view raw text

I'lsorcssioxAi.. 



PHIL. LEE. 



D. M. HODMAN 



LEE & RODMAN, 

ATTOllNHYS AT LAW, 

No. 6 Conrt IMaco, LOI'ISVILT.E, KENTUCKY 
Will practice in all Ihc Cinirts hcM in thcCily oj 
Uoni.^rillc, in the Court of A]i] c:ils at Frankfort, 
anti in the counties of Uullitt, Spencer Shell y and 
Oldham. Collection.-* piouij tly made and remit- 

aprl4-6in, 

JAMES P. HELM, 

Attorney at Law, 

ELIZABLTIITOWX, KENTUCKY. 

Prompt attention given to nil businc:(s entrus- I 
ted to his care. I 

JAMES C. POSTON, 

ATTOliNEY AT LAW, 
ELIZABKTIITOWN KENTUCKY. 

Prompt attention paid to business entrusted to 
by care. March I 7-lsly. 



















VOLUME I.) 



ELIZABETHTOWN, KY., THURSDAY, JULY U. 1870. 



INUMBER 48 



Vi’M. B. RE.AD, 
llodgcnvillo, Ky . 



J. \V. MATTIIIS. 
Kliz ibetiitown, Ky. 



READ & MATTHIS. 

Altorii('y « nt Law, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 



Wi^^.j|gl^tico law It 
Cu'.u'u Coii’^t, 



the Hardin* 
Mchd-tf. 



M. II. Gofer. 



M. II. Marriott 



GOFER & MARRIOTT, 

Altoritrys nt l.aw, 

KLIZA BETIITO H'.V, KESTUCK 
Will practice in all the Courts of Hardin county. 

TIM. NEEDHAM, 
Attorney at Law, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUClvY. 

After eleven months absence in the city of 
Louisville, as editor of the Kentucky Templar, 
I have returned to this place to resume perma- 
nently the practice of Law A renewal of pat- 
ronage is respectfully solicited, and promise faith- 
fulness and promptness hi the collection of claims 
and the transaction of business, nol7— ‘ly 



Wji. Wilson. 



Turner Wilson 



WILSON & WILSON, 

Alloriieys at Law, 

ELIZAUE'rUTO ILV, KESTUCK Y. 

Strict attention given to all business entrusted 
to them. 



J. W.MA TTHIS, 

Attorney at Law, 

EUZAKETllTO H'.V, KESTUCK Y. 

Will practice in Hardin and adjoining countio 
and in Court of Appeal.^. 

Prompt attention given to collections. 



A. M. DROWN. 



UOD’T D MURRAY. 



BROWN & MURRAY, 

Attoriieyv-l ^.aw 

AND 

I\otai’io8 PialiHc. 

Office North-Ea.'it-Corner Public Square, oppo- 
site Eagle House, Elizabethtown, Ky. 

Practice in Hardin and adjoining Counties. — 
Prompt attention given to collection of debts. 



WILL. F. BELL, 

AllM-iioy at Law, 

ELIZA BETIITO H'.V, KESTUCK 

Will practice in the Circuit Courts of Hardin, 
Hart and Larue. 

^-3?**Col ections prompt’y made and remitted 



DR. R. P. McMURTRY, 

P h y 8 i c i a 11 , 

ELIZA BETIITO H'.V, KESTUCK 

OFFICE— on the Northeast side of the Public 
Square. 



D:R. E. WARFIELD, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 

Tenders his professional services to the citizens 
of Hardin County. Office at G.V. MatHiis Sc Co's 
Drug Store.. al2:ly. 

Dr. SAM. ANDERSON, Jr. 

Pliy!«(ciaii and $iiir;;eoii, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 

Office — in East comer Public Square where 
he will utall times be found, unless professional- 
ly absent. nl2:ly. 

UtNTSSTRY. 

 7*. ^ g - 

Would inform the citizens generally 
that he has located in Elizabethtown 
and is prepared U  do all kind.s of 
mochanical and operative dentistry, artihcial teeth 
i)f sur]ia.  sing beauty inserted from ono toanen- 
cutire set, Hi favorable ]»rices. Teeth fillcil with 
fine Gold, so as to entirely arrest the progress of 
decay, irregularities of the teeth 8ucce.ssfnlly trea- 
ed, provideil the treatment is instituted prior to 
puberty. Office on Main Cross Street, over Cisel 
A' Slack’s. Apr7-6m. 



AN ADDRESS 



DKi.ivicia.i) nv sAMur.i, simmoxs 

AT A niAJ^OMC Cl’.I.KRUAlTOX 
IIKI.l) OX ST. JOIIX'S IIAV, JUXI’; 

21TII, IS70. AT Tin: i*\ho u;kt 

SPKIXGS, XCAK SIIJUMlPKDS- 
VlI-LL, KV. 



We would dwell upon the diffcrencej^ nation exists ta this da3);'hav( 
the two. Masonry and the church, bo- ! bled to atoms as to loa - no tra 

liviiT; 



EAGLE HOUSE, 

North-East corner Public Square, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY 

W-F- PURCELL, Proprietor. 

Tho BAR supplied with the best of Liquors, 
Cigars and Tobacco. Feb.l7-Gm. 

Miirkcl St. Ardiiteclunil Foiiiidry 



AND 



IRON WORKS. 

SNEAD St CO., 

Market Street, let. Eighth .aaJ.Ninth, 

Louisville, Kentucky. 

Aug.2t'-I.v. 



To the Brethren, Friendly Greeting; 
to the fViends, both Ladies and Gentle- 
men, wcloome to a reception, not of ban- 
queting nod feasting, but to the meeting 
ol’the mystic brethren jvho.'je noble call- 
ing is the amsiioration of luuukind; for 
our mcctinu is on the Level, our action 
oil the I’lumb, ami our parting ou the 
Square. Our Order, though mystic in 
its operations, is no covenant with Satan, 
no league with hell. Grand in its con- 
ception, noble in its operation, and beau- 
tilul in its application, it has no cause to 
blush in its origin, having Wisdom, 
Strength and Beauty as supports, and 
purpose of option, when understood, to 
cause the admiration of the high and the 
low, the rich and the poor. From the 
brilliant sky of intelligence and the re- 
fulgent lights of civilization, it has passed 
into the darkness and gloom of super- 
stition, unaffected, unalloyed, refusing 
the commingling of its precious truths 
and divine sentiments with the wicked- 
ness of tho world and the falsehood of 
each age; and to-day the whispering 
messages arc received and given as when 
the Masonio Eye can see her Kings in 
tho Orient, in generations by these 
friends forgotten. She has no cause to 
blush for impotcncy of action, for, like 
the stalwart oak of the forest, majestic in 
bearing and lofty in action, she is the 
wonder and the admiration of the world. 
Her operation is as universal as her bans 
are perpetual, piercing depth, penetrat- 
ing space, and overshadowing immensity. 
She has no cause to blush for her mem- 
bership, in that Kings and Potentates 
have bowed where tho publican and poor 
way-faring man, whose light is dark- 
ness, are wont to go. Crowned heads have 
been unsceptcred, measured by the 
plumb, and put withiu the quarrys, hon- 
ored by the fellow.ship of the brethren, 
and exalted for their uoble doings. Gi- 
gantic intellects have been made noble 
stones and fit ornaments for the build- 
ers' uso. Behold here rough ashlars, 
taken from tho mountain quarries, no 
mean subjects of our order. 

In uddrc.ssing you on this occasion, at 
tho request of tho brethren, it is not pre- 
sumed, neither is it neccssa'y, that 1 
should, in the necessarily short time al- 
lotted to me, enter into the minutia of the 
grand conceptions, grand operations, and 
grand developments of Free Masonry. 
Every masonic mind looks with pleasure 
and delight to her historic lore, and 
their hearts are made glad at her pro- 
gressive steps in each successive age and 
generation. We shall in our feeble 
maimer notice firstj and negatively, that 
Ma.sonary is not a political organization; 
secondly, and negatively, that it does 
not claim to be a Christian organization; 
and thirdly, what Masoury is, auJ what 
it claims to be. 

When wo say Masonry is not a polit- 
ical organization, wo mean by this, io 
contrasting tho order with government 
it partakes not of its nature. True we 
have governuicut in the constitution of 
our lodges, in the election of its officers, 
and tho regulation of its affairs; but we 
have law iu its grand conception, a rule 
of action as immutable and unchange- 
able as the fiat of lehovah, or tho laws 
of nature. l olitioal organizations are 
despotic, as in Turkey, where the Sultan 
exercises all tho powers of sovereignty; 
arc monarchical, as Austria, Prussia, 
and England, and are republican, as the 
United Stales, former Athens, Venice, 
and Genoa. Masonry has her existence 
and identity in all of these. Yes, we 
have landmarks by which we stand and 
which are not subject to mutability by 
the whims and caprices of men and leg- 
islators. Its decrees are submissive to 
the political laws in which it has its po- 
litical being, teaching great fundametal 
truths, thereby giving unto Utesar what 
belongeth to him, reserving those moral 
canons that no government can interfere 
with. As an incontrovertible evidence 
that 't is not a body politic, with polit- 
ical intentions and aims, as a corporal 
body it has no co-operation with politi- 
cal orders iu tho policy or expediency of 
government; and, like the church, stands 
separate and apart. To illustrate; What 
may be a crime, or a violation of duties 
belonging to society, or duties belongiug 
to individuals, may not be a violation of 
duties of Masons, and “vice versa.” 
UriiBO is a political term, signifying not 
a moral wrong, but a legal wrong. In- 
tomperance and falsehood aro Masonic 
prohibitions, but uot crimes under 
the political laws. So, many crimes 
are not Masonic wrongs; but there are 
none here who would confound the two 
or imagine that a political organization 
could remain in harmony and unity 
more than two thousand years. 

Secondly, we uotieb “that Masonry 
claims no church authority and is uo 
Christian organization.” I in memorial ly 
Masonry has been erected to God, and 
christiaus have dedicated and held it 
forth in memory of the Holy Johns, the 
Baitist and tho Evangelist. Jews have 
held it iu honor of Solomon. There 
have been but three divine religious dis- 
pensations iu the world since Adam and 
Eve, arm in arm, wandered iu the Para- 
disical garden: the Patriarchal, the Jew- 
ish, and the Christian; and the.se three 
divine developments of religion all con- 
centrate themselves upon the fact that 
Jesus rose from the dead, ascended to 
heaven, and was there received as the 
sou of God. 



of 

causo so nlany charge that wo olaiiii di- 
viiio appointment and divine organiza- 
tion. \Vc wish to show in ostahlishiag 
the Jewi.-h religion, and Christia i, we 
can have no claim to cither (although ty- 
picul of the latter and roprosijntativc of 
the former.) 

Then, first. As evidence of the truth 
of the Jewish religioif, only one j.ostu- 
atum is required, and that is, that rcli 



have so cruiL- 
tracc bchin'd 

tileiii, not even a livii^ man who can 
claim within his veins tme drop of Uo- 
man or Grecian blood; whose continental 
language has become a conventional 
tongue; whose superiority and priority, 
like Petra and Ninevah, gdtic, gone. 
One nation — yes, monumental nation — 
of antiquity yet remains, who can trace 
their lineage to its source, and with 
monumental institutions evidence and 



ion is predicated upon matter of fact, not i prove thoin to bo the legitimate seed of 
conjocture of opinion. This'boitig true. ! Abraham, and which stamp the seal of 
if the fact upon which it is predicated verity upon tho histori'- facts recorded 



bo true, then, logically reasoning, the 
religion must bo true. Wo will have re- 
spect to tho Jewish, ibr in tiiat dtspcnsir- 
tion it is said -Masonry became specula- 
tiva upon an operative system. 

The fact upon which this religion is 
predicated are these: It is recorded that 
in the days of MoScs the children of Is- 
ral amounted to six hundred thousand 



of this poojile. Their I rciiincision and 
passover exists uiid lust 

proposition we lu 'o nmotlvjra- 

tivo monunioiits, instituted simultane- 
ously with the trauspiratron of the facts to 
bo preserved and perpetuated, have never 
been out of existence from that period 
up to the present hour. This cun be at- 
tested by many proofs, one of which I 



fighting men; that they passed out of will only mculioii here, and which will cs 
Egypt and walked through the Red sea, I tablisli the proof of the proposition af- 
reached Mt. Sinai, and there saw the | firmed: Moses tells the Israelites on the 
v.sible manifestations of God; that : night precedin'' their departure from 
they heard his voice proclaiming the I the land of Egypt to take a lamb, to be 
decalogue; that they were fed with | called the Paschal lamb, to dres.s, prejiare 
manna in the wildcrnes.s forty years; and eat it in a peculiar manner. Tho 



that they had a pillar of firo by night to 
guide them, and a cloud by day; that 
they drank limpid water from a rock of 
flint smitten by the rod of illoscs, and 
that they passed through tho river Jor- 
dan as on dry land. I have hastened 
over these I'acfs hjstory records, and 
within tiie Bible you have read them. 
Now if those I'ucts be true, atid proven so, 
the religion upon which is predicated is 
also true. We have the testimony of 
the Bible, which all should admit as ad- 



festivu(was to be observed in that night 
and under circumstances calculated, ou 
every return of its anniversary, to excite 
the recollection of the fee iiigs of the 
Jewish nation. This festival, you, who 
aro acquainted with this history, know 
was the celebration of the passing over 
of the -Vngcl of Heath, sparing tho first- 
born to the bosom of the mother, giving 
joy to the heart of the father, causing 
anguish, lamentation and bereavement to 
tha Egyptian people — it was iu honor of 



missible, hut wo would address the in- their exodus from servile slavery to glo 



credulous us to church and JI isoury and 
prove to them, outside of divine revela- 
tion, not directly tho existence of a Su- 
preme Being, but tho authenticity of the 
fecriptiircs, which teach us of the Father 
and of the Son. 

We return to hasten the proof of the 
facts stated above, and iu order to prove 
them we must lay ‘down certain criteria 
by which wc are enabled to decide with- 
out doubt or uncertainty all questions of 
historic fact. Were it not for these cri- 
teria by which we are enabled to appre- 
ciate the value of testimony, we would, 
in the ordinary intercourse of society, be 



rious liberty. What must have been the 
feelings of their hearts when they knew 
that the God of their Fathers had done 
this, so that when the clouds of discom- 
fiture should hang over them, lest they 
should forget this great love, they are 
told on every anniversary of this festival 
to cat the passover with a strict observ- 
ance of all rites and circumstances. 
Consult the Rabbi of Isr.io! and you find 
thcro has gever been an interval, from 
that period to this, in which the anni- 
versary of the passover has not been sol- 
emnly celebrated. We could dwell 
longer in proof of these questions upon 



liable to constant deception, inasmuch as H’liKh hangs the symbolic teachings of 
tho couscicncious speaking of tho truth is our order, but the postulatum admitted. 



not tho distinguishiug virtue of the pres 
ent age; and before we accept as truth 
every doctrine taught by men, wc should 
test its verity and prove its dictum, wo 
will iu this instance be governed by the 
injunction: TUe.-'e criteria are various, hut 
whenever there is a perfect consistensy 
and accordance between tho fact reported 
and the testimony adduced to prove it, 
conviction of the verity of that fact ne- 
cessarily tbilows. The facts under con- 
sideratiou are encrusted with tho vonor- 
ablo rust of antiquity — a rust that has 
been accumulating for four thousand 
years. It will be our purpose therefore to 
establish tho criteria which will satisfac- 
torily demonstrate ns true, facts report- 
ed to have occurred four thousand years 
ago. Some author has resolved them in- 
to four particulars, and as follows: 
First, The facts relied upon were sensi- 
ble; secondly, They were facts of remark- 
able notoriety; thirdly. There now exists 
standing monuments in perpetual cora- 
raeraorntion of these fact, and Fourthly, 
These commemora’ivo attestatious have 
continued from the very period in which 
the facts transpired up to the present 
time. Thi.s criteria, when applieu, pro- 
duces salutary effects. Wo have said 
that six hundred thousand men are said 
to have walked through the Bed sea as 
on dry land. In consequence of the rod 
of Moses being extended over it, the 
Egyptians, following, were drowned, 
while they on the opposite sJioro looked 
on and beheld it all. Was not this a 
sensible fact? Y^ct another to embrace 
the first particular criteria: In tho same 
history, the uight preoediug this depar- 
ture of the Israelites out of tho land of 
Egyptian bondage, you remember the 
plagues sent upon Egypt that Pharaoh 
might relent, that tho children of Abra- 
ham might go. In vain was the visita- 
tion of Jehovah’s wrath until at last the 
Angel ot Heath, the pale horse of revela- 
tion, passed over the fertile jilaius and 
crowded cities, taking the first-born from 
each family. Tho lamentation and des- 
olation of that Empire makes it sensible 
indeed. AVero these sensible facts pub- 
licly exhibited, and facts of remarkable 
notoriety, in open day and in the pres- 
ence of witnesses? When the monsoon 
of death plucked the idol of your house- 
hold and gloom came within, could sun- 
shine ever erase it from your memory, 
and drive it from the paths of retrospec- 
tion? Every one who has knowledge of 
these events know that Egypt, when 
this occurred, was tho realm of letters 
aud the Empire bf eulighteumont, and 
that Pharaoh’s court was crowded with 
statesmen and scholars learned iu the 
arts and sciences. Yea, publicly wit 
ncssed by no laggards, but by the wis- 
dom of the world. Are there auy com- 
memorative institutions now existing in 
attestation of these sensible and public 
facts? The Masonio mind delights iu 
the evidences thereof, for in its proof lies 
the truth of the Order; though a science 
of morality, 'tis developed and inculcated 
by the ancient method of symbolism 
which we shall notice in its order. We 
affirm that there are commcmoralivo in- 
stitution# attesting this fact. Notwith- 
standing all the mighty Empires of an- 
tiquity which once flourished iu history 
and in their respective turns controlled 
the temporal iestinics of tho world, have 
suuk.cue by ouo iuto dust; .(the Jewisb 



