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date (1861-03-06) newspaper_issue 

4 



"IT 18 NOT IN A SPLENDID GOVERNMENT. SUPPORTED BY POWERFUL MONOPOLIES AND ARISTOCBATICAL ESTABLISDMENTS THAT THE PEOPLE WILL FIND HAPPINESS. OR THEIR LIBERTIES PROTECTION, BUT IN A PLAIN SYSTEM. VOID OP POMP, PROTECTING ALL, AND GRANTING FAVORS TO K0J1B,V=^ 

LOUISVILLE, KKNTU(^KY. WEDirn^)AY, MARCH 6. 18(51 



VOLUME XVII 
WEEKLY 1)I:M( )( ; 1( AT. 



,.NlT]Vmf  11 28 



THURSDAY MOllNlMl.. 



FEB. 



l^'Lincoln is at Washington, and the 
force bill has been yirtually defeated In the 
Lower House of Congress, by a decided ma- 
jority. 

We have never had any apprehensions 
that any danger was to be apprehended, of 
coercion. If any lighting is to be done, it 
will be rashly brought on by some unauthor- 
ized body of crar.y Seoessionists, without 
any real necessity, even on their own 
theory. The sentiment of the North is 
against it; so much against it I bat it will 
not bo tolerated iu that region. The people 
there know that foroe will not settle this dif- 
ficulty. Other means must be used. Those 
who feel these apprehensions are mistaken 
in the Northern people. Even the Republi- 
cans in Congress, ■who are likely be the last 
to come to their senses, begin to feel the 
sentiment ouiside, which will deepen and 
strengthen daily. There are insurmountable 
obstacles in the way of coercion. The Qot- 
ernment is bankrupt on such a programme; 
oapitalists will cot lend money to men bent 
on cutting their throat  , and bankrupting 
themselves; and force can't bo used without 
money. Armies can't be raised in the 
North, to engage in coercion; it would bring 
on an "irrepressible conflict" there. The 
invading force couldn't get to the Ohio 
river. The attempt would arm the whole 
country on bot.^eiUes. For force, th« A4- 
rr i . t-..^; V 11 y-ira to reiy 8ol)^ly 



iry'-^shai]^ 



NOVEMKEU ELECTION. 



KEHTUCHY. 



A.lttlr _ 

Allen _. 

AnJeraoD ................ 

Bullonl 

ItarreD 

»«Ih 

ll^xitl,^ „,.„ 

Kuiirbou....^ 

l^..vl.■ 

Ilfiyd (DOW coauty). 

Urackf n » 

Urtathltt 

Ki   ^:tturldg« 

nullitt 

Butler .. 

Caldwell . 

Calluwuy — « 

Canipbell 

Carroll „ 

Curler _. 

Casey 

ClirlsUao 

Clarke 

Cliiy -., 

('lllltOD _ 

Crittenden . 

CuiiiberlaDd.......MMw 

Diivlesit 

tMinoiiMU 

Kstlll 

fayatte 

Filming „. 

Floyd. _ 

Fratikllu. ...„„..., 

Fultun „ 

Uallatin „ 

Uarrvd „,....... 

Oraiit . 

Graves 

Grayson 

Green 

Grecutll) 

Hancock 

Ihirdlu 

Harlan 

Harrison 

H.irt 

Ht'nderaon „ 

Henry 

llt^knian 

HoiiklnM .... 

Jacksou H... 

Jfffer.on 

JohOMti .... 



» : r.ui^ 1 it would cry 

There couldj" J^'b bonor ;ob« vron in such^-. 
war, and none ^ut fan&tios W^nld enlist to 
prosecute i(. 

All sensible men see that this notion of 
coercion by forje of arms must stop, or end 
in calamities that no country could or would 
endure. 

We are constantly told that the seceding 
States will not come back, and they will not 
by coercion. The politicians who have 
precipitated matters desire that coercion 
may be attempted. They tell us constantly 
it will be resorted to. They keep up the 
excitement by reitrerating that coercion is to 
be apprehended. It is by such predictions 
that they hope to save themselves. The 
people would never submit to such a despot- 
ism as has been inaugurated in the Cotton 
States, but under the apprehension that 
there would be an attempt to force them to 
submit to Republican domination. Remove 
that apprehension, and let them once see 
that the N^h is disposed ta do justice, and 
these precipitators have lost their power. 

They will be egregiously disappointed if 
wise counsels prevail at Washington. There 
is nothing they dread so much as the spirit 
of a oompromisc in the North. They will 
keep all knowledge of it from the people as 
long ae they can. They will keep up sensa* 
tion dispatches and discredit the fairest 
propositions. 

The Charleston Mercury looks to the Abo 
Utionists for the deliverance of the South; 
and quotes with evident gusto the crazy ef- 
fusions of Wendell Phillips and Oarrison. 
If these Abolitionists could control the 
North, the Secessionists would rejoice; for 
they would be vindicated before their own 
people, if not before the world. 

But these Abolitionists are but the North- 
ern wing of the Secessionists. They are as 
willing fur Uidunion as the politioans of the 
South. They can easily be great men at 
home upon a dissolution of the Union. They 
are iu the same fix with the Disunionists 
South; their glory depends on Disunion. 

The people are not with them in either 
section of the Union. Neither dare go be- 
fore the masses, and submit the issue fairly 
at the ballot-box. 

They will fail, however, infallibly. Such 
ft "^2^57^f'^'° poultry lonp. It has 

iUy wise meamirea y -N^ • ^ ■, ^ 
hastily as it was established. 



"Apprehcneiona of ianger are the first 
symptoms of the Secesxion disease. Shall 
Kentucky submit to Lincolo'.' We don't 
think Kentucky will submit to any power, 
but Providence, and the Constitutions of the 
Federal Government and the State — one 
their fathers made, ami the other they made 
themselves. They have carefully provided 
against submission to anything else. They 
make their legislators swear to these, and 
their judges swear to the same documents 
They keep all these officers under their eye, 
and subject to approval or rejection periodi- 
cally. They have not the same power over 
the Federal Qovernmenl; still the Federal 
judge, marshal and jurors are our own citi- 
zens, and we have a Federal Court to revise 
any law of Congress, and nullify it if they 
hold it unconstitutional. We have confi- 
dence in that Court, and it is not easily 
changed. Besides that, the Federal Gov- 
ernment lacks the power to oppress. If 
it has not enforced all the laws for our 
benefit, it is because it lacked the power, if 
it lacks power to do all the good we desire, 
it must lack power to do evil. And when an 
issue comes to the worst, Kentucky can re- 
sist, if she chooses. She has as muoh right 
to resist oppression as to secede. She can 
accept the benofits and reject the evils. We 
have a right to resist what is clearly intol 
erable, and the power to resist it, too. The 
Federal Qovernment has furnished to all the 
Slates what it was not bound by the Consti- 
tution to furuish. It was not bound to 
acquire vast regions of territory as an outlet 
to the population of the States, free and 
elave. Certainly the slave States have got 
more territory through the Federal Govern- 
ment than they ever would have got with- 
out it. 

What substantial reason, then, can be 
git'^n why Kentucky should run away ' She 
has U:) coercion to feiir; andif shehad.she can 
resiai iiin the Union as well as out of it; and 
the breaks the Constitution no more one way 
than the oiler, la truth, the Constitution 
is good enough, if obeyed. We only want 
explanations tVat will forever settle up this 
irrepressible negro question, just as the 
Const it utioD, fairly carried out, would set 
lie iT. f 

To be sure, if tl.e florth were all craty, or 
a majority in every Stale were so, they 
might, of necessity, break up this Union 
forever; but we shall not assume, what is 
absurd, that the millions have lost their 
senses 

Even these politicians North and South 
are not crazy; they are acting for them 
selves. The whole country don't estimate 
them as they estimate themselves, and they 
prefer a part, where their chances are bet- 
ter. They know what they are about. They 
have been "educating the Southern mind;" 

but the p'^ople will get too well informed 

soon for their benefit. 

Speaking of the adoption of the 
Constitution of the United Slates by the 
Southern Confederacy, "For what," ex- 
claims the indignant Charleston Mercury, 
"have we cast olf the North as a rotten 
incubus, if we are thus to re enact all of 
their swindles, outrages and insolences 
be plundered with 
'to stultify ourselves 
with a half way representation — and to 
indorse all the slanders and insolence of the 
Northern States' ' 

-The 



lUJislKll 

Log AD „ 

i*von „ 

 failtrton 

.MdROfflU 

.Marlon „ 

.Murshiill. .»„..„«.....«,...«.. 

MaHOu „ 

McCrackon » 

Ml. Lean „ 

.Mt-ade 

Mercer 

Metcalfe (ouw coanty).... 

Muiit/umery _...™ 

Monroe -..««....« 

MorKuii — . 

Muhlvtiburg. »....».. 

NeUuu 

Ntcholiu. 

Oblo » « 

Oldham - 

Owen „„— 

Owaley 

FetidlfltOQ 

IVrry ^. 

Poweil „ 1. 

Pulaiikl 

Rockca-Htlo 

Ki'wau 

RusHell 

Scott -....„,.. 

Shelby 

Sliiipsoo .„ 

Sponcer 

Tiivlor ». 

T idd 

TiiKK 

Ti iinbU 

Warren « 

Wobhlugton 

Wayne 

Whitley « 

W-Afc „ „ 

WuiKllorU «... 

Webster. 

Total « 




ILLINOIS. 



Lloeolo ov«r Itouclw. MV«)i. 



. so.s«i 65J10 .^^,143 i.aei 



C\mnttt«. 

And«r»oD, 
Ani^ellaa, 

Atabco, 

Aauin, 
Baud era. 
Batttrob. 

lUi-*. ; 

Bell, : 

B Jtar : 

Hlauco, 

BtJsque. 

Uowle, 

brazt^rla 

Bra/u . 

Browfi. 

Burk*,-..ri. 

Bumetl, 

Caldwell, 

Calhoun, 

Camaricue, : 

CameruD, 

Cnainbera. 
Cht-rokee, 
CtiUlii, : 
Colorado. 
CuHial. ; 

Ct.r.kt'. ; 

Coryell, 
Dallaii. 

D4-U10((, 

Di- Will. 

kill*, : 

El Faxu. : 

Krath. : 

Faltf, 

Kan bin, 

Fayette. 

Fort B-nd, 

Flecstloiie, ; 

(iulveHtoo, 

UlU.sple. 

U...UaJ. : 

Uun^alct', 

0 ray so II, 

(iuadaluupe, 

Iloiidersou, 

ill \Hig'J. 

lltil. : 
Uopklus. 
Houston, 

UuDt, 

Jackiion, 
Jack, : 
Jattper, 
JetUrkon, : 
Johuiti^n. 
Karnes, 
Kaufman, 
Kerr, : 
t-ainar, : 

1 ampattse:), 
Lavac .'a, 
lA-on, 
Uberiy, 
IJinehtune, 
Llvu Ouk, 
l.Uno, 
Mar uij, 
M'Leuuan. 
MaJtsou, 
.Mutuifjorda, 
Medina, 
Milan, 
Moula^ue, 
Muutgtoinery, 
.N«i:oitdtM.'hea. 
Newton, ; 
•Navarro, 
N'euc**s, ; 
Orangv, 

Palo Pinto, 
Haoola, 
Farkcr. 
Folk. 

Red Kiver, 
Kwluglo. 
Hubert *on. 
Bunk, 
Sablue. 

San AugUflUue, 
San Patrtdo, 
iian tfub*. 
Shelby, : 
Btulth. 
.•;tarr, : 
Tarraut, : 
TituB, : 
Travta, 
irlnliy, : 
T  ler, : 
Cpthur, : 
U V aide. ; 
Van Z%tuU, 
Victoria. 
Walker, 
Washington, 
Webb. ; 
Wharton, 
Wilson. : 
WlUlamsoii, 
Wise. ; 
Wood. 

Vouuif, : 
/apata, 



TEXAS. 



acll. «tc. 
: lis 



Dtm. 
Breck. 



Chuntiet. 

AJaiiis 

AlPx»niier 

Bond 

Vooue 

Br. wn 

ilurpau 

Calhoun ......m ■ 

Curroi , 

Cas. 

Champaign 

Chri.tlan 

Clnrk 

Cia.v „., 

Cliiiloa 

Coles 

Cook 

Ciawfonl 

(^iiiibfrlaDd .... 

Di' Kilb 

Da Will 

l»u Piifie 

Douglas 

*'lK r 

Kilwarilk 

KlIliiRliam 

V«vittc „... 

F..rJ 

Kraiikllli 

Kulton 

UMlatlr. 

iJrt'ene 

Uruiiily 

I'Anilltoii 

Hancock 

Hanlln 

I(  n k'r:i9ll 

Ilcnry 

Iro()uulij 

Jaciison .......... 

Jartper 

Ji-tfersoQ 

JtTsey 

Ju DavlPKs 

Johoaon 

Kuiif , 

Katikakev! 

K.-iidall 

Knux 

I ake 

la Balle 

LAwrencH 

e 

Llvln f«loD 

l.OKali 

Macon 

Macnnpln 

.MailUon 

.Marlon 

Marsliall 

Maaon 

Ma-^aac 

McCKinough 

.Mclltibrv 

.McLoan. 

.McuarJ 

MiTCpr 



Oitlv .... 
Peoria . 
I*frry .. 
I'lall ... 
like 

I'ope 

(•ulaakl 

Putnam 

Kaudolpb.... 

Richland 

Kock la and 

Saline 

!4angamon .. 
!'chuyl« ... 



Krp. 

Lincoln. 

.. sail 

106 
»»7. 
.. 1759 
.. 7» 
.. 3i U 
26» 
11 0 
.. 1046 
.. 1793 
.. 96i 
.f ISM 
081 
718 
.. 14*4 
.. UV« 
Ml 

e» 
.. ym 

.. i»"* 

17W 
8119 
.. 17X7 

WO 
*■« 

,. KM 

n\ 

.. UI2 
102 

.. vn 
mi 

. \as 

SI6 
GM 

*io 

. 1781 
40 

4S07 
,. 1977 
1st I 
»S32 

.. xni 
tut 

.. 

2420 
1171 

. VM 
IMl 

. 21V1 

. .tiei 

SM 

. \«an 
lit 

. BJj 

. 



Dtm. 
Doufflafl. 
4lt i 

eM 

981 
310 
IWt 
I41S 
««8 
4(11 
1902 
1221 
14" 8 
1724 

loro 

1194 
14117 
9S46 
I3S4 

*n 

9 iS 
Iblt 

SUI 

829 
19X1 

370 
1(H4 
la7l 

I4ti 
lJUl 
SWO 
1020 
2.73 

714 
I5&3 
29«0 

t'f) 

611 
1-32 

9» 
1K« 

90fi 

wa 
lt»l 

IS41 

l.tM 
lui 

S03 
S71 

mi 

■Mi 
42^1 

2ro 

1140 

loan 

1S2I 

mi 

■im 

SlIU 
1715 
U76 
1224 

ir.i 

J266 
1 )4 



Bell. 
81 
ITS 
15 

33 

68 
1 
19 

25. 
2U 

8 
SO 
43 
79 
107 
24 

9 

S 
fl 

3 
39 



75 
48 

83 
U7 

99 
lU 
62 
31 
4 

147 

5 
116 

105 

a 



Drm. 
Breck. 

67 
79 
2 



SO 
4 

S5 

12 
15 



Total 



172161 



TENNESSEE. 



CoMRflVt. 

Anderson 

BI«l«o* 

B ount - 

Hradler „. 

Bedford 

HentoD 

  atupteU , 

Carter 

(^eatbam. .. 

Claiborne 

Cocke 

Cannon » 

Coffee , 

Carroll ». 

(hiUitMrrland 

Davldaon 

DeKalb 

Dlckaun 

Decatur „ 

Dyer 

Fentreaa. 

Pranklla _ 

VayetML „ 

U ranger 

Ureene 

OUea 

Urundy 

UlbsoD 

llawktna. 

iiamlltou - 

Uancuck 

llafilln 

Hlckiiuui 

Uuiuphrt ya....„ 

Hardeman - 

Henderson 

Henry 

Haywood 

Jtflerson 

JobDaou 

Jacksou 

Knox 

Lawrence 

t ewls. „ 

Uucoln 

Liauderdale 

McMlnn. „ 

Melgf _ 

Marlon 

Monroe.. ...... 

Morgan 

Maury 

.Montgomery 

Marahall. 

Macon. 

.McNalry 

Madison 

Overton - 

Obion 

Polk 

I*erry 

I!' ■. 



( nicin. 
Bell. 
II.   
3«l 

uet 

no 

IM( 

452 
S45 
8W 



Dfm. 
Breck. 
339 
177 

m 

7M 

tm 

113 
271 

Vutt Uirown out. 



614 
931 
445 
 1 
U7I 



-H(77 
W 
47S 
7M 
13* 
»8 
•63 
1047 
1048 
HIS 
74 
191)9 

lOtr; 

IU74 
3U9 
671 
tli 
350 

r i7 

1246 

887 

an 

1625 
608 
1182 
X47I 
470 
«  
617 

4ai 

' 986 
ISO 
498 
915 
168 
1434 
1436 
«ii2 
baS 
11164 
till 
394 
 86 
SM 
3*1 



718 
473 
921 
1101 
7J7 

1432 

m 

46i 
3«t 
4W 
465 

1516 
361 
687 

»i5l 

1511 
431 

1039 

1165 
(I21J 
493 
718 

1067 
«M 
6(5 
(11 

ll)U8 
3St 
681 
14U 

1060 
859 
690 
S5» 

2I 2 
172 
978 
Ml 

:i47 

10M 
tl8 

1731 

1IJI2 
,1328 

493. 
414) 
1417 
885 
825 

m 



1104 



■ 10 



44 

11 



200 
26 



178 



105 
62 
»2 

10 
193 



5.V) 



450 

232 



14;« 
65 



ta 



445 

68/ 
*Si 

151 
1019 



ToUl 

Majority rur Brectlnrldgc, CMS7. 
*Funlon of Bell and Douglas'' friends. 



74 
leu 
171 

20 



151 10 



2S» 
474 
9UII 



67547 



Cbuniiti. 

AHcention, • 

AnHumptlon. - 
Avoyeflea, • 

Ulenyllle, 

B . »ler. 
Caldo. 
Calcasieu, 
Caldwell, - 
l.'arro 1, 
Catahoula, 
CJlalbjrne, • 
Concordia. 
Uc Soto, 

K. Baton Bouga, 
E Velklana. 

Krankllu, 
lUrvllle, - 
Jackson, ■ 
Jeltervoii, 

l-utuvctte. 



upon ouiseWei 
diacritu'iDaliag 



ProBident elect is in cloyer. 
He and Mrs. Lincoln are tbe recipients of 
many valuable preaenlB from ehrewd office 
seekers. Lincoln has been given a span of 
fine LorseB, and Mrs. Lincoln haa been pre- 
sented with a carriage. Wc are glad Old 
Abe has got a new carriage, for his personal 
cairiage is very awkward. 

The New Orleans Bulletin contains 
the following pertinent inquiry: "If the 
South, with the General Qovernment on her 
side, baa tried for forty years to maintain 
her rights in the Union, and has failed, how 
is she to do so when the power of the Q»t- 
jrnment is against her?" 



PtU'iuemlneH, 
I'olut Cou^jcc, 
Rapides, - 
^uhll e, 

Bernard, . 
8t. Charlea. - 
St. Nelena, 
St. Jamea. 
61. John Baptlite. 
m. Landry, 
Ct. Mary. 
St Martin, 
rit. Tammany, 
Tenaaa, 
Terrebonne. 
Union. 
Verml'llon, 
Wadbltig'ulJ. 
W, Uat  n Kouge, 
West Vellclaua. 
Wmu, 

Total, - 



LOUISIAirA. 

I'ruan. 
Bell. 
• ■ - 279 
... 233 

• - - - 290 
293 

- 253 
545 

■ • : . 24 
• - . 1» 

• - - - 3a« 

430 

- ■ 720 
152 

• 364 
569 

• 277 
249 

- 229 
337 

■ 984 
71 
324 

ii» 

/.5S 

9*r 

}6I1» 
340 
6a 

l9Li 

ilia 



■Mi 
176 
884 
9»  
AI7 
343 
iU 
410 
S52 
442 
112 
218 

:1S8 

Ml , 



Dtm, 
Breck. 
144 

311 
750 
682 
419 
b48 
396 
325 
530 
676 
W6 
175 
634 
490 
377 
342 
535 
527 
196 
488 
214 
425 
J 75 

612 

JS. 
02» 
10(6 
lJU 

134 

79 
r3l 
U 0 
429 
9t t 
4»2 

5;2 

11.4 
264 
441 

7» 
211 
3«7 
147 
272 
354 



Dtm. 

Doug. 
356 
478 
7 
131 

37 

61 

iW 
20 
168 

2 
l.W 
131 
40 
101 
1119 
4118 
406 

II 



\r. 

98 
45 

39 
18 
18 
108 

^: 

21 
88 
4'  
Mi 
3 
64 

a 
1 
5 
27 
33 
241 



.math 

Utewart 

Sumner 

Shelby 

Tipton 

Van Bureu..., 
Waablngton... 

Warren 

Wayne 

White 

Williamson. .. 

Wilson 

Weakley , 



IH'. 
252 
538 

1475 
412 
8(3 

(041 
4» 
IM 
(67 
(78 
701 
7(3 

1587 

2«3 
900 



Total 69274 

Bell over Breckinridge. 4365. 



188 
151 
1517 

618 
786 
1«7T 
744 
M 
187 
ISSl 
1220 
3(2 
686 
797 
1165 
1335 

64709 



l tm 

Doag. 

:« 

38 
47 
3ul 
35 
5 
20 
15 

10 
14 
211 
7 

129 

383 
13 
86 
81 

151 
16 
» 

688 
17 
3^ 
Stt 

eu 

241 

f-7 
1A5 

It; 

14 
734 
74 

2i 
453 
35 

4 

33 
128 
tm 

293 
270 
141 
88 
.Vl 
52 
46 
63 
*»5 
43 
27 
514 
• 429 
411 
165 
63 
19 
21 



1 

£9 
60 
114 

153 
2959 

56:1 
I;; 
62 
14 
73 
28 
32 
63 

12 (, 

11350 



INDIANA. 



Adama 

Allen 

Bartholomew .... 

Benton 

Blackfoni 

Uoone 

Brown 

Carroll 

CaM 

Clark « 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawfard. 

Davtesi 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

De &alb 

Delaware 

DubolB 

KlkharU 

Fayette 

rioyd 

fountain ~ 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Olbsou 

Orant - 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Uarrlsou 

Hendricks .. 

Henry 

Howard 

UuminKdon 

JarkHOU 

Jaai er 

J«y 

JefrerM n 

Jenntnga 

Jobniton 

Knox 

KoSCtUKCO 

LafranKe 

Lake 

Luportu 

Lawrence 

Sladlfton 

Mai Im 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Muoroe 

MouitEomery 

Morgan - 

Newton 

Nuble 

Ohio 

Orange ». 

Owuu 

Parke 

Perry - 

Pike 

Purter - 

Posey 

Pula»k  

Putnam 

Uandolpb 

Klpley 

Kush 

ikott 

fchelby 

?*l»pnrer 



VauderOuri »— 

V«ruillUuo 

Mko 

Wabash 

WurreU ~ 

Warrick 

Wa^blnglon ... 

Wiivue ». 

WeiU 

White 

Wbltley 



Breckinridge o ver Bell. »477. 

OEEUON 



Benton 

Clacktiiuait ... 

Cliilttop 

Coluntbla. 

Cood - 

Curry 

Douttlas 

Jacktou 

JoMpbene..... 

Lane 

Lion 

Marlon 

MHimoniah... 

I'olk 

TllUmM4 k 

I'uipi^iia 

W«.co 

WaitblnKtou ■ 
YarnliUl 



Lincoln. 

213 
4IU 



179 

38 — 
45 

Kutunu not received. 
Keturus not received. 



Union. 
Bell. 

3 

2 



Total. 

Lincolo over Breckinridge, 264. 



322 

377 
253 

ur, 

582 
696 
•71 
191 
11 
151 
IW 
271 
415 

.5270 



284 
3MI 
211 
155 
90S 
K65 
364 
4UU 
8 
72 
148 
134 
211 



23 
89 
1» 
I 

6 
17 
5 
4 



Dem. 
Breck. 
392 
32) 
19 
36 



506 
672 
351 
566 
672 
286 
261 
215 
13 
75 
(55 
138 
217 



Orunties. 



KARYLAND. 



Atlegbany 

Antiu AruxKlel 

Baltimore City 

Bttllimt. rt: Couuty. 

Caroline 

Carroll «. 

Calvert 

Cecil « 

Cbirlcs , 

Dtirebester 

Fre lie rick 

liarford 

Howard ^ 

Kent 

Moitti^omery. 

Prince George** .... 

Queen Aixue'i 

HotaerMt 

St. Mary's 

Talbot „ , 

Wa^lDgtoa 

Worcester ^. 



i 



Tot«L.. 



Hep. 
Lincoln. 

522 

3 

10K3 

37 

12 

. 69 

1 

158 

6 

S» 

u» 

81 

1 

42 

5W 

1 

0 

2 
1 

t 

94 
0 

(294 



D'wuxrali. 
lireck. Doug. 



Rtv. 
Lincoln. 

632 
2552 
1769 

S7-. 

275 
1699 

301 
1:90 
1874 
1369 

6X9 
1454 

7W 

931 
2127 
2028 

I. 500 
1933 

301 
2471 
1343 
1151 
1656 

II. 95 
IU19 
1298 
Itl6n 
UJU 
(195 
1201 
1593 
20SU 
2926 
1589 
1582 
1185 

534 
1135 
(661 
1649 
1303 
1570 
2290 
1695 
1225 
3167 
1158 
171.9 
1024 
1426 

516 
181'. 
llSri 
2367 
1755 

305 
1743 

361 

849 
1140 
1898 
1026 

894 
1529 
1065 

571 
ISM 

fn 

19K) 

17:.7 
660 
19U0 
1296 
IVU 

'J6.1 



»4- 

le?5 
IU9II 
2429 
2J87 
44U 
745 
\SI% 
1234 
9119 
993 
1133 



Dtm. 

3224 
1846 
235 
408 
941 
729 
1446 
1727 
1837 
1.116 
1437 
844 
749 
2136 
1546 
1339 
1U» 
1347 
1938 
917 
ism 
1360 
2272 
991 
1.515 

\m 

1316 
1114 
1289 
1848 
ll«3 
1106 

8. '5 
1402 
1740 

278 
1077 
1146 

! 30 
1392 
loit8 
15C0 

749 

455 
154.IH 

787 
Is41 
3252 
1473 

679 
I608 

716 
2179 
1516 

If«9 
1.32U 

335 
1114 
129.1 
1320 

947 

882 

889 
1128 

663 
1747 
1180 
14-« 
1119 

447 
2047 

lloe 

231 



1544 
844 

21(7 
1142 
ii4 

784 

1968 
1781 
ll«9 
811 
1067 



ToUll. 139033 

Lincoln over Douglu, ((524. 



Vnirn. 
Bell. 
II 
32 
34 

8 

9 
47 

6 
14 
34 
316 
51 

6 
42 
133 
96 
20 
24 
111 
20 

1 



9 

6 
112 
46 
20 

4 
13 
17 
41 
16 
15 
52 
36 
17 

( 
150 
42 
6u 
39 

% 

16 

27 
(08 

8-1 
161 
2 

66 

64 
78 
14 
1 
4 

ati 

85 
118 
84 
1611 
3» 
ft 
168 
7 

1?3 
10 
37 

:35 

5( 
24 

175 

2 



302 
24 
211 
%  
15 
85 
31 
102 
3 
9 
4 

5306 



Dem. 
Breck. 



66 
6 
40 

Sf: 
31 
.1 

130 
250 
47 
61 
8 
629 
61 
93 
2 
90 



■ 2 
29 
.33 

204 
94 
97 
36 

241 
90 
35 
14 

117 

12 
564 
S-Ai 
336 
42 
9 
10 
20 
474 
523 
70 
319 
21 
153 
■JO 
395 
6f 
62 
41 
38 
174 
176 
88 
65 
6 
(8 
28 
523 
4 
361 
.56 
174 
476 
262 
43 
172 




MICHIGAN. 




Oouluitt 

Allegan 

A pena 

Barry 

Bay . 

Berilen 

Branch 

Calhoun • 

Cass „ 

tlieboygan « 

Chippewa - 

Clinton 

llatou 

Kmmet 

Genesee 

Ud. Travenie.,.„ 

Urallol 

Ulll«lale „ 

Houghton 

Ilur.jn 

Ingham 

lonia 

li'.ic.  

Jackson 

Kalauial..u ... 

Kent 

Lenawee 

Livingston 

Macliiaw 

.Macomb 

.Maul tee 

Manltou 

Marquette „ 

.Mason 

.Mecosta 

Midland 

 loiiroe 

.Montcalm „ 

Muskeijon 

Newd^Ko 

Uak'an.l 

Oceana 

I.sbella 

Outuuaitou 

Ottawa 

Saginaw 

Sanilac 

Shiawassee 

bl Clair 

gt. Joseph 

Tuscola _ 

Van Buren ...mm 

Washtenaw 

Wayne 

ToUl „ 

Lincoln over I ouirlas, 



Dtm. 
D0U3. 
1544 

rs 
Idas 

324 
2C7 
15.58 
2449 
1624 
74 
89 
1273 
13 '8 

168 
19»  

198 

314 
1719 

2II» 
1-38 
1294 
41 
:596 
2031 
2640 
1222 
3510 
2003 
89 
2i k  
1.8 
67 



(^RtoR. Dtm. 
Bell. Breck. 



OHIO 

Cbull iM. Htp. Dtm. 

Lincoln. Doutr. 

A.lAus 1667 2010 

Allen „.. 1796 1882 

Ashland (16» 17»t 

AshUbula 5.566 860 

Athens _ 2.526 1491 

Auglalto III89 1H36 

Belmont - 2675 1450 

Brown 2105 30n6 

Butler 2 «7 4ir« 

Carroll ™ 1767 10(3 

(!hampa'gn 2125 ISIO 

asrk.. 3017 1730 

Clermont 296.5 S2i» 

Cllntcn 2133 1 464 

l^jlumblana. 3864 2130 

Co hocton...„_ (IIIO 2 99 

Craw lord 2064 :75J 

CuMthoga _„ 8686 4811 

Darke ..^ 2160 2479 

Penance KCVt 1304 

Uelawaru 2 99 1967 

Krie 2886 l&V 

Kalrlleld _ 2178 3219 

PavelM _ )4.w 1121 

Franklin 4295 4846 

Fulton. 1629 9p1 

aallia isfll 1472 

Oeauga. 2877 677 

Oreen Sm 1751 

Uncrnaey (610 1933 

Hamilton 1(182 151.31 

Hancock _ 2135 2.101 

lUrdln 14:t2 1198 

Harrison 2175 r/» 

Henry 808 1039 

Highland _ 2409 2272 

Hocking 1329 1781 

Uolmea 1392 2281 

Huron 4107 2083 

Jackson 1738 14.36 

Jetleraon 26n2 1163 

Kno\ _ 2860 2060 

l ake 2521 622 

Lawrence - IbOl 1147 

Licking 3301 3154 

lx)«an 2413 1512 

Loralne 4045 1766 

Lucas - 2889 1 20 

MsulUon 1417 11)16 

HehonlDg 2907 1990 

Marlon 15m5 I6411 

Medina 3oi.  1765 

Meigs 2«Jf9 1699 

Mercer 832 1908 

Miami (431 2:137 

Monroe 1335 3447 

Montgomery 4974 4 In 

Morgan 2445 1767 

Mi rn.w 22tX) 1923 

MuHkluguni 4O01 3,55" 

N..be 1944 I.;i7 

Ottawgy 571 6vJ 

Paulding 551 391 

Perry li'/i^i 'a' ' 

Pickaway .V 

Pike 

Portage 

KIchl.ii.a '..Z7 'ai'j 

Roas , 3 i43 

Sandusky l*M 

t cKMil. (1 6 

Seneca „. (062 

Sbelby. 1597 

Statke 4C6« 

Summit 3607 

T.umbuU 4349 

I'uscarawaa - 3i: 6 

Union 1792 

Ven-Werl. _ 1015 

Vinton 1246 

Warren S316 

Waahlngton 3169 

Wayne S»'i 

Wllliama : 1713 



Unif^n. Dtm. 
Bell. Breck. 



131 
21 
34 

77 
36 
22 

nil 

218 
184 
28 
264 
int 
2119 
711 
96 
( 
18 
76 
42 
8 
2S 
JS 
155 
2S7 
119 
3 
190 
17 
124 

S6«5 
16 
54 
45 

8 
475 

12 

3 
37 
1*0 
79 
98 
18 
19S 
151 

too 

47 
121 
171 



5 

215 
2 

39 
142 
179 

2U 

22 
39  

52 
1 



39 
29 
496 
342 
43 
69 
1289 
91 
156 
113 
f.2 
104 
57 
15 
306 
217 
117 
(3:1 
16 
14 
46 
»•  
201 
46 
7- 
26 
37 
S3 
35 
54 
366 
24 
.32 
637 
3 
157 

4.5 
52 
15 

703 

524 
87 
76 

U4 
17 

168 
79 
68 

132 
13 
58 
7 
6 
39 
47 
72 
66 
3^ 

157 
91 
23 



WISCONSIN. 



(  iiin'ie . 

Adams 

Ashland 

llod Ax 

Brown , 

BulTalo 

Burnet 

Calumet 

Chlptiew* 

Clarke 

(.'oluiilbia 

Crawford 

Ilallas 

Dane 

Dodge 

lloor 

DoUKlaa 

Dunn 

Kail Claire , 

Fond du Ijac ... 

(trant 

Un'en 

Orccii Lake .... 

Iowa M 

.lack-Son 

.leilcrson 

Juneau 

Keiio^iha 

Kewaunee 

Lacrosse 

Lafayette 

1 apolnte 

ManUowo - 

.Maralhau 

Mifquelte 

.MUuankee 

Monroe 

Ocotito 

Outagamie 

Or.aukee 

Pepin 

Pierce 

I'oU 

Portage 

Kaclue 

KIchland 

Kock 

."auk 

■Shawansw 

ShetKivgan 

St. Croix 

Trenipeleau .... 

IVrtI worth 

WajihlngtoB ... 

Waukesha 

Waupacca 

Waushara 

Wlnnabigo . 
Wo ■ 



Krp. 

Lincoln. 
M4 
3j 
114.5 
873 
41« 



Dtm. 
I*oug. 

? i 

32 
465 
1239 
H9 



t'nion. 
Bell. 



Dtm. 
Breck. 



No rclam. 
106 i4» 
(V 211 
152 09 

(2S6 16)4 
828 M2 

No retnta. 



Vood 



4798 
4398 

2i0 
70 

.Vit 

490 
4llV  
1579 
2372 
I9-.7 
1909 

IV. I 
3077 
l«33 

l-a7 

33l'  
1477 
1736 
43 
1041 
219 
I*! 
4831 
1229 
5*1 
8(2 
6(7 
3W 
C87 
199 
944 

1167 
51 8 
23119 

1.3 
(731 

664 

490 
39IU 

939 
3-20 
1340 
liM 
Va'y 

362 



4174 
44.56 



ToUl . 
Lincoln   



Ml 10 

iver liouglma, 21.1^- 



341 
342 
3001 
19 2 
1324 
71-8 

isrn 



737 
9a) 



1*4; 
4^1 



1823 
IM 
4il 

121 
471 

HI6 
» '. 
114 
2179 
.,97 
134 
IMI 
2:47 
S5«3 
575 
405 
lHi9 
391 

».VI»I 



1 

12 



Wood . 
Wyandotte . 



