 

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1 a* 
1 ■ 

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1 58 

I M 

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V9S 
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~~ - — on Consumption, v 
Mills's ThvrepeutH- and Ms 

Stokea' Disease* of the Heait. M ... 

Staart o U H.«*pit*l* and S1-.1 ... 1.^ I Paris, svo. 

Tanne r , Manual ol th.- It .. n. .  ! Medicine. I2n»„. 

— — Dm. .we* of lid.il,, , . in,: ; 1 U . ' 
Taft sOper,..,,.. Ue, ltwlr 
Taylor • u r. 4* ... , 
The-.iy I p, ,. 

ia»o 

Taylor 's V -i.- .1 .ie. ,-, 
J* 0 "**' Ifr awsja d g Me.i jjfrsjii iiiT.i 
ihoiupsouA rwtaingou Uwr »u l 
Todd on Urinary Di ea.-» *vo 

Clinical Lecture-so:, Acute Di 

A Bowman s Fhy.iological At 

To***»** Deulal Surgery, ^v tM 

Ioj nbee a Aural  urgery, -n ^ ,^ 

Trols, I, - i, |i.-. . ( ir, - v..'. tuu 

Tyler Smith . nUietncs.svo itt 

I'm ed Males Thai mat . pieia, ll'mo 

Vidal on V. n. r . I 1 ■ -i - 

Virchow'* Cellular rathology,  iu 

Walshe ou Dna-ases »f the MBnsjs, -   . 

us Disea-.-. ol the Ib art, m.i ™ 

Walton'* Ur.-r .tive ophth 
Walker on Intermarriage 

Watson * Practice of Physics, »vo 

West's Lectures ou Infancy and f h.Mhood, 

Lectures 011 Diseases ..f reui.ilea, s«o... 

What toUbaeiveat the Bedside. I.'m.^ 

whitehead on Abortion uid St rit.ty, svu.... 

Wilson'* iiuman Anatomy, Hn ._ 

on th* Skiu, svo 

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Test and Plates in I vol.. svo 

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Dissector. 12m.. 

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Wistar's Anatomy, with notes by 

Wood A Basnhe'a Dispensatory of th.-' C u 

svo. New tCdition 

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Bucknill and iuke's Manual or Psy ' 

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Inaanity, Mauoali.r. ByBucknillA luke, -v .. » mi 

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Hand- book of Hospital Piactice, 12mo.. 

Lauri- '* Element* of Homieop " 
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Oweu on the Skeleton and Teeth, l.'mo _ 

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Paget'* Lectures on Surgical Pathol, gj . 
Parker'* M.idern Treatment of sv r 
Parnsh'a Treatise on Pharmacy. 
P. reira's Materia Medica, svo, (iu press... 

Peaalee'a Human HI*tolosry. s V ,. 

Piggot'a Dei tal Chemistry, svo 

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Rand s Medical Chemistry 12nio 

Rayer »n Diseases of the Skin, 4to. 

Baa**'* Analvais of Phyaiology. I2mo. 

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Svl.ai.ua of Chemistry, l.'mo 

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Rigby'a Midwit rv , Jvo _.. 

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Ryan • Philosophy of Marriage, l.'mo.. .. 
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Salter on the Aaihma. svo 

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Louisville daily union press, 1865-12-29

4 pages, edition 01

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