the criteria established by . which to 
prove any historie fict- I'uough encrusted 
with the age of antiquity, wc see tho only 
conclusion, tha truth of the Scriptures 
aud the verity of the Jewish religion, 
predicated and based upon the facts 
proven. With like reasoning and the 
ex parte testimony of Paul, aud the facts 
that Jesus died, arose again, and ascend- 
ed unto tho Father i'or the redemption 
of the uorld, and similar criteria, we 
could establish the truth of the Christiau 
religion; but we wish your particular at- 
tention to the fact that Masonry does 
not take hold of the flrst, and, iu part, 
only {prefigures the second, in that the 
tabernacle in the wilderness came after 
the deliverance of Israel and before the 
death of Christ, commemorative of the 
former, foreshadowing tho latter. That 
we have a commemorative institution 
withiu the sanctum of our lodges, every 
Mason knows; that tho solemn striking 
of the bell points to Mt. Moriah, reach- 
ing to the Son of God in the resurrec- 
tion morn, every JIasou feels. But we 
hasten; Ma.-oury, as I have said before, 
is a science of morality developed and 
inculcated by the ancient method of sym- 
bolism. My Brethren, symbolism is 
dear unto us all. There is no science so 
ancient as thi.s, and no mode of instruc- 
tion has ever been so universal as was 
tho symbolic in former times. The wis- 
dom of the Chaldeans, Phcnicians, 
Egyptians, Jews; of Zoroaster, Sanoho- 
uiathon, Pherecydes, Syrus, Pythagoras, 
Socrates, and Plato, of all the uncicDts 
that has come to our hands, is symbolic. 
I'hc first religions were evidently sym- 
bolical, because, as the great philosophical 
historian, Grote, has remarked, at a time 
when language was yet in its infancy, 
visible symbols were the most viyid 
means of acting upon the minds of the 
ignorant hearers. Mu.-„, Jio was skilled 
in all the learning aud wisdom of the 
Egyptians (which was symbolical), 
brought with him from tho cradle of all 
the sciences a perfect knowledge of this 
science, as it was taught by'thc Priests 
of Isis and. Osiris, aud applied it to the 
ccrcmouics with whieh he invested the 
purer I’eligion of the chosen people of 
God. Hence we learn from the Jewish 
historian that in constructing the taber- 
uacle, which gave tho first model for the 
temple at Jerusalem, and afterwards for 
every Masonic lodge, he applied this 
principle of symbolism to every part of 
it. He divided it into three parts to 
represent the three great elementary di- 
visions of tho Universe — the land, the 
sea, and tho air — the first two accessible 
to tho priests and the people, symbolic 
of the land aud the sea, which all men 
might inhabit; while tie third, or inte- 
rior division, tho Holy of Holies, whose 
threshold no mortal dared to cross, and 
which was peculiarly' consecrated to God, 
was emblomatical of heaven. His dwell- 
ing. With tho tabernacle tho Temple of 
King Solomon is closely connected — the 
one was the archetype of tho other, and 
this magnificent Temple, with all its re- 
gal splendor, has become the type of tho 
great Temple of God above, its courts 
and throuo symbolic ot the Great A\ hito 
Throne and 'Temple Courts of Heaven. 
We have endeavored to show tliat Ma- 
sonry, OS' an organization, is neither po 
litical or Chiistian. 

Wb now return to the thoughts con- 



iioctod with the objects of our present 
convocation — JIa.sonry and its profes- 
sions. A Free Alason is a man, free, 
born of a free woman, a brother to king.s, 
and a compaiiioH of princes, if they bo 
Masons. The name wliich we hold, and 
wnieli wc cherish, originated in the buil- 
ding ot the Temple of Jorusalcm. Our 
ancient brethren, who were employed by’ 
King Solomon to Work at this famous 
edifice, were declared free, and exempted 
from all imposts, duties, and taxes for 
them and their descendants. At the 
destruction of the Temple by Nebuchad- 
nezzer the posterity of these Masons were 
carried into captivity by tho Jetys, but 
wbeu tho till' f their humiliatioii wa- 
expired, by good will of Cy.i-. . .hoy 
were permitted to erect a second Temple, 
being declared freo for that purpose. 
Heuee wc are called Free Masons. Far- 
ther, wc cannot accept as candidates auy 
hut tho sons of free women. This dates 
its origin to a much earlier period, even 
from tlie time when Abraham held a sol- 
emn festival at tho. weaning of his sou 
Isaac. When Ishmael amused himself 
teasing the young child, wo know how 
Sarah had him removed with Hagar the 
bond woman, saying they were not com- 
petent to inherit with the free born. She 
,«pake by divine iiispirat'on, a= she knew 
that, from I.saac’s loins would s]iriiig a 
great and mighty people who would 
serve the Lord with freedom, fervency 
and zeal. And these two persous, Ish- 
mael and Lsaae, aro typical of the law and 
the gospel, tho one given by Moses and 
the other by Christ. Hence, we are ac- 
cepted Masons. This circumstance has 
been embodied in Free Masonry to show 
that although a pirson nyay have becu 
born of -a free woman, ahliough he may 
have been made a Mason, and entitled to 
all the privileges of initiation, yet if he 
undervalues the privileges and neglects- 
to improve his mind by an application 
tioii of the doctrines and precepts which 
he hears in the Lodge, instead of profit- 
ing by his freedom as Isaac did, he will 
be no belter than a profane bond-slave 
like Ishm .cl, who was cast out from his 
father’s house as unworthy any show in 
the inheritaneo. It was by the same 
carelessness and inattention that the Jews 
forfeited tlieir freedom aud suffered their 
privileges to be transferred to others. 
By their wilful rejection of the Messiah 
they have been excluded from the covo- 
naut of Grace; have taken tho place of 
the sons of slavery; have been cast out 
of the vineyard of promise, and are aliens 
from tho truo Israel of God. In man 
thcro are throe ages: youth, manhood, 
and old age; iu the adorable God-head, 
three persons : Father, Son and Holy 
Spirit, and in Masonry there aro three 
degrees: the first representing ttio outer 
court of the Tabernacle of Moses, and 
the court, of the Gentiles iu the Temple 
situateil at Jerusalem, for in either case, 
tho Tabernacle or tlie Temple, the uu- 
circumcised could enter no farther. The 
rite or sacrament of baptism, which io- 
troduces the penitent intp the van of tho 
church, corresponding with the privilege 
that enabled a Jew to enter into 
tho second division of the Taber- 
nacle, is represented by the degree of a 
Fellow Craft, which qualifies him to en- 
ter iuto the holy’ place and be invested 
with the highest honors and privileges of 
Ma.sonry. It was denominated by Haul 
a worldly sanctuary, aud tl.ereforo at 
this step of your progress you become 
eligible for instruction in worldly knowl- 
edge and receive the rudiments of scien- 
tific acquirements. But it is only when 
a Masou has been raised to the third and 
sublime degree that ho can form an ac- 
curate judgment of the real tcudeuey of 
our mysterious association. Up to this 
point all has been preliminary and con- 
sequently, superficial. But now the 
whole scheme of Masonry becomes re- 
vealed to the enlightened eye of the Mas- 
ter Mason. Like the High I’riest of Is- 
rael entering the Sanctum Sanctorum of 
the Tabernacle and Temple, he beholds 
with steady gaze the Shekiuah of Glory; 
like the perfect Christian admitted to 
communion with his God and Saviour, 
he enters the church Triumphant and 
beholds insuperable thiugs which it is 
not lawful for him to reveal, and like Paul 
in tho third heaven, he hoai-s unspeak- 
able words which to utter would he death. 
Speculative Masonry, which is but ano- 
ther name for Free Masonry, in its mod- 
ern acceptation, is technically and brief- 
ly defined as tho application, or, perhaps 
more worthily, expressed, tho religious 
consecration of tho rules and principles, 
the language and implements of opera- 
tive Masonry to the veneration of God, 
the purification of the heart, and the 
preservation of certain profound dogmas 
of mystical philosophy. Bearing in 
mind that speculative or modern ]'’ree 
Masonry dates its origin from the build- 
ing of King Solomon’s Temple by Jew- 
ish and 'Tyrian artisans, the first impor- 
tant fact that attracts our attention is that 
the operative Masons at Jerusalem were 
engaged in tho construction of an earth- 
ly and material Temple to be dedicated 
to the service and worship of. God, a 
house in which Jehovah was to dwell 
visibly by his Shekinah, and whence he 
wa.-i by the Urim and Th.maiuim to send 
forth His oracles; now, tho operative art 
having for us ceased, we, as speculative 
Masons, symbolize the labors of our pre- 
decessors by engagin'' in the construction 
of a moral templo in tur hearts, dedicated 
to the honor of Him who is the author 
of purity, and whence every evil thought 
and unruly passion should ho banished 
as tho sinner and the Gentile were ex- 
cluded from the sauctuary of the Jewi.-;li 
templo. As Masons we have three vir- 
tues, Faith, Hojie and Charity. Tliis is 
the theological ladilcr which Jacob in 
his viaion saw, reaching up into heaven, 



ted Faith and Hope, .an ' 
chorisMs shall attend Charity in c 
less ages thereafter. ’Tis the 
8tar to our noble order. Faitli 
Ui'ot, Hope is a coneomitaut and fo 
but greater thau all is Charity. L 
the brethren and kindness to all 
kind; fear God and keep his co‘ 
incuts is tW- whole du'y of 
•I'O 

i'hea, my b’.ethrcu, let us put cn tiio 
breast-plate of Faitli, llie ariiior of Hope, 
and thu helmet of Charity, going about 
doing good, that our works redounding to 
the honor of the order m.ay evidence 
likeness unto divine morality, lhatothers 
may feel and know that our callingis good, 
that our order is noble. Let us be among 
those who are working the amelioration 
of mackiiid, not only where the d-ews of 
righteousness ascend, where the light of 
civilization exists, where the Bible, the 
inestimable gift of God to man, cau be 
found, but also iu the secluded shades of 
Hindoo, iu tho pestiferous groves of Af- 
rica, and in the iMohamedan regions ot 
Asia. No longer the Koran should tako 
upon its unconsecrated pages tho Imple- 
ments of our order. No longer should 
the land of Solomon's wisdom, our Grand 
.'■lastcr, he travailing iu sorrow, lament- 
ing in darknes.s; but let us with banners 
upon every breeze herald the speedy’ ap- 
proach of light from whence darkness 
doth depart; let our names bo iu the 
mouths of babes a synonym offswcctiicss 
and of gladness; let no widow’s cry came 
up as a memorial against us; no orjrhan 
ask and receive uo bread. Finally, bo 
of ono niiud; live iu charity to all mankind, 
and especially’ the brethren, tho hou:e- 
hold of the faithful. 



Mati'imuiial. 



hour of deliverance. Though the time 
when Jehovah will gather together the 
scattered Israelites we know cot ; though 
the prophesies aie uiiscafclrable and can 
only be understood in their fulfilluient, 
yet, tho melioration of their lot, who 
cling to ‘the beloved fields of Palestine, 
may he effected by a diffusion of light, 
and knowledge once more rfiuong them, 
aiul is it unreasonable to suppose that 
Ma.sonry might again cheer up the heart, 
of sorrow in that unhappy region to 
which the Eastern realm of a new world 
: now owes their joyous day? 

] Wc might speak of the Four Cardinal 
Virtues, Temperance, Fortitude, Pru- 
deuce and Justice; we might talk to you 
of the Bible, Square, and Compasses, and 
and admonishes us to have faith in God, ; mftny privileges belouging uuto us as ail 
hope of immortality aud charity to all j order, but we close our remarks with 
mankind. Tliis part of our system has j Charily — an apple of gold basketed iu 
the Holy Bible for its basi"; Faith. Hope I silver, a diamond chanceled with rubies, 
and Charity for its supporters; Jehovah ! an opal clustered with pearls, for when 
for its President, and lleSven lor its end. ' Faitli hath changed to sight and llopo to 
The true Masonic Philosopher sees in all j fruition. Charity’ goclh to the cud of time 
things an ever pte.sent Hcity as the gov- | AVhen harps have chanted a requi 
ernor and director of those inagnificciit 
works which proceeded from His hand, 
all guided by the celestial dictates of 
these theological virtues. If the lrees.of 
the field bud and blossom under the in- 
fluence of a genial sun; if tho teeming 
eartli is irrigated with gentle showers; 

“If flecej tl'.fk.i the IiilU ndorn . 

Aiiii vullcyi Kiniie with wavy corn;’’ 

it is^Q ha.-r iJ ordi mir . ^,1 p hcahip* 

Divinity: if the great ruler of the de; 
ri=e in the morning to call the inhabi- 
tants of tho earth from their slumbers 
and commence their labors; if the ruler 
of the night move majesticalty through 
llio heavens, partially enlightening tho 
darkness with her 'silver light; if the 
stars and the planets with which the 
firniameiil is studded like an azureicano- 
py charged with sparkling knobs of 
burnished gold, pursue their aoeustoraed 
courses, century after ccutury, without 
the slightest deviation, it is to display 
the power and goodness of the great Ar- 
chitect and His provident care, in making 
all tho works of the creation subservient 
to ono object— the comfort and happi- 
ne.ss of His creatures; aud wc ought rev- 
ereutiilly to bow the knee and with our 
ancient Grand Master, King Solomon, 
exclaim, “Lord, »hat is mau that Thou 
art mindful of him, or the son of mrin 
that Thou vi.sitest him.” Wo might with 
pleasure talk of the three great lights of 
Masoury, the Bible, the Square, aud the 
Compasses, but time, hurries us on. 

Masonry has no principle but what 
might still more ornamoiit the purest 
mind, nor any appendage but what iiiiglit 
give additional lustre to tho brightest 
character. By the exercise of tbo duties 
of Masoury the rich may add abundantly 
to the fund of their eternal inheritance; 
the wise may increase their knowledge 
o( the nature of God in all His best per- 
fections and thereby daily grow still 
more wise unto eternal salvation; the 
pute in heart may be always advancing 
in the divine likenes.s, and they who 
walk in this path of the just, with zeal 
aud activity, will find iU'as tho shining 
light whieh shincth more and more unto 
the perlect day. While wc have showed 
that Masonry is neither a political or 
Christian organ.izitioii, we havo also en- 
deavored to prove It not merely a moral 
edifice, for every degree throw# light on 
the nature and attributes of the true God. 

The preservation of His name is its great- 
est honor; the promulgation of truth its 
greatest glory. It claims hut one book 
out of all the libraries of the world, that 
book is the Holy Bible. 'This will re- 
move wonder that a society’ whose secrets, 
neither I’apal tortures, Spanish Inquisi- 
tions, despotic powers, riches nor elo- 
quence could ever penetrate, has been 
preserved so many centuries, and is per- 
petually iucreasing. Tho reflection is 
solemn to a thoughtful mind. Mysteri- 
ous characters are traced iu the Inner 
Chamber, and the light of day shines 
upon them, and they arc the name of 
God in whom wc live,, move and havo 
our being. For many ages we held the 
keys of knowledge while the Barbarians 
were desolating everything that was fair 
and beautiful iu society, aud Jlasonry is 
probably destined to be one of tha mighty 
instruments in tho bauds of Providence, 
to spread tho sacred word among all na- 
tions who know not God and whoso ig- 
norance has a claim on tho children of 
humanity. Under the blessings cf 
a good govertiment and beneath 
the broad light of Christianity, 
wc little know the sufferings of a 
large portiou of our race in remote coun- 
tries. Tiio funeral fire that consumes 
some widowed mourner, still burns on 
the banks of tho Gauges; the unhallowed 
Turk still pollutes the holy laud of Pal- 
estine; the dark African still looks to 
hoiven iu the agony of despair, and there 
are multitudes who live iu wrctcheducs,s, 
without coml'jrt or hope hereafter, while 
the great Masonic family aro bound to 
diffuse that light whieh cheers all that 
see it and carries gladness in every ray. 

Whatever opinions may be entertained 
on tho subject of evangelizing the multi- 
tudinous nations of -\sia, and circulating 
the sacred word through their wi'lo and 
sorrowful dominions; whatever may be 
thought of those innumerable societies, 
actuated as by a diviue impulse in this 
grand and holy object, yet, ought not 
Masons to take a deep interest in the 
restoration of that ancient realm of our 
Hebrew brethren wheuco all our light 
first dawned to peace, to comfort, and to 
joy. Tho mountains of Lebanon where 
tho f tones wore hewn, squared and num- 
bered; the heights of Joppa where tU t 
mateiials for the building were conveyed; 
the Mount of Moriah where the Temple 
of Kolomou was erected; the garden of 



Married pcoglo will plca ."0 rca'l as wrilteil. 
Single ones can road Iho lir.«t lino, then liio 
thiv'l, then the sooond, and finally the lourlh in 
cacii verse:. 

That man must lead a Iiapry life, 

M’lio’s freeil from matrimuuial ehains, 

IVlio is directe'l by bis wife, 

Is sure to sutler for his pains. 

Adam couiil fiml no soli-I peace 
When Eve was given for a male; 

Unlil lie saw a woman's faoo 
Adam was in u happy slato. 