2011 
. 1567 



173- 
UTS 
3135 

■im 

CilS 
17MI 
3175 
11)69 

»4in 

17»5 
1672 
2S»h 
II 4-. 
9.' l 
1731 
2011 
(060 
32.'J3 
1180 
1.330 
1670 




MISSOirRI. 



77 
305 
10 
352 
4.3 
24 
13 
11 
17 
8 
153 
4 
23 
122 
175 



3 

115 

272 
13 
40 
70 
17 

774 
97 

21.5 
71 

1:16 
I'. 
23 
21 
13 

11} 
94 
14 
20 



Total 211610 

Lincoln over Douglas, 44378. 



167(32 12194 11405 



MISSISSIPPI. 



Obunius. 

Adams «.. 

Amite _ 

Mt4kla 

Bolivar 

(^Ihoun 

Carroll 

Clall ome 

Clark 

Chickasaw 

Choctaw 

Coahoma 

( iplah , 

Covington 

DeSoto 

Franklin 

Ore ue 

Hancock „ 

Harrison 

Hlnda 

Holmes 

Issaquena 

Itawamba 

Jackson 

Jas|.er ., 

Jetleraon 

Jones M, 

Kemper 

LtCayctte 

Ijaudordale 

Ijawrence 

Leake 

Lowndes 

Madison » 

.Marlon 

5iarshall 

.Monroe 

Neshoba 

Newion 

Noxubee 

llctlbbelui „ 

Panola 

Perry 

Pike 

font. 'to.- 

Rankin 

scoit 

Simpson 

Smith 

SiiuUower 

Tallahatchie 

Tippah 

Ttiihemlugo 

'INintca 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Wilkinson „ 

Winston 

Yalobusha 

Vazoo 



Union. 
Bell. 
4K 
383 
525 
277 
355 
788 
(63 
343 
538 
642 
21U 
(38 
106 
M6 
156 

45 

47 

88 
1108 

m 

133 
727 

25 
(61 
(6t 

96 
499 
6-6 
353 
146 
363 
676 

ta* 

s 35 
1098 
612 
162 
217 
44( 
259 
Too 
105 
221 
gIS 
506 
299 
1.16 
(34 
134 



25040 



Dtm. 
Breck. 
376 
427 

1030 
218 
791 

IIM 
. 421 
904 

11171 

1334 
157 

1052 
391 
745 
335 
250 
(57 
4(0 

lal5 
784 
104 

16M 
31'. 
712 
333 
264 
6s9 

1034 
951 
840 
690 
929 
627 
298 

1119 

1273 
7.32 
634 
701 
746 
551 
(01 
831 

1512 
67ti 
1.93 
370 
517 
173 
285 

1466 

1748 
1:2 
660 
180 
160 
404 
800 
919 
688 

40797 



Dem. 
Doug. 
158 
3 
6 
12 
54 
II 
26 
76 
33 
25 
41 
14 
8 
4111 
3 



40 

9 
6 
63 
17 
l- 
49 

69 
114 
142 



3'i 
17 
2 

(f.'J 
49 
10 
29 
57 
20 

lf . 



339 
11 
8 

:i 



33 

254 

3*13 



Total 

Breckinridge's nukjorlty o»er Bell. 15,767; over toth, 
12,174. 



IOWA. 




Broome., 

t:aturaugus 

Cayuga 

ChautauquiL...» 

Chemung 

Chenango 

Clliiti.n „.. 

Columbia 

Cortland .»....,...„,. 

Delaware 

Dutchess 

Krle 

K-ssex _ 

Fiaiiklln 

Fulton and Ualulltoo... 

llenessee 

Greene 

if. rklmer 

JellVrson 

Kings 

Lewis „ 

Livingston 

Madison 

Monroe....... 

.Montgomery , 

New York 

Niagara «»...... 

Oncloa , 

Oiionilega 

Ontario 

Oraoge 

Orleans 

Oswego 

Ot«eKO 

IhitDani 

queens „ ». 

H.i|.«elaer 

KIclimolid w 

Hocklaud 

riarstogu 

Schenectady 

^cl)oha^le 

Schn.vler , 

Seneca 

Steuben 

St. Lawrence 

SuOulk , 

Sullivan 

Tlosa „ 

Tompkins .* 

Ulster 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Westchester 

Wvoinlng 

Vales 



3961 
5)08 

5001 
6763 
124111 
3454 
3103 
3111 
4164 

3i;c 

i302 
8796 

ljw(3 
32.57 
5178 
6289 

19808 
liW 

1129l  
4992 

12W 

l!243 
4764 
 l9ii 

38:« 

9076 
6.^3 
1963 
3749 
H4r.t 
1408 
14IU 
.590(1 
21.54 
3279 
t55l 

3iri  
S'OI) 
11324 
3756 
2944 
3760 
4349 
6775 
2710 
SI73 
I I6S 
6771 
4498 
(014 

3611646 



:tf,73 
247 s 
5665 
3270 
1122 

3212 
6071 

l -6«5 
17H3 
1402 
2897 
24.16 
3534 
.3382 
55:11 

2n5p3 
2271 
32M 
32IS 
7391 
3151 

62293 
7341 

m 

6011 
2246 
5411 
jlsil 
IW 
4:192 
8421 
2370 
ZI69 
4552 
1994 
4218 
1703 
2990 
5 23 
4007 
3519 
3170 
274:1 
30»i 
6252 
1971) 
3482 

:)93i' 

8081 
2390 
146 . 

312510 



ToUl 

.Majority lor Lincoln, 5Ui3 .. 
•A union of the friends of Breckinridge, Douglas and 
BeU. 



CALIFORNIA. 



Bueiia VIstii 

Calhonn 

Carroll 

Cass 

Cedar 

Cerro Oordo . 
Cherokee .... 
Chlcka-saw .... 

Clarke 

Ctay ...„„ 

Cl.ylon 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Dallas .,.„„.. 

Davis 

D.catur 

l eluware .... 
Desmolnes .... 
Dickinson ... 
Dubuque 

Kmmet 

Favelte 

Floyd 

Franklin 

Fieniout 

Oreeiie 

Oruiidy 

Oiiltirte 

Hamilton 

Hancock. 

Hardin 

Harrison 

Henry 

llowart - 

Humboldt .... 

Ma , 

Iowa 

Jackscn ...„ 

Jasper 

Jett'erson 

Johnson 

Jones 

Keokuk 

Kossutb 

l.ee 

Linn 

Louisa 

Lucas , 

.Madlsou ....M. 
Mahaska .... . 

Marlon 

Marshall 

.Mills 

Miuhell 

.Monona 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Muscatine .... 

O'Bilen 

Page 

Palo Alto .... 
Plymouth .... 
Pocahontas .. 

Polk 

PoUwatomIe 
Poweshiek ... 

Ringgold 

Sac 

Scott 

Sholby 

Sioux 

.Itory 

Tama 

Taylor ^, 

Union 

Van Buren ... 

Wapello 

5VarTen 

Washing! 'U . 

Wayne 

Webster 

Winnebago .. 
Winneshiek . 
Woodbury ... 

Worth 

W right 

Total 



19 
25 
167 
1518 
157 
10 
550 
C92 
8 

20 ^9 
1974 
47 
612 
843 
680 
1 68 
1997 
46 
2092 
36 

ri29 

960 
228 
402 
121 
141 
326 
224 
29 
713 
385 
2148 
386 
55 
4 

782 
1174 

law 

1463 
1804 
1453 
13.30 
64 
2617 
r22« 
1^09 
58*'. 
737 
lii39 
1508 
8.54 
441 
.Wl 
109 
879 
152 
1.S40 



4 

32 
21 
13U3 
41( 
721 
348 
13 
S739 
100 
3 
418 
775 
153 
198 
1667 
1399 
1152 
1724 
579 
253 
24 
1382 
129 

m 

9S 



20 
26 
135 
963 
59 
3 
306 
445 
13 
1574 
1450 
31 
43:1 
1424 

769 
1677 

7 

30'. 9 

e3J 
2111 

i 9 
516 
145 

19 
3»1 
IIU 
4 

1S2 
3.7 
I l i 
273 



1405 
650 
1245 
1448 
11197 
1195 
I* 
(632 
1289 
739 
483 
764 
1112 
161 17 
403 
327 
172 



66 — 



29 
2 



5 
51 

6 
226 
11 
20 
1.56 



I 

66 



II 
40 

13 
38 
111 



136 
80 

26 



16 
14 
1 



89 — 



749 
81 
1285 
10 
290 
29 
6 
10 
1074 
410 
4M 
H2 
3( 
1377 
1.4 
10 
333 
413 
248 
(08 
1552 
|6«6 
795 
luj7 
648 
207 
21 
TsO 
117 
30 
20 



.5 
2 
109 
3 
10 



37 
28 
t 



( 

7 

19 
22 
40 
60 
7 
1 



70409 551 ir 1763 



Lincoln over Douglas, 15,293. 



MINNESOTA. 



Anoka 

Benton 

H ue Eartb.. 



79 
(3 

816 
48 

161 
6 
67 
33 



2 
24 



3 
38 
7 
6 
23 



No return. 



49 

55 
43 
2165 
361 
241 
2u: 
3768 
158 
131 
300 
1217 
1206 
396 
1221 
1955 
19eO 

■no 

1274 
3630 
6701 

64057 



7 

19 



25 
139 



405 



8 
9 

37 
21 

26 
f6 
102 



tlou.:oii 

Isanti 

Jackson ■ 

KandlyobI 

Kannabec 

Le Sueur 

McLeod 

Martin 

Meeker 

Mlile Lac „...„ 

Morrison » 

Mower 

Monongalia 

Mcollet 

I'lmstead 

Otter Tall 

Pine 

Kamsey 

KenvlUe 

KIce 

St. Louis 

Scott 

Sherburne ...„..m.« 

SIbey 

SUarus 

Blee'c 

Toombs 

Wabaahaw 

Waseca i... 

Warhlngton 

Winona 

Wright 

Total' 

Uoroln over Douglas, 



Rtp. 
Lincoln. 



904 
S7» 



'9* 
41 

13 

15 
566 
240 

40 

166 

53 
501 

42 
461 
1*48 



1233 , 
69 
(96 
40 

:.23 

120 
397 
438 
521 

izii 

304 

753 
1291 
572 

2»;09 



Dtm. Dtm. 
Douglas. Breck 
l.'U 9 



374 
91 
3J4 



429 

05 
■■22 



.555 
61 
6 
83 
1 

9:1 
194 

17 
291 
404 
6 

1107 

41 
503 

22 
642 

58 
1S4 
482 • 
157 
3 
(fiO 
143 
422 
571 
1.V1 



Cbunfief. 

Alameia. 

Ainatior 

Butte 

Calaveras 

C jlusa 

Contra CosU... 

t)el Norte. 

al Dorado 

Fr.sno 

Ilumbolilt 

Klamath 

Los Angeles. 

Marin 

Mariposa 

.Menilocliiu 

Merced 

-Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

S. Bernardino.. 

San Diego 

S. Francisco 

San JaiKtuln 

S. Luis ubispo.. 

Sun Mateo 

S. Barh.ra. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra. 

Blsklyou 

Holouo 

Sonoma. 

Stai.l-uiK 



l*ooluuine 

Yolo 

Yuba 



Rep. 
Lincoln. 
103S 

995 
1436 

977 

250 

612 

174 
2118 
53 

(35 
92 

.l' 2 

4118 

261 

198 
39 

307 

440 
2536 
1742 

458 
(6711 

307 
81 
6834 
IMl 

lis 

389 
46 

1465 
671 
464 

14* s 

963 

6S0 
1(36 

167 



W,34 
534 
1666 



Dtm. 
Dong. 
513 

18«6 
1502 

H75 

I 

12 
445 

377 

494 

282 

4U) 

235 
47 

(33 

518 
2372 
1367 

503 
2k3I 

221 
2) 

4ino 
7SJ 
12! 
513 
305 
881 

aa 

lOM 
1641 
1504 
(02 

?30 
14) 
ft 



Union. 
Bell 

6( 
178 
320 
240 

70 

i:«i 

39 
2tl6 
123 

20 

36 
»)1 

38 
319 
166 

63 
5 
141 
4113 
776 
211 
352 

98 
8 
944 
, 199 

41 

110 
129 
252 
39U 
517 
292 
435 
66 

318 
15( 



496 

1360 



ToUl 39173 

Lincoln over Dougias, 657. 



26 
IM 



6817 



Dtm 
Breck. 

4H1 

945 
1172 
1717 
392 
391 
217 
1907 
272 
2S2 
163 
686 
185 
815 
499 
213 
216 
B79 
1651 
1447 
453 
169" 
192 
148 
25611 
1374 
150 
130 
123 
722 
319 
581 
1319 
760 
745 
14t.7 
433 
440 
316 
593 

»i 
6.. 

i6;t 
34334 



ALABAMA. 



Cbuntier. 

Anuuga 

Barboor .. 

Bibb - 

Baldwin . 

Blonul _ 

Butler 

Calhoun 

Covliurton 

Chsmbera 

Cherokee 

Clarke 

C'losa 

L'hocktaw 

Conecuh 

Coifce 

Dale 

Dallas - 

De Kalb 

Frankl n 

Fayette 

Greene. 

Henry 

Jackson 

JelTerson.... 

Lawrence 

Lauilerdale 

Limestone..... 

I.owndes 

Marengo. 

Morgan 

Madison - 

.Monroe 

Marlon. _. 

Marsha 1 

Montgouiery 

.Mobile 

Macon 

Perry 

like.. 



Pli'keni.. 

BUS 



us.sell . 

Randolph 

Shelby - 

St. Clair 

Sumter 

Turcaloosa ~. - 

TalUdega 

Tallapoosa 

Walker 

Washington ~ 

Wlleox 

Winston - 

ToUl 

Breckinridge over Bell, 2ii.9;«. 



Union. 
Bell. 

256 

2H 

11179 
364 
416 
918 
5(7 
255 
706 
473 
334 
391 
277 
(24 
S»l 
715 
369 
765 
317 
130 
(45 
525 
444 
J6  
H2 
112 
144 
400 
64( 
197 
165 
1UJ4 
»» 
UIO 
791 
ir27 
M 
854 
."W 

sia 

174 

473 
1023 
1091 
1270 
103 
155 
355 
. 40 

(7875 



Drm. 
Breck. 
611 

1715 
013 
129 
61H 
918 ■ 

2347 
404 

1017 

1706 
952 
930 
542 
15H 
878 

1280 

m 

849 

902 
1299 

696 
1109 
1760 

831 

370 
70« 
522 
1007 
HIS 
.549 
591 
l.V» 
9.S6 
441 
1.'.55 
1.^41 

1184 
^92 
1581 
1(11 
993 
1734 
853 
963 
68i 
1219 
1»17 
1451 
446 

176 

U3 
(OS 

4.SS31 



Dem. 
DoU7. 

(92 

6 
l'v5 
Hi 
4.SH 

111 

54 
12 

157 
223 



339 
202 
460 
37 
157 



56.'. 

77 
571. 
790 
3. '5 

57 

6.! 
545 
13J0 
222 

62 
763 
133 
l-sj:! 

4  
99 
81 

16 

5.1 
34.1 
Us6 
210 
136 
23 
71 
(98 

xa 

21 

113 
147 



PENNSYLVANIA. 



125 
15 



NEW JERSEY, 



Oiuntiet. 

Ailantlc 

Bergen 

Burlington 

Camden u 

Cape May 

Cumberland 

Hssex 

Qlouceater 

Huilson 

Hunterdon 

Mercer 

Middlesex 

Monmouth 

Morris 

Oc€an 

Pasaalc 

Salem 

Sussex 

Somerset 

Union 

Warren 

Total — .. 

Majority fur Fusion. 4,477 



H,i  
Lincoln. 
1109 
1458 
5269 
(483 
680 
2!13 
Ml( 
1953 
3491 
(827 
367* 
29(1 
3096 
31.S4 
1.198 
2sl4 
2226 
1768 
1959 
2197 
(401 

(8321 



Fuiion. 
Breck. etc. 

7' 4 
2092 
403i. 
2643 

520 
\iM 
9711 
14711 
5150 
39S4 
3:iM 
31)116 

40?9 
3.112 
701 
(416 

1973 

■l -ir, 
2297 
2736 
3226 

62.S01 



Counties. 

Adams. 

Allegheny 

Armstrong..... 

Beaver 

Beilford 

Berks. 

Blair 

Bradford 

Bucka..„ 

Butler. 

Cambria 

Carbon......... 

Ontre 

Chester........ 

Clarloo 

Uearlleld 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Crawford 

C^iniberlaiid .. 

DauphllL 

Delaware. 

Elk 

Krle 

Fayette 

Forest 

FrankUn...... 

Fnlton 

lirevur 

Hnn^^jiton. 
In'llana . . 



Lehigh 

Luzerne 

Lycoming 

8fcke»n._ 

Mercer. 

Mifflin 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

.Montour. 

Northampton 

Northumberland ... 

Perry 

Philadelphia 

Pike 

Potter 

Schuylkill 

•nyder 

Somerset 

Sullivan 

Susquehanna. 

Tioga 



Lincoln. 
... 2.724 
...16,725 
.... 3.'65 
.... 2.824 
.... 2,505 
.... 6.709 
... 3,030 
.... 7,091 
.... 6,443 
... 3,640 
.... (,»77 
.... 1,758 
.... S.Oil 
.... 7,771 
. ... Iji29 
.... 1,702 

1,736 

.... 1,873 
.... 6,779 
... 3,.5«3 

4,.531 

.... 5,131 
.... 407 
... 6,160 

3 4.54 

.... 107 
... 4.1.51 
... 788 
.... 1,614 
.... (,0(( 
.... S 910 



Fuslon. Dougli 
2,644 
6.725 
2.106 
1,621 
2,224 
8,54« 
1,275 
2,184 
5.174 
2.332 
1,648 
1,301 

™,008 
(,078 
1,836 
1,244 
2,3-6 
2.961 
3 183 
2.392 
1.3(0 
523 
3.531 
3,3(18 
47 
(,515 
911 
2.665 
1,(22 
1.147 



r 

523 
5 
4 
14 
4(0 
23« 
9 
487 
13 
110 
36* 
U 
(«( 



72 
86 
«2 
26 
195 
152 

17 
24 



BeM. 
38 

570 
SI 
58 
86 

137 

397 
22 
95 
22 

121 
21 
16 

(02 
12 



14 

22 
117 
169 
(88 

90 
147 



Cnuntitt. 

Adair 

Andn w 

Atchison 

Audrain ......... 

Barry 

Barton 

Bates 

Benton 

Bollinger 

Booie 

Bui haiian 

B- tier 

Caldwell 

Ca loway 

Camilen 

Cape Girardeau.. 

Carroll 

Barter 

Cass „, 

Cedar 

Cliarlton 

Christian 

Clark 

Clay 

Cllutun 

0. 1e 

Cooper 

Crawford 

Ds'la _ 

Dallas 

DavU as 

Dent 

D.K4lb 

Dunklin............ 

Doug la. 

Franklhi 

Ga.S4 i^nade.. 

Gentry 

Green...... 

Grnndv 

Harrison. 

Henry 

Hickory - 

Ho.t 

Howarl 

Howell „ 

Iron „ 

JackaoD 

Jasper 

Jeflen-on 

Johnson ... ....... 

Knox 

Laclede 

Lafayette..... 

Lawrence 

Lewis 

Llncfdn „ 

l.lnii 

1. U ingston 

McDonald _ 

Jl.w.n 

MadlsoQ 

Maries 

Marlon 



.New Madrid , 

Newton 

Nodaway 

Oregon , 

Osage 

Ozark 

Pemiscot..... 

Perrv 

Pettis 

Phelps 

Pike. 

Platte 

Polk 

Pulaski ^ 

Pu'nam ,. 

Ralls „ _ 

Ran.lol oh . ...„...'... 

Rav 

Revuolds 

Ripley 

St. Charles 

St. Clalr 

St. FrancoU 

St. Qeiievleve 

St. Lou's 

Saline 

SchU) ler...„,„...„ 

Scotland 

Scott 

Shannon. 

Shelby 

Stoddard „ 

Stone . 



Rep. 
Lincoln, 
is* 
97 
68 
I 
1 
» 
.« 
74 
(3 
12 
452 
I 

43 
15 

6 
175 

3 

23 



„ 277 

r."!'.l 11 

114 

(0 

13 

8 

(0 

33 



Vnt'in 
Bell. 

29! 
«77 
ll 5 
580 
333 
76 
3S6 
306 

1671 

la-7 
88 
367 

1306 
.324 
651 
562 
16 
715 
266 
r.is 
342 
732 

104.5 
674 
226 
952 
IVi 
406 
2^ 
545 
243 
343 
(U9 



Htm. 
Breck. 
;i39 
:4I9 
63 
366 
286 
93 
348 
100 

99 
852 
611 

17 
146 
472 

133 
325 
276 
Kl 

m 

277 
19i'i 
■JtK 
497 
3Uj 
314 
4^7 
»1 
192 
:405 
172 
269 
:tl8 
213 
79 



494 

483 
»'l 
41 

1(9 

297 
16 
15 

202 
1 

108 
191 

38 
14* 

18 
1(1 
« 

43 

3 

iS» 

m 



With Onrk. 



T 



4S  
18 

147 

2 

338 



Sullivan 

Taney 

Texas 

Vernon 

Warren 

Washington 

Way no 

Webster 

Wilght 

Total 

Douglas over Bell, 42*. 



139 
* 
37 
15 
8 
4 
7 
111 
1 

* 
4 

5*4 

I 

19 
43 
9»45 

14 
1(7 

6 
2 
90 



95 
28 
3 



577 
157 
517 
9S6 
307 
319 
7uS 
197 
348 
9'20 
176 
194 

1173 
424 
416 

1234 
.52J 
335 

1577 
415 
833 
725 
546 
678 



1 

»8 

321 
223 
4 6 
(65 
15 

too 

69 
154 

217 
(15 
199 
1300 
1208 
7(0 
«( 
S«9 
585 
821 
1006 
38 
74 
(19 
338 
421 

4Sii 
1035 
W 
43« 
(43 
38 

31 
373 

43 
194 
2117 
307 
493 
243 
335 
123 



108 
51 

2: 9 

414 

100 

so 

232 
143 
171 
147 
91 
36 
»I3 
192 
1.55 
627 
301 

fit 
5I  

697 
.396 
219 

in 

411 
98 



204 
160 
255 
(74 



155 
70 
63 
(II 
4»l 
421 
877 

477 
(81 
2M 
149 

520 
233 

85 
232 

H 
294 
141 

:i 

610 

366 
251 
197 
192 
327 
993 
195 
112 
675 
287 
511 
381 
89 
62 
291 
376 
369 



Dtm. 

Doug. 
616 
819 
645 
2s9 
2" 
107 
511 
574 
251) 
578 
11.21. 
2.15 
2r.3 
839 
3r 9 
513 

4 

212 
321 
692 
1211 
.542 



|i:f 
2 i 
22.5 
1.92 
207 
239 
130 

8.S8 
18N 
873 

416 
910 
«23 
298 
453 
939 
136 
3(9 
I19;. 
407 
49(1 
617 
(S7 
1^ 
774 
13s 
468 
81 St 
b2\ 
«itl 

ii " 



Arcomar. 

AlDeiiiarle 

AlcxAiidrla. 

A lies ha II y 

Amelia 

AniherAt 

A|ipoin;itox.....H 

AUKll-I;i 

Itarbour.. 

B»th 

B Hlford 

Berkeley „ 

Booiio 

B(Jtetonrt 

Itraxton 

Hro.ik.^ 

Bniiiswiclt 

Kut-klnicltam 

B'lr] anan 

ChIk-11 

Calhoun 

Canii !: !.| 

Caroline ; 

Crtrroil ^..^ 

- ''ity 

V ..I. r^■ 

Clav „ 

Craig 

Calpeper 

Cumt erland 

Dinwlt'.Ue 

Ihjrl.lrWue 

KlizaU-lhClty... 

Kwtex 

Fairfax „. 

Fauquier..... 

Fayevte 

Floyd 

Fluvanna 

Franklin 

Frederick 

Ulles 

liilmer 

01.jur.i3t«;r 

Q004 Itiand 

(Jraysori 

Greenbrier...™ 

Orei-iu) , 

(Jreeii.vlll*^ 

Ifalllax 

Hiiuipshlre , 

IlanovtT 

Iltncock. «.... 

Hardy , 

Harrison 

HenrlcQ 

Htu'v 

HlchUnd... 



VIRGINIA. 

Stp. 
Lincoln. 
00 



rniDAY MORNINO.. 



MARCH I. l((l. 



117 
Is54 
5(6 

ti 
3» 

81 
119 
4S7 
369 
(51 
1117 
845 
125 
107 
5911 
.391 
■JtO 
K-\ 
13 

7.S 
R32 
341 

351 
921.1 
561 
455 
7(1 
215 

230 
83 
557 
97 
61 
151 
5|il 
635 
185 



170(8 «n72 31317 :8801 



Cbun.'(€i. 



Appling 

Baker 

Bal.lwin 

Banks 

Berrien 

Bibb 

B ooks 

Bryan 

Bulloch 

Burke _ 

Butts. 

Calhoun 

Camden 

Campbell 

Carroll 

Cass 

Catoosa 

Charlton 

Chatham 

C-atuhiKichee.. 

Ch.itiooga 

Cherokee 

Clarke 

Cloy 

CUytou 

Cinch 

Cobb 

Cortee 

Co umbia 

Colquitt 

Coweta 

(.'rawford. ........ 

Dade 

Dawson , 

Decatur 

DeKalb 

I ooley 

Douuherty 

F:arly 

Fchols 

Kdlngham 

Knianuel 

Klbert 

Fannin 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Franklin 

Forsyth 

Fulton 

Ollmer _ 

Glascock 

Glynn , 

Gorilou 

Greene...,...^* 



GEORGIA. 

Cnifm. 
Bell. 

112 

114 

»l 

(S 

(1» 

(80 

(81 

75 

„ 7 

, (11 



9( 
(5 
4I( 

(08 
(13 

338 
141 

5(8 
226 
4(6 
446 
W6 
346 
312 
115 
583 
30 
336 
67 
5 I 
107 
177 
92 
519 
415 
249 
(77 
123 
25 
203 
241 
291 
110 
301 
848 
137 
364 
1195 
122 
14 
17 
481 
JUL 
451 
I2i 
402 



Dem. 

Breck. 
287 
25* 



(18 

80* 
(36 

173 
5*7- 
4C8 
(09 
230 
(97 
785 

1(94 

105( 
382 
43 

1812 
303 
287 
854 
491 
286 
197 
106 

1377 
93 
67 
115 
895 
37« 
2.'.9 
338 
579 
636 
3(8 
371 
294 
87 
(08 
210 
110 

SCO 

472 
756 
726 
631 
1018 
7M) 



Dtm. 
Doug. 
I 
2 
»5 
10 
1 

313 
4 



(56 

37 



33.1 
74 

320 
19 

152 

4(4 
57 
12 

103 
6 
51 
14 

363 
1 

2 
23 
(( 

64 

23 
26 
1 

3 
42 
457 
100 
28 
(86 

47 
»47 

:i3 
17.5 



Lo»(ull. 

I jiinliMin , 

LoulSK 

Lunenburg 

Miidlson 

Marlon. 

.Marshall 

.Mason 

Mathews 

McDuw.-ll 

.Mecklenburg 

M'Tcr 

Middlesex 

Monongalia. 

Monroe 

Montgomery.... Jha 

.Morgan 7... 

Nanseniond 

Nelson 

.New Kent 

Nicholas .... 

Norfolk Cits 

Norfolk County.... 

Northampton 

Norihuniberlaud .. 

Nottoway 

Ohio 

Orange ..«..«... 

!;«ge 

Patrick 

Prtidleton 

Petersburg 

Pittsylvania 

Pleasants 

Pocahontas 

Portsmouth 

Powhattan 

Preston 

Princess Ann , 

l^lnce Kilward... 

l*rllKe George 

Prince William..., 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Raleigh „ 

Randolph 

Rapiiahannock 

Rlchmon 1 City 

HlchniondCoiinty 

Kllchle 

Reaiie 

Koanoke 

Rockliri'lge 

Rockingham 

Russell 

Scott 

Shenandoah. 

Sniylh 

Southampton 

Spottsylvanla. 

Stattord 

Surry , 

Sus ex 

Taylor 

Tatewell 

Tucker - 

Tyler 

Ijwihur 

55 arren 

Warwick 

Washington 

Wayne 

Webster 

Westmoreland ... 

Wetiel 

Williamsburg 

Wirt 

Wise 

Wood 

Wyoming 

Wythe 

York 

Total.. 




1929 



Bell over Breckinridge, 358. 



74333 



NORTH CAROLINA. 



Qin'i(i .«, 

Alamance 

Alleghany 

Alexander 

Auson. 

Ashe 

B'-aufort 

Bertie 

Bladen , 

Brunswick 

Burke 

Buncombe 



t'Mton. 
Bell. 
6 .l 

 o return, 
471 
ttl 
717 
1081 
597 

'i'hrown oat. 
?86 
447 

7115 

-10 



Dem. 
Breck. 

;•:!(■. 

403 

245 
22-J 



l em. 
Doug. 
.36 



— ...oi^ 



Harris... 

Hart 

Heard 

Henry «... 

Houston 

Irwiu 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jetlcrson 

Johni^on 

Jones 

Liberty 

Laurens 

Lee 

Lincoln 

Lowndes 

Lumpkin 

.Mscon 

.Madlsou 

Marion 

Mcintosh 

Meriwether .... 

Miller 

Milton 

.Miti hen 

.Monroe 

Montgomery..., 

Morgan 

Muiray ......... 

Mnscogree 

Newton 

Ogletborpe 

Paulding 

Pickens 

Pierce 

Pike 

Polk 

BulaskI 

Putnam , 

(Quitman 

Kabun 

Raululph 

Rlcliuioud...„, 

S. I.ley 

Scrlveu 

Spalding 

Stewart 

Sn inter 

Talbot 

Taliaferro 

Tatnall 

Taylor _ 

Telfair 

Terrell 

Thomas , 

Towns 

Troup 

Twlgga 

Union 

Upson 

Walker 

Walton 

Ware 

Warren 

Washington.... 

Wavne , 

Welister 

White 

WhIteaeM 

Wilcox 

Wllkea 

Wilkinson ..... 
Worth 



Total 

Breckinridge over BeU. 9003 



& 9 
151 
(80 
658 
5 v 
19 
4«8 
((* 
362 
Utt 
214 
145 
4(8 
221 
170 
(31 
(•3 
4M 

m 
at 
» 

537 
(S 
M 
14« 
«8 
(M 
Ml 
((4 
TW 

no 

(47 
IM 
IM 

7» 

«(r 
(45 



1*7 
11 

(04 
(4* 
234 

in 

KO 
484 
*»4 

506 
173 
•B 
(SI 
1(7 
(87 
4*9 
101 

«70 
181 
218 
•19 
655 
574 

34 
(40 
(0* 

37 
(93 
151 
4(0 

19 
. kX 
354 
1(2 

4288( 



482 
4)9 
62S 
i55 

74 
675 
(51 

«7 
117 
235 
2S8 
128 
(41 

34 
314 
31* 
271 
(7* 
921 
175 
•14 
(31 
417 

an 

464 

40 
103 
422 
769 
» 4 
241 
781 
451 
Zil 



L51 
(87 
353 
5*7 
403 
172 
343 
59« 
538 

am 

4Q8 
2(0 
313 
(83 

98 
(27 
402 
192 
402 
330 
471 
(79 
480 
555 
215 

55 
312 
134 
242 
220 
747 
(54 
(66 
484 
361 

51(8* 



I 



326 
470 
(f.2 
445 

2;9 
3 



:io 

90 
62 
54 
31 
2 
108 
174 
326 
96 
14 
21 
:i6 
18 
105 
2 

30 
14 
12 
41 

49 

25 
(4 

.57 

• 

142 
210 
- 160 
351 
188 
39 
45 
1 

15 
48 
.34 

170 
3 
10 
.57 
1062 
65 
34 
27 
18 

131 



«9 
S4 
44 
48 
• 
11 
49 

s^) 

183 
I 

427 

285 

5 
29 
302 

3 
171 
111 

4 



ARKANSAS. 



..... 2,422 

..... 2,;i71 
39,^ 

1,515 

7,561 

1,678 

3,218 

429 

4,470 

4,75« 

Union 1.824 

Venango 2,6-0 

Warren 2,284 

Washington. 4,724 

Wayne (.85 

Westmoreland 4.8:.7 

Wyoming 1, 8*- 

York 5,1* 

ToUL (88,0(0 

Lincoln over Fusion ticket.... 



s 5j. 
2,306 
1,743 
21,619 

(£11 

621 
4.968 

910 
1,175 

497 
2,548 
1,277 

812 
1,932 
1,087 
3,975 
2,618 
4.796 
14(7 
5,4*7 



iiil 
5119 

311 
115 
97 



422 
CO 
I 



II 

28 



171 
72 



178,871 M,765 



12.776 
.88.159 



FLORIDA. 



I ruim. 
Bell. 
... 1*5 



114 

n 



DELAWARE. 



Cbvntur. 

Kent 

New Castle 

Sussex 

JoUL , 



Rep. 
Lincoln. 

1070 

, (074 

671 

Wl» 



Union. 
Bell 
717 
1573 
1574 

3864 



Dtmocratt. 
Breck. Dong. 
(CH7 144 
2999 718 
2351 161 



7337 



1023 



ihUHtitt. 

Alchua 

Brevard 

Calhoun - 

Clay 

Columbia 

Da.le - - 

Duval "• 

KscamMa. — (77 

Franklin _ « 

(lailsden (84 

Hamilton „ Ill 

llernaudo ~ 

lllllsbora' — 

Holmes - 74 

Jackson „«, 4(2 

JelTerson 158 

Lafayette...... .. * 

Le.iu 182 

I.evy r— 

Liberty ;75 

MadlsoIL ...^ f(i 

.Manatee " 

Marlon 9* 

Monroe '60 

Nassau *S 

New River - 7* 

Orange. p 

Putnam p 

St Johns H 

Sumter ............ ^ 

Suwannee (5 

Santa Rosa. 1* 

Taylor ^ 

Volusia 's 

Wakulla „ 1» 

Washington. (7 

Walton. _ 171 

Total fi^yt 

Breckliiiiiigeover B«U, iUOCi 



Dtm. 
Breck. 
•27 



57 
e06 

3(4 

lU 

384 
3*2 
243 



Dem 
Dong. 



115 
113 
487 



511 
21* 

1(0 
311 

144 

177 
151 
1(1 

(4543 



Arkansas ... 

Ashley 

Benton 

Bradly 

Calhoun 

Cairoll 

Chicot ...... 

Clark 

Columbia ... 
Conway ..... 
Crawford .... 
Crltleuden.. 
Craighead ... 
Hills- .., 



KanT... 

Jackson 

Jefferson. 

Johnson 

Lafayette . 

l.awreuce 

 ladtsun 

.Marlon _ 

Mississippi 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

"ewton 

chlta. 

J Wi*lp8.'.'.'.'.'."'.'.".'.".', 



Polk . 
Pope 



isett ... 



Scott _.. 

Searcy - 

Sebastian 

Sevier 

St. Vrancli. 

Uulon 

Van Buren 

Washington 

White 

Yell 

TotaL 

Breckinridge oTer Bell, ^638. 



tMion. 
Bell: 
417 
422 
(26 
440 
(04 
368 
253 
50J 
716 
3I« 
374 
(57 
19( 
371 
(12 



(8 

60 

W8 

(71 

7r 

•0* 

310 
190 
474 
176 
232 
176 
386 

40 

67 
779 

82 
(C6 

51 
10( 

11 
3*6 
•51 
899 

337 
II* 
197 
544 
361 
414 
••3 
2(8 
881 
532 
309 

..20094 



Dem. 
Breck. 