In all tho fem.alc faoo apimars 
Hypocrisy, deceit and j»ridci 

Truth, 'larling of a heart sinuere, 

Ne'er known in woman to reside. 

AVh.it tongo is able to unfulil 
Tlio falsoiioo'I tliat in woman dwells; 

'The worth in woman wo belie. d 
Is almost imporceptiblc. 

Ciirso'l be the fnoli.sli thiCg. I say, 

AVho elianges from his singlt-ness; 

AVho will not yiebl to woman's sway 
Is sure of | erfect hicssedness. 



Cutting Hay. 

Many planters in gatliering hay Ictitlie 
iu tho field until it is entirely dry. 'J’o 
accomplish this, it is usually exposed, 
night after uight to heavy dews, and not 
unfrcqucntly to rains, nhieli greatly in- 
jure tile appearaiue as well as the (lual- 
ity of the hay’. The proper wav to cure 
hay is to cut it early iu the morning, and 
spead it carelully over the ground; turn- 
iiig it up to the sun aud wind once or 
t'ffico during tlie day with a rake or fork, 
and hauling it under shelter just before 
uight. If the sun is bright, almost any 
hay will be sufficiently cured in a single 
day to keep, and it will be bright iu 
color, aud much nioro palatable to the 
st(x;k, as well as more nutricioiis than 
when deadened by two or three days c.x- 
posure. In jiuttiiig it away, arrangc- 
iiicuti should be made to spread the cut- 
ting of each day over a covered mow pen, 
to tho depth of one or two feet, and 
sprinkle salt freely over it. It is well 
to have two or three jiens for depositing 
the hay, so that each day’s cutting may 
in two or three days before more is add- 
ed to it. 'This precaution is not iicces- 
gary where tho gra.ss is mown in tha 
morning, and has ouo bright sun upon 
it. 



AVatciing l.ocuiuntivcs 
Fast trains on railro'sds can only be 
run nhen the stoppages to take in ’Wivtcr 
arc at long intervals. One of the Eng- 
lish methods of feeding locomotives is 
very effective, and is about being intro- 
duced iu this country. At tho Montrese 
Btutioii the Hudson river railroad has, 
laid down iu tho center of the track a 
perfectly straight trough, lined witli 
pointed sheet -iron, 1.2U0 feet long, 15 
inches deep, and 18 inuhes wide. This 
trough, holding 1(1,000 gallons, is kept 
constantly supplied with water from n 
spring. To tho tender of tho locomo- 
tive between tile hind trucks is attached 
a scini-cireular pipe, with a nozzle so 
arranged as to drop down iiitq tho trough 
at the will of tho engineer. The nozzle 
is directed towards the point tho loeo; 



Gethseraane, where lay’ tho sepulchre of, ... . - 

our Lord and Master; the villages qj' . n'ot'vo is going and sinks top depth of 



Bethlehem, Nazareth, and Bethany; tho 
sou of Galileo, and the river of Jordan; 
all those spots are still existing, rendered 
dear to every Jlasoii by a thousand asso- 
ciations: and tho land ot Palestine is still 
beautil'ul as ever, hut whero are the gen- 
erations that ouce were there beholding 
the star in the East, and receiving the 
glad tidings from above, and listening to 
the voice of our beloved and departed 
brother, John the Baptist (cruelly be- 
headod by the treacberous llerGil at the 
blood thirsty request of tl.o daugiUer) 



two inches in the trough. It is stated 
that when the train is ruuning at.tlxq 
rate of' tliiriy miles an hour, and Uhe 
nozzle is dropped in the rough, J.G.'M 
gallons or water will he forced iuto llio 
toiider before the entire length of the 
trough has been passed over, 

t^Haniel Webster oncTs»i i; “If we 
work upon marble it n-ill perish; if upon 
brass, timo will efface it; if we i oar turn 
pics they will crumble into dii-t; but if 
wo work upon our immortal mrml.s— if 
wo imbue tliem with priiieii'les, with (ho 



whoso festival wo this day celebrate'.’ ju.st fear of God andl iovc of our follow 
Iho ruiii.s of .lei'u.salcm will answer. | men 



,, , , , , , . I .. we ongravc on those tahlcUs soillt: 

Deep darkness ov. i'sha.l.i,w.s then- poster- ] ihing whieh, ndl bi.i;.|Ucu 
ity, a Soi'i'owlul [icople uT'. awaiting the ! etei'uitv.” ^ 



jiAroJgb al'. 



ELIZABETHTOWN NEWS 

WILL Editor, 

J.  V. MATFH1.M, Assistant ErfHor. 

MATTins .A UEI.E, Proprietors. 

EllzaCctlitovrii I I, IH7U 

DEMOCRATIC TICKET. 

FOB COUNTY JUI GE, 

A. B. MONTGOMEllY. 

FOR COUNTY CLERK, 

VIUUIL IIKVVITT. 
fob STlERfFP, 

W[L1 IAM i). WOOD. 

FOB COUNTY ATTORNEY, 

WILLIAM F. BELL. 

FOR SURVEYOR, 

G. ABNOLD. 

‘ FOR JAILER, • 

T. J. PHILLIPS. 

FOR ASSESSOR, 

LINUS I. WAllIlEN. 

Ftm CORONER, 

JOSEPH 8. GHAY. 

s.;u otjrATUu.,V^Pru'»bla. 

For many months past Spain has been 
ffithoul a sovering, the resolution of a 
year or so ago having forced its (iueen 
to flee the kingdom. 

Since then the government has been 
getting along in loose style, though a 
Prim man was at the head. During this 
time the crown has been offered to a half 
dozen “bloods," but some overwhelming 
objection has been raised to all, either at 
homo or abroad. A few days ago it 
was offered to Leopold Zobenzollern. 
Though a relative of Louis Napoleon, 
tho Emperor sees in this move the hand 
of Bismarck and Prussia. 

Napoleon thinks it will never do to 
have Prussia on tho one side and Spain 
on the other, with a Prussian Prince as 
her King. 

All Europe is agitated over the mat- 
ter, and unless Leopold withdraws war 
will probably commence immediately be^ 
tween France and Prussia. Austria 

» 

still smarting from her whipping, it is 
thought will go with France. 

The effect upon us here will be a very 
material advance in breadstuff's. 

Speaking of the probable war, the 
Courier- Journal says : 

Tho geographical position of Spain, in 
the rear of France, has for hundreds of 
years rendered the scepter wielded at 
iVladrid a weapon of the first importance 
in every European contest. When 
Charles II, the last of the Spanish Ilaps- 
burgs, died in 1700, the effort to place 
Philip of Awjou, grandson of Louis 
XIV'., upon the throne of Spain, in ae- 
cordance with the will of Charles, in- 
volved France for thirteen years in the 
bloody “War of the Spanish Succession,” 
in which England, Holland and Germany 
opposed Philip in behalf of a Prince of 
the Austrian family. Anything like a 
union of the military prowess of the 
Latin races is decisive of every European 
contest, and hence the despeiate and 
costly c.Tort of Napoteon I to fix his 
brother Joseph on the Spanish throne. 

The question whether Europe is on 
the eve of another war over the Spanish 
crown, as a result of the dubious rela- 
tions existing for some time between 
France and Prussia, is one of great in- 
terest on this side of the Atlantic, be- 
cause of its influence upon tho com- 
merce niid|finance of this country. 

The territorial expansion and political 
exaltation of Prussia, the daring enter- 
prise and success of Bismarck's diplo- 
macy and Prussia’s arms, have left many 
a sore spot in Europe and excited no 
little jealousy and alarm in France. A 
feeling that their military glory is chal- 
lenged and that their Euroiican su- 
premacy is menaced, if not already 
wrested from them by the wonderful 
combinations and triumphs of Prussia's 
great minister, is enough to set ablaze 
the warlike order of the French. On 
the other hand, Prussia seems to feel in- 
stinctively that her recent aggrandize- 
ment has made France her foe, and that 
something must bo done to secure her 
acquisitions. After procuring the elec- 
tion of one kinsman of his king as Prince 
of IlouBiania in the East, Bismarck has 
secretly intrigued for tho election of a 
Prussian prince, Leopold of Hohenzol- 
Icrn, to tho throne of Spain, expecting 
doubtless to overreach the French Em- 
peror by conferring a orown upon one 
who is a kinsman of tho latter and a 
Catholic, but still a Prussian. 



Could the South German Confederatioit, 
or group of States, be secured on the 
same side, they have CG,510 men on the 
peace or 134,40G on the war footing, 
with 107,000 of these prepared for in- 
stant service. Such a coalition wou'd 
give France tho control of 777,000 
fighting men at once, with a reserve of 
2,59G,10G tiained soldiers. 

On tho other hand, Prussia has 726,- 
000 men on the peace or 1,260,000 on 
tho war footing, with 300,000 now ready 
for operations on her Western frontier. 
Northern Germany, going with Prussia, 
has 315,520 on tho peace, 551,003 on 
the field, or 944,321 on the war footing, 
of which 546,000 are instantly available. 
Th's would place at Prussian disposal 
846,000 men for the fii"st moment and 
1,364,321 in reserve. Thus she would 
have, instantly, 60,000 men more and, 
hereafter, 231,785 less than the Fronch 
alliance. Should she bo able to manage 
Southern Germny for her cause she 
would have 1,053,000 men, or 176, oOO 
more than France to move at once, or 
quite enough to cope with her and Aus- 
tria together, for the time being, with all 
the advantages of a common language 
and position. This would leave Prussia 
still a reserve of 1,441,727 men, or only 
154,37.“ less than that of France and 
Austria coalesced— a difference swamped 
to the extent of nearly 00,000 by her su- 
periority of immediate force. — [New 
Yuik Herald. 



Ectter from Hou. J, P. Kiiott. 



Washinoton, July 1, 1870. 

TT. F. Bell, jETwr/,.* Attorney at Law: 

Dear Sir: I have delayed answering 
yours for several days under the impres- 
sion that the Committee on Pensions in 
the Senate would report on the bill which 
passed tho House some weeks ago, 
granting pensions to the soldiers of 
1812. The committee has, however, not 
made their report, and I fear they will 
not during the present session. The bil[, 
has not been printed, but it was simply 
that such soldiers ef 1812 as could take 
the oath of loyalty should bo placed on 
the pens'on rolls at 88 per month. The 
Commissioners of pension will issue his 
circular, giving directions how to proceed 
under the law should it bo passed, aud, 
should he do so, I will send you a copy 
as soon as issued. 

V'^ery truly your friend, 

J. P. Knott. 

The idea of a man who has spent tho 
the best days of his life in detenso of 
his country being acquired to prove his 
LOYALTY, is in keeping with Badicalism, 
and never could have had its origin any- 
where else. 



Bg^Capt. William Lindsay and Judge 
Rufus K. VV'illiams, candidates for the 
Judgeship in the Fourth Appellate dis- 
trict, were in town Monday en route for 
Leitchfield, where they had an appoint- 
ment to speak. 

Finding, owing to the running of the 
trains, they could not meet their ap- 
pointment, they left for Bowling Green. 

Lindsay, the nominee of the Demo- 
cratic party, will beat Williams, inde- 
pendent, several thousand votes. 



JSrCol. R. S. Bevier, of Logan, is 
mentioned as a probable candidate for 
Lieutenant Governor. . 



|£^The Owensboro Shield suggests 
for Governor that true and tried Demo- 
crat, Colonel Willis B. Macben, of Lyon 
county. 



/;^Col. Robert Y. Bush, of Hancock, 
formerly of this county, candidate for 
Congress in the Owensboro district, fa- 
vors repudiation of the National debt, 
and is writing letters favoring it for the 
Owensboro Shield. 



B®,The Henderson news has this to 
say of Hon. T. C.- McCrcery : 

“M^e have it from an unquestioned 
source that our able Senator, Tom. Mc- 
Creery, has no aspirations to step into 
the Gubernatorial shoes to be vacated by 
Governor Stevenson, and that he will 
decline peremptorily entering his name 
as a candidate for the office. This being 
the case, it only remains for that gifted 
and popular statesman's many admirers 
to secure him a place in the United 
States Senate after the expiration of tho 
term of Senator Davis. 



Eightltig Resources of the European 
Powers. 

“To cook a hare catch one” is an an- 
cient and frite but very practical recom 
mendation. To get up a war is easy 
enough, but to carry on a war is another 
thing. Neitlier individuals nor commu- 
nities will long go about through the 
world “blue molded,” like Pat at Don 
nybrook fair, “for want of a batin’,” 
without being accommodated first or last, 
Such seems to bo precisely the state of 
mind that Prussia has reached with her 
enormous military establishment, and 
such, too, the humor of Franco laying 
down the law to all Europe. But how 
are they and their allies, on ether side, 
prepared for the issue? Ay, there’s the 
rub. 

France, tho military Colossus of the 
West, has, according to the latest and 
most accurate advices, under, the new 
laws recently carried into cfl'cct, 414,632 
soldiers on the peace footing, 647,271 of 
a field army, or 1,350,000 men in all for 
l)er entire ordinary war strength. Of 
these 370,000 men arc ready to march at 
the tap of the drum on the outbreak of 
hostilities. Austria, which, correctly or 
incorrectly, is regarded as the inevitable 
ally of France, has 278,470 on tlie peace 
establishment, 838,700 of a war strength, 
j.r 300,000 lolly prepared to move. 



Pica of lusaiilty. 

W. W. Taylor, a white man, who some- 
time ago killed a negro named Moses 
Gray in Louisville, was on Monday ac- 
quitted on the plea of insanity, pro- 
duced at the time by a superabundance 
of whisky. 

We know nothing of the merits of 
this case, but this plea of insanity is be- 
coming too common, and the idea that a 
man under the influence of liquor is at 
liberty to commit murder, or any other 
crime, would be simply ridiculous were 
it not for the evils it brings upon the 
community. 

Tho truth is the juries are [too lax in 
their verdicts, and men often be- 
come heroes when they should be con- 
victs and murderers. 



5®*The people of Logan county are 
to vote in August on a proposition to 
prohibit the sale of liquors in tho county 
except for medicinal purposes. 



8®* We welcome to our exchange list 
the Hopkinsville New Era, published, 
owned and edited by Col. Jno. D. Mor 
ris and A. G. Caruth, Esq. It is Dem- 
ocratic in politics, splendid in ability and 
lively in news, and we hope it much suc- 
cess pecuniarily. 



Democratic Xomliices. 

What the Courier- Journal says for the 
whole State fits Hardin county exactly. 

’ If you vote against the nominees of the 
Democratic party, you are compelled to 
record, your votes with the negroes ; 
all persons opposed to Radicalism should 
cast their votes for the nominees of the 
Democratic party. This is a duty they 
owe to their faith and to their country. 
It is evident that a few more years of 
Radical rule will prove disastrous to 
I every section and every interest. The 
; only hope now is that the Democratic 
I party will come into power. We arc 
; told by the Democratic Congressmen, in 
I their address to the American people, 

■ that if we are true to ourselves and the 
j Democratic party wc will have a major- 
I ity in the lower House of the next Con- 
I gross, and in two years more will control 
the Senate. Is not such a consammu- 
! tion worth a struggle? Is there any sac- 
I rificc that we should not make to attain 
1 such a desirable end? 

The people of the North, East, and 
Westare rallying to the Democratic party. 
New York has rolled up 87,000 as a 
Democratic majority, and she expects the 
Kentucky Democracy to show no sign of 
faltering now. If any bolter, independ- 
ent, or Radical candidate should be elect- 
ed, it would be flashed over the wires on 
Monday night of August the 1st to all 
of tho Radical stronghold* that they had 
gained a victory — that the nominees of 
the Democratic party had been defeated. 
A bolter or independent now is worse 
than It Radical. Let the people beware 
of them, and shun them as they would a 
pestilence. 

The Ilh at l.chaiion. 

Read what the Lebanon Clarion says 
of Capt. 7. M, Fiddler, and what Capt. 
Fiddler says generally: 

Capt. J. M. Fiddler then mounted the 
rostrum and made a very inflamatory 
harangue, suggesting about as many pei- 
nicious ideas to tho freedmen as could 
well be crammed into a speech of the 
same length. Among other instances of 
bad taste he went out of his way to make 
an attack upon Father Schacht and Fa- 
ther Hutchins, two eminent Catholic 
clergymen. These gentlemen are well 
known in this community and univer- 
sally esteemed; and tho idea of Capt. 
Fiddler's assaijing them from the rostrum 
is to the last degree absurd. Such an 
attempt can only recoil upon the head 
of its author. 

Capt. F. also paid his respects to the 
members ot tho late Third party, whom 
he designated as “spotted liorses.” He 
warned his hearers against giving them 
any support, and advised them if they 
voted for anybody but radicals, to go for 
a man who took his democracy straight 
and had the manliness to say what be 
was. He intimated, however, that they 
should have a full ticket of their own 
and advised them to give their votes to i 
none but Republicans. 



Disabilities Itcuiuved. 

The Senate of the United States on 
last Friday passed two- bills removing 
the political disabilities of nearly 3,700 
disfranchised persons. 

'J’bc only ones to whom pardon was 
refused were General Gostavus 4V. Smith 
aud General Basil W. Duke, whoso 
names were stricken out of Senator Mc- 
Crccry’s bill, which included nothing 
but Kentuckians. General Duke is at 
present one of the Louisville representa- 
tives in the State Legislature. , 

The bills have yet to pass the House. 
The following persons, with many others, 
arc embraced in tho McCreery bill: J. E. 
Cantrell, Scott county; W. S. Dulaney, 
Warren county, aftd Thos. II. Hays, 

T. Love aud M. II. Gofer, Hardin 
county. 



C, W. Y EAGER & CO. 



Ellzabetlitowii aud Paducah Railroad. 

The change of time in starting from 
this point at 10:40 A. m. instead of 2 P, 
M. has proven a source of great incon- 
venience to the local travel, and we 
hear of many complaints on account of it. 

Passengers arriving hero from the 
South on the 11:55 A. m. train on the 
L. & N. R. R. are compelled to remain 
here until 10:40 the next morniag. 

Tr.ivelers reaching here on the 10:25 
from Louisville under the old arrange- 
ment were the only ones inconvenienced, 
and they were delayed but three hours 
and a half. Now the road is compelling 
the farmers to come town on horseback 
or by private conveyance, or to come by 
rail and remain over night. 

The change, it seems to us, is a bad 
one pecuniarily to the company — it cer- 
tainly works to the inconvenience of the 
road and tho injury" of our town. 

If the company could go back to the 
old time-table it would certainly give 
greater satisfaction to the people along 
the line of the road. 



Rumor* 

\Ye heard several times yesterday that 
we were to have a new candidate for 
Sheriff. Nothing positive and settled 
could be learned, but if wo do, tho lead- 
er will bo a Radical, and tho deputies a 
kind of no party-indcpendent-constitu- 
tional-third party-don’t-care-a-cent kind 
cf Democrats. 

fi@"Rear Admiral ^J. A. Dahlgren, 
United States Navy died in Washington 
on tho morning of the 12th instant, of 
heart disease. 

Eoulsville Dive Stock .Market. 

Louisville, July 11, 1870. 

Cattle — There has been a moderate i 
run of cattle on the market tho last 
three days — hardly enough to supply the 
wants of homo consumers — the market 
ruling brisk, and all selling about as fast 
as they arrive. ' We quote at from 3 to 
3^0 for inferior and rough; medium good 
4 to 4ic, and for good to best grade of 
butcher stuff 5 to 6c; extra nice smooth 
steers and heifers 6} to 6Jc; shipping 
cattle sell as to quality at from 64 to 
7Jo. None left in the pens unsold.” 

Hogs— -Ran light for tho last three 
days. Market good for nice smooth 
hogs, prices ranging at about the same 
as last quotations, at from 7 to 7.Je for 
Stockers; medium and half fat 8c to 8Jc, 
and for the best smooth well-fatted heavy 
hogs 84c to 8|c. But few in pens un- 
sold. 

Sheep— Arrivals moderate, and but 
little, if ary, change in the market. 
Since last reports wc quote for thin, poor 
sheep, by the head, 81 to 81 75; medium 
and good at 82 to 82 50, and nice, 
smooth butcher sheep, that are fat, 3^c 
to 44 c per pound. 

Wheat — The market continues quite, 
and, as yet, but little is coming forward 
to market. We note sales to-day of 500 
bushels old Red at 81 20; 500 do choice 
i White on p. t. Mediterranean, Amber, 
j and White wheat range from 81 10 to 
1 §1 25 per bushel. 



Xi^Congrcss having refused to re- 
move the political disabilities of General 
Bazil W. Duke, he has resigned his seat 
in the Legislature. 

8®*The contest over the election of 
Hon. G. M. Adams as representative of 
the Eighth Kentucky district has re- 
sulted in a manner highly complimen- 
tary to him..MA_|^ Radical contestant 
backed by Mr7ijmio.s’ jlrctensions can- 
not oust a Kentucky Democrat in the 
present Congress, the race at home must 
have been much freer from improper 
electioneering on Mr. Adams’ side than 
close races generally are. He is a prom- 
ising young statesman, and we rejoice 
that no pretext could bo found for disre- 
garding the popular voice.— [Courier- 
Journal. 

ELIZABETHTOWN & PADUCAH 

RAILROAD, 

or K EJMIJCKV. 

First Mortgage 8 per Cent 

20-YEAR BONDS. 



Coupons payftblo on the 1st days of March and 
September at the Bank of America, in New York, 
where the principal is also payable at maturity. 

These Bunds are issued in sums of $1,000, Cou- 
pon Bond, under the first mortgage of the road; 
covering its entire prujierty and franchises, and 
arc due 1890. They have the privilege of conver- 
sion into stock by the holder for seven years after 
the first through train has been run. The Bonds 
can also be registered if desired. 

Tho length of tho liocof the Elizabethtown and 
Paducah Railroad is 186 miles, running from 
Elizabethtown on the Louisville and NashvlBo 
Railroad 4U miles South of Louisville, to Paducah, 
at the intersection of the Ohio and Tennessee 
rivers, forming the outlet of tho tobacco growing 
counties of Grayson; Butler. Ohio, Daviess, Mar- 
shall and McCracken, and passing through the 
rich and extensive bituminous coal Qclds situated 
in Grayson, Hopkins, Caldwell, and Muhlcnburg 
counties. Along tho entire route is found an un- 
limited sui»ply of the finest lumber, and in many, 
counties rlob deposits of iron ore exist. 

The road is now nearly all under contract and 
in course of construction, 100 having been graded 
and 25 miles put in running order. The company 
has a capital already subscribed in available city 
and county bonds and cash amounting to 

$3,095,000! 

To lay the rails add completely equip the road, 
there will bo issued TIIREE MILLIONS OF 
DOLLARS of tho first mortgage bonds. 

These bonds will passthrough tho hands of the 
United Stales Trust Company of New York, where 
the proceeds of sales will bo deposited to bo paid 
over to the Company only as each mile of the road 
is completed. The must rigid care has been ex- 
ercised to protect by every legal safeguard tho in- 
terests of the bondholders. With the capital al- 
ready secured; and the proceeds of the bonds now 
offered, tho road will bo finished and equipped at 
an early day. 

Tho management of (ho Elizabethtown and 
Paducah Railroad is in tho hands of sonic of tho 
most respunsiblo and favorably known merchants 
of Kentucky. With the guarantee of their able 
and faithful direction, aud the large amount of 
stock subscribed, these bonds form a very desir- 
able and safe investment. 

The price is 87)^ and accrued interest. 

Any further inn rination will be furnished upon 
a] plicatioH to cither of the undersigned. 

NORTON, SLAUGHTER & CO., . 

41 Broad Sfreet. 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER SMITH & 
CO., 40 Wall Street. 
UALLGARTEN & CO., 

28 Broad Street. 
New York, June 6, 1870. 

G. "W. NORTON & CO., 
Bankers, Louisville, Ky., 
Agents for Kentucky. 

These Bonds can be obtained on appli- 
cation to 

COL. SAxMUEL B. THOMAS, 
Elizabethtown, Ky. 

june 23-3m. 




GET 'IHE BEST. 

Webster’s Uiiabridset] Dirlionary. 

lOvOOO WoriU and Mtaningn not m Other Diction- 
aries, 

300 Eogravings. 

1840 Pages Royal Quarto. 

G lad to add my testimony in its favor. 

[Pres’r Walker of Harvard.] 

E very scholar knows its value. 

[W. H. Prescott, tho Historian.] 
TTOhe most complete Dictionary of the language. 

[Dr. Dick, of Scotland.] 

T Iio best guido of students of our language. 

[John G. Whittier.] 

M e will transmit bis name to latest posterity. 

[Chancellor Kent.] 
TTJl tyinological part surpasses anything by earlier 
iXj laborers, [George Bancroft.] 



'Bring relation to Language Principia does to 
Philosophy. [Elihu Burritt.] 



B 

ITJlxecU all others in defining scientific terms, 
iXj [President llitcbcoek.] 

(^0 far as I know, best defining Dictionary, 

[Horace Mann.] 

it altogether, tho surpassing work. • 

^ [Smart, the Eng ish Orthoepist.] 

A necessity to every intelligent family, student: 
teacher and professional mnn. What Library is 
complete without the best English Dictionary? 

Webster’s National Pictorial 
Dictionary. 

1040 Pages Octavo. 600 Engraringfi. 

The work is really a gem of a /l4Vt»V»«d7ry, just 
the thing for tho million.— [American Educational 
Monthly. 

PublUhodby G. k C. .MERRIAM, Sprinfield, 
Mass. Sold by all DouksUlors. junc23ll | 




A FULL LINE OP 



MIlliERY 

Bonnefs and Ladies Hats, 

BONNET RIBBON AND 

TrLinvcnvmNT&s 

Of all kinds 

SWITCHES AND CHIGNONS, 

Fancy Goods an dN otions 

Dross Trimmings, Silk, Laces, Jaconet and Swiss, 
Edgings ainl insertings. Ruffling and every dis- 
scription of trimmings for 

LADIES UNDERWEAR, 

Stamped Yokes, Handkercheifs, Gloves, Hosiery, 
Corsets, Hoop Skirts, *kc. 

Stamping for Embroidery and Brading neatly and 
promptly done. Main Cross Street. apr2l 



_ LAND SALES. 

Farm Wanted. 

In good state of cultivation and in Kentucky 
or vicinity. Please address with full dcscrij tion. 

T. S. BREWESTER. 

SoulbiugtOD, Conn. 

juncIO Im. 



FARM FOR SALE. 

Lying ten miles north of Elizabethtown on the 
turnpike road leading to Louisville, containing 
154 acres, 126 of which is under fence, HM  acres 
in cultivation, the balance in timber, 3.3 acres in 
grass, 30 acres in corn 40 acres in wheat, rye and 
oats. Has on it a good young orchard, of 00 
hearing apple trees; also, some selected Poach 
and Pear trees: a good well convenient, tho en- 
tire place well watered with good spring running 
through the place. The farm ha.s on it two sets 
of good buildings, consisting of dwellings and 
out houses, and will make two convenient farms. 
Will sell ]mrt or all to suit puicluiscrs. Address 
Henry Stovall, Red Hill, Hardin county. Ky., W. 
J. Stovall; Elizabethtown, Ky , or inquire on the 
premises. june2 3m 

Tho pre.-tont crops now growing on the farm 
will also be sold. 



HAY FARM FOR SALE. 

We, as Executors of W. W. Montgomery, dccM 
offer for sale a tract of 265 ncros of land, lying in 
Hardin county, onc-half mile west of the Eliza- 
bethtown and Louisville Turnpike 5 miles from 
the mouth of Salt River and immediately on 
line of tho proposed Louisville and Memphis Air 
Line Railroad, aiul 26 miles from tlyc former place. 
There is on tho farm about 1 00 acres of fine mea- 
dow or grain land, the remainder being good land 
well timbered. Has upon it a fine, large hny shed 
and press of the latest and most improved Mor- 
mon patent. Has also on it an orchard of good 
fruit, is a healthy location, convenient to church- 
es, schools, and mills. Also another tract of 46 
acres of finely timbered land near the same. For 
further information apply to James Montgomery 
at his law office in Elizabethtown, or A. B. Mont- 
gomery at his residence near (ho land* ^ 

A. B. k JAMES MONTGUMERY, Ex’rs. 

May 19 — 12m or tf 



A Valuable Farm for Sale 

Situated I’l^ miles west of Elizabethtown, Ky.» 
containing 400 acres, onc-half cleared and under 
good rcnco— balance heavily timbered; good 
dwelling.'*, hout-ouses, Ac., plenty of ncvcrfailing 
spring water* To any person wishing to enter 
tfu fruit and dairy business this farm offers first 
class inducements. Will bo divided if desired, 
having buildings on each. Terms easy. For 
further particulars inquire of Miles 11. 'J homas 
on tho promises, or JA.MES W. SMITH, 

May 6, 1870.-*3m Near Glendale, Ky. 



LAND SALE. 

John L. Helm’s Executors are now offering for 
sale at reduced figures in lots to suit purchasers 
and on ea. *y terms, 

'the roiifnittbleati 

Tract of Land, containing about 1 ,600 acres of 
the best grain and grass land in Hardin county, 
it being well watered ahd finely timbered. This 
Land is situated one and a half to three miles 
Horn Elizabethtown on the Betblehem road. 

For further particulars call on Mrs. John L. 
Helm, M. H. Cofer, or M. H. Marriott, Elizabeth- 
town, or Judge II. W. Bruce and John L. Helm, 
jr., Louisville. jnii6 — 6m. 



WOOD BROTHERS, 



DEALERS IN 



I 



WINDOW SHADES 

AND 

Table Oil Clotbs, 

NO. 116 FOURTH STREET, 

BETWEEN MARKET AND JEFFERSON, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. 

BSf“SoDiplc8 at Q. V. Matthis A Co.’s 
Elizabethtown, Ky.“®a may5-3ra. 






UAS JUST OPENED A 



AND 



Will keep on han^ all sorts of 

CANDIES, NUTS, FRUITS, 

to-gether with every thing usually kept hy a first 
clas Coufoetioncry. Also, a superior quality of 

CICtAKS and tobacco 

Aprl4-6in. 



AL. BOUBLIER. 



EMILE BOURLIER 



4li BOffRlIFK & BROi 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Tm,C0PPER AND SHEET IRON 

Ware; Stoves, Grates and Castings, 

No. 249 Main Street, 

Between Sixth and seventh, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. ‘ 

Rtmfing. .^pouting, Guttering, (!a’vnni ed Iron, 
and all out door work promntiv utteuded to. 
aug26 Ij 




Oi-ty 

TERRA COTTA WORKS. 



SlOliCe BITTEBS, 

For Debility, Loss of Appetite, Weak- 
ness , Indigestion, or Dyspepsia, Want 
of Action of the Liver, or Dis- 
ordered Stomach. 

There arc no bitters that can compare with 
these in removing these distressing complaints. 

I.SDIA.VAPOLIS. Ind., Feb. 7 , 1869 . 
To Ja.s. Ruddlo, Louisville, Ky. 

Gents — About two months ago I procured a 
bottle of Dr: Hurleys bitters for my wife, think- 
ing it a pleasant tonic, but not relying much on 
its medical virtues, and it cured her of a disease 
she had long be* n under treatment for. I was 
afflicted in asiiui ar way, and got some for my 
own use, and am happy to gay that it has cured 
mo. My disease was of tho bladder and kidneys. 
It is oertninly a sp endid medicine, and being 
] (easnnt to take is quite a recommendation. Wo 
and our neighoors have no use for any other now. 

Veiy respectfully, your friend, 

J. L. B. 



DR. SEABROOK’S 

INN F ANT SOOTHING SYRUP. 
Price 25 Cents Per Bottle. 



Use in tho future only Seabrook’s, a combina- 
tion quite up with the Advancement of age. 
Pleasant to tako, harmless in its action effleient and 
reliabic in all cases. Invaluable in tho following 
diseases. 

SUMMER COMPLAINT, IRREGU- 
_ LARITIES OF THE BOWELS, 
IIESTIVENESS, TEETH- 
ING, &C. 

Gives health to the child and rest to the moth- 
er. 

Marietta, Oa., Nov* 1 , 1860 . 

Messr.®. Jos, Ruddle A: Co* — Gents: We have 

used your Seabrook’s Infant Soothing Syrup in 
our families, and find it does more good than all 
the other rcincilies we ever tried. Wc believe it 
perfectly harmless, and it givc.s rest and ease to 
our children quicker than all other remedies now 
offered for sale. Also, wo have been scDiiig it for 
three years, nn«l it gives universal satisfaction. 
Wc never heard it complained of* Our wives will 
use no other. Y’ours, 

W.M. R. ROOT, 

J. L. ROOT. 




ESTABLISHED T862- 

Window Cnp,., Bracken, Ca|.ital,. for eoluinns, 
Chimney Tops Modillions for Cornices, 

And everything pertaining to the exterior or in- 
terior of biiildinga. Also Vases nnd .«tatnary 
for Garden decoration. I am jirepared to cxc- 
cuto work of any fiesign olfered by arehitects or 
others at rcasoniihlc rates, with dispatch; and for 
design and execution defy competition. .Manu- 
facture Stone Bipe, ati sizes for Drainage or Sew- 
erage; also, Tile for Land Drainage. .Manufac- 
ture and keep on hand tho latest styles of Blas- 
ter Decoration, Centerpieces, Cornice Ornaments. 
xe. 

N. B.— My Terra Cotta is manufactured from 
finest stoneware clay, and all work guaranteed. 
_ , P. BANNON. 

OFFICE— Fifth, between IVulnul nnd tircen 
Sts.; Factories, Fifteenth and Portland avenue, 
and Thirteenth and Lexington Sts- 
. julyltf - 



P. BKADAS & CO. 
CANDY Manufacturers, 

Importers and M'holosnio Dealers in all kinds ol 

roi'i-igii I'l'iiii., Fancy  irvccrlc3, 

4:c. No. 77 Fourtli Ssrcct, 

DOUIbVILLEjK Y. inl7-ls6ta 



R. G. MERRILL, 
Of Tennessee. 



S. J. UART 



MERRILL & HART, 

MER HANT TAILORS, 

AND DEALERS IN 

GENTS FURNLSHING GOODS, 

No. 172 zMain Street, bet, Fifth and Sixth, 
LOUISVILLE, KY. marl7-lsly. 



HURLEY’S AGUE TONIC. 

NO AllSENlC-NO MERCURY. 

PERFECTLY RELIABLE, 

The only remedy for Chills and Fever, or Ague 
nnd Fever, that in or can bo depended upon is 
Hurley’s Ague Tunic. There nave been thou- 
sands cured by using it who bavo tried the usual 
remedies in vain. 

Nkw Albany, Ind., May 28, 1868. 
Messrs. Jas. Huddle k Co. : 

Dear Sirs: I was afflicted with ague for 

months, perhaps a year or more. Your Hurley’s 
Ague Tonic was reemnmended hy a friend. I got 
a bottle iiniuedintely and comincnccd taking it 
according to directions, and have not been 
troubled with a chill since. I am satisfied if it 
be taken according to directions, it will cure any 
cas ? of tho ague. I recommend it to all suffering. 