604 
703 
633 
398 
791 
231 
804 
83* 
549 
244 
88 
319 
513 
(87 
772 
««6 

■m 



762 
664 
750 
486 
906 
626 
527 
13 
301 
360 
313 
929 
149 
•19 
(94 
253 
254 
6C3 
673 
619 

556 
(6:1 
376 
.'75 
754 
416 
757 
504 
WH 
602 
533 

28^2 



i'sas. 

Douglas. 
55 
13 

(5J 
36 
28 
26 
28 
•3 

IVi 
52 

357 

178 
I) 



Cleveland 

Columbus 

Craven 

(Tumberland 

Chirrltuck 

Lavldson 

Davie 

I'liptln 

E Igecomb 

Forsyth 

Ftaoklln 

(iaston 

Gates. .„ 

Granville 

Ureene 

Guilford 

Halifax. 

Harnett 

Uaywood 

Henderson 

Hertford ... 

Hyde _ 

Iredell 

Jackson „ 

Johnson 

Jones 

Lincoln 

Macon 

Madison 

.Martin _. 

.McDowell 

.Mecklenburg 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

New ((anover 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Orange 

Pasquotank. 

Perquluiaoa. 

Person 

Pitt „ 

Polk 

Randolph... 

Richmond 

Ri.Iieson. • 

KoeklnKhani 

Itowan 

Rutherford 

Sam^ison 

Stanly 

Stokes. 

^u^ry 

Tyrrell - _ 

Uulon 

Wake. 

Warren 

Wautauga. 

WaslilugtolL 

W ay lie 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

Vadkin 

Yancey 



191. 
322 
693 
670 
66 

1186 
•41 
149 
196 
9i'd 
318 
131 
391 
868 
3(6 

18718 
546 
138 
248 
496 
418 
459 

1625 
142 
630 
165 
317 
243 
469 



(091 
723 
692 
879 
595 
728 
• 329 
1389 

17.S9 

825 
7.59 
8'* 
3H 
870 
381 
304 
- 7 •.7 
542 
367 
425 
246 
39 ■. 
323 
403 
974 
197 
533 
473 
221 



'I'hrowDout. 



333 
349 
836 
723 
588 
64 
664 
506 
153 
956 
477 
3(1 
483 
710 

118 
12(4 
544 
6,8 
405 
1 21 
495 
529 
»34 
432 
502 

aoo 

379 
1130 
1.38 
322 
413 
239 
1323 



751 
274 
llul 
10( 
299 
1323 
1617 
654 
781 
7.1" 
239 
2:14 
420 
721 
270 
321 
269 
720 
1017 
1026 
695 
979 
53 
7V5 
811 
77 
S.V8 
1216 
690 
1(7 
159 
1359 
363 



122 
15 



lis 

22 

13 
4 

20 
3 
31 

40 

10 

21 



I 

U'. 

3 
179 

4 



134 

16: 

13 
3 



With F^lgecomb, Ac. 

842 495 
r4 50O 



ToUl 4499 

Breckinridge over Bell. 3519. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Otunties. 

Bametable 

Berkshire.. 

Bristol 

Dukes „. 

Ks.sex ...M 

Jianklln 

Hampden 

Haniiihlilre .i 

Wlddl.-sex 

Nantucket 

Norfolk 

Plvniouth 

Silllolk _ 

Worcester 

Total 

Lincoln over Douglas, 



Rep. 

Lincoln. 
. 2371 
. 5202 
. 79rO 
. 338 
. 148.32 
. 3991 
. 5184 
. 4.'4)7 
. 17806 
.. 420 
. 8( «U 
. 6703 

10*74 
. 17272 

.106533 
71161. 



Dem. 
Doug. 

133 
2865 
1713 

116 
3773 

917 
1993 

6- 3 
7069 
31 
3589 
142» 
4891 
5241 



Union. 
Bell. 
2s:l 
2W 
640 
58 
3178 
135 
296 
182 
48 0 
76 
2987 
1.86* 
(tVM) 
1890 



34373 323(1 



Dtm 
Breck 
366 
199 
321 
64 
829 
331 
.504 
230 
921 
9 
438 
29: 
9«( 
3»2 

•939 



lO'The conduct of the oRicers of the 
United Slates, in surrendering, Toluntarilj, 
the trusts in their charge to the States, is 
really humiliating. It is certainly no Roman 
virtue. The cffioer may be a SeceBsionlsl; 
as zealous for Disunion as the most despe- 
rate fire-eater; but to transfer his trust to 
another power, when he is honored and 
trusted, may be honor, but it is a sort we 
don't understand. Th* first step in the 
honorable direction would be to deliTer the 
trust unimpaired to those who gave it to 
tiim, resign his office, and then assume his 
position as his own judgment and impuUe 
dictate. 

Arnold might have become convinced that 
he owed allegiance to the mother country; 
and then, if he had returned West Point to 
those who had placed him in command, re- 
signed hi i office, and having thus freed him- 
self from obligations, acted as be thought 
proper, he would not have been a traitor. 

He acted otherwise; and although Eng- 
Isn l loved tbe treason, and rewarded the 
traitor, she never respected him. 

We apprehend that these United States 
officers who, like Twiggs, hand over their 
trusts to the seceding States, will find that 
they have gained no credit by it. There is 
too muoh sense of honor in the extreme 
.Southern Stated to look at such acts.wiihout 
disgust. We know that Major Anderson 
has infinitely more of the respect of the 
Southern States than Qeneral Twiggs. 

How would these Cottou ^^ates feel if one 
- ' ' ' ii  satisfied tf 
iWiteal 

reaigui((g, uaitiii over ane ui^^beir fortitiua- 
tions to the United Staffs' What would be 
the diSerenoe in the motnl of the act? 

Depend upon it, the civilized world irill 
not look at this spectacle without disgust. 

The merits of the question between the 
Union and these seoeding States have noth. 
ing to do with the point. If th^ Union 
were altogether wrong, and those States 
altogether right, it would make no differ 
ence. N-e higher law oan cancel an obli- 
eatiOQ of morals and honor. 



Washington Items, 
Washington, February 27.— Last sight 
ei-Sonator iJeli. Tnnno.isce, JudgeDoug. 
Ills, Mr. (Juthr vij, Gov. Hicks, 

and others, urgi ..oil to Mr. Lincoln 

to interpose foi a .iciileuieut. Their inter- 
view continued Bcvcrikl hours. 

The Commissioners from the Southern Con- 
federacy are expected arrive here before 
the close of the week. Tbey are accredited 
to the incoming admininirati iu. and pend- 
ing their efforts to negotiate, nothing will be 
done calculaffid to destroy the public peace. 

Wasiiinqton, Feb. 27. — The following ia 
a synopsis of the resolutiouri of the Commit- 
tee of Thirty-three. 

Resolved, In tho opinion of the Commit- 
tee, the existing discontent among tke 
{jouthern people, and the hostility among 
them to the Federal Govcmmeut, are greatly 
to be regretted, and vF^ether such are 
without just cause or net, ixny reasonable 
oonstitutional remedy and additional spe- 
cific and efTectual guarantees of their 
peculiar rights and iatnnts, as recognized 
by the constiiution, necessary to preserve 
the peace of (he country and the perpetua- 
tion of the Union, shoiild be promptly and 
cheerfully adopiod. 

Retvlved, by the ScnaU and Ilouie of Repre- 
smlath es, That all attempts by Legislatures 
to obstruct the recovery of fugitives from 
service are in derogation of the Constitution, 
inconsistent with the comity and good 
neighborhood that should prevail among 
States, and dangeron* to the peace of the 
Union. 

ReioUed, That the several States be re- 
quested to cause their statutes to be revised 
with a view of ascertiiining if any conflict or 
tendency to embArrass the execution of the 
laws for tbe delivery of persons held to 
labor by the laws of any State and escaping 
therefrom, and ursontly request that such 



enactments b" 
"^ll^iuircd V - 



Legis 



Read the Montgomery correspondent 
of the Charleston Mercury, and you will get 
some idea of the difboulty of building up 
after tearing down. South Carolina left 
he Union for free trade and the reopening 
of the African slave trade. These were her 
real reasons, and she will be disappointed 
beyond measure to find she is no nearer 
these objects than when she started. 

The Provisional Qovernment retains all 
the evils she complains of, and in an aggra- 
vated shape. 

This Provisional Government is a despot- 
ism: but a permanent Government is to be 
formed, and must be ratified by all these 
States; and, until then, we presume, the 
Provisional Qovernment will remain. What 
will satisfy the Cotton States will not snit 
South Carolina. 

If the Border Slave States should join, it 
would only increase the difficulty. Can any 
Southern Confederation be formed at all? 

the question. Any Constitution they 
make must be ratified by the States before 
it is valid, and the whole will never form 
one that all will accept. 

It is easy to put down and destroy; bat to 
rebuild is the diflficulty. We don't think 
rebuilding possible. Tbe whole will result 
in almost as many Independent governments 
as there are States. 



repealed, as 
"oostitulional 
for^a 

■tit*. 
.neee rcsohi-. 
5 Hiveral States, 
iai'i before the 

recognize slavery, as 






VERMONT. 








'■\.44/it(V*. 


Re,. 


Dtm. 


Un. 


Z tlK 


Lincoln. 


Doug. 


Be.l. 


Breck 


.4ddl"..n . 




:144 


4'/ 


17 


11, ■ •   1 ■ 






94 


12 










20 

. I'j 










'J 






Oil 


41 








312 


S7 


j 






973 


212 


3= 


ftutland ....'..„ 


17(s 


293 


120 


6 


4178 


1348 


116 


2.! 


Wa^litngtuu ... 


2941 


I2M 


4:1 


4 


Windham 


_ 37:12 


431 


473 




Windsor 


5313 


951 


291 


(6 



90 
50 
4 

19 

82 
SO 
62 

77 
53 
28 
12 
113 
173 

48 

i 
117 
319 
106 
281 
78 
51 
244 
1(0 
65 



(bunttes 

Androscoggin .. 

Aio'istook 

Cumbeiland 

rrauklln 

Hancock 

Kennebec 

Knox 

Lincoln 

Oxford 

1'enob«cot 

flscataijula 

Sagadahoc 

^mersel 

Waldo 

Waahluxtoo 

York 

ToUl . 



MAINE. 

' Rrp. 

Lincoln. 

3526 

1142 

7934 

2281 

3322 

6J99 

, 3120 

2510 

„ 4244 

„ tW97 

U.5lt 

2257 

40H 

3800 

3515 



Dem. 
Dimg. 

ISiS 

414 

4«15 
1358 
932 
2JV3 
lfl25 
1073 
2123 
1555 
401 
630 
1533 
1434 
2320 
4389 



Vn. Dem. 
Bell. Breck. 

V) 65 
167 
34   

.56 

106: 



345 

iS 
189 
200 

68 
267 

16 
1.S5 

14 
(76 
174 

84 

75 

93 



, 62811 296*3 3016 



UncolB over Douglu, 33118; over sril, 24704. 



156 
Kl 
210 
199 
20H 
374 
142 
212 
537 
348 
294 

63fcs 



CONNECTICUT. 



Oountiei 

FalrQeld 

Hartford 

Lltchaeld . .. 

Middlesex 

New Haven.. 

N. London 

Tolland 

Windham 

ToUl.. 



Rip. 
Lincoln. 
7(MS 
8519 
6118 
(883 
8667 
6470 
1494 
«1« 

43793 



Dem. 

Doug. 
SlTt 
8145 
173» 
11(0 
2910 
2598 
11(9 
1453 

17374 



Lincoln ov«r Pauglu, 3M18, 



rnron. 
Bell. 
2051 
Mt 

no 

574 

311 
18 
20 

32n 



Dtm. 
Breck. 
3835 
3291 
1672 
1335 
438U 

1199 

478 
3iV) 

1»4»3 



We find in tti« Little Rock Democrat 
an account of the eeizure of the arsenal at 
that place. 

The citizens were surprized one morning 
by the appearance of troops from Helena; 
and, on the day following, from Phillips, 
Monroe and Prairie counties. Tbey came 
to take tbe arsenal. The Governor dis- 
owned the movement; said it was not by bis 
order; but it did not stop the movement. 
The mob were bent on (akine Ahi 

efthi • li . he conclude 

rather than allow worse to be done; for he 
could not control the mob or divert them 
from the object. So he made a demand of 
Captain Totten. The Captain required a 
day to consider, and at the end of the time 
gave up the arsenal. 

Thus, says the Democrat, tke 4iifficully 
was happily settled. It is a straa^e story 
of a happy settlement— both the federal 
Government and the State authorities co- 
erced by an irresponsible mob! Thi« jnay 
be the way to protect riglMs and liberties 
the South is talking about; l)ut it is exactly 
like the old beaten road to (fespotism. 

The New York women's petition has 
been sent to Congress. It cpBoludee thus: 
We pray you for our sake— and in the 
name of every endearing tie which unites 
man to woman — as father, brother, husband, 
and friend— not to abandon us to feel that 
wo and our efaildren are, by needless ani- 
mosities, to lose the neble political inherit- 
ance left us by the valor and wisdom of our 
common falhera; but that the grand falirio 
which they construotc B»»y be preserved 
with equal talents and Tirtuee by their 
descendants; for which your petitioners will 
ever devoutly pray." 

ThS Osliai»A.TOB OF TH« Nahsbal Typo 
OBAPUIOAL Union.— Thomae F. Conway, the 
member of Congress from the State of 
Kansas, was born in Charleston, South 
Carolina, and is now only about thirty 
years of age. He resided in Charleston 
until he was about fourteen, when the death 
of his father caused the removal of the 
family to Baltimore. He served his time at 
tbe printing business, and while engaged 
as a journeyman printer originated the 
organization of the National Typographical 
Union. 

1^ The Charleston Mercury intimates 
that the parapet on the south side of Fort 
Sumter has been cut away to allow the guns 
en barbette to be depressed at the angle 
necessary to sweep the wharf and tiie 
waters adjacent. ^ 

Cohhissionebs to Beloilm. — The Mil- 
ledgoville Recorder leams that the Oovern 

/•« J 1 1 — i f |».'iat4((l tbe Hv" 

Butler King Commissioner to negoi... ^ 
with the Belgian and Savannah Sieain 
Navigation Company, for the establishment 
of direct trade with Southern ports, pur- 
suant to a late act of the Legislature. 



now existing in fifteen States, by the usag^ya^^ 
and lavrs ef those States, and recognize i^^^r 
authority, legal or otherwise, outside of 
such States, to interfere with slavery, ia 
deciding upon the rights of their owners or 
the peace of their society. 

Retoh'td, That we recognize the justice 
and propriety of a faithful execution of the 
Constitution and laws mi^de in pursuanoe 
thereof, on the subject of fugitive slaves and 
discountenance all mobs or hindrance to the 
execution of such laws, and that the citi- 
zens of each State should be entitled to all 
ihe privileges and immunities of the oiti. 
zens of the several States. 

Resolved, That we recognize no such 
conflicting elements in its composition, nor 
sufficient cause, from any «ourc«, for a dis- 
solution of the Union; that we are not sent 
here to destroy, but to sustain and har- 
monize the institutions of the country, and 
that equal justice be done to all parts, and 
to perpetuate its existence on terms o( 
equality and justice to all. 

Retolved, That the faithful observance on 
the part of all the Slates of all constitu- 
tional obligations, to each other and to the 
Qeneral Government, ia essential to the 
peace of tho country. 

Resolved, That it is the duty of the Gen- 
eral Government to enforce the Federal laws, 
to protect Federal property, and preserve 
the union of these Slates. 

Resolved, That each State i.i requested t » 
revise its statutes, and, if necessary, to so 
amend them astojsecure, without legislation 
by Congress, to the citizena of other States 
traveling therein, the same protection as the 
citizens of other States, traveling or so- 
journing therein. 

Reeolved, That each Slate is respectfully 
required to enact such laws as will prevent 
and punish any attempt whatever, in suoli 
State, to set on toot the lawless invasion of 
any other State or Territory.. 

Resolved, That the President be requested 
to transmit the foregoing to the Governors 
of the seversl States, with a request to 
them, respectively, to comnxinicate them to 
their several Legislatures. 

Washinotoii, February 27. — The Select 
Committee of five on the President's course 
in receiving the Commissioners from South 
Carolina, reported to-day. The majority 
report is signed by Dawes, Howard and 
Reynolds. The committee regard the mes- 
riage itself, as well as the manner in whiok 
it was treated by the President, as among 
the most remarkable events of the eiiraor- 
dinary times in which we live. The com- 



9 



'iMfp pariTiof iin'ler«tfin 1 on wl. 



iple 

^Id 



Execir 

indi vid^B^HB^ ' r 

ty iii^^^^Pvement of a trc 

aoter . 

They fail io see any circumstances josti* 
fying the President in enieHaining any 
diplomatic intercourse with South Carolina, 
except on the assumption that South Carolina 
was an independent power, and that tha 
President, by according them one offioiai 
reply, involved, to some extent, a recog- 
nition wiib a rebellious State. The Com., 
mittee concluded by saying 

Washington Items. 

Washinoto.n, Feb. 27.— The Conferenca 
to-day, in voting down the Franklin substi- 
tute, are in the same position as a week, 
ago. Some Southern commissioners are 
much discouraged, but comforted by the 
assurance of those from other sections that 
they will endeavor to reconcile conflicting 
views on slavery, to-morrow. 

The Senate portion of the Committee of 
Conference on the tea and coffee amend- 
ments have agreed to secede and recommend 
concurrent action, which will probably result 
in the passage of the whole bill. 

Mr. Trumbull, on the part of the SentU, 
and Mr. Washburn, of 111., and Mr. Burlin- 
game, on the part of the House, waited on 
Messrs. Lincoln and Hamlin to-night, and 
furnished them with certificates from Mr. 
BreekinriJge and Speaker Pennington of 
their election. They were formally aocept' — ' 
ed. 

The first proposition to be voted on to-  
morrow in the House, is that of Burch and 
Stout, recommending a National Convention. 

A memorial was received to-day, signed 
by all 'ihe Representatives of the New Vork 
Legislature, recommending Colfax for Post- 
master-Geeeral. 

Major Bowman has been appointed Su- 
perintendent of West Point. 

Senators Seward and Sumner, tne e«r 
York, Pennsylvania and Indiana delegations, 
Judg« Harris, Gov. Hicks, and others, 
calle^! on Mr. Lincoln to-day. A number of 
Virginians also had an interview, and ara 
highly pleased with the President elect. 





ToUl.. 



Lincoln over Douglaa. 25119. 



3ij 8 8619 



NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Bp 



O'linUet. 

Belknap 

Carroll _. 

Clieshlre 

Cooa,.., » 

Oraaon...- 

UlllUborough... 

Merrltiiac 

Hocklneharu 

SlraAbrd 

Sullivan 

Tola' 



.liu olu 

1»«1 

2148 
31-43 
1X9 
482:1 
6^N8 
4794 
1720 
3136 
2437 



Ptm. 
Doug. 
1786 
1993 
1912 
1330 
■SMt 
4117 
3813 
3228 
I9.J5 
1763 



Dem. Bell. 
Brei-k. Bell 



IK. 
43 
3(3 
221 



618 



116 
43 

3« 



37519 2.V«(1 2111 



Uiicolu over Douglas, II6H; over all. 9111. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

Rtp. 
Lincoln. 

667 

„_.. 1246 

„ 1610 



ihuntits. 

Brtstol..,„.„ 

Kent „_.. 

Mewporl.. ».. 

Provld lice 

Washington 

Total 

Majoilty for Lincoln. 4.'i.17. 



1519 
1.12244 



f\ision. 
Doug., etc. 
462 
667 
879 

4.-;i 

834 

7707 



A Tennessee paper says: "Tho 
Southern Congress at Montgomery have 
appointed standing committees on 'territo- 
ries' and 'public lands,' " and pertinently 
or impertinently asks. Where are they '.' Let 
them ask the question a few years hence, 
and we will answer it to their satisfaotion. 



19'Two farmers have just had a novel 
lawsuit at Granger, N. Y. They had steers 
so muoh alike that neither knew "t'other 
from whioh." Recently both animals were 
in the road, and one was killed, whioh it 
was had to be determined by tbe law-suit. 



I^^France is arming to the teeth. It is 
estimated that including the reserves, she 
has a military force of one milliun of men, 
thoroughly equipped, and devoted with a 
zeal almost fanatical to the behests of the 
Veiled Prophet of tbe Tnileries. 



Alabama Items. 

V v-T.ioMiRY, Feb. 2b.— Mr. Wright'i 
 n for discussion on permanent 
II ion will be up for public conaider- 

a'lou. 

Mr. Clinton's resolution instmoting thn^ 
Naval Committee to inquire into tlie pro-* 
pri'-fy ■-'  oonriinioting several irjn-plated 

I . I ovisional foree*" otf th» 

IT- ■ tVr ■ vofes 



Confeuer:4.' 



Sharp words passed between Sena- 
tors Latham and Qwin, on Saturday, in 
the Senate, after which, both gentlemen 
left the Hall. A duel is apprehended. For 
some weeks past their relations have been 
anything but friendly. 



A vagabond, calling himself H. 
Brown, is begging in Wisconsin, on the r^pondent of the Republican says that the 
ground that he has been in prison in Ken- «»y af'erjl'e attack on the overland mail at 



tucky on account of his creed, and that he 
is a cousin of old John Brown. No man of 
that name has been in prison in this State, 
that we know of. Very likely he ought to 
have been. 

SI^The Prince of Wales has sent Mayor 
Went worth, of Chicago, two fine buck sheep 
and two pointer dogs as a present. The 
dogs are for a railroad conductor who was 
civil to U. R. H, 

The ladies throughout the State of 
Mississippi are employed in making uni- 
forms for the volunteers, and in raising 
money to arm and equip oompaniea. ~ 



support 1 

President ' b j. ro« 
i(\ ten years wiih Wtterc 

the list secn:)n Jireot's^ 
ei;ii,rn Ji. y ^1 i cent pe 
after the Ist of August, 
liquidate the princip 
Man. 

.* Thecommitles on flags have 



Massacre by the Indians. 

St. Lons, Feb. 28. — The Arizona corre- 



,The Southern Advooate says 
Davi3' inaugural produced a profound seu 
sation. All right; sensation ia just wib^'l^, 
they live on down there. ^ 

A malicious Black Republican  « 6 
Lincoln's in will be but another vat u' 
saying Schell out, so far as the New' . ''^ 
Custom-house ia concerned. 



The man who trifles with a yoi.'J^ 
Udy's sff««t4on9 may b^ 8fti4 iQ do » m 



Apache Pass, the Indians appeared at tha 
station in large numbers and hoisted a whito 
flag. Chas. W. Culver, station keeper, Mr. 
Welsh, his assistant, and J as. F. WalUce, 
driver, went out to hold a confurence, when 
the Indians attempted to seize them. Culver 
was wounded, Welsh shot dead, and Wallace 
captured. John .\. Ward was also wounded. 
A. B. Culver, a brother of the wounded man, 
who rode to the next station to give infor- 
mation as to the state of afl'airs and procure 
assistance, reports finding, a short distance 
from the station, the remains of a wagon 
train, anl bodies of eight men murdered by 
the Indians. Two bodies were chained to a 
wagon, and presented the appearance of 
having been burned at tho stake. The 
Dames of the men are not mentioned. The 
road was obstructed with rocks for a distanca 
of two miles. 

Jobn Bell to have a Seat in Linoola'c 
Cabinet. 

Hahbi.ibi i Q, Pa., Feb. 1^' —A private 
diSpMch Washington confirms the re-' 

port th". will haveae?*vut 

Mr. Lin^ 



Belief for the Xausas Sntferers. 

H.4BBI8H; KG, Pa.. Fet 27.— The Housa 
passed a ioint resolution gi^iap * tO 000 tor, 
the relief of Kanga'-. 




HAT. 

i ft CO. 



.■.v...,ovr-.r ^ 



'i'iilJ '^KEKLY.' 



$ 2 CIO 

lU 0' 
15 (Kl 

■_' Kl 
20 M' 

• 1 :■') 



SATURDAY MOiiMNO . 



...MARCH. 



Southern Confederacy. 

It Is asEumcd that KentuoUy lifts licr 
tshoUe to join the Norlliera or tlia Southern 
Confederacy. Wo had as well vail and see 
if either Confederacy will exiBt, or is a pos- 
eibility.^ We belieyc that the States hive the 
power to asBamTiiKlependence, and thut no 
force is adequate to prevent iff and that the 
States have the power of choice in Ihia mat 
ter of association; and that each State can 
if so determined, fix its own terms. The 
doctrine of the Precipitators South in, no 
compromise. Let's hare it all right now, of 
have nothing. 

How, then, will South Carolina compro- 
mise with Louisiana? Will the former 
after «eceding for the sake of free trade and 
the vindication of slavery, politically and 
morally, submit now to lose both her ob- 
jects, to accommodate the other States that 
falter and fail in her great objects? She is 
smart enough to know that submi.'jsion now 
irould stnltify her, and render the move- 
ment she has initiated ridiculous. 

Indeed, free trade is the trump card of 
the movement. If the Cotton States would 
consent to raise their rcvcnueby direct taxfs 
and abolish all duties and all restrictions on 
trade, they would profit by it. That part 
of the South Carolina programme is sound. 
It is the only eqnitabl.e and just way of pup 
porting a government. The inter-slave 
trade illuctratee the advantage of this 
policy. ^ 



dontgomery Correspoiidence of the 
Charleston fliercury. 

'Upon one point there appears to be a 
fixed detciini)i;ition and straightforward 
action herf. Keconslruclion ii dead. A 
Southern Conledcr tion is cHtiblishcd, and 
he Southern Confederacy is a li.xcd ilii' g 
But what sort of a Confederacy ? Herethe^. 
Convention is at sen; and vague dreads o 
he fuinre, and terrors of the people, and in 
some degree a want of statesmanthip, par- 
alyze all useful and essential reform, and 
weaken men into inaction. Let your people 
prepare their minds for a failure in the 
luture permanent Southern Constitution: 
for South Cirolina I'j about to be aaddUd vcith 
almost even/ grirvance except abolition Jot which 
she has so lory itruygled. and iiist withdravn 
from the late United iState* Uovernvienti Surely 
.MoDutUcliveJ iuvain, aud (Calhoun taught fur 
uuughl, if »e arc »Kain to be plundered, and 
our coiiimerte criiniled, destroyed, by laiiffs 
ven dtHoriiiiinaTing taritls. Yet this is 
the iiliuoBt inevitable prospect. The fruit of 
tlie labors of thirty-odd long years, in strife 
and bitterness, id about to slip through our 
fingers. 

liut is this all we arc about to be called 
on to enact and bciir ? It is only the begin- 
ning. 

' The three fifths rule of representation 
for slaves wag one of the many Yankee 
swiodles put upou us in t)ie formation o 
the old Con3ii;ution. It is a radio il wrong 
It most uufairly Uw.irfs the powers of some 
of the 8;a'es in any federal ropieaer:talion 
The proportion of our black to the white 
population is very much larger than that of 
aay other gUvv iState. liy the old swindle 
litr fair proportion of reprcsentatioj was 
cut down upou all htr slaves in proportion 
ai three is to fire. The black population, 
being in a majority in our State, two-fifths 
of more than one half of the people of the 
Hiate are euiirely unrepriseuied. And in 
jiist the degree that the proportion of the 
black population of South Carolina predom 
inates over the proportion of the blacks to 
the whites in any other State, is the swindle 
augmented aiitl aggrav.iicd. South Caro 
liun is small enough without again flinging 
away what legitimate power she possesses. 
Tbiit power is in her slaTes — socially, polit 
ioally, and eoouomiojlly. Tue proposition 
of the throe-fifth:, rule calls upon iter not 
only 10 stultify herself, but to dwarf her 
powers. 

"Is this all? It is not. 
to be cuicd upon to bran 

UIIS. 



ey.^ vii tne .. -^Ii -i ' i.i ii'o ' " -  

knowing well it meant a  ax of so many dol- 
lars and cents cut of his pooket. 

But will the people stand it? There is the 
'trouble. If all men were unselfish and 
philosophical they would; but taxes are a 
bugbear. The consumer pays a duty with- 
out knowing it. He buys the imported ar 
tide, and a part of the price finds its w.iy 
into the treasury. He has his choice to buy 
the article or not; but he is so situated that 
he will be sure to choose to buy, and the 
Government by thisprocees fills its treasury 
The inequality of the thing is compensated 
by its convenience. Hence all governments 
resort to this plan of getting money, except 
the States of this Union, and the Southern 
Cotoftdcracy wilt resort to it too, and South 
Carolina will have to submit or secede again 
to accomplish her end. 

The reopening of the slave trade has its 
advantages too. This Southern Confederacy 
wants Cuba, and it can't b« bought or con- 
quered, and held as a Colony; it must be 
gained by enlisting the people of Cuba in 
the cause. 

What 10 likely to win their favor as the 
protection of the slave trade? They are 
constantly in want of slaves. All the navies 
of the world have not been able to stop the 
trade to that island. Interest would, there- 
fore, attraot Cuba to the Southern Conl'ed 
eraoy, if the slave trade were reopened 
Other regions, contiguous to the Southern 
States, could bo very profitably cultivated 
by slave labor, if it could be oheapeued, 
which can't be done without a supply of 
elaves from Africa. 

There are, however, ditiicullies in the 
way. The navies of all the world are 
against the trade, and they will remain 
against it. This would ordinarily deter a 
statesman from an attempt to reopen the 
trade. This, however, is no consideration 
•with the rulers of South Carolina. Their 
miseioa and the mission of the Southern 
Confederacy, in their estimation, is to vin 
dioate slavery in all its aspects, regardles)- 
of all difficulties and risks. She has potent 
advocates in all the Cotton Slates, and the 
Southern heart must be fired up to the poiui 
of risking all in the cautc. The man who 
faltern or hesitates x ill soon be b -X down as 
an Abolitionist. 
^Here are two poi^J* * 

This Is not fill -t^MiJ 
after it is forfff^i - ^ 
muai be submiticid to 
ohanoee will there b 
«aoh State? The present 
tion was not adopted 
struggle. It is about as well adapted to the 
flountry as an iuHtrument can be made. It 
is possible that some amendments, in the 
way of explanation, may be ratified; but the 
formation of a separate Confederacy, with 
every State free to enter or not, is a diner- 
ent matter. Besides, with the right of iSe 
cession admitted, what do we want but trea- 
ties between the States? Federal tribunals 
are without authority, except by consent of 
the Statos. 

To be sure, if the States had appreciated 
the importance of supporting a common 
Federal Qovernment, and not set the exam- 
ple of Secession, there would be no danger 
in the theoretical admission of the right of 
Secession; but with our experience of the 
facility of Secession, and the readiness to 
adopt it, we could set little value on a Fed- 
eral Government or a Federal Constitution 
The one our fathers made has a great deal 
of useless lumber in it. It ought to be 
ohanged materially. All its expense and 
paraphernalia are so much useless drapery 
if it be without authority, except as a State 
pleases. 

When States come to consider what sort 
of Constitution they want, with this Seces- 
sion idea at iti base, they will Ce on a sea 
of speculation in government without chart 
or compass. * 

The question, then, first to be solved, will 
be, whether there can be a Southern, cr 
Northern Confederacy either, to join. The 
States are, in fact, the only governments 
there are. 

This provisional affair South is a usurpa- 
tion, a despotism, without a shadow of legal 
right, according to any principles of gov- 
ernment recognized in this country. It is 
tolerated from appreheusioas crf'danger, 
from passion and prejudice. 

When the States come coolly to fix up 
jiermanent institutions, they will scan its 
'ifeatures, with tha right of Secession allow- 
 »i, with the widest range for difference of 
^opinion. It is not of maoh ooo9f ]ii..nce. 
deed. whcre_p...''*aiej:ofs. si"' 
bligaliona Cllal it cafflhfo*?^ - • 




rrobably 
id her 



. r  mecdy i^i'aiiM i a 
power 10 prohibit by law the turiher intro- 
duction of slaves from Africa or eLsewhere 
outside of the United Slates. Terrorism is 
about to make its perpetual prohibition a 
fundamental provision of the Constitution 
itself. A. biigma is thu3 broadly stamped 
upou the whole institution before the whole 
world, and sealed by ourselves. Tnat Con- 
gress' should have power to prohibit the 
trade is a UgiLimate provision. I should 
liOi otject to such a provision. It is a mat- 
ter of trade, business, and general econo- 
my. There may, or there may not, be a 
sufficient supply of African labor now in 
Americi. Of this it is for the people of the 
several States to decide, through their rep- 
resentatives in the General Congress. But 
io brand it by a fuudameutal ariicle of the 
Constitution itself is to cast an infamous 
slur upon the whole institution — the lives 
and the properties of every slaveholder in 
the land. 

"For what have wo cast off the North as 
a rotten incubus, if we are thus to re enact 
all of their swindles, outrages and insolences 
upon ourselves! To bs plundered and 
manacled wiih a half-way representation, 
and to indorse all the sUnders and insolence 
of the Norihcrn States? 

"All tbid ij not encouraging to our hopes. 
But there remain two methods of retrieving 
ourselves. The first is in our Convention. 
We msy have to fuUow the example of 1788. 
The second is, by providing in the Consti- 
tution, fur the present, an easy way of 
amendment; and South Carolina miy insist 
upon amendments upon thcBe points being 
made. D.)ubtles3 public spirit will advance. 
.Many meu here w-int iuformatiou. They 
are ignorant and uupractised in this mat- 
ter. Toerc is s.ill room lor much hope in 
the end — with the exercise on our part of 
much firmness 

"Xo chaage the sui jeol: a nice pickle 
Souiii Curulina has bceu placed in with 
regard to Fort .Suuiier. Thme weeks ago it 
«as feared by niaiiy that any assault upon 
I hat fort was to be postponed to the tih 
February, and then to be turned over to 
itic action of the Southern Congress. Such 
his proved the fact tVbat has been gained? 
Provident Davis will not be inaugurated 
until Saturday evening, the 10th February. 
This is the earliest period potsiblo. Cir- 
cumstances may stiil further dcbiy it. The 
.Monday two weeks foUowiug i.incoln is to 
be iuaugurattd at Washiugiun. What op- 
portunity is there between these two dates 
lor Mr. D ivis to mike preparations for 
attack-— to make his demand upon Mr. 
Buchanan for its surrender, and lo receive 
an answer before the 4 h of Maroh? None, 
whatever. We will have to fight, and fight 
Lincoln instead of Buchuuau. And who 
are lo do the fighting? South CaroliniaD «, 
and none but Suulli Carolinians. The fort 
will be reinforced if it is in the power of 
to d.. ii. Will uuybody tell me h«r* 
cn • .'»vq/"^7~^5^"5^1icy • '•''' : 



 fire Peace Proposition as Passed. 

■^The following is the Franklin proposition 
as passed by the Conference : 

Sec 1. lu all the present territory of the 
United States north of the parallel of thirly- 
sii degrees thirty minutes north latitude, 
involuntary servitude, except as a piinish- 
mcut for crimes, shall be prohibited. In all 
the present lerrilory souih of that lino the 
Klalus of persons held to involuntary ser- 
vice or labor, as it now exists, shill not be 
changed, nor shall any law be pafsed by 
Congress or the Territorial Legislature to 
hinder or prevent the taking of such per- 
sons from any of the States of this Onion 
10 said Territory, nor impair any rights 
arisTiig from said relation, but the same 
shall be subject lo the Judicial cognizince 
of the Federal Courts, aooording to the 
course of common law. 