Yours truly, VINCENT KIRK. 



loHisville Standard Seale Works. 

Rankin & Go., 

(Succcssora to Rankin & Bro. and Nelson & Davis. 
JI.VNlFArTl-RKE.S or ALL KINDS f 4 

Hay, stock, Coal, Eailroat 
Counter & I'latform Scales 



Bra..a and Iron Bcama, Steam 
lH at, IVarehoiiaea an l nil othc 
. ._ikindaof Trucks, andStonc M'agunf 
-4i*Skids, Ac.. Ac. 

No. 89 Sixth Street, bet. Market and .Jellersor 
^ ^ j. OVI.SVILLE, K Y. mach24:Cin 

aEQ,Rcpairing of Scales promptly attended U 



B JH « B H ^ • 




HiiiTcj's Sarsaparillii 

IVith Iodide of rotash. 



GALT HOUSE, 

LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY. 

JILSON P. JOHNSON, 
s23-iy. Manager. 



This is tho pure and genuine extract of the 
root, and will, on trial, ho found to effect a cer- 
tain and perfect cure of the following coinpluiuts 
and diseases: 

Affections of tho Bonos, Habitual Costivoncss, 
Debility, Disensesof (he Kidneys, l yspep«ia. 
Erysipelas, Female Irregularities, Fi.stu- 
ia, all Skin Diseases, Liver Com- 
plaint, Indigestion, Piles, Pul- 
monary Diseases^ Scrofula, 
or King’s Evil, Syph- 
ilis, A’c. 



I W. C. D. IVIMPS. • J. N. WILL.VUD. 

WILLARD HOTEL 

I\ HIPS &, WILLARD, — rROPitiETOKs. 

8. E. Cor, Centre k Jefferson Strcoti, 

LOUISVILLE. KY. a26-Iy. 



Dr. Hurley — Sir: I wish to make known my 
case to the inhabitants of Louisville. 1 am a 
clerk in a large establishment, and the victim of 
hereditary scrofula, from which I have suffered 
beyond description, and for months have been 
unable to follow my employment. I have taken 
God Liver Oil, Iodine, Guysott’s and Bull’s Sar- 
saparilla. My brolbor has been in Louisville, 
nnd hearing of Dr. Hurley’s Sarparilla, procured 
me half a dozen bottles of it. I determined to 
stop all physic, but by the persuasion of iny fam- 
ily I tried it, after taking four bottles the sores 
began to benl, and the large glands to disappear. 
I have suffered for twelve years, and am now fin^ 
ishing the last bottle, which will leave me in per- 
fect health. I think a it wonderful medicine. 1 
shall bo happy to answer any communications 
that may be addressed to me on the subject. 

I am, sir, yours obliged, * 

HENRY TURNER. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 



HURLEY’S 

POPULAR WORM CANDY. 

As this is really a specific for worms, and tho 
bc.st nnd most palatable form to give to children, 
it is not surprising that it is fast taking the place 
of all other preparations for worms — it is being 
perfectly tasteless, aud any child will take it. 

Louisvillr, August .3Uth, 1869. 
Messrs. James Ruddle k Co.: 

Gentlemen — In consequence of tho benefit I 
have received from the use of Dr. Hurley’s Worm 
Candy in my family, I send you this, h« ping you 
will make it public for the good of other jmrenU. 
My wife nnd self are satisfied that but for tho use 
of Hurley’s Worm Candy, at least ouo of our 
children would have died. Both of our children 
are now well and hearty; they passed worms sev- 
en inches long. Any one doubting this can call 
and sec mo at corner 10th and Chestnut streets, 
aud I will give the'm proof of this and mure. 

Yours, with respect, M. IIOEY, 




Capt J. T. SiiiKLBY, Jko. M. S McCork ,a 
Lato of Memphis. Of Louisv.iia 

NATIONAL HOTEL 

Having recently made an addition of forty 
rooms to this contrnlly located bote), together with 
spacious parlors and reception rooms, and a gen- 
tlemen’s narlor and reading room, wo desire to 
call tho attention of the public to tho improved 
stylo of the house and our very low rales. This 
hotel is in the centre of tho city, convenient to 
all hiisincss houses, steamboat landing, postoflico 
and places of amusement. 

street Cars Leave the Door Every Tea 
Minates for all Parts of the Cityv 

Fare $2 50 per Day. 

scp23tf SHIRLEY A McCORKLE. 



O. SPRATT. 



CIIAS. A. BRIDGES 






PiCKETT 






Elixer of Pyrophosphate of Iron and 
Calisaya. 

ThU elegant combination posscssesall tho ton" 
io prupertics of Peruvian Bark and Iron, without 
tho disagreeable taste un«l bad effects of either, 
seperately or in other preparations, of these val- 
uable medicines. It should bo tnktm in all casc.« 
when a general tonic impression is required after 
eonvalcscence from fevers or debilitating diseases 
or in those distressing irregularities peculiar U) 
females. No female should bo without it if liable 
to such diseases, ^or nothing can well tako its 
place. 



James Ruddle & Co., 

I’llOl’lllKTORS, 

LABORATORY No. 41 BULLITT STREET, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

All -of tho nbnvo good., for solo Iiy 

G V. MATTHIS A CO., 
Elizubcllitown, Kv. 



SPRATT & CO., 

Proprietors, 

CORNER EIGHTH AND MAIN STREET 

LOUISVILLE, KY. s23-ly. 

BAIR© BROTHERS 

Importers and Manufacturers, 

AIILLINERY GOODS 



DRESS TEIMMINGS, 

TI£9TS.T3fi:E» U:\TS 

AM) 

* 8. W. Corner Main and Sixth Street, 

LOUISVI L]j E KENTUCK V. 

/^^"New Goods arriving daily from the com- 
UiUK'tuH.’Hl of the .'jea.-uu till it.- close. 














ELIZABETHTOWN NEWS. 

Klizabellituwu ^luly 1 1 » IH* ) 

oi;k ncu tl:ums. 

On and after Iho 12lK day uf August, next our 
Terms of Subscription will bo as follows, viz : 

One Copy One Year ^ 

Olio Copy Six Months 

OneCopy One Vear(Dclivcrcd by Carrier) 50 

B. Staadeker & Co. 

(E:a|;lc House Corner.) 

C.raud Closing Sale fur the Siiuiiucr 
S^easoii. 

In orJer to maEe room for a very 
largo Fafl Slock, bare reduced their 
prices on all Goods from 10 to 25 per 
cent. Dress Goods lower than ever 
Calicoes, best brands, still lOo. Bleached 
and Brown Cotton at factory prices. 

S^i^Mr. B. F. Gofer, of Lallue coun- 
ty, has brought to our office some speci- 
mens of the Russet potatoes that are 
larger than any yet brought in — our 
senior editor and the man that beat him 
not excepted. 

Town Taxes. 

TLa« rMi°tcos onb_^I«nday night fixed 
the rate of caxatiou at 50 cents on the 
hundred dollars, and we learn that it 
will require eighty cents on the hun- 
dred to pay the interest on the bonds 
voted to aid the Elizabethtown and Pa- 
ducah railroad. 

B®-To close~^r STA.VUEKEirS— 
100 trimmed Ilats and Flats at 40c, 50c 
and 75c. 

That Bridge. 

The grand jury at the last term in- 
_ dieted the County Court and the Board 
of Trustees of this town for not having 
a bridge in good repair over Valley 
Creek, in Elizabethtown. Judge Bruce 
tried the case and held that the Board 
of Trustors were bound to build the 
bridge, and fined them five dollars for 
neglecting their duty. The amount of 
the fine is too low to allow an appeal, 
nor do we know the desire of the board; 
but if the town has this bridge to build, 
we arc in favor of a good stout iron one 
that will be an ornament to the town, 
and not a source of endless expense, 
vexation and danger. The money had 
bettor go in that directiop than any 
other. 

Dan. Bush, indicted at the last 
terra of the Circuit Court for shooting at 
and wouuding with intent to kill John 
Slack, on Tuesday morning went to the 
residence of Constable Robert English 
and gave himself up. Alter reaching 
town, and while looking for bail. Bush 
attempted to make his escape, but after a 
lengthy chase was captured and lodged 
in jail. 

Bg^Prof. John Moffit, late of Canada, 
now of Tennessee, will be hereon Sun- 
day aud on Sunday night at the Metho- 
dist Church, will deliver his lecture, 
or sermon, on Scriptural Temperance. 

BQJuClothing is now sold cheaper at 
B. STAADEKER’S & CO. than the 
Goods itself can be bought for. 

Green Klver Female College, 

This in.'titution of learning is pleas- 
antly located in the flourishing city of 
Bowling Green, situated in one of the 
most beautiful valleys of Southern Ken- 
tucky. It has been for several years 
under the supervision of Prof. Thos. II. 
Storts, a gentleman of ripe scholarship 
and of fourteen years experience as an 
educator. lie has associated with him 
an ample corps of competent teachers, 
who have the good of their pupils at 
heart. The instruction is thorough, and 
the course of study as extensive as any 
female school in the State. This institu- 
tion has fine buildings, ample and beau- 
tiful grounds, the right man at its bead, 
and is destined in a very short time to 
be the first Baptist Female College in 
State. 

Read advertisement, and address Prof. 
Thos. II. Storts, Bowling Green, Ky.i 

n catalop'C. 

Picnic. 

The picnic at Big Spring School- 
house on last Saturday was very largely 
attended. The county candidates were 
on hand in endless profusion, and made 
a furious charge upon the mutton and 
other good things provided by the atten- 
tive managers. 

Our opinion is that the people in that 
neighborheod are good looking (espe- 
cially the ladies); good providers, good 
eaters, good dancers, and good for the 
Primary candidates. 

Real Estate Transfers, 

Sunuol Goldnamer to Joseph- J. Al- 
bert, lot in Elizabethtown (17 feet front,) 
$956; Micajah Middleton to Isaac Rad- 
ley acres and 1C poles 812 50; A. M. 
Brown to R. B. Pusey and wife, lot in 
Elizabethtown, $4,500; C. G. Winter- 
smith to Alexander R. CMliver tract of 
land on Cedar Creek, $3oO; Larkin N-all 
to Jno. M. Laymon 5^ acres on Bfg 
Spring road, $119; Wra. II. Branham’s 
heirs to Horace C. Branham, 73J acres, 
8407 50; Levin S. Stith to Horace C. 
Branham 4S acres, $500; Wm. II. AVil- 
liams to Jno. C. Dorsey lot in Nolyun,. 
$300; Alfred W intersmith to Zarilda 
Mayfield lot in Elizabethtown, $35(t. 

\ 



BGI.B. staadeker & CO. only ask 

an examination of their Stock and Prices 
before purchasing anywhere. 

Falls CUy Terra Cutta Burks. 

Mr. P. Bannou is the proprietor Ttf 
this establishment, which is located on 
the corner of Portland Avctiuo and Fif- 
teenth streets, with the oHicc and sam- 
ple-rooms on Fifth street, opposite the 
Cathedral. 

Mr. Bannon established this manufac- 
ture in 1853, and since that time has 
done a large amount of ornamental work 
for the city' of Louisville. One of the 
first jobs of this kind done by him was 
furnishing the window-caps, brackets, 
&e., for tho National Hotel, which is 
now one of the standing monuments of 
the beauty of style, as well as the cheap- 
ness and durability of this work. A 
spocimeu of more recent date may be 
seen on the fine block of buildings on 
Fourth street, opposite the theater. 

But Mr. Bannon’s trade is by no 
means confined to the city of Louisville. 
He has filled largo orders for Memphis 
and Nashville, and there is scarcely a 
town between Louisville and New Or- 
leans to which ho has not shipped his 
work. 

Mr. Bannon is also prepared to do an 
extensive business in making statuary 
and vases for garder.8, &c. He is, also, 
in addition, manufacturiug stone pipe 
extensively, and now has a large con- 
tract with the city of Louisville to fur- 
nish this pipe for general sewerage. 
The E. & P. R R. are using large quan- 
tities for culverts. He also manufac- 
tures drain-tile for reclaiming wet land; 
and farmers who have tried it say the 
first crop generally pays for the expense. 
We have tried the sewerage pipe and 
find it very good; nothing better and 
cheaper for leading water and slops off 
from the house. 

Those of our citizens who arc building 
new houses, or who have old ones they 
desire to ornament and beautify, will do 
well to call at his office and sample- 
rooms and examine the nice things to be 
seen. Resides, you can trade with no 
more kind-heartfd gentleman than Mr. 
Runnon. Sec bis advertisement in an- 
other column. 



STAADEKER & CO. are 
still doing Merchant Tailoring at ; really 
Veduced rates, in order to close out their 
Stock of Cassinierc, Cloths and Linens. 



Good B'lirat. 

Going down to the Pic Nic, on Satur- 
day we passed tho splendid farm of our 
friend Elijah' Hansbrough, E.«q. He 
has one field of one hundred and fifty- 
four acre.s in wheat, ono hundred and 
twenty of which will average 25 bushels 
lo the acre. He ono year raised 27 
bushels to the acre on the same ground. 

Muat Market. 

Purcell & Bethel have reopened their 
meat market and can now be found at 
the LaRue corner one door' from where 
they formerly kept. They have em- 
ployed a regular butcher and are pre- 
pared to sell nice fresh meats at the low- 
est market prices. 



Mepllngat the Couithousc. 

We arc requested by tho Trustees for 
this district to say there will be a meet- 
ing of the friends of the Common School 
at tlie Court-house on Saturday night. 
The meeting will be an important one. 
Come at tho ringing of tho bell. 



Matthis d' BeV : 

Gentlemen — Below please find ab- 
stract of tho assessment of taxable prop- 
erty of Elizabethtown for the year 1870 : 
Total value of property $757,220 

— Which is made up of the fol- 
lowing items: 

Value of 1,042 acres of land $ 52.520 
“ 401 houses and lots 388,805 

“ 141 horses, mares 

and mules 10,450 

■ “ 165 head of cattlo 

(over $50 to each 
owner) 1,330 

“ 40 grocery and dry 

goods stores 36,550 

“ 235 gold and silver 

watches and clocks 6.170 

“ 28 pianos 5,350 

“ Gold and silver 

plate 3,385 

“ ' 37 carriages and 

spring wagons 5,066 

“ P r 0 pe r ty under 

equalization law 235,745 



$757,220 

Of this sum the whites own $735,420, 
and the negroes $21,800 

Tho population is 1,457, to-wit: 
whites, 930;. blacks, 527. 

The number of white voters is 255, 
and 112 blacks. Total, 369. 

There are in our city 126 dogs; of 
which the whites own 67 and the ne- 
groes 59. 

299 persons aro subject to road tax — 
whites, 209; negroes, 90. 

The increase in value of property 
since the assessment of 1869 was made is 
eighty-nine thousand, two hundred and 
ninety-four dollars, as follows: 

Increase in value of houses, lots 





(t 


and lands 


$59,870 


n 


it 


horses, mares 






and mules 


1,395 


u 


(( 


cattle 


525 


u 


(1. 


watches and 
clocks 


1,815 


u 


u 


pianos 


1,075 




(( 


carriages 


1,190 


u. 


tt 


stores and 






groceries 


2,415 


u 


 (. 


property un- 
der equali- 
zation law 


21,009 








889,294 



When tv/o numbers of 
our paper are received 
i by a subscriber with an 
X mark on them, it indi- 
cates your term of sub- 
jscriplion has expired 
with the last number so 
marked, and unless re- 
newed again, your paper 
will be discontinued. We 
adopt this mode because 
it is convenient to us, and 
at the same time gives 
ample notice to our pa- 
trons of the expiration of 
their- term of subscrip- 
tion, that they may re- 
new without failing to 
get a single copy of our 
paper. 

Give us a prompt sub- 
scription list, and we 
will give you in return 
our paper, live and ac- 
tive. 

Jacub F. Weller. 

The partnership heretofore existing 
between Henry Murrell and Jacob F. 
Weller under the firm and name of Mur- 
rell k Weller as grocery merchants, 
Louisville, Ky., has been dissolved, and 
Jacob F. Weller can be found in the 
s.ime business at No. 185 Main street, 
Louisville — same house formerly occu- 
pied by Jno. M. Robinson & Co. 

It is useless for us to tell this people 
that Jlr. Weller is an honest, courteous 
and thorough busiuess man — they know 
him as such; but wo will tell thorn all to 
trade with him — he .sells good goods at 
fair prices. 






8®.llead Lee Joseph’s advertise- 
ment. 



DIED, 

MORRISON — On the 9th day of July, 1870, in 
Middletown. Ky., Kt.I.RS Lee, daughter of Rev. 
II. C. and Mary K. Morrison, aged I year and 1 
months. 

BROWN — At his residence, in this county, on 
tho 27th of June, of consumption, .Mr. Charles 
Brown. 

FRYREAR — On the 27th of Juno, nl tho rosi- 
denoo of her husband, Air. Frank Fryrear, in this 
county, of erysipelas, Mrs. Fryrear. 

.ST.ATEK — At his residence, near Colcshurg, 
in this county, Mr. I’cter Stater, aged 84 years. 

DAUGHERTY — Near Fr.anklin Cross-roads 
in this county, on tlio 5th inst., after a protracted 
illness of several weeks, Airs. Lucinda Daugh- 
erty, aged 49 years. 



MARKET REPORT 

PRICE CURRENT. 

CORnECTBD WEEKLY BY ROB’T D. OEOOUEOAX 



Beeswax, ^ lb 

Candles, star 

Candles, tallow 

Candies 

Coal ^ bush 

Coul Oil 

Cotton yarn, 500 

700 

Lard 

Mackerel, No 2, kit 

“ barrel 

Mackerel No 1, kit 

3 

Nails 

Linseed oil 

White lead 

Rice 



25(?^30 

17^20 

16 

201^ 

25(0,30 

35^50 

20 

16 

18 

2 75 

10 50 

3 50 

2 50 

5 

1 35 

12 60@13 

10 



T. IT. Gunter, 
CUy AsBCssor. 



.Salt bbl 3 25(ii,4 90 

Soap - 7)^@10 

Ginger 40 

Sugar, Dcm 13^(0)15^ 

Brown sugar 13a143's 

White sugar 

Wheat 84al00 

Rye 80 

Sirup lOOal 25 

KRgs -  5 

Chickens..... 3 50 

Peaches, halves $1 75 bush; quarters $1 50 

Dried Apples 90 

Corn 90al OU 

Cornmeal 1 10 

Oats 50a60 

Cheese 20a23 

Coffee 22a25 

Clear Sides 15(^18 

Hams 18a20 

Shoulders , 13nl5 

Lard 18a20 

Flour ^ bbl 6 35a0 50 

Kanawha salt, bushel 75 

Starch • 9al2K 

Vinegar 37 

Butter 45 

Pepper..... 50 

Brooms, ^ doz 3 50a4 50 

laOUISVILLIi MARKKT. 

Flour lb bbl $4 25 to 7 75 

Wheat, 1 @l 30 

Coro, * I OOal 10 

Corn, sacks included 1 lOal 18 

Oats, 58to60 

Rye, 90al 05 

Barley, 9Utol 16 

Sugar, brown, 10 to 12 

Sugar, white, 12^ ^ 

Hogs, 7 to 9 

Hams, ... ....*. «•••.••■•  ••••« •••••« 22 

Sides, 18 

Shoulders, 13^ 

Lard 19K 

Beeswax, 26a28^ 

Butler, 18 to 20 

Corn meal 1 OOal 05 

Flax Seed, per bushel 1 75a2 00 

Feathers, cnoieo 70a75 

Hay, per tun 18 00a20 00 

Potatoes, per bbl now ....^. 2 50 

Wool, unwashed clothing 30a.34 

** ** combing 35a40 

** tub washed 47a50 

Hides, green salted 8a8)^ 

Dry salted 14al6. 

Dry dint I7al9 

Sheep hides (wool on) 40a.fl 

Ginseng, lb 55a58 

Sheep, per head 

Cattlo, per pound 3)^a7}4 

Coal, per bushel 17 

Lggs 14 



For Congress. 

"^E 5 i.,Wc arc authorized to announce COL. WM. 
B. READ, of Larue* county, as a candidate at tho 
November Election; to represent this, tho Fourllb 
District, in the Congress of the United States. 

IS^We are authorized to announce CAPT. E. 
A. GRAVES, of Marion county, as a candidate 
at the November Election, to represent this, (ho 
Fourth District,. in. tho Congress of tho United 
StuU»« 



AUGUST ELATION, 1870. 

CIRCmr JUDGE. 

*^.^..Wc arc .nntliorizod to announcoCoI. M. II. 
CDPKK :i.^ a candidate for the Circuit .Judgeship 
of the X'iiih Judicial District-*— August elcctiuii, 
1M70. 



COUNTY COURT CLERK. 

^•^-Wc are aiitorized to announce .John F. 
KLINGLES.M ITU as an Independent candidate 
for Clerk of Hardin County Court, at the August 
election 1870. 

^•^We arcauthorized to annnnnoe CHARLK.S 
W. M.ATTIllS as a candidate for otlleo of Clerk 
of Hardin county at tho August election, 1870. 

JAILER. 

hereby annonnee myself ns a candidate 
for Jailer of llardin county, — and in no event 
will submit my name to a convention. 

ROBERT STITII. 



ASSESSOR. 

^^ 5 :^ 53 .. Wo arc atrtb«n*lzcd to announce CLAI- 
BORNE CASH as a candidate for Assessor at Ibe 
August election, 1870. 

We aro authorized lo announce BRUNO V. 
BKHRY as a candidate for Assessor, Augustelec- 
tion 1870. 



Gl-rooxi !Fl.iveir 

Female College. 

kv. 

Rev, THOS. II. STOUTS, Piuprlelur. 



Dissolution of Partner- 
ship. 

The partnership heretofore existing between 
Joseph 6c. Hermes was dissolved on tho 20th day 
of June, 1870. Tho undersigned having pur- 
chased the interest of Mr. Ho'incs, will continue 
the business at the old '^|0f|4|||Mn.^iam*8 building. 
All those indebted to tho wiii come forward 
and settle with mo, as 1 am alone authorized to 
settle up the business of tho lute firm. 

July 13, 1870. LEE JOSEPH. 



J. H. GILES 

Still continues to keep, and is constantly add- 
ing to his stock, a well-selected assortment of 
Guitars, Violin.^, and their appurtenances. Also, 
Toys, Dolls, Notions, Cigars, Tobacco, Pocket 
Cutlery, Stationery, Cakes, Candies, Foreign 
Fruits, Catsup.s, Ac., Ac. 

He stitj makes 

ICE CREAM 

A specialty, and it may be found at all times 
in any quantity. 

Ice-Cold Soda Water 

May al.so be found in his bonse. 

^trExtra Inducements offered to Weddings, 
Parties and Picnics. 

Store at Raubold’s old stand — Main Cross- 
street, ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 



T he next Session of 40 weeks begins 1st 
.Monday in September, 1870. The course 
ot study is conqirehetisiro, thorough and prtic- 
tical. The Teachers nrc cxpcriciieod nild reli- 
able. Tho location is all that could be desired 
for a Boanling School for yonng Indivs. 

Parents who wish to have their tlaughters ed- 
ucated under Aof/ic will do wen 

to visit the Institution, or oorrespond with tho 
Proprietor on the subject. July 14 3in 



Jacub F. Weller, 

WHOUSALE UMU KU 

Coiiiiiiissioii Merclmiit, 

.^'o. I 8.^ .Jfain Sti-eit, 

Between Fifth atnl Sixth. 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. 

(House furmerly occupied by Jno. JI. Robinson 
,kCo.) 

JOUS II. WELLER. juIyllGm 



2^' 






Teachers Attention!!! 



The Great Medical Discovery! 

Dr. ■WALKER’S CALIPORI7IA 

VINEGAR BITTERS, 

Hundreffs of Thousands 

Dear testimony to their wonderfuUI | ^ 
Curative Effects, C- o 

WHAT ARE THEY? 



Mi 

Br* Sv 



Notice is hereby given that the 

County Board of Examiners 

Will attend for tho examination of Teachers for 
tho Free Schools in Hardin County, at 

ELIZABETHTOWN, July 16th, 18th, 19th, 22d 
and 23d. 

STEiniENSBURG. Wednesday, July 20lh. 
AVEST POINT, Thursday July 2»th. 

BIG SPUING, Friday July 2 nh. 



Let all persons yvho dcsi^ro or expect to teach 
in this county, attend for examination at ono of 
the above places. A fee of 

will bo charged for each certificate. Trustees 
And parties interested in the Free Schools, would 
do well to attend these appointments, ns they 
can scloot their tcaohers and transact any buisness 
thc^ may have with the Commissioner at the same 
time. 

TI M. NEEDHAM, Com’r, "I Board 



M. NEEDHAM, Com’r, ) 
Y. SAM’L WILLIAMS, \ 
if. J. W. IIEAGEN, j 



Rev 
Prof. 

Elizabethtown, July 12, 1870. 



of 

Exumin’rs 




THEY ARE NOT A VILE C = ^ 

IFANCY DRINK, III 

Made of Poor* Hum. Whiskey, Proof Spir- 
its. and Hefiise Xiiquors, doctored, spiced, 
and sweetened topleast Uie taste, ca'Icd.*‘Tonicd * 
“Appetizers,** “ Hestorers,'* &o.,that lead tho 
tippler on to dninkcnneas aud ruin, but are a true 
Mi-hicine, made trorn the NtUivo Roots and 
Uerta of ('aUlomia, freo fVom allAlcoholio 
Stimulants. Tuc-yar*' thoGR'EATBtiOOD 
PUHIPIEB and LIFE GIVING PHIN- 
CXFXiEi, a perfect Keaovaior and luvigoraror 
ot tho System, carryingoff all poisonous matter, 
and restoring the blood t»  r. healthy condition. 
No person can takotheso Biltcrs, according to 
dircctioiLi, and remain long unwell. 

$1 00 will bo given for an inciir.ablo case, pro- 
viding the bones aro not destroyed by mineral 
poisons or other means, an l the vital organs 
was'Cil hevond tho point of repair. 

For Inflammatory nad Chronic Hh©u« 
matism, and Gout. Dyspepsia, cr Indi- 
go ition. Bilious, Hemittent. and Inter- 
mittent Fevers, Diseases of the Blood, 
Diver, Kidneys, and Bladder. th«* c Bit- 
tors have been Huriv^siui, 8uch Dis- 
eases are can.Hcd by Vitiated Blood, whii-h 
is gt-neriUiy Tmxlur*Al hr deiaugomcnt of tho 
Digestive Organs. 

They invigorate tho stomach, and stimnlato 
the torpi-1 livernnd D jivcLi. wliich ronJertUeni 
of unc iu:dled e:fioacy in rloarisin:^ (ho b'oolof 
all iTupnrit les, and Imparting now life and vigor 
to t ho wliolo system. 

Dyspepsia or Indigestion, ITcadachc, 
^ P.iin in tno Kliouidors, t'ouubs Turhtnc.'M of li:o 
Cliusi, D;zzincf».'i, Bour 8tomac)i,'Bad T.isto in 
the Mouth, Bidioos Attacks, I’olpitation of tl.o 
llearl. Copious l)i.xeuar:fcs of Unno, P.iin in 
th-j i-^:on.  of the Kidneys, an 1 a handre-l other 

S xiiiful 8 inptoma which fire th3 offjpriags of 
ysjiepsia. are cured hytheso Biltrrs. 
bleansic tiio V'itiat»*.l B'uk) I wh ‘never yon fi-vl 
its impurities bursting through the skin in Pirn- 
ple«. Eruptions, or Borci^; cleanse it when it is 
foul, .and yotirfocIiniM will tell yon wh^'n.'* Keen 
the blood pure and the health of the system xriU 

follow. 

PIN, TATE, and other WORMS, birkin? In 
the system of so in.'iny thousands, arc effectually 
destroyed un i removed. 

For full directions, I'ead carofullytho circular 
around each bottle, printed ju four latiguagcs— 
Knj»lish, German, French, rnd Snanis’i. 

J. WALKER. 32 A ;‘l Commerce Street, N. Y. 
Proprietor. U. II. McDONALD U CO., 

DniJWistsan.l ilenenii Atrm's. 

8 m Francisro, California, and 32 and 31 Com- 
CO fctr •et, N. Y. 

rwir soLD BY .eVLL DRUGGISTS AN'D 
DE.4LEi:S. 

julyl4 



yUiSVILLE & .lUIIVILLIi 

AND 

MEMPHIS & LOUISVILLE 

RAILROAD LINE. 

— ' « 

On and after June 12th, 1870, trains will 
leave Elizabethtown as follows: 

SOUTH. NORTH. 

IU.25 A. M. Nashv., Mcrap. A N. 0. Mail 8.36 i». m. 
7.44 p M. Nash, Mein, N.O.A Mob’c Ex. 4.49 a. m. 
2.25 A. M, Nushv.A So. Ear*t’n Ex. Mail 11.55 a. m. 

^^ifNaiihville, Memphis, Now Orleans and Mo- 
bile Express, and Nasbvillo and South-Eastern 
Exprc. 4s Mail ruu daily. All other traius daily 
except Sunday. , t 

BAKD8TOWN BR 4NCH, trains leaves Bards- 
town Junction at 5 00 r. m. for Bardstown. 

KNOXVILLE BRANCH, trains leaves Lcb 
anon JAinction at 9.45 a. xi. for Lebanon, Stan- 
ford, Richmond, Crab Orchard, Ae. 

ALBERT FINK, 
Gcn’l Sup’t. 



Elizabethtown & Paducah 






To Grayson Spri igs and back in 
Ono Day. 

On and after Monday, Juno 27th, 1970, tho Ac- 
commodation Train will leave Elizabethtown at 
10.40 A. M., and- arrive at Grayson Spring.'? 
1.15 P. M anti at Leitchficid at 1,40 P. M. Re- 
turning Icavo Lcitcbficid at 4.20 P. M., and 
Grayson Springs at 4.45 P. M., arriving at Eliza- 
bethtown ot P. M. 

GEORGE MACLEOD, Ch- Engineer. 

T. H. WiGULESWuuTH, Div . Engineer. 

June23tf 



Special Notice. 

Ad the scasonr of the year is nearly upon us 
when tho accumulated contaminations of the 
blood and system begin- to show themselves in 
blotches, pimples,- and a thousand and one other 
different and unsightly forms, wc naturally look 
around for something to purify tho blood. We 
can make a suggestion, which, if yon profit by 
you will thank us forever after. It is the secret 
of loveliness, for none of us can bo beautiful and 
healthy unless pure blood ^’courses through our 
veins,” and “bepaint our cheeks ” Take a few 
bottles of Dr. Hurley’s Compound Syrup of Sar- 
saparilla; it has stood tho test of nearly half a 
century, and is still »ho most reliable renewer of 
tho system extant. Read Jas. lluddlo A Co.’s 
column. apr28-ly 



Kentucky Safe Manufactory, 



O. V. MATTUIS. 



E. WARFIELD A"CUt. 



Gr. T". Ivi^TTHISife CO. 

DEALERS IN 

DRl!fiS,IlEDIfl\ES, ni.\TS, OILS, I'IRMSIl, PEliFliJlEPiV, 

Dye-Stuffs, Glass, Combs, Hair Brushes and 
TOILET ARTICLES GENERALLY. PATENT IVIEDICINES, 

COAL OIL AND LAMPS, CIGARS AND TOBACCO, 

MEDICAL WINES AND LIQUORS 

ALSO, A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 
OP ALL KINDS; 

Envelopes, School Books, Pens, 

Inli, 

AND ALL OTHER ARTICLES KEI’T BY DRUGGISTS GENERALLY. 

All orders from County Dealers and Physicians, shall be promptly 
attended to, upon the most liberal terms. 

SATISFACTION GUAEANTEED. 




8. GIBSON. 



M. U 'MLEir. 






MAXCFACTUUSn.^ OF 




FIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF SAFE^, 
(DemmuCTon s/iuns 

BANK VAULTS. JAIL WORK, &c, 

91 and 93 Green street, between Tliird and Fourth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

REFERENCES. 



Pre^’t Peoples Hank of Ky., Louisville. 

PresH German Bank ainl Ins. Co.. Louisville. 
Pres’f Central Savings Dank, Louisville. 

Pres’t Louisville Ins. and Banking Co. Louisville. 
CashV Farmer’s Bank of Ky., Henderson. 

I’rcs’t Deposit Bank, Frankfort. 



Pres’t Merchants Nat* Bank. N. Albany, Irtd! 
City Gass Company, Louisville. 

Courier-Journal Company, Louisville. 

Union Cement Association, Louisville, 

Potter A Vivion, Bankers Bowlinggrecn, Ky.- 

March 17-MideOiiu 



C. & J. HALL & CO. 

Manufacturers and Dealers in all kinds of 

15 IJ I f. I V MI 5 E M , 

Alleghany Pine and Hemlock Lumber, Weather- boards, Flooring, Banisters, 
Shingles, Laths, Pickets, 

I-.uLiici.'toeir, 

Cherry, Walnut, Popiar, Gum and Maple, Bed Slats, Table Legs, Chair-Ecn-ads,, 

Bronm-Haadles, &c. 

S. E. Corner Hancock and Market streets, Louisville, 

Proprietors of 

4 SFF‘S.R 50 Ni STEAIV 5 SAW MtLLSs 

Fulton street between Wenzel and Cabel. 

Orders for Bridge Timber, Railroad Ties and Stringers solicited. foblT ly. 



W. M. DAVIS. JNO. STORTS. JNO. MANGOLD. T. II. CAMPBELL. 

DAVIS, STORTS & CO. 

Successor to AY. H- DIX. 

K JS.VT VC K I* r Mj . j .V* / .V G .7/ 3 V I. . 







Doors, Blinds andSash Manufacturers ik Dealers in all kinds of Building lAuobcr, Rough k Dresset’,- 

NINTH STREET, NEAR BROADWAY, LOUISVILLE KY. H23-Gm 

fESTHffMTpHMGMlLL 

H. J. LEWIS & BRO., 

Manufacturers of 

DOORS, BLINDS. SASH. DOOR AND WINDOW 

FRAMES. MOLDINGS. BRACKETS, ETC.. 

Tenth $t., befnccii AVniiiiit and riieKtaiit, LoiiiKVilic, !i.v. 

'A COMPLETE supply of Building Lumber, L.uths, Phing'es, Posts, Dressed Lumber, Floorin'-, . 
Shelving AVeotherboarding, etc., always on hand. ^iD'Send for Bill of Prices. s23-ly. 




AA'aro Iloom 

318 East AV'alnut. 



I Madison Street, between Clay and Shelby, J cJ"ureenVciay. 

I.OUl.SV a LLli. K K.Vi'TIJrEi Y. 