When any Territory, north or south of 
said liue, within such boundary as Congress 
may'^escrib-', shall contain a population 
equal to that required for a member of 
Congress, it shall, if its form of government 
be republican, be admitted into the Union 
on equal footing with the original States, 
with or Without involuntnry serviiude, as 
the Constitution of f-uoh State may provide 
Sec. 2 No territory shall be acquired by 
the United States except by discovery, and 
for naval and commercial staiiors, depots, 
and transit routes without the concurrence 
of a majority of all the Senators from the 
Stales which allow involuntary servitude, 
and a majority of all the Senators from the 
Slates which prohibit the relation. Nor shall 
territory be acquired by treaty, unless the 
votes of a majority of the Senators from 
each of the States, hereinbefore mentioned, 
be cast as a part of the two-thirds' ma- 
jority necessary for the ratifioition of such 
treaty. 

Sec 3, Ndtber the Coiislitulion, nor any 
amendment thereof, shall be construed to 
give Congress the power lo regulate, abol- 
iih, or control, within any State or Territory 
oflhfj United States, the relation established 
and recognized oy the laws thereof touching 
persons held to labor or involuntary service 
therein, nor interfere with or abolish invol- 
untary ccrvice in the District of Columbia 
without the consent of Maryland, or without 
the consent of the owners, or making the 
owners who do not consent just compensa- 
tion; nor power to interfere with or prohibit 
llio Kepre eatativcs of othei St.ates frem 



THREEJ^OSES. 

lY ADW-AIOK ANNE rROOtOH. 



IXXXVitjj Congreis— Second Session. 
■ . .March \ —Sniate —'Sit. 



.lu- 
I I 
I 
1 

l)r. 



blow, 
h reveal.^ l 



wli.'n ihe iTii .tin 



Vn- 



•nth 

■ ■TIT ruouth. 



oral lou has been enibaTr.issed and compli 
catcd; anri what is gained? Nothing that I 
can aee, but the spilling of muob more 
valuable blood ihinwas at all necessary. 
However, people look upon matters in very 
different ways. My views may be all quite 
incorrect." 



CoHixa B.\cK --Never coming 
lie Precipitators. We are aware 
tbrty can help it. They 
Union; it \% not fol* them; 
easou. Even they may change. 

ago they would ha|re de- 
ost of them, the idea oftSeces- 
We only suggest that their opinions 
^at they are not coming back ar^f no 
account generally. Whenever the people 
move to come back, Ihcy will ruir^ead, 
and swear they nev«r intended ■fo go 
away. 

t&'^i is staled that prominent South 
Carolinians in Washington eay that the 
people there are growing markedly cooler, 
and becoming much wearied with the exist- 
ing national excitement. Many complain 
bitterly of the excessive taxes, the disturbed 
condition of business, and the censequent 
depreciation of property. It is known of 
one South Carolinian whose loss from seces- 
sion will be two hundred thousand dollars, 
and many others arc sufferers in similar 
ratio. They helped to vote the Slate out, 
but being feelingly convinced of their error, 
would gladly help lo veto it back aga^, if 
any fair opportunity were given them. 

9^ Col. H. S. Webb, distinguishe^fiy 
his services in the Mexican war^^d 
brother to •!. Watson Webb, iS in 'Jew 
Orleans, to offer the service' of himselfc^^td 
^•^\lt sons- to the Soumern army. * 

|®.Mc.»ris8ey, the prize-fighter, 
said, will have a fat office in the New Vo.^ 
Custom-house, for sertice rendered to the 
Bepub'-ican party^ ^ 



bringing 
C.duiubi 




Tho r.'.l Juuf 1: |i.nl. 
Till' very iliiv 1 — 
Ali.l now II ■ i ^ la lilJ. 

Willi li"r ' 
Th. r,' « 
All.l w;li. 

At Ihr. . 1 ill ^ -• ' 
iMy worl l was w..n and lost. 

Convention of the Citizens and Work- 
ing-men. 

rofflcUl Brpo.t.] 

This convention met, pursuant to the 
published call, and organized temporarily 
by calling Mr. J. Walton, of the Fifth ward, 
to the chair and appointing Mr. Ransom, of 
the Sixth ward, secretary. 

On a call for credentials of delegates, all 
Ihe wards of the city responded with full 
delegations. 

The chairman appointed a committee of 
one from each ward, consisting of tho fol- 
lowing gentlemen, to report permanent 
organization : First Ward — Milton Curry ; 
Second Ward— D. Milicr; Third Ward— Jno 
H. Howe ; Fourth Ward— J B. Watkins 
Fifth Ward— Charles Miller; Sixth Ward— J 
J. KUis ; Seventh Ward— J. 0. Baxter ; 
Kighih Ward — C. L. Slanoliff; who reported 
the following permanent officers : 
I'KESIIiENT. 
M. W. TKBRY. of th? flitti Ward. 

VICKPRK.SIDE.NTS. 

Si. t'LAIR McKKLIiilN, l'lr,.t ami Bciiml W»rJs 

W. K. ROIIINSDS'. Third and Fourlh Wards. 

J. A. .Mll.r.KR, Kiltll UuliSUlli Wardn. 

h. lilLCIIKIST, Meventtiand KIghtb Wanla. 
SKCIUTAHY. 
■ -• TIM . • , T .lrd Ward. 

^' ommittee were 

.t and Gilchrist 
short 



Body-snatching by Montreal m^l- 

cal students has created a small riot in t%t 
cit^ among friends of lamouted dcccist^ 

\ 



A Naivrd LusATic IN Ciii-Kt.n. — The 
Three Rivers (.Mioh. ) Chronicle, of thelllh, 
telis this story: 

Anlnsane man, named Henry Darling, 
who hailed from Casj; roir.ty, where, wj ut- 
derutsnd, he had relatives, attended the 
-Methodist Church iu Park township, in this 
county, on last Sunday, at which place H 
D. Lord, of Thr.;e Riferf, wai preaching. 
The insane man, after entering the church 
and being quietly sealed for some lime, went 
outside the hou^o of worship, and stripped 
oft every vestige of clothing he had on. In 
this Condition — in a state of complete nudity 
— he entered the church, and deliberately 
walked up Ihe aisle. Under the embarrass- 
ing circumstances, the preacher sat down, 
and the lunuiic, as he proved tj be, was 
taken in charge by the officer of Ihe law, 
and when afked what prompted his outlan- 
dish and indecent conduot, he replied that 
he did af the preacher told htm to do; and 
when asked his name, he at different times 
gave different names, and after further ex- 
amination, gave sufficient evidence of his 
insanity. 

A Story ABOUT TUE FtBRV Di'eb or Sb 
D^Moi'OL. — Tho Augsburg Gazette affirms 
that Ihe following extraordinary and appar- 
ently quite apocryphal epistle has been 
addressed by Marshal Pelissicr to General 
Cialdini: "Sir — You state in your last 
proclamation that you have made a French 
General (Lamoriciere, we presume), Uy. 
Knowing you as I know you, I know you to 
bo perfectly incapable of such a thing But 
y.jur falsehood acquires so much the more 
gravity and absurdity if it applies itself to 
a General who is bravery itself. I do not 
ieh to finish this Certification here, but I 
reserve to mystlf to do so with the tip of 
my boot if ever I meet you as in the Crimea. 
Pelissier to Cialdini " 

SiNOULAK ACCICSNTAL UUBE OF CrOUP 

A country physician having, in a case of 
croup, attempted to cauterize the false mem. 
braue by stick caustic, the patient somehow 
or other swallowed the wholo piece. In an 
iicony of terror, Ihe practitioner forced a 
concentrated solution of kitchen salt (hydro- 
■ 'orato of soda) down the patient's throat, 
way of antidote: and, to hia surprise, 
not oLly saved him from the effects of the 
Caustic, but also cured him of hia croup by 
ihe "finio Ki'i-r,!.-. remedy. 

iiicr asserts positively 
.■' .1.1, -..li .LI . a!; out whose mysterious 
i-appearance and probable murder, there 
was HO much talk, is now living iu Florence 
— or was six weeks ago — with Mr. Wymaa, 
who accompanied her to Europe. She 
wrote to a person in Florida, from Florence, 
in December last, stating that she never 
would return to the United Slates. 

Si&'The "loot" of the Summer Palace at 
Pekin, jilihough productive of much plunder 
to the invaders, peeras to hiive afforded lo 
them but little suhstan'ial benefit. The 
Chinese eagerly bought up a large quantity 
is the tirst da^s of Ibu stle, giving iu ex 
change counterteit Mexican dollars. 

AcoiDENT TO Mr. Booth. — A recent dis- 
patch from Albany, N. Y , says that Mr. J. 
Wiikes Booth, a tragedian, met with an 
acciiient at the Gaiety Tneater by falling on 
hia dagger, and intlicting a muscular wound 
under his right arm between one or two 
inches iu depth. It is said, however, not to 
be of a serious charac'er 

R-MUWAY COMl'.^NIKS A3 CoMiiON CaR- 

RH US — It is alleged that a private agree- 
ment to waive nu exemption law is invalid, 
and can u it bo enf. rced, inusinuch as it is 
an agreement iu do an illegal act. It lia ' 
been decided that railroad companies can 
not thus avoid their responsibility as com- 
mon carriers. 

ISf Mr. .T. D. Garrison, of Calhoun 
county, .Vlabama, ha.'i recently discovered 
ou hi ! plauj^ation a rich mine of iripoli. 
Tripoli is a rich mineral substance, of great 
value in cleituing and polishing watches of 
all kinds. 

Frezzoliui electrified an audience in 
the Tacon (llavanna) Theater, by her ex- 
quisite singing. A young prima donna, 
only twelve years old, just from Brazil, 
created a sensation tlie stme evening. 

fST' it is said tint S-Jt U,000 more has 
h7en lost than gained in the oil wells of 
I'euuHjlvania. The reports to the contrary 
arv for specolative purposes. 

f®" The Conrrier des Eiats Unis can 
uuderstand why Lincoln is called honest, 
but doubts whether he will ever be called 



poWxT 

tary sCNHin p 
Jurisdiction of the United Stales, wiiiiin 
those Stales and Territories where tho same 
is establijhed or recognized; nor the power 
to prohibit the removal or transportatiun of 
persons held to labor or involuntary service 
ia any State or Territory of tho United 
States, to any other State or Territory 
t hereof, where it is established or recognized 
by law, usage and right. 

During the transporiatioQ 'y sea or river 
the right of touching at ports, shores, 
landings, and landin(]^ ia case of distress, 
ehall exist, but not^  e right of transit 
through any State t"ilory, if said traffic 
be against laws thereof; nor shall Congress 
have the power to auihorize any higher 
rate of taxation on persons held to labor or 
s.'rvioe than land. The bringing into the 
Disiriot of Columbia persons held to liber 
or service for sn'e, or placing them in 
depots to be afterwards transferred to other 
places for sale as merchandise, shall be 
prohibited. 

Sec. 1 The third paragraph of the second 
section of the fourth article of the Constitu- 
tion shall not be construed to prevent any 
States by appropriate legislation, and 
through the action of judicial and ministe- 
rial olBcers, from enforcing the delivery of 
fugitives from labor to persons to whom 
such service or labor is due. 

Sec. 5. The foreign sLive trade is hereby 
forever prohibited, and it shall be Ihe duty 
of Congress to pa^s laws to prevent the im  
portation of tl^ives, coolies, and persons 
held to service or labor, into the United 
Slates and Territories, from places beyond 
the limits thereof. 

See tj. The first, third and fifth sections, 
together with this secttou and these amend- 
ments, and the third paragraph of the sec- 
ond section of the first aniole of the Con. 
stilution, and the third paragraph of the 
second section of the fourth article there- 
of, shall not be amended or abolished 
without the consent of ail the Slates. 

Sec. 7. (yongress shall provide by law 
that the United States shall pay the owner 
full value for his fugitive from labor in 
cases where the .Marshal or other officers, 
whoso duty was to arrest such lugiiive, was 
prevented from doing so by violence, intimi- 
diiiion, mobs or riotous assemblages, or 
when, after arrent, such fugitive was rescued 
by like violence or intimidation, and the 
owner thereby deprived or the same; and 
Congress shall provide a law for securing 
lo the citizens of each State the privileges 
and immunities of ibe citiz-:!ns of tho several 
Slates. 

The seventh section recommends that 
when a fugitive negro was paid for, he was 
to be free. 



.^rovii-- 

kionis, from NewW'ork, arrived 



red\^ 



Arrival of the Canadian. 

PoRTLANii, Feb iS,— The Canadian, from 
Liverpool on Ihe llih via Londonderry on 
Ihe lotIi«|diai' ftn-ived 

The ivfrth Br'  — .t*- , , . 

-jSr""'^ ' Vv 
*Sioni», from NewW 

.aijilon on tne lOtL. 

Britain. — A London letter in the 
Paris Moniteur asserts that a numoer if 
Kiiglish merc'Dants are about lo present an 
address to the tjueen, praying that r. nego. 
tiniion be opened with France for a mutujil 
re luction of existing armaments. 

Parliamentary proceedings were unim- 
portant. 

The rumor was renewed that Lord John 
Russell will shortly accept the peerage and 
a seal in the House of Lords. 

A break out of Ihe weavers occurred in 
the District. They held a large meeting and 
resolved lo resist Ihe dictatorial demands of 
tho operative, who, in their turn, maintain- 
ed their position with firmness. 

France. — Another handbill, entitled 
"France, Rome, and Italy," by M. Lamori- 
ciere, was announced for publication on the 
li ih. The Patrie says it will give a clear 
insight into the imperial policy and enr-ble 
Kurope to judge the matter. Official 
published dispatches say that, in the event 
uf French troops leaving, no other foreign 
power will be allowed to supply their place. 

The bourse on the 18ih opened firm and 
closed tlat. Rentes Gsf -lOo. 

[taly — .\ Turin telegram of February 
13ih says Oaeta will capitulate to-morrow 
morning. 

Cialdini will occupy Mount ilrlando and 
all the fortifications, and after the departure 
of the royal family he will occupy the city, 
Ihe garrison remuiaiug prisoners of war 
until Messina and Civitidi del Teiondi shall 
be surrendered. 

The King and Queen, with their suite, 
will depart on board the French ship Mi. 
retta. 

Dispatches from Gaeta, prior to thecapit. 
illation, says a Capuchin monk left there 
with the mission of raising an insurrection 
in Calabria, and was arrested near Cosenea, 
and important papers found on him. 

The city of Finnu and the surrounding 
district has been declared in a state of 
siege. 

Austria. — It is said that subscriptions to 
the new loan exceed thirty millions fljrins. 

The ConsuUte of Pesth had voted an 
address to the Emperor of Austria, King of 
Hungary, declaring that the recent Royal 
retcripis have destroyed the confidence 
created by the imperial diploma of Gotober 
last. The law prohibited the p.ayment of 
taxes by the Diet, and force alone could 
remove the citizens fropi the lawful ground 
they have taken, and unswervod relation to 
a constitutional life cm alone save Ihe King 
and country. The Consulate of Odenburg 
has resolved to pay taxes as heretofore, till 
the Diet shall have taken its resolution. 

Switzerland.— \ Berne telegram, of the 
18th, says it was through the medium of the 
Swij.3 Consulate at Algeria that Mr. Cob- 
den proposed that Swiizerland should 

iirr TTCTT^— .-— — ^.-^ — -* — - — 1- .-L. Jli;^ j^tate^ oT 

America. The Federal Council had dc- 
oiined the proposition on the ground that it 
was not qualified for such an ol?ioe, but at 
the same time expressed thanks to Mr. 
Cobden. 

J.ondun, Friday. — In the House of Com- 
mons Lord John Russell said the San Juan 
queslion with .-Vmerica was still open, but 
England had made a proposition ia a fair 
spirit, and hoped it would be accepted. 
With regard to the fugitive slave tlio only 
correppondence had been a demand from 
Anderson for his extradilioo, and a simple 
acknowledgment of the demand. 

The Orea! Eastern will be again ready for 
sea in March. Her reported destination is 
New York. 

The Bsnaparte Patterson case was again 
before tho French Court on the 8ih. The 
Imperial attorney explained its leading 
beitiings, and ^aid the ouly queslion was, 
is the marriage null for want of publication 
in Franoe, and iirgiied that this had been 
decided in Ihe aflirmative. The Court post- 
poned its judgment eight days. 

Business Brisk in New York City. 

Nkw Yoftw. Feb. '2.^ — Xliere are a great 
number of Southern merthunls iu the city 
making purchases oarly, with a view of 
availing themselves of the ordinance of 
admitting goods to tho Confedorated Slates 
free of duty to a certai* date. The dry 
goods business is unusually active, mostly 
for caah. 

Virfifinia State Convention. 

RiouMONii, tlebruary 'Zi. — In convention, 
to-day, Mr. Morton madoa speech in f»vor 
of immeaiate secession, aid denouncing the 
result of tho Peace ConvMition. 

Mr. Baylor commencel a Union speech. 

.•Vdjourned. 

Major Gwin, of the ttmy, was buried 
to-day. 

Pennsylvania Legislature. 

IIakhi-iubu, Fcbruarj — The Senate 
passed a bill commuting tbe tunnnge lax on 
the Pennsylvania RailroiU by a vote of 18 
to 15. The Sunbury aniiErio bill passed 
finally by a vote of id to %. 

The Senate agreed to aljourn on Ihe li^lh 
of March. 



0,' . jicrar-S. Vi i,:,jn, Stanc 

^ponied to calls made to 4hem 
pAtriotio a3Jr'68se3''to^f!t• oo^?ntioa. 

M. W. Terry, as permanent Pre ,\dent, 
took the chair, and returned thanks for the 
honor conferred. 

A committee was appointed on resolutions 
of the following gentlemen: First ward, T. 
S. Nadal; Second ward, J. H. Kendall; 
Third ward, II. Dent; Fourth ward, G. A. 
Hull; Fifih ward, Chss. Miller; Sixth ward. 
Judge Thurston; Seventh ward, W. Horan; 
Eighth ward, A. 8. Kierolf, who reported 
the following resolutions: 

WuKHE.vs, We, the Citizens' and Working- 
men's Union Associations of ihe city of 
Louisville in Convention assembled, feeling 
a deep interest in the prosperity of the city 
of our homes, and not desiring to create 
di-isen;ions amongst men who have the same 
object in view, therefore, 

Retolted, That we shall disregard all 
party ties heretofore existing, and exact of 
our city officials, now soon to be chosen, 
Kconmny, Fideli'y to their Trusts, a Prompt 
Discharge of Duly, and a cessation of Parly 
Fdvoritism. 

R.:solved, That in politics generally, we 
shall cc-operate with all who labor dili- 
gently for a preservation of the Union on 
a fair h^tU. 

Hesolved, That we believe it wise to in- 
troduce into the city government some new 
men who have not held ofiice as a trade, and 
we therefore recommend to the oonsidera- 
lion of our fcUow-oilizens, as our fairiy 
e.'cpressed choice, ihe following gentlemen: 
For Mayor— JOHN M. DELPII. 
For Treasurer- HENRY WOLFORD. 
For Auditor— HARKY STUCKEY. 
For Aftessor— A. W. R HARRIS. 
Resolved, That as there are several worthy 
gentlemen oandiJatei for the office of City 
.Attorney, we do not deem it necessary to 
m:.ike any recommendation for that office; 
nor do we deem any recommendation of 
Cindidates for the District offices desirable. 

Resolved, That wc recommend to the 
citizens and working-men of the various 
wards tha' they selecl good men to repre 
sent them in tho legislative branches of our 
city, and thereby begin a reform so much 
needed in our municipal government. 
Respectfully submitted. 
The resolutions being adopted unanimous- 
ly, the Convention prooeedcd lo ballot for 
.Mayor. 

The names of the following gentlemen 
were recommended informally to the Ccn 
veniion, as Ihe choice of various members, 
for Mayor: Messrs. Crawford, Dent, 
William Kaye, Delph, W. E Robinson, 
Granger, C. H. Stancliff, Walton, Miller, 
Shanks, Vaughn, Glover, Horan, Gilchrist, 
Wyatt, Joyes, Terry, G. W. Morris, Camp 
" .„   W. L. Murphy Afinr an iuf 

I Crawio y^rftinjef Iieipii. Alesr. 

Dent, Walton, Terry and others staled to 
the Convention that they would not accept 
a recommendation under any circumstances, 
a^ the-y wauted no office. 
A ballot being had, 

Mr. Delpli r^.- cived 96 vot«a. 

.Mr, Uratuifcr irtcetvt-d „ IJ *' 

. ir. Crawiurd lecelved „ 7 " 

Mr. Delph was then recommended to the 
citizens of Louisville as tho unanimous 
choice of this Convention for the office of 
Mayor. 

Mr. .\. W. R. Hiirris was unanimously 
recommended by this Convention as a can- 
didate for City Assessor, and Mr. Henry 
Wolford as a candidate for City Treasurer. 

The following gentlemen were balloted 
for as their name-i had been presented, for 
the office of City Auditor: Messrs. Stuoky, 
Duvall, Huber, Garrett, and McGinniss. 

A vote being taken, was as follows : 
Stucky, 81; Huber, 17; Garrett, 9; McGin- 
niss, 5; Duvall, 4. Mr. Elucky was then 
recommended unanimously as the choice of 
this Convention. 

Mr. Kierolf offered the following resolu- 
tions : 

Resolved, That as the National Conven- 
tion of Working men lately assembled in 
Philadelphia, have adjourned to meet in the 
city of LouiivlLe, on tho Ith day of July 
next, we hereby extend the hospitalities of 
their brethren of Kentucky, and ask the 
several States of the Union to send full 
delegations on that occasion. 

Resolved, That we hail, with joy, the 
loyal Union sentiment of the delegates to 
that Convention, and rejoice, with honest 
pride, in tho hope of future Peace through 
ifie exertions ot the noble sons of toil. 

The above resolutions were adopted. 

A gentleman presented the following res- 
olution, which was adopted : 

Rfsoked, That tho Working-mea's and 
Citizens' Associations pledge themselves to 
secure, by every honorable means, the elec- 
tion of the candidates recommended to fill 
the various offioes at the April election by 
his Association. 

A resolution was adopted to publish the 
proceedings in the city paperj. 

After a vote of thanks to the officers of 
the Convention, it adjourned eine die. 

KOBT. .■ . TRIl-I.STT. Secretiry. 

|@*Siifrercr8 from Scrofula and Scrofu- 
lous Affections, clean upl Why wear your 
Pimples, Blotches, Ulcers, Sores? Why 

.■d oi»» -•« • vwa'U. .fi 

»nd Gout? Why suBer 
Sypiuliu^ au*t Aiercurial diseases to rot the 
bones io your bftdy, or the flesh off your 
bones? Why let your sluggish blood drag 
and soatler its distempers through your 
veins? Ayer's Compound Extract of Sarsa- 
parilla cures these complaints, and cleanses 
them out of the system. Use it faithfully, 
and you bring lo society a healthier, clean- 
lier, and far more acceptable member. 
mrl,dlj:wl Democrat, Baltimore, Md. 



! s petition of the German 
1 , . . . : lib of Syracuse, for the Union 
and againat compromise. Also a number of 
peiitious of the same character. 

Messr.i Ten Eyck and Trumbull present- 
ed petitions for the Union and Constitution 
LS it i.", aL'^^^ cu^rceineut of the laws. 

Mr. nailer presented a large number of 
petitions in favor of the Crittenden resolu- 
lione. 

Mr. Wilkinson presented a large number 
of petitione for the Union, and against com- 
promise with rebellious S'ates, or any ex- 
tenjion of slavery; also a petition for relief 
of Kansas. 

Mr. Crittenden presented petitions from 
cilizeuB of reveral Stales asking for meas- 
ures of peace and the preservation of the 
Union. 

Several private bills were passed. 
A reeolutiou allowing Com. Paulding to 
receive a grant of land and sword from 
NicFiragua was taken up. The grant of 
land was UrtcBtni out and bill passed. 

A bill for reimbursing Com Paulding for 
bis expenses in defending a suit by one of 
Walker's men was passed. 

The reports of the select committee on the 
Peace Conference and tho Crittenden pro- 
positions WIS taken up. 

Mr. Douglas asked ihal Ihe reports from 
the House tlso be taken up. Agreed to. 

Mr. Mastn said they ought to be sent to a 
committee lo be made intelligible. 

Objcciion Was mide to taking up the res- 
olntions. 

Mr. Seward offered his joint resolution as 
a substitute 

Mr. Hunttr moved to strike out the first 
article of lh« peace proposition and insert 
the first Crittenden resolution. 

Mr. Clingman raised a point of order 
against any amendments. 

Mr. Seward claimed that tho amendment 
of Mr. Hunter would change Ihe character 
of the propotilion from that of the Peace 
Conference io one from Congress. 
Considerable debate followed 
Mr Clsrktiiggestcd Is Mr. Hunter to offer 
the Crittenden resolutions as a whole, not 
as a series. 

House — Mr. Phelps, from the Committee 
on Ways and Means, reported a bill, which 
was passed, regulating the value of new 
siw.... i;ulij^* t-''*»9hoe in Custom-house, 
compnliHf^ /^4.}-100 cent?.*" 

Mr. WiwAjijJt^^^^.f ii; 
the rep.ir 



Letter from Mexico, 

Trom ttie Si.aclal Corres,'indeDce of the Xcvr Orleans 
Delta. 



'For 



tho SunUv l 3i!l«vi;;.! l mocr»! 

LOVE_AND GOLD. 

BY .MBfl. U a S-MITIl. 




I©- The Collector of the port of Charles- 
ton gives notice that all vessels fr.om Slates 
not members of the Confederate States will, 
from and after the ult , be regarded as 
foreign vessels, and as such must enter, 
clear, pay fees, and cemply with all Ihe 
laws and regulations in force on the 1st 
November last. Large orders for goods 
have been received at the North from the 
seceded Siales since the passige of the 
tariff act. 

Tub SorTHERS Tariff. — .\ll kindi of 
provisions, agricultural productions in their 
natural slate, and munitions of war, are 
exempt from duty. All merchandise pur- 
chased in any of the Stales not members of 
the Southern Confederacy, during the ten 
days subsequent to the 18lh ult., the date 
of the passage of the tariff act, is also 
exempt from duty, provided said merchan- 
dise be imported into tho Slates of the 
Southern Confederacy before the Ith of 
March. 

Mnrder. 

Grand Rapids, Mich , Feb. 28. — Daniel 
Barber, Tax Collector, was found murdered 
on the highway, near L ippanvilie, in this 
county, early this morning. He is supposed 
to have had a considerable amount of money 
with him, which is missing. There is no 
clue to the murderer. 

Fi.vAHCiAL Itkm. — The Snow Banks are 
going into liquidation. 



B.uH the 
colli'' lip 1 1 ' ■(■ hour. 

Mr. E'y unsuccessfully askei for action 
on the bill for an extension to Mr. Sibly, 
contractor of the Pacific Telegraph line, till 
December 1863, for the completion of the 
same. 

The House then considered the Senate's 
amendoients to the army bill. 

The report of the Committee of Thirty- 
three was taken up. 

Mr. Lovejoy moved to postpone till the 
4th of July. 

The Speaker quoted the rule that a mem- 
ber reporting measures may open an4 close 
the debate, and gave the floor to Mr. Cor» 
win. 

Mr. Lovpjoy appealed, but the House 
sustained the Chair. 

Pending Ihe propositions was an act 
admitting New Mexico into the Union. 

Mr. Hickman moved to lay it on the table, 
tarried— 114 lo 17. 

Next was an act for the rendition of 
fugitives. 

Mr. Hickman moved to postpone till 
Monday next. 

The Speaker ruled the motion out of 
order. 

The bill was then passed by a vote of 92 

to 82. 

The bill to amend the act for Ihe rendi- 
tion of fugitives from justioe. Mr. Corwin 
explained its provisions. It was made to 
avoiil contradictions in decisions mode by 
Governors who are not judges of constitu- 
tional law. The Bill was rejected — 47 to 
12C. 

Mr. Grow asked the House to proceed to 
the consideration of Territorial business. 

The Speaker asked leave to present the 
proceedings of the Peace Congress. 

.Mr. .MeClernand moved to su.spend the 
rules 

Some said they wanted to consider more 
important busiaess. 

Mr. Bolder loudly asked what could be 
more important than the peace of the 

country ''. 

.Mr. Grow contondei that tho Territorial 
bill wes sot for consideration after Corwin's 
report, and was now up. 

Tho Speaker overruled the point. 

Mr. Grow appealed from the decision. 

A motion was made to table tho appeal. 

Mr. Burnett said as the effect of the vote 
was lo prevent a vote on the peace propo- 
sition, ho demanded the yeas and nays. 

Here the Speaker declared a recess till 
seven o'clock, in accordance with the pre- 
vious ordjr. 

On reat sembling, the Speaker stated 
the queslion pending. 

Mr. Hickman moved a call of the House 

Mr. McCl-j^iand proposed that the reporl 
of the Peace Commissioners be taken up. 

Mr. Lovejiiy objeoted 

During a cill of the Houae, Mr. Hughes 
u-kel ihi' t'l.' Se»r{;eat at arms might 
I'i members before 

liee b*,1 v.. «- 



Sctiiton hoped' not, as the publiir 
shad not suffered ihe least detri 



Mr. 
businc! 
mcnt. 

Mr. Stevenson reported resolutions ad 
verse to the claim of Mr Conway, of Kan- 
sas, lo full pay for the session, allowing him 
only from the time he was sworn in. 

.■Vduptcd. 

Mr. Shffjnin moved to suspend the rules 
requiring that no bill be sent from one 
tloise to the other within the last three 
days of the session, for concurrence, and 
thit no bill be jiresented to the President 
on the Inst day of the session. 

Mr. Mcdernand proposed lo take a vote 
at 4 o'clock to-morrow on the Peace propo- 
sition. 

The Speaker reviewed his former decision 
arid said that Senatorial business was in or- 
der. 

Mr Grow being willing that a vote be 
taken on suspension of the rules for the 
reception of the Peace propositions, a mo- 
tion was madt accordingly, but the House 
decided not to suspend the rules, 92 against 
CO. 

Arrival ol tlie Pony Express 
Fort Kkainky, March 1 — The Pony 
Express posstd here this morning ahead of 
lime. 

San Francisco Feb. 16 — There has been a 
fair and steady business doing the past 
week. The grain market has an upward 
tendency. 

The Sacramento Valley Railroad was at- 
tached for $1U0,000. It was not known 
whether this would have any effect on Ihe 
propoi^ed extension of tho road. The annual 
reporl, for ihe completed portion, shows a 
surnlus of receipts over expenditures of 
SKW.OOfi, against $90,IX)0 last year. 

Difierent companies iu San Francisco are 
trying to get bills through the Legislature 
authorizing street railroads. 

Lady Franklin sailed yesterday fer 
BritiBh Colunibia. 

The Pony Espres, with telegraph dates to 
the lid. of February, arrived at Carson Vally 
yesterday, bringing the news of the passage 
of tho Pacific railroad bill The intelli- 
genco was joyfully received, as also the 
more favorable account of an early settle- 
ment by compromise of the disunion ques- 
tion. 

On account of Indian troubles on the 
overland route, troops from Fort Buchanan 
are Euid to have proceeded to the Apache 
country with prospects of hostility. 

News from Sandwich Islands is lo January 
21st, one month late. Business dull, owing 
lo ra'ny season and Ihe absence of whalers. 

Three remarkably short passages have 
been made from San Francisco to Honolulu 
The Norwetter and Camel inside of ten 
days, and the Fair Wind in eight days and 
seventeen hnira. tho latter being the 
quickesi ■ ^ TStl^t-lTof tke'«.-« .va,, 

for l!^C^l, , . . 1 by the Collector Gene- 
ral, are puhlisLcd. In almost every item, a 
falling off is shown from the tables of the 
previous year.-- The causes of this decline 
are attributed mainly to tho decrease of 
foreign whale ships visiting the islands, but 
in part lo the new tariff of ten per cent, on 
niercbnndise of all kinds, which went into 
force in 18110. 

The Western stage passed this afternoon, 
from Denver, February 2o. 

The weather has been very fine, and a 
larger number of buildings are being erect- 
ed, than at any previous lime. 

Many miners are leaving for Ihe Platte 
Cannon mines, and also for the Blue Ar- 
kansas. 

Important Texas News. 

Nkw Obl. March I. — Galveston 
advices state that ('aptain Hill, in reply to 
the Texas Commissioners, refused lo evacu- 
ate Fort Brjwn or to surrender the Govern- 
ment prope.-ty. It is stated that Capt. Hill 
ordered reinforcements from Ringgold bar. 
racks to rtlake the properly on Brazos 
Island. A collision between the Govern- 
ment and Stale troops was imminent. 

Harriuon county voted 80i  for secession, 
44 against it. 

6ass, Marion, Rusk, and Cherokee coun- 
ties are repijrted almost unanimously for it. 



lill Of Mmco, Fell. V, Ifr-'. 

Our polifioal horizon looks gloomy. The 
very unceremonious manner in which Senor 
Paoheco was ltirnt l out of the country, and 
the internal disorders convulsing the 
United States, will, it is feared, all'ord to 
Spain the opportunity ehe has so long sought 
for of interfering actively in the affairs of 
this country. There are many who believe 
that a few weeks will see a largo expedition 
dispatched from Havana, and that a very 
considerable force will ere long he landed 
on the shores of Mexico. I have long 
pointed out the probability of such an occur- 
rence, and from present appearances the 
accomplishment seems near at hand. Un- 
fortunately Ihe men at the head of affairs 
arc altogether unequal to the emergency, 
and unless, in the meantime, England or 
some other European power intervenes in 
the affairs of Mexico, we niay live to seethe 
horrors of a civil war succeeded by those of 
a foreign invasion. 

Miiamon, who is now at Havana, will, of 
course, do all in his power to fan the fUme, 
and the Spaniards, although hateful to the 
population at large, will receive the most 
co-operation and support from the Church 
and raoi't of the leaders of the late reaction- 
ary parly. 

llio scandalous manner in which the 
escape of Miramon was connived at and 
assisted by the French Consul at Vers Cruz, 
has been universally condemned. He was 
conveyed on board the French man of war 
Le Mcrcure, in a French boat, disguised in 
the Uniterm of a French officer, and accom- 
panied by Captain Lc Roy, the French 
commander, and a Mens. Doaz.in,the French 
Consul. From thence he was transferred to 
a Spanish ship which conveyed him lo Cuba 
in company with Ihe Spanish Embassador. 
That a French Consul should have taken 
upon himself the responsibility of aiding the 
escape of a man denounced by Her Majesty 's 
Government, for violating the sanctity of 
the British legation, is scorcely lo be sup 
posed; be must have fell sure of the support 
of his Minister, Mons. Dubois de Suligny, 
and as that gentleman has preserved the 
most ominous silence, although appealed to 
by the French press, upon all that has taken 
plac it is fair to Euppose that this gross 
ur.l ioTi ■ ( fllploTTiitic leccncy haR received. 



to be imagined ihat 

alliance with England. vmU ^ijipi ,m;oi .-iija 
conduct on the part of bis representatives. 

The rest of the leaders of the reactionary 
parly are still at large. Vicario has been 
completely defeated, and his forces dis- 
persed, but he, with Zuloaga and l.agarde, 
have managed to make their escape. Such 
is ever the case with Mexican chiefs, who 
always take time by the forelock, and bolt 
immediately if they see the chances in any 
way making against them. Mejia and 
Marquies are in the fasfnesies of the Sierra, 
from which, i! is anticipated, that Doblado 
will have much difficulty in driving them. 
With these exceptions, the revolution would 
seem to have been put down; but how soon 
it may again burst forth no one can tell. In 
the meantime, the City of Mexico is lefi a 
prey to bands of robbers and assassins, who 
nightly parade Ihe streets, and commit lie 
most frightful outrages A few nights back, 
Mr. Charles Wagner, nephew and Secretary 
of the' Prussian .Minister, was attacked on 
his way home by four of these ruffians, who, 
after inflicting five or six wounds, left him 
for dead. It does not appear that plunder 
was the object, and there is reason for be 
lieving thai this and other outrages, which 
arc being daily enacted, are part of an organ- 
ized system for making away with foreign- 
ers, who generally have sympalhizod with 
the Constitutional party. No one o»n move 
out of his house after dark, and tho foreign 
.Ministers never leave the precincts of the 
city without being accompanied by a regu- 
lar escort. Numberless persons have already 
been made away with, but not one of the 
murderers have been apprehended or brought 
to justice; and as it appears impossible lo 
arouse the Government to any degree of 
ac'ivity, foreigners are themselves aboul lo 
organize some regular system to pulaslop, it 
possible,! 0 this disgraceful state of things in 
the midst of all this, our friends io the United 
States will scarcely believe thai our sapient 
rulersare full of mighty projects. Pantheons 
are to be erected and railroads constructed, 
and, whilst unable to provide the most insig- 
nificant sums for the payment of even one 
out of th; many claims that have been estab 
liehed against them, they are contemplating 
undertakings which will absorb millions. 