CS-- "XT' tiXXX » 

Manufacturer of 

SASH, [wM‘ gi“s] BOOES, BLINDS, Frames, 

llrac/.'cts, Boxes, *Jlatiilcs, etc. 

Keep.*? always on hand a complete supply of Building Lumber, Laths, Shingles, Post.«, Pick- 
ets, Dressed Lumber, Flooring, Sliclving, Weatherboarding. All kinds of Ripping, Splitting, Scroll 
Sawing, Turning, etc., done to order, with Neatness and I !:*patch. ^ 

"^^a^ORDEUS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO,*^ - novMy. 



ELIZABETHLTOWM 
Sash, Door arid ’Blind Factory 

.AIAXUFACTUREU of sash, DOOi:S,r.I.INI .- . l«»OU and AVl.NDOAV FUA.Ali;.-^, .AIAXTLE.H 

BK AUKET,--, ETC. 

nnnplvlK* :4up]»ly of Huibliug Lumber. L.uli.-’, .Shii'gleo DrcsacJ Lumber, Flooring, Shelving. WonUi-- 
A boarding, GIusj, etc., always on hiuuU ^cc9 ly. 



V 




ELIZABETHTOWN NEWS. 

Elizabethtown- — July 18, 1870 



Discontented Couple,- 

And old discemtented couple, who had 
Inrd wort to procure the ncccssarie.s of 
life, were constantly complaining of the 
laults and findings ot others, instead of 
seeking by ilivine help to rectify their 
own. 

“All this trouble and sorrow in fhc 
world is through Adam and Eve,” the 
old gentleman would exclaim. “If I 
had been A.dain I would never have al- 
lowed a woman to lead me into such a 
scrape. 

A wealthy and pious lady lived near, 
who had frequently relieved the old man 
and his wife. One day, when passing, 
she heard them grumbling as usual about 
Adam and Eve. She felt auxious to 
convince them of the importance of be- 
ing contented with the station iu which 
y?ovidence had placed them, and how 
wrong it was to be thus constantly mur- 
muring with their lot in life. 

The next morning the lady’s servant 
in livery came to the cottage with a 
message from his mistress, requesting 
the old ctuple to go up to the mansion. 

The looks of discontent vanished for 
once, as the old folks wero delighted 
with siiflA.a mark of distinction from one 




so 

iiBMj  a 'sion, the lady 
reern. most kindly, and thus ad- 

dressea m: 

“I have set apart two rooms in my 
liouse, and so long as you attend to my 
wishes, you will be allowed to remain 
here, and have everything needful for 
your comfort. Eut if you disobey any 
of my rules you will be immediately 
turned out and sent back to your mud 
cottage.” 

“I thank you, thank you kindly, mad- 
am,” responded the old man. 

“Never fear our doing anything 
against your wishes, ma’m,” added the 
'old woman. 

“Very well,” said the lady, “then you 
will find a homo here for life.” 

Everything necessary for their com- 
fort was provided, and all went on well 
for some time. There was one thing 
that somehow puzzled the. 

For several days there was placed on 
the table a covered dish, which they were 
desired not to touch. 

“My lady desires me to say that every 
dish is at your service except that oae,” 
said the servant. 

On such a day, having nearly finished 
their hearty repast, the curiosity of the 
old woman was greatly excited as to the 
forbidden dish, and she said to her hus- 
bind: 

“What can it bcT’ 

“Never mind,” said the old man, 
“we’ve had a capital dinuer without it.” 

“As the old lady was doing us good 
she might as well let us taste every 
dish,” added the old woman. 

“Why, yes, she might as well have 
done handsomely,” rejoined the hui- 
band. 

“There can be no harm in looking,” 
continued the old woman, “the lady will 
never be any the wiser for that.” 

The old man was silent, and silence 
serves to give consent. lie was almost 
as curious as his wife about the strange 
dish. Tho temptation was stroug, and 
the longer it was parried about, the more 
Irresistible it became. 

“She’ll never know we have looked,” 
replied the old woman, as she gently took 
hold of the cover and very curiously 
raised it on one side, aud then stooped 
down to peep under. 

“Oh! oh! oh!” exclaimed tho terrified 
old woman, as she started back aud up- 
fct the dish cover on the floor. 

Out jumped the mouse! 

The uproar roused the lady of the 
house, who, suspecting what was the 
matter, was quickly at tho door. 

“What! is this the return you make 
for my kindness? You, who were ready 
to blame Adam and Eve for eating the 
forbidden fruit, could you not obey my 
trifling request?^ You Lave now forfeit- 
ed the privileges I conferred upon you, 
and you must therefore leave my 
house immediately, and return to your 
mud cottage. Never, in futu: c, blame 
Adam and Eve again for what you evi- 
dently would have done had you been in 
tbeir place.” 

r^Ecv. Dr. Price, of Encland, lately 
delivered a sermon, in which be spoke of 
liis experience in America as follows: 
“Stopping on one occasion at a junction 
he went to a hotel close by and had an 
excellent dinner. Afterward, going into 
the clerk’s office, he entered his name, 
Thomas Price, Baptist Minister, Abcr- 
dare. ‘Oh, sir,’ said he, I guess you arc 
a minister.” ‘I guess so, too,’ said I. 
‘Well,’ stiid he, ‘you have only half to 
pay. The dinner is eighty cent*; if you 
pay forty cents you get off free the other 
forty.’ ‘On what principle is that? said 
1; and ho said: ‘We give fifty per cent, 
off to ministers and editors.’ ‘Indeed,’ 
sa'd I, I happen to be an editor too.’ 
‘Editor of what?’ 'Siren Kynru.’ 
‘Don't know the paper; where is it pub- 
lisyed?’ ‘In Wales.’ ‘I don’t know it; 
but you’re an editor, are you?’ ‘Yes, I 
am.’ ‘Well, I guess we are about square 
exactly.” ‘I said: ‘I really think I shall 
come again on those terras.’ ‘Come 
whenever you like and we will treat you 
on those terms. 



Elizabellitotvii Advertisetiiciils. 

PURE AND FRESH. 

AVo keep OB hand at our 

fDRUG STORE 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY., 

Pure Alediciiies ciiid Drug's^ 

Comprisin'? a well selected stock of articles usu- 
ally kept in Dru^ Stores, which wo will sell for 



CHURCH DIRECTORY. i GEORGE MUNSCH, 

MIBtlllT MOB. 






•-HJ .jvk ibl.be 9 

at moderate pro6ts. Also a ^oud assortment of 

PATENT MEDICINES, 

TOILET SOAP, 

DYE-STUFFS, 

PAINTS, OILS, 

LAMPS, 

PERFUMERIES, 

STATIONERY 

Call and examine. Our salesman, Dr. Tabb, 
is always ready to wait upon customers. Physi- 
cians supplied with medicines on favorable torms, 
and prescriptions promptly filled. 

COFER & LAMBUTIU 






fd B* 

S © ^ 

ts C 

3 » (^ 






t = 2 » 

^ a* 5. O ^ 
» ^ 3 

£ 3 

H £. 
£-®= S • 

r* — C« JTi 

V" .g § 

B 

“3 53 

®, S 03  1 

» ■ g - B 

= 0 - 5 ° „ 

•' 2. 3 O o 

W »— » ^ 3 

06 

« 3 ® V 

O 3 
w _ J cn 
K •» o 

I ?•». f I 

I ^ © O V- 



fcj 

  

CO ^ 

^2 Q 

2 

B O 

B p_, 
03 



Ik 



S? p 3* 

o ° 2 



bd 

o 

o 

e -8 

t/l 

P 

P 

P- 

i/i 

bP 

o 

CD 

fD 

CO 

CD 

P 

03 

P 

•-J 

CD 



07 



0 

D 



o 



S3 a 

§ 

& 
0 



(f) 

0 



0 



BAPTIST CHURCH. 

John S. Gnttoii, Pastor — Services every 
Sribbaih at 11 A. *M. and 7 F. M. Frayer meeiv 
in/t every Thursday ni^ht, al 7 o’clock, and 
and Sunday evening at 3 o^clock. Church meet 
iiig Saturday before the fiiet Sunday in each 
ironlii. Sunday SchC'd at B o’clock. 

METHODIST CHURCH, SOUTH. 

»■ ■ Faplor — Services every 

Sabbath at 11 A. M. and 7 P. M , and Class 
Mee'ingaid o’clock F. M. Fruyer meeting 
every Tuesday night, 

PUE.SUYTERIAN CHURCH. 

Parke I*. Flournoy. Fasioi— Sevicee every 
S «bbaih at 11 A. M. and 7 F. M. Frayer meet" 
iiig every Wednesday evening. Sunday School 
e ery Sunday at 9 o'clock A. .M. 

CATHOLIC CHURCH — ST. JAMEg. 

T. J. Uisney, Fastor— Services every second 
and fourth Sabbath in the month. Catechism 
every Sabbaih at 9 o’clock A. M. 

ITIaxoiiio. 

Morrison T/odg’c, No. 7(1, !*'• niid A. M., 
meets on the first and third Saturdays iu every 
month. 

G. V. Mattiiis, W. M.; B. Whkeler, S. W,; 
ThO.S. II. WiGOLE.sWORTII, J. W.J U. 1). (rrOGHK- 
CAN, Treas.: Virgil IIkwitt. Sec.; F« x Hewitt, 
S. D ; A. \W Morris, J. D.j II. D. Kendall, 
S. ami T. 

Eastern Star Chapter No. 31, meets on 
Thnrsdav after the first Saturday in everv month. 
1?ESI HEK FAMILY No. 147 meets on Wednes- 
day night befote the first and third SHiurday iu 
each month. 

Officers. — R ev. C. D. Donaldson, E. Patron; 
Dr. E. Warfield, Conductor; (I. V. Matthis, Treas- 
urer; John Miller, Recorder; Mrs. Mary A. Mid- 
dleton, Patroness; Mrs Lctitia V. Matthis, Con- 
ductress; Henry Kendall, Watedtman. 

Taylor Lodge, No. 34, 1. 0. 0. F. 

Meets every Fiiday evening over Radley’s new 
store house. 

OFFICERS. 

M. SWEETS, N. G., G.T. HARRIS, V.G., 
M. ARTHUR, Trca?., S. GOLDNAMER, Sec.‘ 
U. KENDAL. Host. 



ELIZABETHTOWN, KY., 

Who has worked in the be.st Shops of tho South- 
ern and Western StsteVf has on hand and will 
continue to keep, a well selected stock of 

Cloths. Cassimeres’ and Vestings, 

also trimmings of every description. He is a man 
of long experience, and will warrant every gar- 
ment made in his Shop, to equal any made in the 
city; satisfaction given iu every caic. He has se- 
cured the services of 

Mr. J. II. PORTMAN, 

an'accoinplishcd aud well known workman. As 
ho receives a 

FASHION PLATE MONTHLY, 

he is enabled to out and make in the very 

LATEST STYLE. 

He would inform the ladics\espccially that he has 
on hand a sipply of tho 

Best Machine Thread. 

Ho requests parties to call before purchasing 
elsewhere. 

Shop — in Radley’s Building up stairs. 

is connected with no Firm in Town. 
Particular pains taken with boyselothing. agl2m6 

lF*iotu.ros, 

Pictures taken at bis Gallery in the front room 
os the Radley building, up stairs. 



GOOD TEMPLARS. 
Elizabethtown Lodge No. 89 I 0. of Q. T 

Meets at every Monday evening at half past 7 
o’clock, in old Semimary building. 

Tim. Needham, W. C. T.; Miss Florence Mur- 
ray, K. II. S.; Miss Florence Geoghegan, L. II. 
S.; Miss Laura Ambrose W. V. T.; John Ililson, 
W. S.j Miss Kate Gray, W. A. S.; Abbie Orr, W. 
F.S.; Green Harri.s, W. T.; John Quiggins, W. 
Chap.; Otto Davis, W. M ; Mias Julia Moore, W. 
P. M.; Miss Nora Wood, W. 1 G.; Wm, Sweets, 
W. Sent.; Joe McMurtry, L. D.; M. Sweets, P. 
W. C. T. Degree Temple meets Third Monday 
evening of each mouth, at same place and hour. 
11. 3Iattuis, D. Sec.; Tim. Needham, D. T. 



NEW STORE. 

GROCERIS, PRODUCE, 

A.N'D 

H I* -vxr X* e ! 

I 

'W. Hi. TT TT^T . TVr 



f 



m 



Froparc for the Holidays. 

NEW MILLINERY STORE! 

MRS. FELIX HOSER desires to say' to her 
friends that she has opened in Adam Beeler’s 
New Building, a new large and varied stock of 




for Ladies and Children, consisting in part of the 
latest styles of Bonnots, Hats, Ribbons, Laces, 
&c. She is prepared to do Pinking, Fluting, and 
Stamping on short notice, and Dress Making is 
the specialty of the establishment. A largo lot 
of Christmas Toys can bo had for the little ones. 
dccl61y 



EAGLE LOCK WORKS. 




n. V. speckman. n. p. dix 

SPECKMAN & DIX, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

BUILDERS’ AND RAIL ROAD 

HARDWARE. 

No. 70 Fourth Street, near Main, 

LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY. 

auBtf. 



C. C. HAGAN 



Dealer in 



'jlllE/a AND 
Also will pay the highest market price for Bacon 
and Lard. 

LIVE AND DRESSED CHICKENS 

for sale. Main-Cross Street, in Bryant’s new buil- 
ding, near Depot. Mach31-ly. 



PoiiH Take His Own Medicine. 

The following anecdote is told of Dr. 
Cabarrus, tlie great homccpathic phy- 
sician, who has just died in Paris: Mill, 
.lulia Barron was out of sorts and sent 
for him. ‘‘What is the matter?” asked 
the doctor. “Oh, I hardly know my- 
self,” she replied; “my spirits are terribly 
unequal. Sometimes I am greatly elat- 
ed and then I suddenly sink into the 
deepest melancholy.” After a mo- 
inent’s reflection, Cabarrus .--aid gravely: 
“I am afraid there is only one viay to 
euro you.” ‘'What is it?” she inquired 
eagerly. “You m* s get married,” he 
replied with a mirthful twinkle of the 
eye, but still keeping a grave fade. 
“Well,” said Mile. Barron, after a little 
hesitation followed by a long-drawn sigh 
of relief; “perhaps you are right. Would 
you marry me?” “Ma chcre,” replied 
Cabarrus blandly; “the doctor prescribes, 
but he doesn’t take his owu medicines.” 



WATCHES & JEWELRY. 

JOHN MILLER, 

WATCHSVIAKER 



COUNTY DIRECTORY. 

HARDIN CIRCUIT COURT. 

Hon. M. II. CoFER, Judge, 

Baker Bufu, Coinmonweiilth’s Attorney, 

T. H. GUNI'EK, Muster Commissioner. 

CtiRrs. M. Fkaize, Clerk. 

VV M. T. Love, Slietin. 

T. J, Piiii.LtFs, Jailer. 

Jo. S. Gray, Coroner. 

JoitN T. Viers, Assessor- 
Court conveoes Fourth Monday in May and 
November. 

HARDIN COUNTY COURT. 

\V. D, Vertrees, Presiding Judge, 

ViKoiL Hewi-iw, Clerk. 

James Montgomery. Coirntv Alter, -rey. 

Ttx. NEEniiAM, School Commissionor, 

Co’url convenes Third Monday in each month 
except May and November, Court of Claims 
Third Monday in October. 

HARDIN QUARTERLY COURT. 

Holds its terms on the first Mondays in Janua* 
ty, April. July and October, 

POLICE COURT. 

R. M. Park, Judge. 

James C. Poston, City Attorney. 

AVm. H. AVarren Matehal. 

Holds its Cifil Terms the Last Wednesday in 
February, May, August and November, 

SUPERVISORS OP TAX. 

Meets on First Monday in May. 

justices’ courts. 

held in the months of Mutch, June, Septem- 
ber and December. 

let Oiatricl, Ejizabelhtown, Tho-nas H. Dum 

can, First Monday Fkst Wednea- 

Jay. 

2nd District, Nolynn, First 

Friday — Peter Stuart, First Saturday. 

3rd District, Wallingford, David Handl), Se- 
cond Monday — E. M. Lampton, SecoodTuesday. 

4lh District, Slephensburg, Samuel Frank lin. 
Second Wednesday — E. Mercer Second Thurs- 
day. 

5ih District, Meeting Creek, E. T. Langleyj 
Second Friday — T. 0. Linder, Second Saturday. 

6lh District, Allison, J. 0. 'Ball, Third Tuee- 
dav— J. C. Allison, Third Wednesday. 

7lh District, t'luycrafl’s, J. G. Nall, Third 
Thursday— David Slilh, Third Friday. 

8ih L'istricl, West Point, S. E. Sheets, Third 
Ssuirday— J. K, Davis, Fourth .Monday. 

9lh District, Atchers, W. A, Brooks, Fourth 
Tue.sday — David Selby, Fourth V' ednesday. 

lOth District, Cole^iirg, John 0. Korh, Fourth 
Thursday— C. L. Shawler, Fuurth Frida 

Courts in LaRue County. 

LARUE CIRCUIT COURT. 

IIon.G. W. Kavfkadgh, Judge. 

J. W. ScifboLiJfO Commonwealth’s Attorney. 
E. U Burba, Circuit Court Clerk: 

Wm. H. Hamilton, Sheriff. 

Jamt.8 Rkuma.n, Jailor. 

Court convenes Fourth Monday in March and 
September, each term continuing Twelve days* 

LA RUE COUNTY COURT. 