The advantages which might have been 
derived from Ihe enormous amount of 
church property placed at their disposal by 
the law of the l: th July, 1850, are being 
recklessly thrown away. Property which 
carefully administered, would have almost 
sufficed lo clear the country of debt, will 
fall into the hands of a few speculators, and 
Mexico will be none the richer. So far 
from ehowin;; a disposition lo act fairly in 
the distribution of this property, the Gov 
erument has just published a law, which, 
for folly and iniquiiy, can scarcely find a 
parallel. It declares "null and void all 
contraoli), in any way affecting church 
property, which have been enter ' 
, aMi-i-ur U«t U»r -ai ■ " ' Tvil I. 

^xprodtf (•ROonoTT ui i^e con«ii(nTr: 

thoriiios " Tlii* is giving lo a law — wiiicli 
was only published in Vera Cruz on the 13ih 
July, 1859, and in Mexico Ihe beginning of 
this year — a retrospective effect, which is 
monstrously unjust. A^ many contracts 
effecting church properly were made by 
f'ireiguers with Zuloaga, after he had been 
acknowledged by all the foreign powers, 
and one in particular, by a well known 
English firm, for §700,000, it is not to be 
supposed that such a scandalous legislative 
enactment will be allowed to pass unnoticed. 

The returns from the different Stales for 
the election of a President have not yet 
been ascertained, but it ia believed that 
Senor Lerdo y Tijada will be the fortunate 
man. It is in thij gentle man tht^t all our 
hopes center, and if he fails Mexico has no 
one to look to. 



In (liyi* of (Ircec*. or year* leforo, 
Tlicrs vru a Tiibled fliiddeu known. 

\Vlioin (lUAlut plillosoplicr.4 ol yora 
0»n.*iille,| sllonll.v aloBP. 

At ■ ■ -,,),, ,M , 



The oilier to bt' WU lolu LaUKlit. 

The wo'iti-lcl ."i.irit 1-1,, • I hfi l.iln 



\\ ticiM K'-'Utiu i.jvc lif r lu.iUllL. wrouslit. 
ThU potent tioddeim knew no boimili*— 

Her iw ejiter riile l Irora shore to shore, 
Far &s n throliMnx h^art wd4 four.!), 

The prayer lor Lova was. Give mo mora. 

All 90 ight her f ecret bUss to know, 
The law of love, say u^es oIJ, 

Tin oarih, by some convnUive throiv, 

" Uple-aw'tJ tii-j ;;lli(eriag tyrant— Ool J. 

With poinp anil ihow his p9wer euMveil, 
An 1 held ttlo i ombat flri ce ami strong; 

All thrones au'l powera lii itust be UM, 
When I, the conqueror, rMe along. 

With Mloaltby step ana angle ken. 

The worl.Iaiiilre shall own my away; 
With taUinsln Ihs hearlH of men, 

Wilri^ from Ihelf lips my victory. 
The Ja.led stceJ hU mettle trie j. 

Till every man the battle t,lew; 
The last expiring soUlter cried, 

"Our caase, dear Woman, resta with yon.' 

Poor, footlih dupe, 'twere vain to talk 

Of all his treasured storeA of gold. 
The boon of love was never bou;rhi. 

The heart's a gem that can't be sold. 
A;.J he whose vonlty and pride 

Pre.suiiKS to mock the law of love, 
To ^- ilii ;t heart byiiolden i'ril e, 

thait win a serpent, not a dovj. 
RoDiiESTsa, N. T. 



The Southern Congress and the 
sissippi River. 



Mis- 



Frigntfol Disaster. 



FAU.rSQ Of TllK FLOOR OK A OOXCEBT llALL 
AND I'RKCU'ITATION OF TllK AUDUS.NOIS l.NTO 
TUK KII.NS. 



On Ihe evening of the 22d, a very large 
audience assembled at Crittenden's new hall, 
in the village of Tiiusvil, N. V. to listen 
to a musical enteriainment which was lo 
have been given by Mies Juvinella Olivn, a 
young lady who has sung once or twice, in 
concert, at St. James Hall, iu that city. 
Aboul 7J o'clock, after the performers had 
passed on to the stage, and the concert was 
about lo commence, the floor of the hall, in 
Ihe second story, suddenly gave way, pre- 
cipitaiiug two or three hundred persons, 
men, women and children, lo the Uoor below, 
which in turn succumbed lo Ihe sudden 
pressure, and sank to the cellar bottom. 

A large coal stove upon the first floor, 
was precipitated among a quantity of shav- 
ings and other combustibles, and bursting 
asunder, scattered fire in every direction 
Instantly a blaze rose through the opening, 
grasping at everything within its reach, 
and a frightful scene ensued. The mass of 
human beings entangled among ihe boards, 
flooring, benches and seats which followed 
them in their fa l, struggled desperatelv lo 
escape the lUmes rapidly spreading through 
the interior of the building, and those who 
remained above, having sprung to another 
section of the flooring, when the cracking 
of the timbers beneath them was heard, 
were obliged to escape from the windows. 
The musical company were obliged lo leave 
all their effects to save themselves. Several 
persons were injured, but all escaped with. 
OutlosHof life, arcBultmostastonishihg. The 
building was entirely consumed within fif- 
teen minutes. 



Washington Itemi. 

Wasuinqto:;, March 1 — Lieuts. Hayes 
and Holmes, of the Maiine corps, have 
resigned, and are going South. Lieuts. 
Bailey and Montgomery, of the artillery, 
have resigned, and are going .South also. 

Kopublicku members ot the Ohio Senate 
have unanimously recommended Colfax for 
Postmasler.General. 

The stesmer Pawnee arrived here to-day 
on a trial :rip. 

The Marine corps paid a farewell visit to 
Buchanan to-day. 

Tho formal ion of Lincoln's cabinet is not 
settled, «cept by rumors, which are con- 
tlicting. 

Destructive Fire- 
Rock {siant , March 1. — The dry goods 
house of Messrs. Nelson, Uirsoh \ Co. was 
deetroyec by fire last night. Loss 114,000 
and ineuted for $7,000. 



The Lanouaok of Chess. — A London 
paper of January ISth says : 

"List night an interesting lecture on 
chess was delivered by Herr Lowenthal, the 

celebrated Hii'-.'-ttriiin . i....-f. o . 

rfan, i^eauenhall street, lo the members of 

the literary institution in connection with 
that building, lie had, he said, discovered 
that there was a bond of brotherhood, or 
kind of freemasonry, between chess players. 
Having been driven from his own country 
by political troubles, he found himself a 
perfect stranger in .New York, without 
friends, and totally ignorant of the English 
language. He knew no masonic sign by 
which he might make himself known, but 
seeing an illustration of a chess problem in 
an .\merican newspaper published in Ihe 
city, his despair gave way to hope, and 
having called at the office of t!ie journal, 
he was Introduced to a chess oliib, where he 
received the greatesl hospitality and kind- 
ness, and where he found a language in 
which he could speak to a strange people — 
the language of chess. 



A HILL 

To be entitled an Act to declare and eslablith 
the Free Navigation of the Missiasippt 
River. 

Sec. 1. The Congreit of the. Confederate 
States of America do enact, Thai the peaceful 
navigation of the Mississippi river is hereby 
declared free to the citizens of any States 
upon its borders, or upon the borders of itp 
navigable tributsrits: and all ships, boats or 
' *' ' ■ ' ^- ' y navigate Ihe same 
■i^an may be estab- 

1 ' 

- ■ ■ , , , . - . ', 1 ,ii -  

Sec. 2. Jie it further enacted. All ships, 
boats or vessels, which may enter the waters 
of the said river, within the limin cf this 
Confederacy, from any port or place beyond 
the paid limits, may freely pass with their 
cargoes to any other port or place beyond 
the limits of this Confederacy, without any 
duly or hindrunoe eioepl light money 
pilotage and other like charges; but it shall 
not bo lawful for any such ship, boat or 
vessel, to sell, deliver, or in any way die. 
pose of any part of her cargo, or land any 
portion thereof for the purpose of sale and 
delivery within the limits of this Confeder 
aey: and in case any portion of such cargo 
shall be sold or delivered, or bnded for thai 
purpose, in violation of the provisions of 
this act, the same shall be forfeited, and 
shall be seized and condemned by a proceed- 
ing in admiralty before the court having 
jurisdiction of the same in Ihe district in 
which Ihe same may be found, and the ship, 
boat, or vepsel, shall forfeit four times the 
amount of the value of the duties chargea- 
ble on the said goods, wares or meachan- 
dize, so landed, sold, or disposed of in vio 
lation of the provisions of this act, to be 
recovered by a proper proceeding iu admi 
rally before the said court in the district 
where 6uch ship, boat, or vessel may be 
found, and half for the use of the collector 
of Ihe district, who shall institute and con 
duel such proceeding, and the other halt 
for the use of the Government of the Con 
federate Stales: Provided, that if any such 
ship, boat, or vessel shall be stranded, or 
from any cause be unable to proceed on ite 
voyage, the cargo thereof may bo landed, 
and tho same may be entered at Ihe near 
est port of entry, in Ihe same manner as 
goods, wares and merchandize, regularU 
consigned lo said port, and the person so 
entering the same t-hall be entitled to the 
benefit of drawback of duties, or of ware 
housing said goods, wares, and merchan 
dize, as provided by law in other cases. 

Skc 3. lie it further enacted. If any per 
son having the charge of or being concerned 
ia the transportation of any goods, wares or 
merchandize upon the said river, shall, with 
iutent 10 defraud tho revenue, break open 
or unpack within the limits of tho Confeder 
ate Slates, any part of the merchandize 
entered for transportation beyond the said 
limits, or shall exchange or consume the 
sime, or with like intent shall break or 
deface any s«al or fastening placed thereon 
by any officer of the revenue, jjr if anj 
person shati deface, al or or torge any 
certificate granted for the protection of 
mcrcbandiie transportod as aforesaid, each 
Mud every perron so offending shall forfei 
and pay five hundred dollars, and shall be 
imprisoned not less thau one nor more thai 
six months, at the discretion of the court 
before which such person Bh^ll be convicted 
Skc. 4. Be it further enacted. In cose any 
' ' "f vessel shall enter the waters oi 

ithiii Ihe limits of the CourcdiBF 

ttn I .'iieroh«ndize subject to Ihe payment ot 
duties, and Ihe master, consignee or owner 
shall desire to land Ihe same for sale or 
otherwise, it shall be lawful to enter the 
said goods, wares and mtjrchandize at any 
port of entry, in the same manner as goods, 
wares or merchandize regularly consigned 
to the said port, or to forward them under 
bond or seal, according to Ihe regulations 
customary in such cases, when consigned 
to any port or placi beyond the limits of 
this I'onfcderacy, and in payment of the 
duties on said goods to obtain a license from 
the collector lo land the same at any point 
on the river, and when goods, wares or 
merchandize shall be entered as aforesaid 
the owner, importer or consignee shall be 
entitled to the benefit of the drawback duties 
or of warehousing the said goods, wares and 
merchandizing as i.s provided by law. upon 
complying with all the laws and regulations 
which apply le oases of entry for drawback 
cr warehousing respectively. 

Skc. 5. Be it further enacted. When any 
such ship, boat, or vessel, having on board 
goods, wares, and merchandise subject to 
the p-yment of duties as set forth in the 
4lh section, shall arrive at the first port of 
her entry of the Confederate Stales, the 
master or person in command of such ship, 
bout, or vessel, shall, before he pass the 
said port, and immediately after his arrival, 
deposit with tho Collector a manifest of the 
cargo on board, subject to the payment of 
duties, and the said Collector, shall, after 
registering the same, transmit it duly certi- 
fied to have been deposited, to the officer 
with whom the entries are lo be made ; and 
Ihe said Collector may, if he judge it neoes 
sary, for Ihe security of tho revenue, put 
an inspector of the customs on any such 
ship, boat, or vessel, lo accompany the .same 
until her arrival at the first port of entry lo 
which her cargo may be consigned, and if 
the master or person in command shall omit 
lo deposit a mauifest, as aforesaid, or refuse 
lo receive such inspector on board, he shall 
forfeit and pay $.jUO, with costs of suit — one 
half to the use of the officer with whom the 
manifest should have been deposited, and 
the other half lofhe use of the Collector of 
the District to which the vessel was bound. 
Provided, however, that until ports of entry 
shall be established, above the city of Vicks - 
burg, on the Mississippi river, the penalties 
of this act shall not extend lo the delivery 
of goods, above that port by vessels or boats 
descending the river. 

A SPAuaow CAt'OBT nr as Ov=tkr. — The 
Birmingham Daily Post narrates the follow- 
ing incident which occurred on the prem- 
i- e8 of Mr. Potter, fishmonger, Dale-Lnd, 
ISirmiugham, England: 

A neighbor, passing through the yard, 

observed a sparrow flullering in a frantic 

-anner on th ' lop of a heap of ovai»w 
sueils, — ./ugu aiiH.ggiiug to release mm- 

self from the unpleasant detention. He 

found that the leg of the poor bird had 

been caught firmly .in the grip of a young 

oyster which was attached to the outside of 

one of the discarded shells. He at once 

look bis prisoner into Mr. Potter's shop, 

where Ihe singular bird trap was opened 

with a knife, and the bird released. It is 

supposed that tho oyster had opened its 

pearly jaw for air, and that the feathered 

wanderer, whilst hopping merrily past, 

accidentally, but loo surely, "put his fool 

in it" 



A Lio.N IN rni! F.^milv CiRriB — The fol- 
lowing story is from Constantinople in 
Algeria: "When the vast plains near Jam- 
mapes was converted into a lake of fire by 
accuient, a magnificent lion, not knowing 
whwe to spend the night, directed his 
course towards a douar, into which he flung 
himself, making the hor9e.-i, mules, bullocks, 
sheep, and other animals collected there, 
fly before him. A tent being open the 
creature look refuge therein, lo the horror 
of the family that inhabited it, and crouched 
down on the ground just above the entrance. 
The Arabs lay perfectly slill, not e^en 
daring to sigh, or scarceiy, in fact, lo 
breathe; may wo believe, as staled, that the 
prayers ofl'ered up by them to the Prophet in 
that long night, during which the lion 
remained without moving, but still awako, 
were truly ardeut? When the first streak of 
daylight caused the fire in the plain to lose 
its brilliancy, tho animal rose up, gave a 
gentle growl, which was perhaps his mode 
of saying adieu, and walked ofl' towards 
the mountains." 

DisuNiosiSTs IN Nkw Yovts. City. — We 
clip the following from the advertising col- 
umns of the Herald: 

DIVORCES OBTAINED IN ANOTHER 
Stale, without crimination or publicity. 
Incompatibility of temper only required. 
All cases warranted and strictly confiden. 
tlal. Apply from 12 to 5 r. M , to —— , No. 
^ — Street, room 21. 




TiiK Fate orrni; Lev.^nt.— A correspond- 
ent of the New York Times, writing from 
Panam-^ under dale of the Itith instant, 
says : 

We are now enabled fo surmise, with a 
considerable degree of probability, Ihe fate 
of the United States sloop of-war Levant. 
Captain Robinson, of the Boston ship Dan- 
iel Elliott, which vessel you have already 
learneil, put" into Valparaiso in distress, 
goes home on the Ariel. His vessel has 
been condemned and sold. On the 117 th of 
September, eleven days after the Levant 
sailed from the Sandwioti Islands, Capt R. 
encountered a treniendous gale, which 
carried away his topmasts, mizzenmasi, etc., 
and he saved his vessel with great ditlicully. 
The Levant, il is feared, went down in this 
gale, and of course all hands were lost. 



f^The States and Union says of Henry 
Clay's State: 

Kentucky seem? lo be prominelly on the 
carpet just now, as It has given binh to 
many of the characters fiuguring iu the 
drama of the second .\merican Revolution. 
President Davis was borne in Todd county, 
in 1808. President Lincoln was born in 
Hardin county in ISlW. Vice President 
Breckinridge was born in Fiyctle county in 
18-1. Senator Crittenden, the great com- 
promiser, was born in Woodford county in 
17S'i. James Guihrie, Ihe Chairman on 
Compromise Resolutions in the Peace Con- 
ference, was born in Nelnon county, in 
170:'). Joseph Holt, Secretary of War, is a 
native of Breckinridge county. Major 
Anderson was born iu Kentucky in lbi.la. 
General Harney, Mr. Preston, Ministt^Co 
Spain and Sebastian, are also Kentuo^j^. 



Have Tou Dined ? 

Did it ever occur to you, dear reader, 
that Eating was an art \ Shall you be 
offended, if we ask you whether you know 
how to eat '' Lei us assure you that il is a 
knowledge attained by few. The satisfying 
of the human appetite, for food or drink, is 
not eating.' By no means! Else were the 
thinly clad beggar girl, who daily perse- 
cutes you for " cold vittles," the peer of 
Ude or Soyer. Your (rne eater — gourmet, 
as the French call him — ^is a chemist, a 
physician, a meteorologist, a philosopher, a 
sauan. He is a chemist in that he knows 
bathe knows the affinities of — the varioui 
elements of his meal ; he is a physician in 
his scrutiny of the most secret recesses of 
his own internal economy ; he is a meteo- 
rologist, for ho tells the season and the 
weather beet suited to each class of his food; 
he is a philosopher, for he calmly and 
patiently digests the subjects before him ; 
he is a saran, for, being all these, he is 
eminently practical in each of their speci- 
alil ies. 

The art of Etting is one lamentably neg- 
lected in this great country of ours. Il is 
not for us to say how far our present inter- 
nal dissensions are the result of this neg- 
lect, but it woald not be difficult to prove 
hat the proper coltivation of this sublime 
art must inevitably remove all sectional 
feeling, and restore to its original harmony 
our once glorious Union. Would the Fire- 
Eater of the North consent ts a 00 percent, 
duty on his pompano, his red fish, or his 
green peai in February, or on his dessert 
banana and pine apple? Or would he of the 
South submit to exactions placing beyond 
his reach the Shrewsberry oyster, the shad, 
the soft-shelled crab, or the diamond-back 
errapin? Never! Sooner submit to have 
all his other fancied rights invalidated, and to 
let his gout be preserved inviolate ! Ho 
many national difficulties have been settled 
by a single diplomatic dinner : How often 
heretoftte has this Union SMtpreserved 
i|tf|ri|||s.et' Iladir- 
lOehl d/".a« nattena! IT 
illempt would be i...- ^ - U*vi3 & Co 
from the Sou'i.h, and Abe Lincoln Co. from 
the North, and cross their knees under a 
mahogany table groaning with a bill of fare 
composed by that great artiste, PARGNY, 
and our word for il, the Union would be 
safe. Think wtuit a plethora of humor it 
would evolve frocn poor old Abraham ! Im- 
agine the funny stories he could tell! Nor 
would the gay Jefferson reply negatively, as 
he lately did lo the slave Charles' question 
of "Mas Jeff, won't you take a drinkt" No; 
.\braham and Jefferson would have shaken 
hands across the table long before the brile, 
and Tyler would have sent the glad tidings 
 f restored peace and harmony flashing 
tlong the wires to every corner of ihe civil- 
ized world. 

The first essential for the true eater is 
leisnre. The prauidial hour must occur when 
Tiind and body have borne all the worry 
ind fatigue of the day, and no sense of 
coming business must obtrude. How sadly 
IS this essential violated in this oounlry ! 
Men rush from their offices to a smoking 
301 meal, composed chiefly of fried meats, 
tnd swimming in butter, for the enjoyment 
if which they have prepared the stomach 
oy a libation of sugar and whisky. This is 
eaten, or rather " gulphe'l," as rapidly as it 
:an be maiticated, and the unhappy subject, 
after a taste of tough " pie," or a munch of 
sweetened "pudding," rushes back, to forget 
his food in the busy cares of the day. 
Heavens ! what impiety is here exhibited lo 
the good Saint Qastronomo! Why must he 
line, [dine, forsooth!) in the middle of the 
lay ? If his desire for food is un. 
conquerable, are there not Lyons sau- 
sage, cracknell and good ale to be 
aad everywhere '.' Fortified with these, 
can he not finish his day's work and 
in the evening go quietly to his prandial 
neal, leaving behi id him the cares of his 
daily life, to be resumed on the morrow? 
Vrriving, and having kissed his wife and 
children, let him now go to his beaufet and 
in a glass hardly larger than the thimble 
that crowns the rosy tip of the finger that 
has just carressed his whisker, let him pour 
I few drops of dark Curaooa and a like 
(uantily of yellow Maraschino, adding 
thereto "the least taste in life" of Annisette. 
Having sipped this, let dinner be served 
ltJiAjr.'  i!fl HioB thor^uirhlV' a* this «e»Rnn 
■v.. unu -try .iA,«n a#  ■half Rhell." 

with a sip or two of Haul Saulerte before his 
-toup. Then the soup must not be rich 
enough for a separate meal. It must have 
inly flavor, not consistence. Your rich 
brown soup spoils your dinner. It 
is good, but you can't eat enough 
after it. If you will have wine, let it 
be red, and of France. Do yon eat fish ? 
If so, send your cook a new dress for every 
one you buy, for if she neglects this dish 
your dinner is spoiled. A dry while wine 
is its proper accompaniment. Now comes 
your dinner. Kit roast beef or a leg of 
mutton if you wish, but see that your 
entries are properly assorted, not all sweet, 
nor all sour, but sweet and sour. If you 
have lettuce eat il after, and not with, your 
fish. Take what vegetables you like, but 
put only one kind on your plate at a time. 
No matter how long it takes you, it "will 
pay" to wait. With your dinner you will 
want a glass of good claret. See that the 
temperature thereof is correct. If you love 
lis, put no ice in any wine, least of all in 
claret. It ia a different wine when warm. 
Cold claret is a scbool-boy fancy, or a 
greenhorn's idea of luxury. Drink Sherry 
or Madeira if you will ; we do not advocate 
il. II rusts out the stomach, and will ulti- 
mately spoil your gout, and may give you 
ihe gout. 

Your dinner ended, sip your wine while 
your cook is preparing Ihe desert, for desert 
should always be composed of light and 
airy material, and Is best prepared during 
dinner. Pies and puddings should only be 
eaten by laboring men, whose stomachs 
require more aliment. A Charlotte Russe, 
or Blanc Mange, or light soufHe, some whipt 
creams, a custard or such like dainties are 
fit for a proper desert, with which you may 
lake a glass of sparkling wine. A cup of 
coffee without what Tom Corwin calls 
"condiments," and a cigar, ends your 
dinner and proclaims you a rational man, 
whose duty to himself has been happily 
performed. You cannot now be cross to 
Madame or worry the children if you try 
ever so hard. The fact is you are in the 
fulleEt possession of all your faculties, and 
would be fit company for a dozen of princes 
or a score of Saratoga belles. 

Tki« ■ ■ . " laair."' 

comprises but a small part of the science of 
eating How often have you asked a friend 
to "go in and taste an oyster," and been 
horrified lo see him sit and sip a brandy 
cocktail while the delicious bivalve is un 
dergoing deglutition. You fairly blush 
behind your ohablis till it turns red in its 
slender glass. 

You object to our theory on the ground 
of expense, do you? That is folly, our very 
dearfriend. It is not the expense. It costs 
no more of fire or hire to cook well than 
to cook ill. A slice of veal cooked with 
a delicate sauce made from the vegetables 
of yesterday costs even less than the same 
slice of veal burnt to whil leather and 
swimming in rancid butter. No, friend, it 
is not the expense. Money wont buy it. 
It is Ihe Art. Don't you know that Raphael's 
Tramfiguration or lluido's Aurora cost origi 
nally less than five dollars for paints and 
canvass. Now, fifty thousand wont buy 
them. Tho magic touch of the artist has 
given them their value. Perhaps all of j ou 
cannot become artists like Leduc or Frar 
cantoUi or even like your own Pargny ; bu 
you can all learn to appreciate art and 
should do it. You should be ashamed lo 
know not even how to eat. Cultivate your 
stomachs then, 0, misguided readers, for 
very possibly with most of us, this is all we 
have worth cultivation. 



ArFAias AT PiMSACOLA. — A correspond' 

ent of the New York Tribune, writing from 
the United Stales steam sloop Brookiyn, in 
Pensacola harbor, says that the town is held 
by a mob of four hundred persons, of whom 
three hundred are from Mississippi. They 
are a drunken rabble, and abuse the inhab- 
itants in the most shameful manner: 

"Among the other atrocities committed 
by this gang, "fighting for liberty," is that 
at Ihe time of the capture, or rather sur- 
render of the navy yard, there wai deposited 
there 7,000 tons of coal for our naval ves- 
sels, belonging to the United States Govern- 
ment. This coal these fellows are at present 
selling at a ruinous price; in fact, simply 
what it cost to freight ii; and the proceeds 
are being appropriated by them." 
The writer adds : 

"Personal observation and communication 
have proved anew lo me what I assured you 
was the case in my last letter, viz : That 
there are slill remaining here many good 
and true Union-loving men — men who have 
not been carried away with this suicidal 
excitement, but are those who have gazed 
inla Ibe future, and have discerned the 
terrible and inevitable results of the inaugu- 
ration and|oarrying out of this movement. 

"A portion of these loyal men come off 
lo our vessel whenever an opportunity 
occurs, so that they may escape observation, 
and almost invariably bring wiih them, for 
uur sustenance and comfort, some of tho 
necessities of life. Such has been their 
nol.dc and heroic conduct, that both our 
officers and crew will refer to this epoch as 
a memorable one in the history of the 
Secession era. 

"The only one thing desired by us is to 
receive orders from Washington to retake 
the government property here. We could 
diaperse the parties that now have posses- 
sion of il in two hou^j, and hold it with our 
soldierti and sailors against any odds. 

"I have lo inform you that the United 
S'ates steamer Wyandotte enters and departs 
from the por* with a flig of truce flying at 
her masthead ! It makes our very blood 
boil to witness this humiliating ppeotacle, 
and the bowing of Ihe knee by the Presi- 
dent of our country to Ihete highwaymen of 
the deepest cast. We have thought how 
truly lamentable it is that such inefficiency 
»nd weakness, as has recently been observed 
by us, should have cb.i-'""^ ' (he .ld- 
.ninislTfktion of our Exec 



wa 

fil.: 

in the W like 12;.^., , 

outward trip, the latter 



r.rnsn, 
   ats are 



L. II. Audrain, a printer in the 
Republican office, while passing the bar 
room of the Valley Hotel, in Si. Louis, a 
few days since, was accidentally shot by 
John Dorsey, while the latter was quarrel- 
ing with one Sam Hughes. The ball look 
efl'ect in Audrain's left side, instead of 
in Hughes, and wounded him severely. It 
l enetrated through ajdouble thickness of his 
overcoat, a dress oast, vest and two shins 
nearly opposite his heart, and glancing from 
the ribs cut a long dash in his side, finally 
edging in his abdomen, Dcrsey look refuge 
beneath the pavement amongst the coal, but 
be was ferreted out and arrested. 1 



ended 

n. 

What has hap- 



vi on their last 
boat, by some 
means, ran into the former, not inflicting, 
however, any great damage. At half- past 
two o'clock yesterday afternoon, Ihe Captain 
and the pilot met al the landing, when the 
former made some inquiries of the latter 
respecting the cause of the accident. Words 
ensued, and Kinman became exoiled and 
pulled out a formidable dirk. Ashe aimed 
a blow at Capt. Price, Capt. Russell, (also 
ef the Golden Slate), at empted to draw 
Capt. Price away, when the weapon passed 
clear through his hand and entered deeply 
the breast of Capt. Price, in the neighbor- 
hood of his heart. Price is a slight made, 
delicate man, suffering from consumption, 
and the most serious fears are entertained 
as to the result of Ihe wound. Kinman is 
a taller and much stouter man. Captain 
Price was removed from the boat for medi- 
cal attendance. Kinman was taken before 
the Recorder and committed to jail. On 
reaching jail, aj we are informed by the 
police, he seemed determined to escape, 
and drew a pistol upon ofliser Jewell, but 
that officer by a nimble moveia^t disarmed 
him. On searching him, besiin the dirk he 
had used against Price, and the pistol he 
had drawn upon Jewell, there was found a 
large bowie knife. He was safely lodged 
in prison. — Memphis Appeal. 

TiiK CnASLKSTON SL.tioiiTEa Pen — This 
namehasbeen applied to the ofl dese'ibed 
floating battery in Charleston harbor, by 
the soldiers, and each company is fearful of 
being called upon to man it. Being con- 
structed of Southern pine, and lined with 
oniton bales, it must be extremely combus- 
tible, and heated shot will be very liable to 
set it on fire. Again, ii will have to be 
moored and kept in exact position, for if it 
swings around, or its moorings are cut, as 
they might be by chain shot, il would be 
completely at the mercy of the fort, whiah 
might easily sweep the exposed deck by 
grape or cini-ster shot. 

The correspondent of tho New York 
Times says that it is to be manned by a 
company of mighty hard boys, who call 
themselves the "Richardson Guards," al- 
though they say that the R stood for the 
"Rum Guards" They are all mechanics, 
strong, wiry and muscular, and apart from 
their spreeing proclivities, are powerful men 
in every sense of the word. 

A BoT SwALLowiNo A HoLE. — Tho Other 
day, Charley, five years old, found one of 
those curious bone rimmed circles, which 
ladies have named eyelets, and, while playing 
in the garden, swallowed it. The family 
were in the house, busily engaged with a 
work on entomology, when Charley ran in 
with mouth wide open, m 
to tltfir r.tmos: capaoit v 
him oy the aim^fajf,)^ 

inquired: 

"What's the matter? 
pened?" 

The urchin, all agape, managed to articu  
late: 
"Water!" 

It was brought; when, after drinking co-  
piously, he exclaimed : 

"Oh, mother, I swallowed a hole!" 

"Swallowed a hole, Charley?'' 

"Yes, mother; I swallowed a hole with a 
piece of ivory round it" 

Tkbridle TsAfignY, ktc. — About two 
weeks ago the wife of an Irishman uamed 
Barney Henlen, living in Williamsport, Pa., 
suddenly disappeared from that town. Her 
protracted absence awakened suspicions 
that she had been foully dealt with, and the 
singuUr conduct and contradictory stories 
of her husband feni'ed lo confirm these 
au.ipicions. On Friday last he was arrested 
and imprisoned. Search for the woman 
was commenced, and her body was found 
buried in a shed connected with the shanty 
occupied by Henlen, with her throat cut 
from ear to ear, and her head terribly muti- 
lated. When the fact was made known to her 
husband in prison he attempted lo commit 
suicide by cutting his throat, and very 
nearly succeeded. The affair occasioned 
intense excitement in Williamsport, and 
hundreds of people collected at the scene of 
the terrible tragedy. 

PowDEa roK CuAntESTo.v. — About fifty 
thousand pounds of powder passed through 
Columbus Saturday, the - U, under charge 
of Major Lucas, Gov. I'icken's aid, for 
Charleston. It came on Ihe .Montgomery 
and West Point Railroad. This looks like 
getting ready for an attack. 

l^.If you would be rescued from an 
early grave, partake of Dr. S. 0 Kichard- 
aon's Sherry Wine Bitters. This invaluable 
decoction has met with favor upwards of 
half a century. It never fills in resuscitat- 
ing the partially worn out constitution. 
Sold by Edw. Wi lder. f 

Paanv D.vvis. — This name is of world- 
wide renoirn — not only for the celebrity of 
his medicine — Perry Divis' Pain KiVer — 
but for his great liberality toward th' caase 
of Temperance, and hii devoted Christian 
life. The church he built for »he Baptist 
Society, in the year 1S52, wi'f be a lasliag 
monument to his good name. *{ 

Oil and Wins. — No medicines, which 
hive ever come within tho range of our 
}n, are receiving such testimonials 
Y -» A.^Veiifer 8 Canter and 

Cerate, which are advertised in another 
column. They have rapidly found their way 
in almost every part of the world, and as far 
aj we can learn, upon careful inquiry in 
regard to their effects, they give entire satis- 
faction in every variety of humors and the 
majority of chronic complaints. We have 
no sympathy with, nor aay desire to pro- 
mote quackery, and as the originator of 
these remedies, with two of its proprietors, 
are regularly educated physicians of high 
standing, we feel confidence in recommend- 
ing them to the public as medicines which 
oiu be relied upon. ^ 

A down town merchaal, having 
passed several sleepless nights, disturbed 
by the agonies and cries of a ■iulfering child, 
and becoming convinced that Mrs. Wins- 
low's Soothing Sirup was just the article 
needed, procured a supply for tho chill. On 
reaching Lome, and acquainting his wife 
with what he had do)^|^e refu  ed to have 
it aJminisiered to^^Hhild, as she was 
sirongly in favor offlomeopilhy. That 
night the child passed in sufl'ering, and the 
parents without sleep. Returning home the 
day following, the father found tho baby still 
worse; and while contemplating another 
sleepness night, the mother stepped from 
the room to attend to some domestic duties, 
and left the filher with the child. During 
her absence, he admiuislered a portion of 
the Soothing Sirup to tho baby, and said 
nothing. That night all hands slept well, 
and the little fellow a-woko in the morning 
bright and happy. The mother was de- 
lighted with the sudden and wonlerful 
change, and although at first offended at tha « 
deception practiced upon her, his continued ) 
to use Ihe Sirup, and eufi'ering, crying 
babies and restless nights have disappeared. 
A single trial of the Sirup never yet filled to 
relieve the baby, and overcome the preju- 
dices of the mother. mr8,dliwl 



I 



WK^:Kl/t' DEMOCRAT. 



SUNDAY MORNINO . 



...MAUCH. 3. 1861. 



POSTSCRIPT. 

Subscribers to the country edition of the 
Daily Democrat must Iteep their subsorip- 
tioDB in adTance, or the paper will be dig- 
continued. 

It can be had at the rate of Fifty Cent» 
per month, or Five Dollars per year, always 
in advance. If any fail to receive the Demo- 
crat, they will understand that they are in 
Arrears. 

For Associate Judare of the Court of 
Appeals. 

We are authorized to announce JosnuA 
F. Bullitt, Esq., as a candidate for Juigo 
in this Appellate District, to fill the vacancy 
cccaaioned by the death of Judge Weod. 



I^^The Sccasslonists are heroic and 
indefatigable in their etuse. The result of 
the Peaoe Conference is worthless, we are 
informed now; it is an insult to the South. 
The Black Kepublicans of the Greeley stripe 
are insulted, too, by the conduct of this 
Peace Congress; both sides are Indignant: 
very. It would be as well to wait until Con- 
gress adopts it; for if rejected, then one 
of these parties will have to lay the blame 
on the other. 

Let us see how much Kentucky is insulted 
by these propositions. It is provided thct it 
shall be the duty of Congress to pay the 
owner of a 6lave his full value, if ho is 
rescued in a State to which he has escaped 
by a mob, or lost by the intimidation of the 
proper aulhoriiics. This is of more value 
to this State than all the abstractions about 
Territories. We have a material interest in 
it. It may be objected that if the value of 
the slave is paid for out of the Federal 
Treasury, the owner will have • portion of 
it to pay. 

So the millions^jn the free States, ofc ao— di* ^ " ~. 
to AbotitioAiats a^muoh a^ the peep1c^|||^ F^H^^ 

will (jjri'.r pori:i is of j^ier'W lk«T/i_.. c 
■lave can^^Hi^^s, (he rc^ro escapes over 
the soil of a slave State, and why does not 
the State prevent it, and give belter prolec 
tionto the rights of the owner? Why should 
not the State that allows such property to 
escape bear her part of her own misfortunes 
or faults, especially when others have to 
hear it, who are as innocent ot any fault as 
the Slate herself? Besides, the South, as 
well as the North, are pledged to the owner 
that such property shall be protected; and 
if, by the crime of some, the obligation is 
not fulfilled, Is not one State as much bound 
to make it good as another? 

At any rate, (he tax on each individual 
would be about half a cent to a voter — a 
vast sum to scold about: Nothing oould 
show a better disposition to stand up to a 
constitutional obligation than this provision 
and we submit it to the owners of property 
lost il any provision could suit them better 
or as well. I^oases of this property by in 
timidation anumobs have been a just cause 
of complaint; here is an insurance offered 
against it; and the outcry is, that it's of no 
use to the South. Wo are not surprised, 
however. We should hi»ve met the very 
same outcry if those Secessionists had made 
a proposition to suit themselves, and it had 
been adopted. 

Then we have been constantly terrified 
with tho prediction that Congress would 
abolish slavery in the District of Columbia, 
and at the forts and arsenals in the slave 
States, or the slave trade between the 
SUtes. 

These things are all explicitly forbidden, 
and the prohibition is made unalterable. 
Strange to say, this, too, is of no usel 
Then iu the Territories, South of 36° 80', 
neither Congress nor the Territorial Legls- 
lature can forbid the introduction of slave 
property, or impair the owner's property in 
it; and the courts are to take cogniianoe of 
il, according to the rules of the common 
law. Here is a guaranty of the right, and 
if not every protection, quite as much as is 
seeded during a temporary territorial or- 
ganiiation. According to Mr. Outhrie't 
proposition, the remedies were to be pro- 
vided by the State from which the slave was 
taken. This would have been better, proba- 
bly; but even under that, potiling ques. 

' .li"kel«^a8tney went to get 
thrvuiih M all. 

This is oertainiy an improvement; in so 
far as it settles the question, and lakes it 
out ui Congress. 

We believe ourselves that our Territorial 
policy of 1850 and 1854 is just as good as 
any that could be adopted, with a provision 
that a few hundreds or thousands should 
not tellle this question for all to come after 
them. 

The evil of it is, that it is subject to tlie 
control of Congress, and liable to be a per- 
petual source of agitation. The plan now to 
divide the territory, gives the North her 
own way in her part, until the people come 
to form States, and the South her way in her 
part, until States are formed. 

The great difliculty with the South at the 
present time is the want of African 
stock. Territory outside of the cotton and 
sugar regions can't be peopled with slaves 
at $1,500 a piece. The only remedy for 
this is the reopening of the slave trade. 
South Carolina and her school of politicians 
see this, and boldly propose the remedy. It 
would be profitable and successful, provided 
the world would allow it; but in the end we 
should encounter another difficulty, more 
formidable than any we have now. What 
would we do when, a hundred years hence 
the increase of tho black population fur- 
nished more slave labor than could be em- 
ployed? None of us will see that da}', but 
those who do, will have a hard problem to 
solve, more difficult than any before us. 

We apprehend, it will be like what mathe 
maticians call the irreducible case. We 
greatly prefer putting off that evil as far as 
possible; not hastening it and aggravating 
it by the importation ot any more of the 
African race. 

Nothing, however, will satisfy the Dis- 
nnionists North and South. They are afraid 
this difficulty will be settled. They want 
Lincoln to try coercion; and will be indig 
nant if he does not do it. What will become 
of their charges of oppression, iind the ap 
prehensions with which they have excited 
the people? 

They must, somehow, get a fight, or keep 
up the idea that one is coming. No com- 
r^' iise will do, even if it meets fully every 
^lUi luej 'ii«ve Tii»4e. Tliej i rrX' i 
lue "irrepressible conflict.' They have* 
picked up the cast -olT garments of Seward, 
and resolved to wear them. 



|0-EDgland is looking out for a supply 
of cotton elsewhere than from the Tnited 
Stales. Her statesmen have kept that iu 
mind many a year; but they have not found 
any source of supply. Whatever changes 
may take place, the supply of cotton must 
come from our Cotton States. 

We have no respect at all for tho conduct 
of the Precipitators in the Cotton States; 
but they may laugh at the threats to do 
without their cotton. They will supply the 
market for that article, and il can't be tup- 
plied elsewhere, at least for a long time to 
come, and they are not likely to be fright- 
ened by the accounts of other sources where 
supplies may be obtained. 

On the other hand, this monopoly of tho 
production of cotton is not the great ad- 
vantage it is supposed to be by the enthu- 
siastic admirers of cotton raising. They 
are as much bound to ecU cotton as tke 
world is to buy it. It is a most profitable 
staple; but il is protilable to soil, not to 
keep. It will find its way to market, and 
enemies as well as friends will have the gold 
there to buy it. 

In the meantime, the cotton-raiser must 
have bread and meat, and the cotton must 
buy these necessaries. 

Some smart editors and politicians are 
exhorting the planters to cultivate more 
corn. All nonsensel Why should a mati 
plant an acre of corn when an acre of cotton 
will buy twice as much corn as an acre will 
raise? No matter what may turn up, those 
who have the cotton can get the corn, and 
those who have the corn can get the cotton. 
This has been the great advantage to this 
country. Kach part produces what the 
other wants, and the entire freedom of ex- 
change has been worth ten-fuld free trade 
with all the world besides. 

If there be an "irrepressible conflict" 
between free and slave labor, it has been a 
most protilable conflict. Both sides have 
got rich at it, and all — i -i- i its to 



'^f (he 

jtii« in 



Uy of the p 
Cotton States is in spen .i^g 
gunpowder, and getting up restrictions and 
embarrassments on trade to eat up profits; 
aiming at free trade with foreign counties, 
and throwing obstacles in the way of a far 
more profitable trade at home; and consoling 
themselves with the notion that the South 
can do as well without the North as the 
North can do without the South. We don't 
see what oonsolation there is in that, when 
neither can do as well without the other. 

1^* We learn, from the Sandy Valley 
(Ky.) Advocate, that there is great excite- 
ment in that region by the discovery of oil 
welb of astonishing product on the Little 
Kanawha. Land which brought 5,000 dol- 
lars six months ago, is now bringing one 
and two hundred thousand. Hundreds of 
persons, especially from the oil regions of 
Pennsylvania, are rushing in and leasing 
the oil privileges of every foot of ground. 
As the oil was developed these have beeneub- 
leased, and are now making fortunes without 
boring one well or tpending one dollar. 

The Advocate states as a fact that the 
incredible amount of oil produced by the 
well s on Kanawha, and tho intense excite- 
ment it has produced, enables all parties 
now having leases to sub-let, in many cases 
for half the oil, with a bonus in cash of from 
five hundred to one thousand dollars, and 
these leases only including a few acres of 
land. 

The positive indications of the existence 
of oil on Paint creek, up the west fork of 
Sandy, as well as on Marribone, on the Tug 
fork, has created the impression that 
the valley of Big Sandy abounds in 
oil. Already parties from a distance who 
are judges of surface indications, are on 
Sandy and using every effort to lease the 
oil privileges on every foot of land they can 
control, and, judging from their anxiety, 
and the immense amount of territory they 
desire to secure, wo must come to the 
conclusion that they are satisfied that oil 
will be found in large quantities in (hat 
valley. 

To TOB Wboxq Placs. — .\ letter came to 
the postoffice in this ciiy. directed to the 
Hon. Caleb Cushing, President of the Dem- 
ocratic Convention. The writer, no doubt, 
magines that the Convention over which 
Mr. CuHh'"" praflided. both at rh»r1»*ton 
•tfj Bwltiuicri', hnK afj uri.»d to ihis city. 
He certainly does not ta'i^c & newspaper. 

Atlanta (Ga.) Confederation. 
Quite right. If it had not been for 
Cushing at Baltimore and Charleston, the 
Montgomery Convention would never have 
been called, and he is entitled to its presi. 
dency. 



Inauguration of Lincoln. 
(ftERtlOli TOirElKiyEII! 

Special Dispatch to ths New 
York Papers! 



•The Bonthern Forts to be RO' 
taken and the Iiaws Enforced! 



iaS44osfpOIiM& 111* 
►^"-0 till lh ^ llli 

ted. -^f"" 



I^^We have never agreed in politics with 
the Hon. J. J . Crittenden; but his course in 
this crisis deserves the commendation of 
every patriot. He has not abandoned the 
rights of the South, nor given any quarters 
to the reckless Precipitators who have 
striven to break up this Oovernment. His 
name is the most prominent now in the 
Union, and he represents the sentiments ot 
two-thirds of Kentucky. His term in the 
Senate expires on Monday, and he is then 
only a private citizen. Why should not the 
Ashland District send him to the Lower 
House without opposition? He will thus 
have an opportunity to carry out the request 
of the Senate of this State, and which would 
have passed the House had it come up. We 
want good service and wise service in Con- 
gress, and for the purpoa^f securing such 
services as those of Cri^^^^, we shall give 
up all past patty predellH^ns. j_g 

Mr. Crittenden is a power in this sniEe 
just now, on the right side— a power that 
extends from one end of the Union to the 
other. We don't know a substitute for him 
who would be half as efficient at Wash- 
ington. 

We don't know that he would consent to 
run for Congress; but he couldn't well re- 
fuse a call from those who desire a restora- 
tion of the Union on just and fair terms. 

BiDiccLous. — A petition is in circulation 
by some Disunionists about Lexington "re 
quiring" Gov. Magoflin to consider himsc\' 
"authorized" to call a State Convention. 
This is the most absurd move we have heard 
yet. Why not "require" him to consider 
himself "authorized" to declare the State 
out of the Union at once, and be done with It? 

0g?-The man who confines himself to one 
4rink, lest for him to be vitll supplied. 



Washington Items. 

Wasiiinoton, March 1 — The following is 
an abstract of an amendment to the aet for 
the rendition of fugitives from labor which 
passed the House to-day : 

Every person arrested shall be produced 
before a court. Judge or Commissioners for 
State or Territory where the arrest is made; 
such court to proceed to hear and consider 
the same publicly. And if such court, kc, 
is of opinion that the person arrested owes 
labor ur service to claimants according to 
the laws of the State or Territory, and has 
escaped therefrom, the court, &o., shall 
deliver to the claimant or agent a certificate 
of such facts. And if such fugitive avers 
that he is free, such averment shall be en- 
tered on the certificate, and (he fugi- 
tive shall be delivered to the Marshal ot 
the Stale from which the fugitive is 
ascertained to have Ucd, who shall pro- 
duce the said fugitive before one of the 
Judges of the circuit court for the last 
mentioned State, who shall cause a jury to 
be impannelled to try whether such fugitive 
owes labor or service: the fugitive being 
entitled to the aid of counsel, and to process 
for procuring evidence at the cost of the 
United States. And upon such finding the 
Judge shall render judgment, causing the 
fugitive to be delivered to claimant or re- 
turned to the place where arrested, at (he 
expense of the Oovernment. If the Judge 
is not satisfied with the verdict, he may 
cause another jury to try forthwith, whose 
verdict shall be final. This section also 
imposes a fine of $1 ,0(X) on the~ Mar.'ihal if 
ha does not fulfil the duly assigned to this 
act Section second enacts thai no citizen 
shall be compelled to aid the Marshal or 
owner in the capture, unless force is em ploy, 
ed for a recapture from the Marshal; also, 
fixing the fee of the commissioner at $10. 

Senators Wigfall and Hemphill gave 
notice of their intention to withdraw from 
the Senate to-mar «i , they being convinced 
that the Texas secession ordinance is rati- 
fied by the people. 

The Tribune correspondence says that 
Mr. Lincoln requested an interview with 
Mr. Cameron, and after certain explana- 
tions the latter was otiered^ a seat in the 
Cabinet; to which he replied that he could 
accept no other department than that of the 
Treasury. 

Mr. Purviance, Attorney-General of 
Pennsylvania, waited upon Mr. Lincoln, 
and, in the name of hie Slato^^itested 
against ChaS^' appointment, and insisting 
upon Cameron for the Treasury. 

Later advices state that it is definitely 
determined that Chase shall have the 
Treasury Department. At a second inter- 
view with Cameron, he was offered the War 
Department. 

WASiii.sr.Toy, March 1 — Great consterna- 
tion was created yesterday among the 
Northern conservatives and Border State 
men, by an unfounded report that Seward 
had declined a position in the Cabinet. 
Certain Border Slate men declare that if 
Chase goes into ihe Cabinet, they can't 
sustain Mr. Lincoln's adminislratiou. 

Dispatches from Richmond announce that 
the secession ordinance is defeated. 

Juo. Tyler is doing all he can to drive 
Virginia out of the L'uion, nnd it is believed 
he will succeed in case Lincoln's inaugural 
aadress suggests a coercive policy. 

The formation of the Cabinet excites if 
possible more intense interest than hereto- 
fore, there being no conclusion as yet as to 
the several gentlemen who have been prom- 
inently named in that connection. Their 
respective friends are still vigorously en- 
gaged in securing their appointment. Mr. 
Lincoln was engaged until 2 o'ciock this 
morning hearing what ardent politicians had 
to May upon this subject. 

\\ A-^iiiNOTON, March 2 — The Secretary 
of War has published an official order, dis- 
missing Qen. Twiggs from the army, for 
treason to tho flag of his country, in having 
surrendered, on demand of authorities of 
Texas, the military posts and other property 
of the United States in his department, and 
in his charge. Forty-three army officers 
have resigned since the passage of the South 
Carolina ordinance of 8eces  ion; several of 
them without reference te that subject. 

The recently passed route bill contains a 
section requiring ten cents prepaid postage 
to and from the Pacific coast, without regard 
to distance. All drop letters are hereafter 
to be prepaid with postage stamps. 

There is a great run to- day on government 
funds, several bureaus, including the navy 
agency, have paid their last dollar. Advices 
from San Antonia intimate that government 
dispatches, ordering Col. Waite to supercede 
Gen. Twiggs, were interrupted between San 
Antonio and Camp Verde. The House 
Committee on Ways and Means has rejected 
the Senate amendment to the I'oBtoflice ap- 
propriation 1411, transferring Butterfield's 
OverUnd Mail Company to the central route, 



A National Convention to bo Called ! 

Wasuinoton, March 2 —Lincoln's Inau- 
gural was read last night to the mem- 
bers of (ho Cabine(, who have accepted. 

11 will occupy two columns of the 
National rhtelligeneerti.' No advance copies 
will be sent out. The language held by 
Lincoln is firm and decided. He will 
execute Ihe laws. The forts in the so- 
ceding States will be held, or recovered, 
and duties in seceding States will be 
cellected. He will also advocite a Na- 
tional Convention. 

The S enate will probably concur by a 
two-third vote in adoption of Corwin's res- 
olution concerning uon interference with 
slavery in States where it now exists. Sen- 
ators Hunter and Mason and others from 
the South will probably oppose concur- 
rence. 

Congress will probably pass resolutions 
to day, correcting the tariff bill as signed 
by the President It contains two StCtions 
which were stricken out by the Senate and 
House in relation to duties on wool, and re- 
lative to the warehouse system. 

The safety of Mr. Lincoln on in.iugiira- 
lion day is regarded beyond a doubt. This 
conclu.iion is reached aficr a thorough in- 
V estigation of conflicting rumors. The only 
chanoo of compromitfe, now, lies in the 
adoption of the reselutions of Mr. Corwin. 
Kvery train brings crowds of vijitors, and 
the hotels and lodging houses are filled to 
overflowing, and hundreds aremlam'^"''"g ftr 
beds and hoard 

Mr. nucn&nan bas 

JTc I.UU1U uui. urease t, 
petty revenge excited 

A report gained credence this morning 
that the Virgioia Convention had .,rt,,-rid 
an ordinance ot secession. A dispatch sent 
te Richmond elicited the following reply : 

HiniMuMi), March 2 — Rest assured this 
Convention will not vote Virginia out of the 
Union, notwithstanding the refusal of Con- 
gress to accept a compromise. 

ZXXVI Congress— Second Session. 

Wasiilsoton-, March \.—Senati Mr. Hun- 
ter opposed the proposition, arguing that it 
it was adopted the Senate would lose the 
advantages of the Dred Scott decisien. 

Mr. Crittenden was willing to sacrifice 
his own views for the good of the country, 
and would vote against his own and in favor 
of these in hopes of a pacific settlement. 

Mr. Mason did not favor amending the 
Constitution or sanction the plan proposed 
by tho Peace Convention, and denounced it 
as subversive of what rights the South 
already had. 

A long discussion ensued. 

Mr. Baker argued in favor of submitting 
the question to the people, saying that 
events change so much he was willing to 
violate the Chicago platform, and was willing 
to give up a great deal to the Border States, 
but nothing to Secession. 

Mr. Green said the propositions of the 
Conference were the merest twaddle, but 
the Crittenden resolutions have some sense. 
The right of property must be settled beyond 
doubt everywhere. 

The resolutions from the House were 
made the especial order for to-morrow at 

12 o'clock. 

Mr. Lane spoke in favor of Ihe Crittenden 
resolutions, pending which the Senate 
adjourned 

Home.. — The resoliitionsj passed paying 
Williamson one thousand dollars expenses 
fur contesting .Sickles seat. 

The Nevada territorial bill passed. Also 
the D.icolah bill. 

The joint rule was suspended and Jhe 
Senate 8 amendment to the post-office bill 
was made the special order for to-morrow 
at 12 o'clock. 

After much squabbling Ihe volunteer biil 
was taken up. Mr. John Cochran offered it. 

Adjourned. 

Wasuinoton, March 2, 1861.— — 
Mr. Sumner made a motion to correct the 
journal, where it said, resolutions from the 
Iloufe were read a first and second lime, by 
unanimous consent. He contended that 
when resolutions were read a second time, 
he himself objected, and also others near 
him. 

Mr. Douglas claimed that the amend- 
ments were read twice. The discussion 
continued some lime. 

Mr. Foot presented Ihe credentials of Ja 
cob Collamer, re elected as a Senator fmm 
Vermont The Journal was correct i ■  



Buttcrfield Company were required by Mr. 
Colfax and Mr. Sherman's amendments to 
enter into a written ugroement. to be filed 
in the Postolfiue Uepariment, and to be 
incorporated into their contract, agreeing 
to carry (iOO pounds of mail matter per trip, 
which will take all the daily papois, besidt s 
letterj'; and alto relicquishing aU claims f,r 
damages provided in the .Senate amendmm . 

The bill, after debate, was concuraed iu 
exactly as it came from tho Senate, so it is 
now a law. It reduces the cost of mail 
service to California from SI,4:i7,(»00 to one 
mi'lioD, increases the service to daily, con- 
centrates mail carrying one one line, and 
abrogsitcs Bultcrfiild's contract without 
incurring any claim for damages. 

Mr. Bingham moved to lake up Ihe bill 
reported by him providing for the collection, 
of customs on ship boord in the event of 
Illegal combinations or other obstacles to 
the execution of Ihe revenue laws, and 
authoricing Ihe President, if he deems it 
necessary, to employ Ihe army and naval 
forces for that pHrposo. 

Mr. I'helps objcciel to its consideration. 
Bingham moved a suspension of the 
Disagreed to — lu.'t to 02, Not two- 



BOM 



Mr. 
rules 
thirds 

Mr. 



Dawes called up the report of Ihe 
select committee, concluding with a resold 
lion that the Secretary of the Navy, in ac- 
eptiug without delay or inquiry, resigna- 
tions of ofbccis of the Favy, who were in 
arms against (he government whin tendering 
the same, and of those who sought to resign 
that they might be relieved from restraint 
impostd by their commissions upon engaging 
in hostilities to the constiluleil authorities 
of the nation, has committed a grave error, 
highly prfjudicial to Ihe discipline of the 
pervice, and iniuri';us to the honor and 
efficiency of the Navy, for which he deserves 
th" coD.sure of this House. 

Mr. Dawes moved the previous question. 
Mr. Branch movti to lay the resolution 
on th§ table. Disagreed ^o — &V to 96 

A^r.. Branch, as a member of tho Commit- 
tee, and inasmuch as the testimony had not 
been printed and f icl3 proved, he would not 
sustain Ihe resolution, and asked to allow 
ihe m»jorily and minority leports to be 
leid. 

The resolution was then adapted. 

Mr. Phelps offered a resolution that the 

thanks of ibis house are due. and are 

hereby prcsmted, lo tho Hon. William 

Pennington, the Speaker thereof, fvr the 

caurleous, KnA^^m^^ial adminis- 

h:.'^ dutjJP' •'"P^l^^rfsent 
- dmuis 

TTTn H. t'raig, of North Carolina," 

, bui Ihe Speoker pro ton , Mr. 

decided this to be a privileged 



FINA NCE AND TR ADE. 

WKKKT.Y KF.VIEW. 

OFFICEOFTIIK U)tll!VIt.Li« DKMOCKAT, 1 
tilTVKDAV EVB.iisil, Marclijt, lust./ 

The inoucy market for tlie week lias '.real  iuUu ac- 
tive. closlllK. lo-Jay, tlnu an.t almost strliigeot. 

The demand for loanj of l olh banks aad banklnt' 
liouses, has been tncroased coii.Jderably ijT a day or 
two past In anticipation of tlie heavy payments of the 
4th lust . which many hoiiBea Ilnd difficult to meet, 
owing to ttie contluned bockwardnesa of country pay- 
iiieriH, without bavins recour.se to bank looti^ 

At the bank^ currency li accumulallnK. and they are 
able to aBopI all reasonablo actonimodaUon lo custum- 
ern, though they do not seek puper for tnrevtment. pre- 
ferrliiK todrrllna all Uial rould probably be placed 
elsewhere, throwing, thereby, a larger amotint of paper 
thin usuallnto the i.rlvato banks, particularly that of 
ilry ;,'00'ls houses, who are la-ge borrowers. We do not 
notice, liowever, any advance In ratr i. first class paper 
Bnillnga place readily al percnt-per month, 

less known at IStSa per cent, per month. 

R.vchange 18 reported abundant, with good demand 
for Eaatern al  » prenilam. and New Orleans dull at 

prelliluiu. 

Tho olTerlngs of tincarrent money are small, ihe high 
rates at which It Is sold preventing ill but hiiiuII 
amounts from being brought to our market. 
We refer to our revised currency report lelow: 

DAILY CURRKNCV IIBPOHI. 
Tlie following are the current quotatlooa for 
Kenlucky P»r. 

1 »c dU. 



Rant 

- Hank.. 
Hanks .. 



- and Hlattt... 



1... 



, par. 



I . ^ i ..•-^burg 

Wi..„i„in - 

llllnol* (except discarded) Banks. 

Iliir. /^discarded 

Ml- 
Tei 



par. 

.... T a S 
.... 7 9 » 

...It aw 

6 



Teiimssee ~ 

Virginia - • 9 ' 



I 



dls. 
Us. 
uls. 
.lis. 
dU. 



Irgl 
Alaliama 

Michli;an - 

H. (.'arullna, N. l^rollna an 



«c dbi. 
Vc  (ls. 
»c dhi. 
Vc dls. 




I. 

tit. Loul- 

HONBY MAIIKBT BY TKLJIUHAPH. 

Otncnmin March J, P. H. 
Exchaujjeand money nialt*r8 unaltsred. 

MKW YORE aroCK MAKKCT. 

N»w Tom. March 2. T. «. 
Stocks nnseltled and Irregular wlih moderaM bu l 
tie-s doing; 

Chicago and Ro^k Island JJ'  

Oalfiia and Olcago « •* 

Clev- Und. OIuniLiiiM and Cl*iclnnalt. 

Illinois Central scrip 

Panatna 

Mi.-lr MM 



Lincoln's Inanf^ural. 

The dispatches state that Lincoln's In- 
augural has been read to members of the 
Cabinet, who have approved It. It is of 
the most coercive character if Ihe report is 
true. The Administration will execute the 
laws Sou'.b, retake the Southern forts and 
those now held retained, and the duties will 
be collected. He will convene a National 
Convention. 

Ths Ladiks' Pktition. — The pelition of 
Mrs. Emma Willard and fourteen thousand 
other American ladies, from Pennsylvania, 
New Vork, .N'ew Jersey, Delnware, Vermont, 
Indiana, New Hampshire, Tennessee, North 
Carolina and the District of Columbia, was 
presented to the Senate on Friday. This 
pelition was inclosed in a blue silk bag, 
ornamented with handsome needlework In 
presenting this petition, Mr. Crittenden al- 
luded lo the historical incident, that when 
the llomans and Sabiccj were engaged in 
battle, the women of the latter nation rushed 
between the contending hosts, and the hos- 
tile weapons dropped from the hands of the 
combatants, and peace was declared. 

CaNDIIiATE.? fOR COSORKSS IS TBI! Sei'OJID 

District. — We learn from the Henderson 
Itep^rter that the following gentlemen are 
prominently spoken of in that section 
as candidates for Congress : Honorable 
Archibald Dixon. Colonel C. W. Hutchen, 
Judge Ueorge H Veaman and William R. 
Kinney. All of these are good and true 
men, who have been tried and proved their 
worth. Regarding them as equal in other 
lespect!, wo would give our preference to 
the Hon. Archibild Dixon on account of his 
age, experience and statesmanship, la 
doing this we do not wish to be undentood 
as "".ipTTf iim  .tny means, Ihe high 



iiraacll, 
question 

Mr. Maynard said the value of a reso- 
lution of this kind depended upon the yeas 
and nays being called, and made a motion 
accordingly. 

The House refused (o order the yeas and 
nays. Tho resolution was finally adopted 
with several objections. 

Reports from Ihe Conference Commit- 
tees were from lime to time concurred ir. 




Dr. J. H. McLean's 

Strengthening Cordial 

— AM)- 

THE GREATEST REMEDY IN THE WORLD, 




AND T!l y. 
DKI.ii 1 -■ 



., a- ■! Ha:k.- 
••. r ..,k. 

. H.,..l 
Wild 

^. and 

:iierB In- 
. louuo.sltl.'ll. 
eiittrfi actlvo 

II:! jirl'i.lj.Ie 
■ In 




i.irdi 

s'ck. suttiili,,:, ai.l bli.uit..l l.N\Ai.lIj Vi IIKALTH 
and ."TKKNO nl. 

MoLEAlT'S STRENOTHEITINO 
CORDIAL 

WILL SPHiCTL'ALLY CURl 
LIVER COMPLAINT. DYSI-JSI'SY. JAt.T»DIOB. 

Chr'"l!i- n- N.. — II. ■ ■•'V, 1)'.-..;l-."r.'F .r. K ! ! -lOVS, aH'! 



E. BARB ARC., 

(8U00EB8OR TO BABBAKUU^ (t SVOwISeK), 




1 !' 
l v 
of . 

Pain . , .- 
Uearl. t'l 
tatloiis. I ■ 
d'lwi.. I . 

aw 

^lon 

or all V .\. r 
and fever 



■!at:h. 

I)i;M 
I Uie 
Kmc- 

i-ina 

I'.'es, 
• the 

1 ucy, 
11.U tiUn. 



have been sold '1 fit In no In- 
stance has Itfal. Ion. Who. 
thtn, will soHi r : illtv wh'n 
McLKAN'S STRK.NUrUliNj.NlJ l'01il;lAL vrtll core 
yoni 

Ifln^n.^rr r..n f'.iiv.- v nn s Ir'iT3t.^ M'^R'^fthe Ira- 

m"'! ■ ■ ' ■ i I f.v 

liii. 'ill 

wi-ur. ' . , .1'-. '■ i'.- ' ■ t ' , .^vlii.v-'i 

and uiutruiig orgauUatlou la reolored U  lu prlaUiie 
health and vigor. 

MARltlKD PSRAONS. 

Or others conscious of inatriuiy, iVom whatever canM, 
will find .McL-jiiu's {Strengthening CortlliU a thorough 
rogeiu-rator of the tiysD'm; and all who mm havo lil- 
|urt*.J tiieuiHelves by iniurnper Iridulgencea. wiU lUtd In 
ltil6 Cordial a ccrtatu an.l fipevly remedy. 

TO TBZ3 LASIBB. 

MoLEAN'S STRKNGTHKNING CORDIAL 



Hydraulic Fouttdertf *ir mUachine &hop^ 

Comer of Floyd and Washington Sireets, Louisville. Ky., 

TLfANlrrAC- \TIONARY AND PORTA HI.K 8TKAM BNUI ..OILRRS: CIIK7DI.AS 

i»A Saw-5: Sheet-Iron, Corpor anil llr*j« V. ori; Cast a.'. ; Strew Pli*«, for 0Mb 

or .'r . . . i I'nmp'v of varlonn klmln end Bl'.M. Alto, ; . mid Priwiea: Lard, 

llmher and .Mi., cc; * r. w ronght and (^t^Iron RalllmtB, Balconies and Veramin.^ nu ie lo order from n»w ana 
teaatlfDl de«t(oa. UTavlunsaeut by mall when deaireo. — ALAO— .j 

Macntactnrer of and Aarent for the lale ol 

HeGEOBOE'S 

GRF*Tnynr!cinD9H!NGLE MACHINE 




Cai 
ber, u 



: i per minvtet^ 
' I of Abort Uua  



DRAINING MACHINES. 



•on'' 
Die. ■ 

can niwayH l,u stteii lu operaUon. 
lv27dAwSm 



- most efl^tlva, den 
Nery now knoWri. caa 
or capacity at the Hji 
, , where a Worklna Moda 

E. BAUBAROUX. 



riudKoii 

Krle 

K»w VorkCenual. 

Paclllc Mall 

Mliwourl Blxea 

Virginia. 

Teniif.isee dlxea..., 
I hit.'.l Stales 6'a 
Coiipous.. 



unJrS 17, aud ■ - 

House read ihc; eec^jir^ 

■J. The special order wn- i 

lions which was taken up 

Mr. Lane resumed speaking against thi 
propositions, and defended himself against 
A speech of the Senator from Tennessee, 
(Johnson). He referred to the withdrawal 
of several of the State."?, and declared that 
Virginia would also go if nothing was done 
into the great Southern Confederacy. He 
also argued at some length iu favor of 
secession. 

Tho Senate met at the usual hour. 

Mr. I'earco reported from the ('ommittee 
on Conterencc on the Indian appropriation 
bill. The report was agreed lo. 

Mr. King presented a large number of 
petitions, mostly against compromise. 

Messrs. Sumner, Wilkinson and Cameron 
presented petitions of a similar character. 

A communication from the President was 
received, transmitting papers in relation to 
tho extradition case of the negro Anderson, 
which were ordered to be printed. 

A number of reports from Ihe Committee 
on I'rinting were adopted. 

Mr. Simpson's survey of the wagon road 
was laid over and a number of private bills 
were passed. 

The President sent a message to the 
House, in compliance with resolutions 
heretofore adopted, as to the reasons which 
induced him to assemble so large a number 
of troops in Washington. He submits that 
the force is not so large as the resolution 
presupposes, its total amount being only 
053, exclusive of marines, who are of courte 
at the navy yard as their appropriate sta- 
tion. These troops were ordered here as a 
poese comitatus in strict accordance with the 
civil authoriiies, for the purpose of pre- 
serving peaoe and order iu Washington, 
should that become necessary before or at 
the inaueuration of the President elect. 
What was Ihe duty of Ihe President at the 
time the troops were ordered to the city? 
Uught he lo have wailed before this precau- 
tionary measure was adopted uniil he could 
obtain proof that a conspiracy existed to 
seize the capitol ? In the language of tbe 
Select Committee, this was a time of high 
excitement, consequent upon revolutiomiry 
events transpiring all around us; the very 
air was filled with rumors and most extrav - 
agant fears and threats. Under these cir- 
oumstancce, which the President says he 
need not detail, as they appear in the 
report of Ihe Select Committee, he was 
convinced that he ought to act. The safety 
of an immen.sc amount of public property 
in this city, and that of the archives of 
the Uoverunient, iu which all the Stales 
are interested, demanded it. 

At the present moment, when all is quiet, 
it is difficult to realize the slate of alarm 
which prevailed when the troops were first 
ordered to ihis city. This almost instantly 
subsided after ■ . ■ i . f,,.j( (.qi„. 

and security i . .^.i. ... ooth in 
Washington and throughout the country. 
Had I refused to adopt these precautionary 
measures, and the consequences which many 
good men al Ihe time apprehended had fol 
lowed, I should never have forgiven myself. 

Washinqton, March 2. — Ilouee The spea. 
ker laid before the House a letter Irom 
Thomas il. Ford, resigning his office as 
printer. 

The occasional struggle for a recognition 
by the .Speaker occasioned the greatest 
possible confusion, twenty or more members 
vigorously springing to their feet, holding 
in their outsireched hands the propositions 
thoy severally strove to offer. The chorus 
Mr; Speaker," ".Mr. Speaker," was deaf- 
ening, bui that officer bore this infliction 
with becoming resignation. 

Mr. Haskin, from the Committee on Prin- 
ting, reported resolutions, which were 
passed; to piiut twenty thousand copies of 
the abstracted bonds investigation; also the 
same number of Mordecai and Delafield's 
report on military operations in the Crimea. 
.\l80 two thousand copies of the .Morrill 
amended tariff bill. 

The House then proceeded (o the Senate's 
amendments to the Post-oflice Appropria- 
tion bill. 

Tne House concurred in the Senate 
amendment by a vote of 117 agains. 43 

It was presented there by Senator Wilson 
and annuls the present Butterfield mail 
route to California by El Paso, which now 
costs $000,000 for some weekly letter ser- 
vice, but during the remainder of their 
contracted time, three and a half years, 
gives them the Central Overland Route in 
lieu of the other. They are to carry il 
daily at $1,000,000 and deliver the mails at 
Denver and Salt Lake tri-weekly, ami are 
to run a pony express semi-weekly, carry- 
ing tifc pounds each trip, for the Oovern- 
ment, free of chai :e, and reducing the cost 
cf letters by said express one dollar per half 
ounce. If Butterfield & Co., fail to accept 
this before the "5!h of March the present 
contract is to be absolutely annulled and 
the central route contract lobe let lo the 
lowest biddtr, not exceeding $1,000,000; 
the entire letter mail to be carried through 
daily, in twenty days, and the residue in 
thii ty-fivc days, at the contractors expense, 
and the Ittler to receive two months' pay 
for damages for change of service from Ihe 
Southern to the oeniral route, but the 



Additional by the Pony Express. 

Ft. Keakskt, March 2 — The following 
items of news were received by Pony Ex- 
press yesterdiiy, but their tiansmission was 
delayed until now, iu consequence of an 
accident to the tolegrapn : 

Sandwich lelands —The former tariff was 
 "  per cent , which some tnink is as high a 
duly as the best interests of the Islands will 
aJrait without materially cheeking tride. 
This subject is freely discussed by the local 
papers. The annual staiislios also show a 
large decline iu the production of the prin. 
cifal staple products of the Islands, which 
is looked upon By all parties as somewhat 
singular, and not so easily accounted for. 
The Polynesian attributes it lo drought and 
bliglit, but the Advertiser denies that these 
causes have had even as much effect during 
18G0 as in previous years, butt attiibutes it 
to the financial policy of the government. 

From a table published by the Advertiser 
it appears that there had been a dicressd in 
imports for the year I8G0 of .'J;!32,O0O, in 
exports of 5128,000, in domestic produce 
exported of •'51 18,000, in revenue receipts of 
nearly ?16,00 ), a large decrease in Ihe 
transhipment of oil and bone, and adec eise 
of twenty-two merchant arrivals, with a 
tunnage of 18,000 tuns. The late census 
gives Honolulu a population of 12,i08 nativo 
Hawaians and half caste and 1,010 foreign- 
ers and their children and 28-5 Chinamen. 
Ihe foreign population consists of 1,180 
males and 130 lemnles. A movement was 
being made to erect a monument to Capt. 
Cook. 