J. F. Cksssa, Presiding Judge. 

H. S. Johnson*, County Attorney. 

Court convenes Fourth Monday in each month 
except March and So])tciuber. 

LARUE QUARTERLY COURT. 
Convenes Second Monday in February, May, 
August and November. 

POLICE COURT. 

8. H. Bush, Judge. 

Gid MayfikIaD, Marshal. 



AND DEALRR IN 




CLOCKS, JEWELRY, PLATED 

AND 

Solid Silver AVarc, 

And sold at less than City prices. 

Plain and Ornamental Solid Work made to order, 
in Gold orSilver. (Specialty fine Wulohes) repair- 
ed and warranted. All work guaranteed as per 
agreement. Call and see me. 

North-cast side Public Square, 

ELIZA BETHTOWN, KENTUCKY 

nADISON ALE 

M. F III S Z . 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 

Is prepared to fill all orders for Madison Ale, 
at the shortest notice, by either the box or bottle 
ffhen the money accompanies the order, ag 12-ly, 



L. I. WARRENS 

Just back of the Court House next door to tho 
“Kentucky Barber Shop,” 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 

The proprietor returns thanks for past custom 
and asks a liberal share of patronage. He keeps 
on hand the best of Liquors, Cigars and Tobacco. 
Augl9tf. I 



POST OFFICE CORNER, ELIZABETHTOWN. 

THE 

is .supplied nith tho best of Liquors, Cigars and 
Tobacco. My aim will bo to please all patrons. 

maj4-tf QUINCY McMILLEN 



A good assortment of 

Groceries, Hardware, 
Queensware, 

tf'ood and Jl*tlloiv~tcare, 

Always kept on band at tho 

VERY LOWEST CASH PRICES 

Tci'iiis, Slrictly Caibli. 

I ALSO PAY THE 

niGIlEST MARKET PRICE 

FOB 

Grain, Bacon, Lard, &c. 

MAIN CROSS STREET, in one of C. 

Hotopp’s new buildings. 

NovI8-ly 

R. D. GEOGHEGAN. 



WHOLESALE 

AND 

G R ,0 C E R Y 

AND DEALER IN 

FARMING IMPLEMENTS 

AND 

■rvEo-cH.l33.or 3^, 

HARDWA RE, 
PRODUCE, 
CRAIN, &C. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 

You will save time and money, by calling onmo 
and purchasing any articles you need in myliuo. 
I have a large stuck and will sell to you ut city 
prices, fur. CASH. Do not go further without 
giving me a call. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION 

is called to my stock of 

LATEST IMPROVED STYLES OF 



FRUIT JARS, 



which I am selling fur less than anybody. 




II. M. MIDDLETON 

DEALER IN 

GROCERIES 

AND 

I am paying tho highest market price for Grain, 

BACON AND LARD, 

Grain Cross St., adjoining tho residence of Elias 
Graham. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. al2-ly 

A. L. HARDING, 

(Late ofPcaslcc, Gaulbcrt & Co., 

Window Paints, Oil«, 

Varnishj Pine Tar, Lamps, Lanterns, 
Chimneys 

133 Main St., between Fourth & Fifth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. ap28-6m 



100,000 

BUSHEL OATS 
50,000 

BUSHELS WHEAT 

10,000 

BUSHELS RYE. 



CANADA SEED OATS, 

For sale by 

11. D. GEOGIIEGIIAN. 



NORWAY OATS. 

20 Bushel Norway Sweedisb Oats, for .^^alo by 
R. D. GEOGHEGAN. 



CLOVER SEED. 

50 busheds Sapling Clover seed, .^0 bushels Or- 
chard graj s seed, 500 bushels Seed Oats, 200 bush- 
els prime Uye. K. D. (iEOGNEG.\N. 



SUPERIOR SYRUP 

Iu kegs, at jiriccs tv suit tbo purchaser. 

K. D, GEOCHEGAX. 



KUmill! 



THE GREAT BEPUTATION 



Which Koskuo has .attninej in all parts of the 
lOtmtry 



As (1 Great and Good Medicine 

And the Large Number of Testimouials 



which are constantly being received from Phy- 
sicians, and persons tcho haw hkkx curkd by its 
use, is CONCLU.S1VK FKOOFof itS RKMAKAIII.F VAMUK. 



AS A BLOOD PURIFIER 

jr «.JS .VO EqV.tL, 



BEING POSITIVELT 

THE MOST POWERFUL VEOETAUI.E AL- 
TEUATIVE YET DISCOVERED. 

DISEASES OF THE BLOOD. ‘ 

”Tho life of the flesh is the Blovd,” is a Scrip- 
tural maxim that science proves to be true. The 
people talk of bad blood, a.s the cause of many 
diseases, and like many popular opinions this of 
bad blood is founded in truth. 

The symptoms of bad blood are usually quite 
plain — bad Digestion — causes imperfect nutrition, 
uml consequently the circulation is feeble, the 
soft tissues loose their tone and cla.slicily, and 
tho tongue becomes pale, broad, and frequently 
covered with a pasty, white coat. The condition 
soon shows itself in rouijhncft$ of the skin, then in 
ERUTivE and ulckrativk diseases, and when long 
continued, results in serious lessions of the Brain, 
Liver, Lungs, or urinary apparatus. Much, very 
much, suffering is caused by impure blood. It is 
estimated by some that one-fifth of tho human 
family arc effected with the scrofula in some form. 

When the Blood is pure, you arc not so liable 
to any disease. Many impurities of tho Bloo j 
arise from impure diseases of largo cities. Era«l- 
icato every impurity from the fountain of life, and 
good spirits, fair skin aud vital strength will re- 
turn to you. 



(OUR T II A D E M A B K . ) 

‘•EVERYBODY TAKES ElV’ 

BRADY’S FAiViSLY BITTERS 

THE BEST TONIC IN THE WOULD, 

Awarded the Highest Premium at the State Fairs of Loui.situia, Kentucky, Indiana 
Missouri, Alabama, &c., 1808, and Louisiana State Fair, 180!). Itccoiu- 
meiidcd by the best Physicians in the couutry for the cure of 

Dy^lK'psia Dysoiiiai-y, 

I'viuiilc ron«uiii| tioii, 

luiiiiiUs iiiKl riiolei'st Morbiis, 

(Ji'iivcl, tiiitl lor A i cr aii i KUliicy 



VERYBODYfAKESlTi 









AS A 




FAMILY BITTERS. 



IT HAS NO EQUAL, 

And is.T Great Strengthener and Blood Purifier. It is a sure Picvcntativc nn-ainsi 

€ BI I t, t S ANS  F SI 

If used regularly, as the Chill Season is coming. 

NO FAMILY SHO ULD BE WITHOUT IT. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

lEAi) t ^ f 

NO. 35 FOURTH STREET, l.OUISVILLE, KY. 

BRADY’S SARSAPARILLA AND M.OOD PURIFIER, 

BRADY’S AGUE TONIC, 

BRADY’S DUTCH SCHNAPPS, 

BRADY’S LINIMENT FOR MAN AND BEAST. 



Marchl7-7idcly. 



G. V 



t^Sold by all Dialers Gencriilly.-®n 
. MATTIIIS & 0 Elizabethtown, Ky. 



Elizabelhtonn .Idvcrliseiufiils.' 



LIVER mviGOEATOR! CIBS! m Eli!!! 



STANDS UNRIVALLED. 



ncliiff the only KNOWN .Medicine that kf- 

FICIKNTLY tlimilhllrt anil CORRKCTS the hrjmtk «- 
erelioud and functional DKK.tNCKiiE.NTS of the 

1.IVKR, WITHOUT Debiutati.vo tho systciii. 

\Vhile it acts /rce/y upon tho hivvr Innlrad of m- 
pious jturijiiiij, It tjrailually tho discharges 

to a jicrftctly nnInriU state. 

SYMl'TOXS OF LIVER COMPLAINT a5,'D OF 
SOME OF THOSE DISEASES PRODUCED 
RYIT. 

A sallow or yellow color of tho skin, or ycllow- 
ish-brown spots on tho face and other parts of the 
body; duincss and drowsiness, sometimes liead- 
acho; hitter or hadtailo in the mouth, internal 
heat; in many cases a dry, ten.sing cough: un- 
steady appetite; soinctimcs sour stoinarli, with a 
rai.-*ing of the fmid: a bloated or full feeliiiF about 
the stomach and sides, back, or breast, and about 
the shoulders; conslipation of the bowels; piles, 
flatulence, coldness of the extreuities, Ac. 




It is a remedy of M'ondorfiil Eflieacy in the euro 
of diseases of tho Kitt/a-i/s and Itladdrr. In these 
Affections it is as near a spec-ifleasauy remedy can 
ho. It docs its work kindly, silently, and surely. 
Tlio Relief which it affords is both certain aud 
perceptible. 

DISEASES OF THE KIDNEYS AND 
BLADDER. 

Persons unacquainted with tho structure and 
functions of tbo Kidneys cannot estimate the 
importance of their healthy action. 

Kegular and sufficient action of tho Kidneys is 
as important, n.ay even more so, then regularity 
of tho bowels. The kidneye remove from tho 
Blood those effete matters which, if poriiiittcd to 
remain, would speedily destroy life. A total sus- 
pension of the urinary discharges will occasion 
death from thirty-six to forty-eight hours. 

■\Vhen the Urine is voided in smell quantities at 
the time, or  vbon there is a disposition to Uri- 
nate more frequently than natural, or when tho 
Urine i.s high colored or scalding with weakness 
in tho small of the back, it should not be trifled 
with or delayed, but Koskuo should be taken at 
onco to remedy tho difficulty, before a lesion of 
the organs takes place. Most of the diseases of 
tho Bladder originate from those of the Kidneys, 
prove irritating to the Bladder and Urinary pass- 
agc.«. M’ben we. recollect that medieino never 
reaches tho Kidneys except through the general 
circulation of the Blood, wo see bow necessary 
it is to keep the Fountain of Life Pure. 



KOSKOO! 

I 

Meets with GUEAT SUCCESS in the CURE of 

DISEASES OE'THE IRVOUS 



Almost nine-tenths of our people suffer from 
nervous exhaustations, and are, therefore, liable 
to its concomitant evils of mental depression, con- 
fused ideas, softening of the brain, insanity, and 
complete breaking down of the general health, — 
Thousands are suffering to-day with broken-down 
nervous system, and unfortunately, tobacco, al- 
cohol, late hours, over-work, (mental and phys- 
ical,) arc causing diseases of tho ner\*ious system 
to increase at a fearful ratio. 

Tho symptoms to which diseases of the nei^'ous 
system give rise, may bo staled as follows. A 
dull, heavy feeling in the head, sometimes more 
or less severe pain or headache: periodical head- 
ache, dizziness, noises or ringing in tho head; 
confusion ^ f ideas; temporary loss of memory: 
dejection of spirits; starting during sleep; bad 
•dreams; hesitation in answering questions; dul- 
Dc.ss of hearing; twitching of the face aud arms, 
ate., which, if not promptly treated, lead to Par- 
alysis, Delirium, Insanity, Impotcncy, Apoplexy, 
A'c , Jcc. 



And Still They Come! 

Having reopened my Store, I wish to inform my 
friends and customers that I am still in the field, 
and ready to wait on all of my customers, with as 
fine a 

STOCK OF GOODS 

As can be found any whore. I have just received 
a fine lot of 

COOKING AND HEATING STOVES 

which I will sell low for 

C A- s , 

Also, a fine lot of 

BRITTANIA.^PLANISIIED and SIL- 
VER PLATED WARE, 

just from the Manufactory, which I will sell at 
Manufacturers prices. A good assortment of 

TIN WARE, PLAIN AND FANCY 

always on hand. Also, all kinds of 

HOUSE FURNISHING ARTICLES. 

Special attention will be given to all kindsof 
JOB WORK, ROOFING GUTTERING AND 
SPOUTING, 

done in good order nml reasonable terms. 

T also, pay the highest Cash price for old Iron, 
Brass and Cop]K r. Come one and nil, exumino 
my Stock and prices, aud satisfy yourselves. No 
tnoiblc to show goods* 

Thankful to my friends and patrons for past 
favors, I respectfully solicit a continuance of the 
same; from new friends 1 nsk a trial. 

FRED.L. MADE^ 
BOOTS AND SHOES. 



C, ill O T O P P 



In bis Niiw Building, Elizabelbtowu,Ky 



BOOTS « SHOES 



HOME MADE AND EASTERN WORK • 
MEN’S 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 



ALL STYLES AND SIZES. 



HAYS, CROSS & CO. 

Wholesale Dealers in 

Wliilc and Fancy Goods 

NOTIONS, GENTS’ FURNISHING 
GOODS, &c. 

1S6 Main St. South Sije, bet. FiTth ami Sixth, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. a2G-ly. 



Ches. Jiickson, Jno. Loving, H.W. Smith 

JACKSON, LOVING & Co. 

WHOLESALE GllOCEliS, 

AND 

COMJIISSIO.V MERCHANTS, 

No. 240 Main Street, between Sixth anj Scvcnil* 

LOUISVILLE, KY. a2C-ly. 

I 

I 

j Arthur Peter, W. W. Powers, Harvey Coojjer 

j ESTABLISHED IN 1817. 

PETER, POWERS & COOPER, 

I Successors to Wilson, Peter .k Co. 

I AVHOI.E8.ALE DllUGGIhTi-’, 

No. 272 Mniii St., between .Seventh and Eighth 

LOUISVILLE, KY. a2G-ly. 

^ 0 « S 1 , 

DEALER I.V ^ 

Huto, Caps, Valises, Carpetbags, 

Umbrellas and Can 

National Hotel Duilding, Fourth St., near M.ii3: 

LOUISVILLE, KY. ml7-l8]y 



GAITERS, 



SLIPPERS, 



BROGANS, 

The Finest Goods Made to Order on the Shortest 
Notice, and at Ueasonahlo Figures. 

CHEAP bargains; 

Can bo had by giving me a call and trork warran- 
ted to plc.-iso customers. al2-ly 



W. F. PURCELL. 



D, P^ BETHEL. 



JohnACartcr JohnTFishor JasGCaile 

Carter, Fisher & Co. 

Suecossor? to 

Garvin, Bell & Co., and Carter  t Brotbee 

Importers and Who'c.sale Dc.alcrs iu 
STAPLE AND FANCY 

ry C3-CDOC3.S, t 

and NOTIONS, 

south side Main street Below Seventh^ 
LOUISVILLE. KY. 

Orders onrefuLy filled, aug20 ly 

THE OHIO IMPROVED 

Oliestor Hogs 

Produce the GREATEST amount of PORK of 
any known breed, for food consumed. Send for 
its description and a great variety of other thor- 
oughbred and imported aninia's and fowls. 

H. B. SILVER, Sa'cm, Oliiov 
Sec statement of Hon. John Dun forth in “News’* 
of December 2d, 1869. • Jan.Ctf. 



D. MARSHALL, 

Ladies’ aud Gontlomcas’ Fashionable 

Boot & Shoe ManufactureP^ 

Main street, two doors bo’ow third. 

L0UISVILLE, KY'. 

Also a general assortment of Ladies’ and Gents’ 
Eastern Boots and Shoes, at the lowest price, for 



cash. 



Marchl7-lsGm. 






1 © i s © © 

Is NOT a secret quark remedy. lORMUL.A 
around each bottle. Recommended by the best 
Physiciiins, eminent Divines, Editors, Druggists, 
Merchants, Ac. 

Tho Besi and Most Popular Modicino 
in Use. 



PUECELL & BETHEL. 

MEAT MARKET 

Wc have on hand and arc prepared at all times 
to furnish this community with the best of Beef, 
Pork, Lard Ac., and will sell at reasonable prices. 
Fcbl7-6m. 

R. M. MOCK, 




Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 










WINDOW SHADES and OILCLOTH- 

No. 99 East Side 4th, bet., Market and Jefferson 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Samples at B. Staadekor ^ Co. ^vg-m 



PREPARED ONLY BY 



j.a 



. 1 . 



, ..... 

ORGANIC CHEMIST, 

Laboratory and Office, No. 0 Main Street, 

NORFORK, VA- 

PricoONE DOLLAR PER BOTTLE 

FOR SALE BY DRUGGIST EVERYWHERE 
-4pr7-ljm- 



GUN AND LOCKSMITH, 

Has Removed to North-East side Public .Square. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KY. 

Repairing done with neatness and dcspaloh. — 
All kinds of win'k in my lino arc done iiromj.tly 
at re.asonublu figures, S.\TISFACTION GUAR- 



ANTEED. 



Aug.l2-ly. 



BALLAN & FINETY, 

ELIZABETHTOWN, KENTUCKY. 

.\re prepared to do all kinds of 

HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTING, 

Graining, (ilaiiiig and Paper ILiuging. augl2(. 



AND 

ESlXOa, •ULJStiO 

JOHN. E. ZUBROD 

I Offers bin service? to the peop’o of Eliz.ibeth- 
I t4)wn and tho country aroun l ns a first-cbiss 
] IIOU8K, SIGN and 'ENCAUSTIC PAINTER. 
He refers to Isaac Radley and William Showers 
as to iiis house painting, and to .\ilum Beeler’s 
sign as to tbe beauty of bis sign painting. Ho 
wit! work as promptly and as cheap as any one. 
juuv2 ISTOtf 






The Elizabethtown news, 1870-07-14

4 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt7k9882kf0m
 Local Identifier: elz1870071401
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/elz/xt7k9882kf0m.json
Location
  Published in Elizabethtown, Ky., Kentucky by Mathis & Bell
   Hardin County (The Pennyrile Region)