The exportalion of Hawaian salt during 
1800 amounted to 884 tuns. 

Hon. Juo A. Parker, the new U. S Con- 
sul, had arrived at Honolulu and entered on 
his ofTioial duty. 

The resolution which passed (ho assem- 
bly early in the week, endorsing the Crit- 
tenden compromise plan and Ihe patriotic 
support thereof, by Douglas and Breckin- 
ridge, is still under consideration m Ihe 
Senate. It was drawn up liy Gen. Denver, 
and is advooited by a portion of both wings 
of the Democracy as a bisis for reorganizing 
that party in California The proposition 
inth»Senat? is lo strikeout the names of 
Doug!a- and breckinrid^e, and then endors 
ilie - ' • : n pUn. 

Se I vin^ the ^^"'^(Jpfj 

^f4, and the 
iJaJ to nnin- 
candidate, if possible. 



4S 

.13*11 

. ... 





77 

7« 

ai 





The general market haa show j con^lje^le Improre- 
nipnt ilurlnn the past week under the l^ter faclllllM 
tor Bhlpnii'nt and a foreign demand. 

PLUUR—The demand la active and flew are well 
malDtaliied, with Mies of «,1W hbla at Icea rangtnx 
from^i MforSneto %t®i Mfor extmandts 7i&t 
for fancya 

OIIAIX— The receipts of wheat conAna moderate, 
with sales of 15,700 bushels al $1@1 lolt^okc while 
would proliably bring (t IS. Corn unde large recelpla 
has been weak but rather active, witusales of 2S,100 
bnsl:clii. Ocod mixed com sold aa low   47c, sacks In- 
cludod, from slore.and ctiulce white al 3c. We quote 
mixed and white shelled at  7@s c albc extremes. 
Very Utile car com was offered al VAiS/in. OaH have 
been qiilel but arm, with iialei of 8,S00 ushels at 
^.'•c lu bulk, and 3tiSS7c In sacks from sloe. No sales of 
rye reported. A sale of 500 buahe Is o f sad barley al SOc 
Ij no (|uoiallon for that article, which imomlnally un- 
changed since our laat report. 

OL.NNIES-yuiet bulttrm, wUh sales) 1,500 at 16c. 

BAtiOI.NQ A.ND ROPK-The market lu been quiet. 
Large shipments, however, have been mile to New Or- 
Icaus. AVe quote at l.tSlS ISc for hand J power loom 
bagging, and 7@&c for baud to machine  pe. and sales 
of 190 coils. 

Ct/TTONS-We quote at TtSsc ftir wconrate to mid- 
dling, and Miles of 10 bales. Sales of cotcn yams at 
», 9 and lOc per doien for Nos. 700, COO aniiVOO. 8aiM 60 
coils cotton rope al liic. Bheeilngs have *en dull, and 
sales of 3S balls only were reported at fJutSc for regn- 
Ur brandn. 

n'DOI.-Markel dull with reporte I salevof 10,000 lbs 
grease from wagons and store al Iti^aic. ; 

CIIKKSK AND BUTTKR-Duli and unclngcd-sales 
421 boxes al fSfiiKc lor W. R. Duller lial been more 
active and sales of 3,.KOft3 at \i(a.Wic. ' 

KdOS— Are quoted al lie per doezn. • 

WUI9KY— Whisky has been active andiluctaallng, 
closing at I' c, and sales fur the week of I.O^ bbls. 

ALCOUOL— Has been Arm, and prlcesare higher 
with sales at 29 a30c for 71; to 98 V cent. prof. 

LKAD AXP SHOT- Lead is unchangad a former quo- 
tations, gales shot at $1 70 tar patent aid t2 15 for 

t.U.li. 

IRO.V AND NA1I,3-We quote bar ir* al 3c for 
Blonecoal. and 4c for charcoal; boiler Iron *, 4j»c; sheet 
Iron al 4y«c for stonccoal. and 6@.V «c iir charcoal. 
Nails are selling at t2 £5 for lOds. 

01 1.S-Sales of linseed oil al 7@Sc. Sal« of lard oil 
at ! 0@95c. We quote castor at tl 10®! JO. • 

OINSKNa-Verydullat40c. ( 

FKATllKRS-A drag at S5c. 

APPI.US. KtC— The demand is prloctpaly tor choice 
varieties of appl' s at from $3 to |4 ixr bbl, and sales ot 
cm liii s. Potatoes are in fair request at Irora tl 25 for 
coninion to tl 75 for choice, and sales oi 1,066 bbls. 
Onions dull at  1 75. Beans are active SI 25 fcr 
rlioics. 

HAY— Opened weak and closes Arm. but rather quiet 
at ti: (ii 16 per ton from store, and iiales of .^0 bales. 

OROCi;RIE*-The market haa sustained . nrm poal- 
lion with a good demand from abroad. Sales were re- 
porte-l of 47C hbda sutfarat &W£tt7^ic. and Ib7 bbis rc- 

L-..1 



h.'liat 1)1,® 10' 
.^ al32c, an.l 
I o hair bbli 



al 



mate a .-:'.unt 

and endeavor t.i get a joint convention 
afterwards. If that party's strength can 
be concentrated ou one candidate it will 
probably be easy (o procure (he four or 
five voles needed to call a convention, and 
elect from eiiher the Republicans or Breck- 
inridgcites, according as the candidate is cf 
Nortftern or Southern predilection. 

The Douglas men held a caucus al Sacra- 
mento last night. All the member.-t were 
present. Two ballots were taken for U. S. 
Senator, on each Denver received 17, Nu- 
gent 10, Randolph 12, and A. C. Dougall 
15. Necessary to a choice 28. 

Leet and Walden declined to vote. 

The caucus adjourned to meet this even- 
ing. 

North Carolina Convention Elections. 

QoLDSDoRo, N. C, March 1. — Wayne 
count official gives 1,008 majority for a con- 
vention. Secessionists elected. Nash county 
elects a Secessionist by 917 majority and 
gives 90 msjority for a convention. In 
Lake county Secessionists arc elected; for 
the convention 100 majority. Warren 
county elects Secessionists and is largely for 
he convention. In Person county a Union- 
ist is elected and the convention has a large 
majority. Norihampton elects one Unionist 
and one Secessionist; a large majority for a 
convention. 

Raleii.u, N. C, March 1. — The mails and 
telegraph report ;i7 countie.o, 21 for compro- 
mise, lo lor secession, and 3 divided The 
State has probal ly gone against a conven- 
liou by a majority. Many Union counties 
give msjorities for a convention. 



Missouri uonvention. 

St Lot'is, March 2. — In the Convention 
yesterday (he motion to table the motion to 
reconsider the vote by which the resolution 
requiring members to take the oath to 
support the Constitution of the United .States 
and the Stale of Missouri, was adopted, 
was lost — 05 to 30. Members were then 
qualified. 

In the afternoon (he Convendbn was 
permanently organized by the election of 
ex-Governor Sterling Price, President, and 
S. L Low, Secretary. 

The President laid before the Convention 
a communication from Luther J. Slim, 
announcing himself a Commissioner from 
Georgia. The motion and communication 
were laid on Ihe table. At^ourncd. 



Terrific Explosion. 
New Have.s, .Murch 1. — A boiler in the 
gun factory of (he Whi(ney Arms Company 
exploded at noon, demolishing the machin- 
ery in the east end of the building, and 
injuring some twenty persons. Major Nor- 
ton and .Mr. Oliver were Clown across the 
street. Paul Savage, engineer, was serious- 
ly injured. E R. Farmer, W. S. Richards, 
Samuel Hall and Laban Oliver and son were 
badly scalded. Nine others were injured 
by being buried in the ruins. All will 
undoubtedly recover. Physicians and 
engines went out to the scene, but the latter 
were not needed. The cause of the explo- 
sion is unknown. 

Virginia Convention. 

Ri  fiMONt), Va., March 1. — In the Con- 
vention to-iay Ihe resolution to submit the 
question to a vote of the people*wheiher to 
remain with the North or secede was re- 
ferred. The speeches made to-day indicate 
that the peace propositions are acceptable 
lo the Uuiouists, but are denounced by the 
Secesniouists. 

The Peace Commissioners were invited to 
seats in the Convention as a substitute lo 
the resolution inviting them to address the 
Convention. 

Fngitive Slave Rescued. 

New Vobk, March 2 — Two deputy U. S 
Marshals attempted to put a fugitive slave 
named John Polhemus, said to belong to 
Mr. J.imison, of Louinburg, Va , aboard the 
steamer Vorktown, but he was rescued from 
ihrir custody by a crowd. The cfiicers had 
no warrant. 

Charleston (S, C.) Items. 
Charlkoion, March 1 — The Courier says 
it is doubtful if Pretident Davis intends 
visiting Charleston. The Courier also says 
SIOO.OOO were subscribed on Wednesday 
towards establishing a line of steamers 
direct to Liverpool. 

North Carolina Election. 

Wilmington, .March 2 — In about twenty 
counties heard from each are generally 
largely for secession and a convention. The 
middle counties are largely Union and 
against a convention. There is much doubt 
about the result in the State. 



From De'roit 
Detroit, Maroh 2 — .Vn address signed 
by the Governor, State otficeis and nearly 
every Repub ican member the Michigan 
Legislature has been sent lo Lincoln, by 
Lieut. Gen. Birney, recommending Chase 
for Seoretary of the Treasury, 



1 1 - ■i...'d fa s of S "I 
tjl-;*, aliJ i;i Lec^al :5c. 

UiUKS AND LKATUBR — Dull and uni hanged. 
9mall transactions in dry hides reported at I0@13c. 

II8M1 —Uas declined, and we notice sales of 50 tons 
Kentucky al tvO 

I'KOVISIONU-Measrs. Stewart A Barter report ai fol. 
lows: In the early part of the week provisions were 
quiet, but holders firm. During the past few days more 
u6tivlty has been apparent, and some heavy lots have 

I hanged hands at full flgurea. In tiarrei oiealao a l- 
vance has been (subllshed. closing firm at $17 25 for 
tliy brands, and $17 for country. Ihere Is considerable 
inquiry for bulk sides, wh'ch are becoming scarce in this 
market. Bulk shoulders readily bring 6i«c. generally 
held higher. Bacon In fair request but not quotably 
lilglier. I.ard still remains very dull— held al ^l«ISeSc 
but buyers only offer 9c, The sales of the week are: 

Monday- lUbbU city meaa at $17; tscaskarib side 
bacon at 

Tu.'sday- 27 bbIs city mesa at $17; 40 bbIs conntry do 
at $16 75; 6,O0U pieces bulk sides at biic; 2,(l00do do 
shoul.lers 6',,t; 12 tea prime lard at tUc, 

Wednesilay— 462 bbls city m ess at $17; 2IS bbls country 
do al $li'; 73; 17 tea prime lard at 9\4c; IS csks rib aide 
bacon al 9Uc. 

Tliursdav-lC2 bbis country meaa al $16 Sl^; 1,000 bbU 
do do al $16 75; JL 5 bbis city mess al $17; 65 bbls rumps 
at $11. 

Friday-330 bbls city mesa at $17; 260 bbls do do at 
$17 2' ; 400 bbls country on private terms; M)0 pes bulk 
near sides at 9'4c; 4CDdo do shoulders at (c; 4C0do do 
lisms al 7!Wc: 15 ca^ks clear rib sides al lOiic; 10 casks 
rib .sides al SSc 

Saturday— 300 bbls city mess at $17 25 ; 200 dodo on 
iirlvate terms; 150 bbls coualry mess at $17; 160 bbls M 

0 a-. $16 M. 2S0 bblsmmpsat $11 SO: 50 do deal $ll;3,0OU 
pes Lutk shoulders at 6.14c; 31C do do sides at S ac; 600 
bacon shoulders al 7^4C; 16,000 sugar cured hams on pri- 
vate terms; 20n casks t acon at old rait s. 

TOUACX'O— The market continue') active and prices 
full, with sales of 377 hbds as follows: 

.Monday— The sates at the warehouses were 97 hhds 
as fol'ows: 1:1 al $2 2i)is 2 90; 29 at $3.'^ 90; i al $4#4 70; 
S al $5^5 35; 6 al $«^6 65; 6 at $7@7 SO; 4 at $S(g»S 65; 3 
at $9S9 75;2at$10@i0 .10, and 1 al $11. 

Tuesday— Sales of 74 hhds at the warehmisea to-day 
as follows : 5 at $1 li® 1 1.,',; .S at $2 15@2 90; 33 at $3@3 50; 
5 al $1®4 75; 4 at $5 35®5 -S5: at $*(36 90. 7 at $7®: 85; 

II al»Sw!j S; 2 at $9 .'.■Jisj'J lO; at $1 Ti, an 1 2 at $11® 11 50. 
Wednesday— Sales at warehouses 83 hhda as follows 

lal$170; I2al$2(S2 0: 20at$3#38-; 9 al $4@4 80; 7a 
$5 I5#.^ 95; 4 at t6@6 90; « at 7@7 6.- ; 3 at tSiS« 75; 5 a 
tDia') 8^: 3 at $IO@I0 7.'i; 2 al $1 1 5(i; and 1 at $13. 

Th iriday— Salts al llie warehouses were 50 hhds as 
as fuliows: 5 at $1 80C41 90; 10 al K&2 95; 8 at 3&i 90; 9 
at $irit4 911; 8 at $5 50(^5 9C; 3 at $4@  60; S al $7(47 50; 

1 at X: 1 al $9 (ti, and I al $10 

Fil lay-Tiie sales at the warehouses were 45 hlids 
asfollow.s:  al$lS0@II.S5; 10 at $2re«v2i)(l; 7at»3 a3*); 



at $1 IOi. ^l 95: 3 at t: upi 95: 0 at $6 $6 8li ; 2 al $7@i; 
2 at Styfcs .V); I at $1"; 1 at $1 1 5U 



75; 



;*aturilay— The siller at the warehouses were SN hh.Js 
as follows: 2at $1 50011 80: 6 at tl 4U^2 95: 3 at $3 15@ 
3 90: 7 at $l( t4 95: 7 at tt^i (»; 3 al $6 2S@6 8U; 1 al 
$9 05, and i at $10. 

HARKKT8 BY TBLHOIUPH. 

Niw York, March 2. P. H. 

c ttnn il'i.ll and nominal. Flourdull. prices have un- 
' portant change. Whisky llrm— sales 450 

V hest uiore stea ly. Kye (iiiiet at 6b ^7ix. 
tl -No important change In corn. Oats 

;;i . l .. I'orlt-saieo iiiObbls me»ii at $17 ri. Bugar 
in moderate request. Molasses uucbanged. 

OlN''lNl«ATl. Marcli 2. P. H. 

y ' • ■ . _ ■ . 



erm Hf the lleL.a. i . jl 
Circuit Court has been postponed, owing te 
the absence of Judge FowUr at the Living- 
ston Court, which has a heavy docket. 

New Terbitouies — The bill creating the 
territories of Nevada and Dacotah has 
passed the Senate. 

Court ot Appeals. 

KR i.xiroRi, .Marcn 1. 1861. 

CArslS DECIDED. 

O)mnionwea]lh vs Turner; opinion delivered; name 
stricken Irom the roii of altoriiei s of this Court on 
charges Nos I tiiik 2: ail t he other charges dismissed. 

Spratt vs WUkerson. Montgomery; reversed. 

ORPEBS. 

Oatewood's heirs qs Oatew..od*8 ex'ra. Montgomery; 
mandate modlSe^l so as to ^tve appellants a Judgmtutt 
for cost InClrcu t Couit. 

Carter vs Heiitoii . l.oii Ch'y: motion to set aalde man- 
date awarding daniagi s. 

bowc vs Oiniiiicnwe. I h. Mercer, ordered that man- 
date Issue herein iniuiedialelv. 

Louisville city vs Kuili, l.ou Cli'y; petition for rehear- 
ing lliud. 

Uostctter v9 RtansI erry el al. Lou Ch'y; petition for 
modiacalion of niaudale aied. 

Frankfort. March 2, 1.%1. 

CAUSES DECIDED. 

Gray vs Speed k Bealtlo el al. Lou Ch'v; reversed; 
Harris vsatnie. L-»u Ch'y: r-versed. 
Berry, iir., vs Uiimllioii, Ac , UaiU; altlrmed. 
Keliar vs atepheu-, Ac , Fraukiln, reversed. 

ORDERS. 

Bate V8 0r"v. Lou Ch'y; dismissed. 

Victor vs 'Iroutiuan, Bourbon; response to petition for 
rehoaring delivered and pet'llon for rehearing over- 
ruled. 

.Mcltaynold vs Talbo'-t. Lou Ch'y; petition for modlll- 
ca'lon of opinion overruled. 

Italilwin vs B.ixu r. CLtrke; rehearing granted. 

Crier vs Petiton el ux. el al. Lou Ch'y: motion to cor- 
rect mandate ovemj'ed. 

Ilustetter vs lEtansbcrry.l.oulsrllie Chancery; opinion 
mo-iitli-d. 

Gouiinnnwealth vs Twiner; opinion and mandate 
suspended till tenth day of next term. 
Court adl'iunied tilt the tlrsl .Monday In June. 



For Associate Joiise of Court of Appeals. 

A' ('.-.* ion JHondai/. Mirch l.s, IMl. 
We ari- anthoriied lo annonnce JOPnUA f. 
BULLITT, Esi., as a candidate for Ju^ge in tlils Appel- 
late District, to nil the vacancy occasioned by the death 
of Judge Wood. feSOdAwte 

1^ We are aulborlted to announce THOMAS W. 
UlLliY. Esq.,of Bullitt county, as a candidate forjudge 
of tho Court of .Appeals, lo till the vacancy occa&ione l 
by the d-ath of Judge Wood. feW dAwte* 

aj-We are authorljed to announce Judge TH0MA8 
E. BRAMLHTTE as a candl late for Judge of the Court 
of Appealsat the ensuing election. mr3dAwle 



Palmer's Vegrctable Cosmetic Zio- 
tion 

RIMOVU Pimples and all other blemishes from the face 
and other parts of the person. 

II cures Chilblains by one thoroagh application. 

It cures every variety of lu (lamed. Itching or IrrltatlDg 
Diseases oi the i^kln. 

It cures Warts without fall. See directions. 

It cares the most desperate cases of Tetter. Examtao 
the targe amount of evidence to subjlanliale these factn . 

It has restored to aociely thousands that have tod 
years in seclusion on account of some unsightly erop- 
Uon of the face. 

It cores Boras about the noee and mouUi by a few ap- 
pticatlons. 

It cures the Barber's I*'  wiihnnt fall 

11 ouies Bums, Pea ■ 
many cases operuUug \ 
accompiUhini more tl: 

II Is the great Skin I' . 

no more money ou wort . .-i ,L ; u'- t; 

once on« king of them al! 

Prepared only by 




EVEKYBODY USES IT! 
EVERYBODY'S FRIEND 

IS THE GENUINE 

PERRY DAVIS' 

VEGETABLE 

PAIN-KILLER. 

ASK TUK ATTKN'TlON 0» THKTKADB AND 

- — Mlc to this iong-ti-ated and cnrlvaled 



SV«KY BOTTLK 



Icte.), McLean's 
robust. Delay 
:i 1 meed. 



1. 



1 who may 

:rill3 trash, 
-t as good, 
.■'nlng tJor 
 -medy that 



'lUghly. and at the same Ume 



If your chlldre-! 
Cordial will mak.- • 
Dot a momenl. tr  
IT I.  I 

CACnON-Bev. i 
try to iialiu ut-'ii ^ 
wiilch tliev buy 
Avoid sui ii tiliMi. 
dial, ,i: ' ■ . - ■ ■ 
wli! ; 

strei 

On- ... : . ir.t n every morning fasting, Is a 

c.erlalii preventive lor Ciioiera, Chills and revor. Yellow 
Fever, or any prevalimt dUiease. II la put up la large 
bottlea. 

Price only tl per bottle. t^^Wtles for t9. 

J. II. MoLRAN, 
Bole Profflelrir of this CordiaL 
Also Mcl.ean s Volcanic Oil Liniment. 
Principal Depot on the comer of Third and Pine sta. 
St. LouU, Mo. 

BXcLZAXT'S 

VOLCANIC OIL LINIMENT. 

TUK BKSX UNIMKNT IN THS WORLD. 

The only safe and rdlftble cure for Cancors, inie?*, Tfx 
mors, tfwfl!in*fs, and Brom-'uflo or Goitre, Parnlvsls 
Neuralgia. Wetikueiw of the Muscles, Chronic or Indam. 
matory Kheuiiiatl.^m, Sililucs-i of the Ji^ints. Coiitractefl 
MoDclcii or Ll^anientM, Earacho or Toutliache. bruiaes, 
Spralnfi. W oMi.l-^, Fr. -l, Tuf^.r'. .t-, F.'W-r ^uv-.., Cuke-f 
Brea-' - - fcure Tliniat, or 

any 
how 

ebral- . 1 :.. . 

Thou-uii u ul human b«-)UKii iiuvu buea uved a life ot 
docr« i»!tuile aud misery by the use of thlw invaluable 
medicine. 

McLearCs Volcanic OU lAnmmi 

Will rcllt^re pain aimo.'it Indtantitneously, and It irlll 
cleans, purify and heal the footeet Horea in an iacredt- 
bly short time. 

For IIoTtct and Other AnimaU. 
McLean'rt Uelebrated (.' "1 re- 

liable rtiiiMy fur the c;. .•. Ln'l- 

Rallrt, lipllnrs, an:ialiir i] ' It 
Witt never fail to r . i. .i i run- 

ning son-a, or bwv- - i.r MpralnB, 

bnilses. hcratchfh, :. .t: or collar 

5a!l.'», cul8, acres or .V .1 i . .- a:, i. inine remedy 
ipl ly H as directed, *uid a cure U certain In every In- 
stance. 

Then trltle no longer with the many worthleaa Linl 
ments offered to yoii. Obtain a eiipply of Dr. McLean* 
Oelebrated Llulment. It wUl cure y« a. 

J. H. McLKAN, Sole Proprietor, 
Cornpc of Third and I'liie Pt . St. I/ tjls, Mo. 
l^.Por kale In LouUviil^; i.y Itaynioud a Tyler. Ge 
H. (^ey, ami by evt-o' re •i^ectahle Dru^adflt and dea 
In medicines In the United states. se3 dAwly Int 



• li'^w (ievtre, or 
Mcl.«au's Oel- 



laaaLMT oaftTnL- 



Carter & Buchanan, 

DEAL^S IN 

GARDEN AHO GRASS SEEDS 

A.N'l) .^fANU^ACTUKKK8 OF 

AgricultuTtil Implements, 

)y26dAw mmgVTLLH. KT. 



W. PITKIN ^M. L. P. WIAKD BtNJ. P. AV£RT 

Pitkin, Wiard & Co., 

WIIOLEsALK DtALKRS I.N 

SEEDS, 

AQRICUI.TTJRAL IMPi.KMICNTS AND MACHINES, 
'IrevB, ClaiiLi, Lime. IlydraQllc Cement, Plaster. Ac, 

311 MAIN 8TREKT, 
l.aiial Tlll«i Kr. 

Mr. Avery helrg a partner in onr b' ' 

'1 1 to fU'-Titih wiii';e"^'.- .'.ealers with hij Plo 




80L0N PALMER, 



No. M West Fourth atreet. Cincinnati. Ohio. 
ICr For sale in l,onisville by ItAVTilOND * TYLBR 
and by Drugitisu geueraDy. de7 deodAweow 

The Oreat Bnglish Remedy I 




SIR JAMES CL.VRKE'S 
Celebrated Female Pills. 

Tbu Invaluable meilicine Is nnfalllnK In the core o 
ttioae painful and dangerous diseases IncUeat lo the 
female constitution. 

It moderates all excesses and remores a obetracttons 
from whatever caose, and a speedy care ay be relied 

OQ. 

To Married I^adlea 

pecnllarly salleil. It will, in a short time, bring 
the monthly perloil with rcKUtarlty. 

i'antloa. 

Theie pais should not lie takm bv femate* thai art 
prtenani, duriitg Ihe FIRST THHEE MONTHX, as 
Ihey are sure lo Irring on Miscarriage ; but at every other 
ime, and in curry other case, thej/ are prr/ectli/ safe. 

In all cases of Nervous and fiplnai AfTections. Pain in 
be Back and Llmbe. Heaviness, Fatigue on slight exer- 
tion, Palpitation of the Heart, Lownesa of Spirits. Hys- 
crlcs. Sick Headache, Whlt«s, and all the paln'nl Dl». 
eases occAbioued by a disoritered system, these PIIU 
will effect a cure when all other means have failed. 

Pull direclions iu the pamphlet aroaud each package, 
which should be carefully preserved. 

A boUie conUlntng Atly PUls. and encircled with tke 
Qovornment Stamp of Great Britain, can tie seat 
free for 91 and six postage stamps. 

«S_ Qenerai Agent. JOB M08R8. 

Rochester. New York. 

4^ Sold in LonisTllIe by Raymond A Tyler, Springer 
A Brother, and all the wholesale and retail Druggists. 
Sold In New Albany by Dr. T. R. Austin. 

f 027 deodAweow 



An Aet of Oratitude. 

TWKITT TnOCSAND COPITS OF A MtlMCAl, BOOS FOR ORI- 

iTOfS Ciacui.ATios— By a sujftrer^ who has beea elTec 
lually cured of nervous debllily, loss of memory, and 
dimnes.4 of sight, resulting from early errors, by follow- 
ing the inttr ictlous given in a medical work, and who 
considers it his nly. lu gratitnde to the author, and for 
the benefit of Consumplive and Nervous salTerer^. to 
publish the means nsed. He wlil therefore send ftee, 

any address, on receipt of lA 3 stamps, a opy of tlie 
work, containing every Information required. Address 
Box t n. Postofflce. Albany. N. T. de8 dAwly 



XT' The following is an extract from a letter, written 
by the Rev. J. .1. Holme, pastor of the Pierrepolnt-Slreel 
Baptist Church, Brooklyn. N. Y., to the ''Jouriuland 
Meseeuger," Cincinnati. 0., and speaks volumes in favor 
of that world-renowned medlciue. Mftfl. WiNSLow's 
Soothing Sirup for CiniDRXJi Tkctuino :— 

" We see an ailTertlsemant in your columns of Mrs. 
Winstow's hooryiNO .Sisrp.  Jow we never paid a wonl 
lu favor 01 a patent medicine liefore in our llf*-, but we 
feel compelle i, o say to your reader?* itiat this Is no 

humbug— WS UAVE TRtKP IT, AND ENOW IT TO BE ALL IT 

CLAIMS. It is probably oiieot the most successiul niedi 
cines of the day. beiauso it Is oue of the best. Aud 
th'ih.. i.f your readers wlio have babies can t de bi tter 
M l \- In a suoulv." laJlHva'lAiv 



-Molasses nuiet 



! 1... 1 . 
It 30(932c. 



Fire in Cincinnati- 

CiNriNNATi, March '1. — Yesterday after- 
noon the liquor eetablishment of HotTbeimer 
Brothers was destroyed by fire, with most 
of their stock in store. L. L. Harding's 
commission house, adjoining, was damaged 
to the amount of probably $2'i00. The 
aggregate loss is about $20,uO0, which is 
fully covered by insurance. 



Execntive Council Dismissed. 

St Jiiii.\9, N. K., March '1 — Executive 
Council was dismissed by the Oovernor 
to-day, owing, it is said, to the Colonial 
Secretary charging the Governor with 
aibisting the minority to defeat the currency 
hill. There is likely to be a general else- 
lion. 

The Tariff Bill. 

PnilADELrHiA, March '1. — A special dis- 
patch received in this city says the Presi- 
dent has signed the Tariff bill. 

Sonthern Confess. 

MoNTOOMKBT, March 1 — ( ong eis has 
been in secret session all da; . P.ier 0. 
liurregard was confirmed Brigadier Qen- 
erai of the provisional Army. 



We published a statement, a few 
days since, to the effect that the Hon. I. N. 
Morris, of Illinois, made a patriotic speech 
on the 22d, but, unfortunately, forgtt his 
own remarks and reoited a speech of Daniel 
Webster's, spoken as far back as 1832. 
This should read the Hon. I. N. Arnold, 
Black Republican Representative from the 
Chicago district. 

t&' Hon. Horatio King's draft on Mr. 
Guizot, assistant treaturer of Louisiana, for 
$^300,000 was disUouored a few days age as 
Secretary Diz's had been. 

John Ttler. — This gentleman havingrc- 
(urned to Virginia, is now an oul-and ouier, 
and is doing hia worst to carry Virginiaout 
9f tb« Union, 




WHEELER & WILSON'S 

SEWING MACKINES, 

No. I f la Temple, Iwaiavlllei Kv* 

THE GREAT ECONOMISER OF TIME 

ANH PRESKRVER OF HEALTH, 
HAVE WON THE HIGHEST PKEMIU.MS 

AT THE FAIR OF THE 
CNITED STATES AG RICULTURAL SOC'Y, 
AT THE STATE FAIRS OF 
MAINE, VERMONT, 
CONNECTICUT, 
NEW YORK, NEW JERSEY, 

PENNSYLVANIA, VIRGINIA, 
MISSISSIPPI, MISSOURI, 
OHIO. INDIANA, 
ILLINOIS, MICHIGAN. 
WISCONSIN, CALIFORNIA AND 

AT THE F.URS OF THE 
AMERICAN INSTITUTE, NEW YORK. 
MECH AN ICS'ASSOCI ATION. BOSTON. 

FRANKLIN INSTITUTE. BALTIMORE, 
METROPOLITAN MECflANICS' INSTI- 
TUTE. WASHINGTON, 
MECHANICS' ASSOCIATION. CINCIN- 
NATI. KENTUCKY fN.'STITUTE. LOUIS. 
VILLE, MECHANICAL A8SOCIATION.8T. 
LOUIS, MECHANICS' INSTIT E, SAN 
FRANCISCO, AND AT HUNDREDS OF 
CODNTY FAIRS. 

The Lock-Stitoh made by this Machine 
is the only stitch that cannot bn ravpled. 
and that presents the same appearance upon 
each side of the seam. It is made with two 
threads, one upon each side of the fabric, 
and interlocked in the center of it. 



HSf SEND FOR A CIRCULAR. 
tl9dead*WMWInst( WM. "7' VNKK Ac CX), 



.trian, MillefBead aud 
l-i i klN. WTARD A OP. 

GARGEiT SEEDS. 

We hare oiic "f iho rlno.u a'^sorlm-nt'* of Qarden 
Pwds ( ver oil. i ■ d for -aiL' iti th's uiaTki't. Kv*T -tt.lttK 
warranted fresn and tn:o to name. Uherai diacouot 
male t'  wJio'e-^alp i|fnl).'i"!* 

Our iUufttraieJ Almsnac an-i Cafalo^e. kI^I^iC 
scrlptlons of evarythlng eoM by us, funiUi-s-t gratl;*. 

PITKIN. WIA]^ A 00. 

FLOWER~SEEOS. 

We oftipT for Kalo oiio huii Ircd rh-lot* vAiiptlec, being 
self'cted aa those wh^cb ur * leH tor C^anteu Culture. 

Price liumlrc^l pain-rs, ; pt r dozen papem, bCnt 
by luall, 50c~alwayi In ailvance. 

dtuluKUcrs a«.)it ou aupHcs'l II). 

PiTKIN. WT\KD A CO, 

fel7 d »w LmuIivI'Ih. Ky. 

i Large aud Choice Selection of Fresb 
and Genuine Home-Grown 



GARDEN SEEDS, 

PUT UP AND SOLD WaOI.ESALR AaND RKTAIi^ 
iu Paperaor Bulk, by 

J. D. BONDURANT, 

AT HIS 

SEED AND AGRICULTURAL WARE- 
IIOUaE. 

)34 STm near sixth. 



FTKT^n AND OKASS SKKDS- 

To 1 ■ ' !»■ 1 -r^l can offer superior Induce- 

C' : i: tly answcrod. and UeBcrlptlve 

cata . rioedi and Krult Trees fumlshej 

on appiictiUoii. de2 d* wtf. 



rranklln ZnsnrAnce Oompany, 

OT LOtnSVILLS, ET. 

OWIOE-OOiiNRIl OF MAIN ANTt BULUTT 
second story, Ncwccmb'* btilldlns 
This ComiJany coutinace to ma«fe inaoranc* ft 
the perils of uavleatk r. cn shlpB, •iteauiboaLa aud th 
carjtoe. ; alio, aitalnst Ijia by Are on v-w^b an*! sttreD 
tK ata (bulMtng and In port.) and bouttrs and -^outeLt^. 
A^KAuui Hin.Sec'y. JAB.T&ABUa, ?r&i^ 

Wm. Qar. Charles B. Johnaton, 

Wm. GarvlD Warrct) Newcomb. 

Jaa. 9. LlthKOW, Bam'l K Neck, 

Juo. W. A idertiOB, Wm. Terry, 

Jas. II. \V: !. r G«. a Ca:it!«nua, 



h roKr ^fftMaad iShxiit awi /Voer quickly yield to 
thepowerol the PairhiilUer. 

Wnal stronger proof ut ths^ facts can be prodaced 
than the futlowing letter received, uoHuUcKed.nom Kev. 
A.W,.Canluf 

ROVBO, Macov^ Co . Miotf ., July 9. ISW.^ 
Mtttrt. J. N, Ilirru  .i- • '.-Kn: The confi- 

dence I have In Perrj* Da • - aa a remedy 

Oolds, Couehs, !}urDi , t^pr ; niaatUiu. for the 

cureof whlcb I have sutx . ; . i.-- : it. Induces me 
to cheerfully recomiueud ILtt % lriuo« to others. 

A few months ago I had recourne to It to destroy 
felon— although 1 had never hoard of Ita belug UMd ft r 
that puri'*»se. but havtug liutl'.-red iDleuwly (Vom a for- 
mer one, au t having ao other remedy at l^&lid. I ap- 
plied tho Pain KlUer freely for about dficeu mlnulee Rt 
evening, and repeated the acpliuitlon very briefly the 
next uioriilng— wIil',-1: ei.tlrwy destroyed the felon, and 
Ibcrewed my confldence lu the utility of the reraeay. 

YourH, truly. A. W. CUUTIBS. 

Minister of tho Wesloyan McthodlKt Church. 

TBB VAXSS RIXtZiZlXL 

Qu been tebted In • ii;d bya 

most erery natloif K . ,e almoet 

cou8tJ»nt companlc:, : the nitt*- 

glooary and the trav . . i,,: -i^ ti mi l ..Ui :- «iiid no one 
should travel on our lakes or rivers without U,   

Be kure yuu call fur and get the genuine Pain KlUer, 
aamauy worthier nostrums are attempttd to be sold 
on th i great reputation of this valuable medicine. 

4^I trucUon£ accompany each bottle. 

Price 25 centa, 50 cents, and 91 p««r bottle. 

J. N. HAItKlM & Co.. . 

Proplelors for the Western Hu'ie.i Cinclnnall, ohto. " 

Hold wuolesale aud retaU by aU tao PrugglbU ui Ltn* 
svUle and the Bute. 

'i'HEY ARK 

PRAISED BY ALL! 

no N T UELAV TO 

Purity the JBlood! 
Dr. Weaver's 

Canker aud 8alt Kheum 

rOB TBXCJUKBOr OAMKKR, 8ALT OHKUU, BBX- 
8IPKLA8, SCKOfULOUS DI8EA8K8, CUTANBOUS 

mRumoss. a:.d kveky kind of diseass 

ARISING IfBOM AN IMPURK 8TATB OJf THt 
BLOOU. 

Th« aiMt EflTectlTe Rlo*d Pariflar mt th 
NlBetMatk C'«BtarT. 

It la the preacriftloti of an odii';at«*i Phyalcian, uid 
all wUo are aUlicled wiilt any of tbe above-named dla- 
eaaea. abould utte it witliout delay. It will drive ttie 
dlseaM6 txom the sy^^tem. and when once out on the 
skin a few appllc&tiouh of^ 

. DR. WEA\ER'H 

CERATi: OR Ol-NTTtLSSXT, 

and you have a peniiauent cure. 

TheCKEtATK haM prov.^ iL^elf to be the best Oint- 
ment evHr Inventedj and where once used It has never 
been h^own to fall oi eifecting a permanent cure of old 

flands or Ltps, blolchM or llmpleHon the Face 

SORE KIFFLES AND SO&E £T£S 

Lhe Cerate U the only ihlng required to cure. It should 
be kept In the house of overv family. 

Price Cerate, 2a ceuu per bottle. Bold by most medi- 
cine dealerti. 

J. N. ilARKIH Sc t0.t 

Proprietors for Western BtattB.Olndnuatl. Ohio, 
To whom all orders for the above medldues may be 
add resided. 

8old wholesale and retail by Bdward Wilder and 
Kaymond A Tyler. LoutsviUo, Ky. 

OOOD TO THB TASTE! 

a on I) FOR THK STOMACH IS 

DR S. 0. RICHARDSON'S 

oLv^rry win 

GelebraCcd N Efigi 

fOR HABITUAL C ' 

VKK A.N I J A iLK 

DlSIASBSAKlSi:. ■■ . ..A . 

AOII. LIVKR OU bOWKLB. 
They are utied and recommended by leading PhyalcUns 
of the country, and ail who try It pronouuce It Invalua- 
ble. 

Dr. Janiea L. Leepere writes from Navaree, Stark Co. 
Ohio.*" !;'" i-  '-Vy those sulferlug 

frooi ' mplalnt." 

K. , jrt, Ohio says, 

"they,, . . I. em myself, ha V- 

thg trtkeii (."ill, ic^iUijL- prtjntnttc, and lout my Bpp«tlt«. 
It relieved me, and I can rscommeud It with great assu- 
rance of It-^ inerlta." 

l r. Wui. E. Ki-rr, of Rogersvllle, Indiana, writes n« 
that they are the mofst valuable raedlcln* offered. Ue 
ha^ recommende d ihem wlih greut succesn, aud with 
Uiem niude Acveral cures of palpitation of the heart and 
genera] debility. 

Thomas Stanvford, Esq., BlouutsTtUe. Ucnry county. 
Indiana, wrlteti ua a long letter, umler datu ol May 4th. 
lasu. lie was much reduceil. having been atUlcted for 
throe yean* with great nervi u.j debility, palpitation of 
the heart of the moht severe and prostrating character; 
"afier UKlng a few t ott!ett I was completely reetored, 
and am now In robust hr-alth." 

George W. ilurlnmn t«avtj he was afflicted with rhenm- 
atlKm for twenty yearfl. In all Us various forms, and at 
the date of hi* letter ho had been two years well, the 
Bltt  r^ ellectlug the cure, when several physicians at 
tending him could do hlni no good. Ue says, "for 
rheumatism. dysp*'p9y, liver complaint, kldnev affec- 
tion, or drop»*y, it Iti a Bt eclrtc, certain remedy. AnO 
sur^b Is the news (Vom all partj* of the country. 

It Is sold by most dealen* In medicine. Price 75 cents 
per bottle. 

J. N. HARUIHAeCOo 

^ropr-, t, r * - s othand Wo*it. Cincinnati. 0. 
To whom 1X-: ' ■■». 

N.B. Till I'inr valuable medicines sold 

wholesale ili. .... K-tward Wilder, Raymond A 
Tyler, and t^ij-.ai. a a Oxley, LimUvllle, Ky.; J. M. 
Mills, Frankfort, Ky.; Nort«»n A Bharpe, l^xiogton, Ky.; 
Seatun. Sharoe A Co.. .Maysvllle, Ky.: VV. W. Berry A 
DemovUle. Na.Hhvill«-. Tenn.; Geo. O. ilart.New Albany. 
Ind., and by all medicine dealers K«Q«rally. 

s»4 dAwtf 2 Ip 



rtoree. Tetter aiid Ringworm, ScaM heatls, Ohltlblaln^ 
Aod Frost Bit«i, Barbers' Itch, Chapped or Crack'id 
. or IHi ■ 



anUdR 



lAUNL 

. ITV AND ALL 



CHILDREN 




BKPORE TAKINI! TUB 
EMVIIl 




AFTKR TAKING THB 

i:i.ixiK. 




Dr. WRIGHT'S 

Ci".LF.I(KATEl  

Rejuvenating Elixir! 

Prtparrd on thi strirUsl J'harnutctuSral fhrtnciplft 

or.- ■ I''--' "•••••■•'J-'- 

TRTS 1.^ 
re'^uU 
■lop» ' ' 
CUT' , 

nniiiin.ttt'd. itii 
tested by the * 
even one d'sser i 
ence tu It 
whole i hv - 
and wht ii 

par! 

nat' 

OIIV: 1 

thut eau v i;u- iLt- li i ..l.-.-u.-^ d ij.iun.'ti : 

GENERAL DEBILITY. MENTAL A.ND PHYSICAL 
^KPHK88I0N', IMBECILITY. DBTEKMINATION 
OF BLOOD TO TUE HEAD. CONFU.^EU IDEAS. 
HYSTERIA. GENERAL IRRITABIUTY. REST- 
LE.SSNE53 AND BLEKPLEjS.NESS AT NIGHT. 
AIlliKNCK OF MUSCL'LAH EFFICIENCY, LOSS OF 
APPETITE. DYi*PHPSY, EMACIATION, I,OW SPIR 
ITS. DISOKGAMZATION OF THE ORGANS OF 
OENKRATIuN. PALPITATION OF TUE HEART 

And. In fact, all the concomitants of a nervous aud de- 

bllluted state of the system. 



THE 

' o  
t.-ni!i 
, Dr. 
, :* the 

iMiCi.' li  hii. o Ll. ..-. Elixir 
FicuUy, who, without 
■■' tflvcn in their a^lher- 

I . ■■■ r the 

ced, 
. : ma- 

irs of 
rml- 
now 
, Liilng 



AS A MTIMULANT.lt 1^ quite dim-rent from alcoholic 
prepanaions. It Is l ot suhlect lo reactions m any 
Hli- pe; ti caniliiues to exeri lut tutluence. gradually and' 
ettlclvrt^y, as long aa the toast necessity exbtts tor lU 

prejjejife. 

A* A FEMALE MKI'! ' '^ ' verfUl 
and elh'cllvi.'. and rest. and 
safer thun Otf olh^^r lave 
Hnu.l ' L : .1 

PUm NT a 

vor. . 'he 

effu- ■ : . 1 ; ■ ,, . t , : M.,'.., )lou 

oltOgelbkT. 

SO MI ERALS!-Dr. Wright thinks It well to otake 

his p.ou pi,iiunal ' h.ir;!! tt r .m »he f.nr; !h.n tio minerals 
whdtv". t-r K-rni II' ■ , . ■ wf the in'ire- 

dlentti In h!.i Rwi 'WIiik what 

ruin h.t.4 bei-u onl - opium audi 

menury. 

G»-ii.-r^lly, to lh« UeMlluii-a, Dr. W.ij;ht would caf, 
Nrver j«; a»r. No matter how worn down you may 
be— no matter how weak you are — uo "i i" r vvh«t tho 
cause may have heen~for?ake at f. r has 

led vou lo dftuirt IVi.i'i hyglnuic p his 
REJl'VKNAlTNiJ KLIXIK. and y . tlud 

you: iiU— a piMe, in.stead ti,*' i' \rr^e.to 

you- 1 healitu'. sound aud worthy member 

of •■ !v. 

• n't for $5, and 

forw '^tat-i*. 

t ih^ Uni- 
ted M . ■ . .. . . latallbera 
dlscouui. 

ITor sale by the proprietor*, J. WRIGHT A CO., 

21 rtTi ! !M Chartrea Street, New Ol leans. La. 
tMl . ^ :'y RAVMOM) A Tx'LKR and 

all r tu the UnltCil SUtas 



urn m\m \nmmi, 

MAIN sr., BET, NINTH AND TENTH, 
MVlSni^l^K, KT. 

rpllF ATiriVl: L tr.IlK AND r ni\ii.! iiirs w.\nF- 

01 T.' 

to !■ 

t e t .. 

l.Hl. H.Ml. 

an ' A- in 

opi'i uons, 

i(t - -The merchant, and buaiueas men ol 

I.OU- 

W. , v. =„ CLOVER « CP. 



MRS. WINSLOW. 

AN E.XPERIENCED NUIt.^E AND FEMALE PHY 
skUn. priMeuis lO the attention of mothers her 

SOOTHING SYRUP, 

FOR CniLDRElf TEETHIXQ, 

which greatly facilitates the procets of teething, bj 
softening tbo gums, reduetng all Inflammation— wlD 
allay an. Piiif anil spasmodic action, and Is 

SUKB TO RBGUKATR THK BOWBLS. 

Depend upon It, mothers, it will give rest toyourselvel^ 
aua 

RML1EF ASD HEALTH TO TOUR IXFAJfTS. 
We have pat up and sold tbl-i article for over ten years, 

an I CAN BAT. IN OONFIDENCB AND TRUTU Of It, what W« 

have never been nble to suv of ariv other uiedLIne— 

NK\ Kit llAA IT FAILED, IN A blSOLE INtiTANCE 

TO EFFECT A CUKK. wh.'ii timely u M. Neverdldwe 

know on tn^stanc ' i ' 'I'llon bv any one who 

u^-ed It. Ou t!tv I .are delighted with it« 

operations, and ki ■ f commendation of It* 

maxical eflfCts aii'i ' \N !■ i-; - at; 'm td*. 

matifr "WHAT wi i o KNu'A,' uiu 

andpUdge eur rrputalx^fn/^^r 

hfrr dfciart. In »ini08t every 1i. . • 

is^nrleriug from palnandexhau.sth :!. i 

HI tllt*-en or twenty minutes after V. ■ 

l(iter*' I. 

rr.:. •   

the L 
land. 

THO I : . ^ 

It not only n [ •■■ • 
ales the Ktomaeb i  
tone and eTie*^!:- ■ 
InjiiHt- 
WIM 

spe--. M-a 

and su ' . . : t : .- ;:■ 
ai'd Diu:rh -a ui f 
Ing, or from any o' 
mother who has a i : , . , ^ 

going ctmplainta — d" n-^i it i your i-rcjiuikt,*.-, nor ii.e 

firejudlces of others, ^tanil between you and your sudei- 
iig child .and the relief that will  ur  ars- i i-n- 
LY s?;a»— to follow the u e of this ni. " 
used. Full directions for u-ing will . 
bottle. NoTiH iffnuli;e unlebs the f ac ~ 
A PKRKIN8. N.'w Vork. Is on the nutsM. w: ,,- . ,. 
ja-i5old by Dru^iMH throuKhout the world. 

Ja^Prlnrlpal^Mcei I'.l Cedar MreettN. Y 

Price only ^i-euta i er Bottle. oe^dAwlnely 

Royal Havana Lottery ! 

'PllB NKXT OKllIXARY DRAWING OF THE ROVAL 
A HAVANA Un'lEKV. toiiducled by ttm Spanish 
(lt v«niment, under (tie auparviaiitn of^ llie Oai t«lD 
tleneral of Cuba, will Ulce piac« al UAVANA. ou 

Satiirilay, March le, IHOt. 



A'.ti. ini liivlgor- 
jti Idity. and gtvec 
:i It W. ! nlniofil 

not 



»ooo,ooo. 

SORTED NUMERO tioJ ORDINARIO. 



CAPITA I, I UIXK-SI0O,OO0I 

I Prize of. »iOO.iK i I ai I'liie. ot. tt.OCO 

I Priieof... sn.iiui eo Pritrs of. 300 

1 Prtle of. au.OOO I 143 I'me- of. «U 

I Prite of. 2U,a«r I 31 Ai projin »llona.. S.tXW 

I Prlleot. lO atll 

Four ApproslnuMon  l^ the fKO.COl of MOO eacli; i 
of $« ) tu llie t»! oai; « ol $400 to (jo.nurt;   ul Hon u  

ri.'.KIi)'. 4 of t«t) t'  »:0.n« 

WUUtK TIOKKTS tJu-H ALVKS f lO-QUARTBH? 



Prlxea cached at sifhl at rt i er cent, diacounl. 

BlIU on all solvent Uanka taken al p«r. 

A DrawiiiK wUt bti forwarded as aooa an tbe reanll b 
comes known. 

mr AU .prders for Sctiome, or Tickeia to be address, 
to "DO.N RODIUUUEZ. care of City Po.4t, Cliariestv 
Bunth Carolina " fe27dAwli'e' 




U A BAn AMD iUDIOAI, OUKl fOK 

FEVER AND AGUE! 

CHILL FEVER, 

INT E R M I T TENl 

— OR— 

BILIOUS REMITTENT FSVBB, 

DUMB AGUZ:. 

And aU Hmtu of Disease lumno a .Ku^runu OrHtm 



DOSES WILL CUIUi ANT ORSIMAST 
jTV case, and ONE D08J5 Invariably atopa Uie OWIta 
iU^SSiil"?, 1° " * '»"l demo hnrtflil to Uw 
SYSTEM UNDER ANT OIROUMBTANCES. and M™ 
produces the unpleasant effecU that ntlend Ue BM-tf 
Quiuineand other »(fenl» in ncnerai um. Itcareurary 

fiM /orMruii'.i'Mr"^.\"^^'{C^ 
'ijiL^V|?!L^i-^;s??ti"vV«rc?,rif"^^.^ 

ton, ». a. who are amo^s the largeet vboleula dm 
dealers In the South, write aj follows : 
_ , _ OuiaiiBTOH, 8. 0., Jan. J7th, 18Hl 

(*««: We take pleasure In Htatlug that on yMtoitUr 
our ilr. steve.naon and others ware ear-wltueaaes toii 
most astonlshinj recital and hiKh encomium In nwaM 
to your IMlla. Henr/ Hoelhe, E*i., a i rominent clilaM, 
and ^nntor of B -anfort UlBlrict. called upon us and In- 
quired If we kapt Shallenborger's Pills. Upon ooi aak- 
InH II he linoiv anrthlng of them lie replied subst»n- 
tiaily a* follows: "Sir, I regard them a speclllc for OtilUi 
imd Fe»«r. They were used with flimal success on lb* 
CharL^^lon and Savannah Railroad last summer wt4 
autumn, in the most sickly reKion and under the moat 
trying circntustcnces. I can twitry that, oat of one 
?aDg of about two hundred rie^rro operatives, flfty wer^ 
itrlcken a f . - ,.- • .^ ru-j, aijd every ane r» 
■ 0''ere ' " l«rs»r's PUIa ; »ii4 

TOO 1'" ' ="se, that thev po«, 

seneih.. .- TUk WORLDI* 

'M.Boid by i'ruBa'J^ls evarj wiiero. WholMmle A|«B 
a LouisTtlle. 

LINOENBERGS ft CO. 

AND 

EDWARD WILDER, 

Sole Proprtetors, 

A. T. Sballeuberger & OOf 

RtXJHESIIR, PBNN. 
1*3 dl7Aw*Sweowln^ 



XjOTJIS VIILiXj3E3 

mmi mmw mnmw 

Conducted on the European PUu. 

For the Care of all Private Dii eases 
,TSU.THr v ^nosK atoiotbi) wot 

I V — ; -A X any dheua df a private ii» 

lure, who wobM -Map* Uia Im- 
position ar Umunnl qnacki, 
•boul'i not fall to rsad "Di. 
Oatw' PKivan UanicaL Tua» 
lu OH Sixcu. Dtsuau," a new 
and revised edition of one huiM 
dred paged, handsomely I1lii» 
Iraled with plates aud cngraT. 
IPK^. representing lha genital or 
in e state of health und dta«aa«.-«. 



xi's in _ _ 

]-rtvaio dlst*a£ev Incident to both »exec 
,1 nervous and sexual debility, fioUtarr 
Iweakne*^. lmpot«Bco, etc. Pnc* by m«0 



gans of Loiii 
Treailng on all 
riuch OA seneral 
habits, semlnalweakne*^, 
TKN CMNTH. 

VouNo. Mi. 
In R-^' tiiry ht- 



 LD MiN, who, by Indtilglnc 
e indulgence of tnelr p4^ 
^' Wearn»s .-r a dtsbllltf Im 
- fonn«r 

.iMon. 



a. H. to 9 f. H., 
hill offlc*. DorthaMt 
un atAtm— t rlTftt# 

Uie. Ky. 



-.-'«gularltie^ 
,  ^ and oot po«tac« 

Qld not bo taken rtnrti^ 

v.. 

we wr . 
send a . 
3ona] Inui .■ , 
will forward medicl--' 
(tee from dama,'e or 
conntry with T; ' " 

CondulUtlor ~ 
Banday from \i ^ 
comer of Thlr 1 , . ., 
•Btrance ou Ti.tiii ftiicfi~lv(.uij|\Ule. 

1A»The abovM bu.sliuWH will hereafter be coaduciMl 
b7l r. H.G. MIU.KR, to whom all orders and XaGt 
should be add reaped. 

Dr (lATKS will ronnael with Dr. H. O. M, ca aU dt*  
eaaefl on which his booK treats; or he may be consultod 
personally, or by letter, during basineae hours. 

 a"8ecrecy iu\1olable. Don i forgt t the nama aa 
place. All letteru ahoald be a Jdre-«:-^d to 

DR. U. ti. MILLIB. 

aaS dlnsSwftwlT LonUvllteKy 



XiOUXSVILI.Il 

MEDICAL INFIRMARY! 

CONDUCTED ON THB PLAN OF THB HOBPITAi^ 
DKS VKNKRIENS. PARIS, 



•^■^HERK THO»B 



Wltti »\!lV 

eaae car 
withou: 
l.s. Goii' 
cenf. '[ 
and 0 ' 
of the i\ 
tern It 
real c- ■ 
the coi;' 
ni'in 
t: - 



AFFLICTBD ,^^.i . r^ _ 




nt cures ara 



II .- 

caatra 

and 

Pltie 



plf HM, : 

tratfd 



 J0TICK.-Dr. 
. neot of tho«« 
:!ns both iKKly 
.ntllvl.iual for 
.1 of thvM earty 
^i: - to weaken aod 
y the physical and. 
Me the natural fea^ 
of manhood; the 
1-ct of niarrlaje ftua- 
■d a term of aDc«a»* 
I'.l; ' I - f-*pecially thoaa 

■!nie in maklniK 
. w treatment, 
■.li-'Ut cure. 

DK. liALLs AMiiiKlLAN I'ttaiouiUAL PIIiIA^ 
No article uf medicine Intended for the exclnslTe OM of 
faoialos hiu  ever ii^en such universal eatUCactloo u 
the American Perlo^llcal Pills. They can be relied oo 
In all cases of Menstrual Obstructlonii. Irrerularttlea, Ac^ 
as a Bare a id ufe remedy. Price per mall $1 anU ooo 
postage st.inip 

Patient:* livtnj; at a distance can nes nmd at hom* 
by aeodliig a deecrtpilon of their dlaaaM and lnclot»lu« a 

SUlQp. 

MtoIcIiw sent to any arldrees. 

i^oAee No. 116 Jeff^rn^n Htreet. between First aad 
Second. . Office open /torn 7 a. m. to 9 f. m. 
(eU mC ^ HALL. M. D. 

^W^STFRM REMEDY. ^ 





Dr. MERWIN' S " 

• EVER&AGUE PjUS. 

If. I'tRMASKSr Cl HH or t KVKli A\B 

i.S 

/ li.l At lSL\u t'UoSi vkcAYl^ 

■:.''AT10y. '.^tiuf 

•■ I'l i I S •• NFVFR FAIL TO CURB ALL O? 

' whal is better, thoy 
ul(en o. c«»lonally, 
jtuu. Hence the out 
•■f 'l a pouttd ^ifcure '* 
i llis " dtxfrr/rom aU 
iiarttculars: 
: ... . , 1 u. a spaady and iMrvifr 

n-ntcurc. 

3d. They ar« recemmcnded only for ov cIam of dl*. 

^ agreeable and convenlf ui to taka. 
^ ' tain no poisonous mlDerais, t cli^^ par*. 

' -unlc fancions of th« 

1 l"0 lo prepare tha 
.1,..] .V -I wards lo allay liTlt». 

They are not a Northern "oatcb-i enny hnmboc " 

• I - : a-ed U.v ge!;0«nieo itw.l we.o born, reainil 
'. r.ndet the benign intlueucaa of fiouthtm 

-T, When y^u purchase the,»e Piii, that 
■ ■■ Tai,!., e Bnitgrant 
I Howie-Knives for 
Lliues bavo done la 

-land Uiat this la « 
1 from the slmpl* 
. J, on our lUver-baaAj, 

rH, ."«,WM1 to call attention la tht 
IS .Veatnne. yvu only take a Jrta 
p. ,Atrai'fc- to swdltowtn^ a pint of 
■ re whuh, al best, can  mli/ produce (A  

■■■K n 1! ! vi ITI; iMTTLg. 

r«tan)ps, en- 
■ nv Dealer in 
, ^ .-.lire a bottle of 



litiU. 

7th. 

but ar 



„ ; ^, ' . ~ ~, i^TTKK a .MKKWIX,fiole Proprietors. 

Valuable Medioines for Asthmafr „u *^ ' 



■W-K UAVK R^QKIVED A PUPl'LY OF DK. WIlIT-i 
 V ((IMB and Pot. .Mcil.l.NIVK'K S -MKOlOlNKil, 
for A^Tll.MA (s. m times call.' 1 PUlhUlc) Bulb Ihe 
Medtciues may lo relied on, as time ban already !4*:o* 
KAY.«OM  A TYLKR, 
JaJ7 deo l*» :m n  7* I'onnh stmi 



*%. 8old Ir. ' J l i * Tylar umI W«. 

i' ■ ' ' ■ . !■ • .'■crihner 4 Mairtn- 

i ru^L:i.-MS tu llie liclied iStatea. 



50 



Trundle XXoops. 

DOZEN TKC.NDLK IliWI'S AND 

lu-l ncelv.daiKl i\ r ^ale by 
OIUUN KAWSON (Succts-orto J. T.Ru- 



Brooms ! Brooms ! 



fsr  lAw »8 Main atreet. t et. Thlni and Vou. la 



Notice to Stockholders. 

IOKsIRB TO MRKT ,TIIi; STOC'KltOl.riEU= 
tlie S.inthe'ii Pacitlc 1; iir , , 
ot UmisVlil.', Ky.. on tbe 
and ai.so iu the i lly ol No 

of tho sltUiO IM M' ' 1 . 

seuted al th  - , .iii i il la t-altii-»li  iciit,i- ' 

that each bi. l ersou, will meat tae at v 

or the othfr 

{eJ7 4*wM V, K, 15TKVBJJ80N, Vri- 



 OMS OP 



, ll), 
.'urth. 



Batter and Sng^ar Bnckets. 

7-: IWIZEN D fCOAU BCCKET8, 

I tj i.lui,! .r sa.e by 

OttRI.N RA\V  . V ^i*«r.. an.l BrooraStore, 

nirJiiA-v .vialu i.iie» i. b«u TIdnl and Fnurth. 



200!. 



'^'hcat. 

.l.E BY 
tui. , ^{ABPAgtJi, 



J. 



X ■ 



. rat. 

The excited coudition of the country, 
Upon the oTe of a roTolution, rcad^ii a 
newspaper essential to every man who takes 
ftny interest in public afiFairs. The Weekly 
Democrat contains all the important politi- 
cal and other news, together with dispas- 
sionate editorial disoussiona. The larjio 
Weekly is furnished at the low price of 
per year. The far'Sjr will find, becidca the 
news of the da/ «A|^^tarkct Reports. 
Clubs will B *frui3hca^t* the following 
rates : B^t^ 

for 1 copj^^^^Piu'Jvance $ S OS 

For 6 copftis. Jo, do 10 W 

Tor 10 do, do,  lo 15 00 

For 15 do. do, do 51 "0 

tor 2n (to. do, do * M 

lSt&.A single copy of Ibe WotWy D«mocr»t will l* 
•«nt to^Dj Poatotflce, where tliora uro ten sHl)»cill evi! 
at tl w In jclvsnce. 

Miss Patterson. 
Ike misses of the past generation — they 
•re not misses now, but matrons ; only 
lingering in the lop of time, will all remem- 
ber Miss Palterson, of Baltimore. Slie is 
not Miss Patterson now; but an old lady of 
aeventy-five. A sad history is hers, which 
began with somuoh hope. A gilded horiion 
flattered her girlhood; but it was the frlnger 
«f a dark oloud that burst upon her head, 
and whelmed her whole life in a deluge of 
Borrow. 

She was the only daughter of the weallhi- 
est citizen of Daltimore, accomplished and 
beautiful — one to be envied, if the fiiteij had 
not woven a web of sorrow in her woof of 
happiness. 

She met with a Licutcn.'mt of French Ma- 
rines, enly ninetei?n^^tf6r!) old — ,1ci*onie 
aaparle, the  ^^^^^!^mj~ wi" • 
J. can uer^^^^^^^^ . , . 1 
Emperor "'4^ 
Miss Pattcrs^^Tou.a make a ckj ' , . ■ 
young Lieutenant, ouly nineteen years old, 
and not at all strange that ho shoula ha'^e 
xnade a captive of her. He was a cititen ui 
1' ranee, and when ho loft homo no law of his 
country forbade Us marriage at his discre- 
tion. Afterward, however, and before his 
marriage, a law was passed in Franrf th.'\t 
forbade a marriage of ono under twenty-live 
years of age, without a parent's consent, or 
the consent of his family, if hisparent!* were 
dead. 

The French Minister, Piohon, warned 
Jerome, by letter, of this law of Franc.:', and 
klso warned the Patterson fomily. Tho lit- 
ter tried to break the matter off, and .Icrome 
promised not to press his suit. But love 
laughs at dangers at last. Miss Patterson 
was sent away, and Jerome left; but she re- 
turned, and BO did he. The marriage was 
solemnized in the most imposing manner — 
the Spanish Embassador demandin?^ the 
kand of the lady — the French Cmsul 
present at the marriage. Wo have seen one 
•— a miss then, net so young now — who 
danced at the wedding. Let us agree that 
all were happy. Certainly it waa a marriage 
in this country neither void nor voidable. 
But all were not happy— no; there was one 
sad heart, we may well conclude — the 
father of the bride. Tho marriage si^ttle- 
nent shows his misgiving4. Here it is: 

Article 1 It is agreed that the m.-vrriage 
cf the Bfiid Jerome Bonaparte and Elizalveih 
Patterson shall Ite ,conrr»''t«d and solem 
sized in one and legal form, as to gkcurc 
the validity thereof, to all in --uts and pur 
poses, as well ac-or^tinj!; to t he I iws of 
Maryland ae those of tiis French republic, 
and if in fulim nuy duulw wij iuld arise con- 
oerniag tho validity of tlio Raid marri:ige, 
either in tlie French repuiilic or the Ciiate 
cf Maryland aforesaid, t!ic fl_iid Jerome Bo- 
naparte engages, at all liinns and at tliK 
request of Jhe said Kiizabeth Patterson and 
of the said W. Pstteisor, or of the one or 
the other of them, to rcmi^ve ihofo difficul- 
ties, and to give to the union of the said 
Jerome and the said Elizihelh all the form 
and validity of a perfect raarriage, according 
to the regular laws of tlie said iSiate ot 
Maryland and the said republic of France, 
conformably to all the conventions, clauses 
Itsd acts agreed to in the present article. 
«***«» 

Article 4. In case whtre, by any cxuse 
whatever, on the part r,f Wo ^t^l,^ .T»r"-"i" 
Bonaparte, or of ei' ' 
"linnlH ensue a sens' - 



c I.UOW t^f il. 

oUe biii yaui' 



• 11, do not !et aiiy 
laoliier know th:i! I write. 

Three months later, on the l7th of Octo- 
ber, he wrote ; 

T} MaMmc J. Hnni]y:r!f, r. n ' .n ; 

If you return to the United Stalep, I wish 
— these nra my orders — you to reside in 
your own hou.He : to keep four horses ; in a 
word, to live in ii style belitting your posi- 
tion and as if I were expected to ornve. 
Tell yoilv father, whom I love as much us 1 
do my own, that this is my wish, iind tha  1 
hi\7C piirlicnlar reasons for it. If, besides, 
the Emptrur sends mciipy tu you, you must 
not refuse it — that would irritate him. I, 
too, should sufl't r by llie rciuf*!, and our 
ftlfaii-s would be delayed hi a word, settle, 
as though 1 wt-va ooraiug to join you, but 
do not evtr allow any ono to enpposo ihat 
such i'4 the case. Vou underslnnd, Kli::i, 
not any one; you would lose me forever. 
Have confid'ince in your husband ; be con- 
vinced that he lives, thinksi, and works but 
fur you, aje, for you alone and fur our 
child. You are both of you llio object of 
all biy cares, all my solicitude and attach- 
ment — in short, j ou are all I love in the 
world, and for you and our child I would 
gladly lay down my life. L o not let any 
one know (lui* you have heard from me. 
Write to the Kmpercr and Empress the two 
letters which I cend you to copy. Sign 
only "Bliza " Abave all, Eliza, you must 
take caro to make these letters rend as 
though you wrote them spontaneously, for 
if Ihey euajioscd it was I told you to wriio 
ihem I should be lost. Above all, my dear 
{/tonne amir), be prudent; never allow your- 
self 10 get angry. Remember that any word 
you .  peak against the Emperor (if you ever 
dosn  is sure to be reported to him. 1 have 
euemie? every where, but the Ernpercr is so 
good a father that there is everything to 
hope from his good nature and generosity. 
I kiss you a thou! nnd times. 1 love you 
more than ever, and 1 do not take a sleep, 
speak a word cr do anything that my wile 
ii not in my thoughts. 

J . B. 

The Emperor was puzzled to fix up this 
marriage. How get rid of the first? The 
living parent, his mother, in order to annul 
it, had to give notice of dissent wiihi, 
year. She did.^|it do it until 

UiOliihtt il»d oU^Vdv- U WHa-  

' I a court 'i»W^the 

v4yi Wo suffpect, the (hd lady 
' ih:it ihis was a mean business, and put it off 
until it was cf no avail. Napoleon issued a 
decreeof lijs Council annulling the marriage, 
which would do very well as long as he 
lived; but it was not French law that would 
prevail when he was gone. He tried another 
decree, and found that wouldn't do. He 
wrote to the Pope to get him to annul the 
marriage; but His Holiness told him flatly 
there was uo ground for it.' He then got 
one of his own bishops (o give an opinion 
that the marriage was null. Hia Imperial 
Majesty was rather tangled in the matter. 
If it had been m thing that the sword could 
cut, he could have settled it. But he 
couldn't alter factn and fixed conditions 
settled by\hat was past. 

He got his brother married again, how- 
ever; he could do that; and his heirs by the 
second marriage have claims that come m 
collision with Jerome's. 

The Bonaparto family have acted in the 
most generous manner toward Jerome, jr. 
The grandmother, uncles and aunts recog- 
nize the relationship without reservation. 
The present Emperor has bcsin behind none 
of them in this just and generous conduct. 
Tho case is now before the highest court of 
law in France, and il will bo a puzzle. II 
seems to bo conceded that the main-iage was 
voidable in France, although not void; and 
the legal process to yiake it void was not 
taken. It may, therefore, stand: but what, 
then, is to become of the heirs b^ this sec- 
ond marriage? The court will be puzzled to 
get along without bastardizing somebody. 

Jerome h id bjtter come back to this 
country. Tlicre is uo stain on his honor or 
that of his mother here. When we break up 
this Union, we chill soon have little duke, 
doms and other such baubles to give away 
to thsse ambitious. 

g^^That was a pretty scene at Buffalo, 
New York, on Washington's birthday, when 
the pupils of the High School ware celebra- 
tiiig the glorious anniversary, and, Miss 
Paddock read a delightful, patriotic poem by 
Niiss Avery, upon the conelution of which, 
Millard Fillmore rose, and after the tumul- 
tuous obeerlug, said that he believed that 
all the su'^.^efsors of Washington in the 
. ondeavore i 



18 antl Hat'- 
ideiiices upou 



i   j »ii i i iw« 



?riilt ftiiya  



The . 

tiCUlt,.,. .... 

our TouLK Men 

Every copimercial locality is, ever and 
auon, disturbed by the cry of "hard times." 
These are periodical, and must continue to 
be so, while so large a class of our popula- 
tion insist upon enrolling themselves among 
the non producers. The restlessness among 
our young people, which is yclept "Young 
America," is anything but an evidence of 
vigor. It is merely a testimony of irrita- 
bility, and n mistake as to the proper sphere 
for usefulness. The constitution ot our 
planet indicates that a very large proportion 
of our people nhould be tillers of the earth. 
Besides, being a heellhful occupation, it is, 
all things considered, not less lucrative than 
any other. 

We remember that, some years ago, a dis- 
tinj^uiohid son of MasHnchusetts made a 
very extended statistical inquiry as to the 
number of Ni w England merchants, who, 
from the ccmmcn.-.ement to the close of their 
commercial career, had esciped bankruptcy; 
and the result was, that but Ihreo out of one 
hundred, had passed through life solvent. 
Our young men, who have a penchant for 
trades, are not apt to look upon the adverse 
side of the pietura. They only perceive ap- 
parent prosperity in the mercantile ranks, 
and fancying that a merchant's life is one of 
leisure and case, thry rush into trade only 
to find themselves egrcgiously disappointed 
in their calcuktions. 

We are aware that we shall be told tha 
our smartest and most successful merchants 
are originally from the country. Qranted; 
but young men from ths country, who be- 
come succecsful iu our cities, arc those who 
have suffered from poverty at home, and 
np m Ihei ' ajlxw^BlAJi C'ly have taken hold 




{j\\m\m loiellteencel 



rUOSPECT OF 



PEACE 



REPUBLICAKS COHINQ DOWN! 

VOTE ON COUWIN'S AMEND.MENT! 

DIFFICULTYTErWEEN MESSRS. 
CRITTENDEN & FESSENDEN! 



TIIF OLD PATH /or AFTER A BLACK 

hkpuhlican: 



XXXVTth Conpress— Second Session. 

W.^suNiirnN, February "-M. — Smate —"SXr 
King pieseutrd a number of petitions, 
signed by thousands, in ftvor of the consti- 
tution as it is and the enforcement of the 
laws. 

Mr. Foster presented sever.il petitions in 
favor of the Itordcr .State rcriolulions 

The postolUce appropriation bill was taken 
up 

The amendment of the Finsnca Committee 
being under consideration, by consent, Mr. 
Crittenucu, Irom the select committee on 
the proposiiions adopted by the Peace Con 
ference, offered a report recoiamenoing ihe 
adoption of that propo^iiion. 

Mr. Seward said that the Senator from 
Illinois (Trumbuin and himself formed a 
minority on that committee, and wished to 
submit a subsliiute, but the majority thought 
it was not competent ; so he asked leave to 
submit a joint resolution in his own name, 
in which the Senator from Illinois concur- 
red : that 

WuRF..\3, The Legislatures of Kentucky, 
Illinois (iud New Jersey have appealed to 
Congress to call a convention fcr proposing 
amendments to tho constitution, therefore 

Resolved, That the other Slates be invited 
to take the subject into consideration, and 
to express their will on the subject, in pur. 
suance of the .'ith article of the constitution 
Mr. H ile objected to the consideratien of 
the report to dav. 

Mr. Doolittle said Ihat it was a mistake 
that Wisconsin had sent delegates to the 
convention. He had a proviso, which, at 
the proper time, he should offer to the 1st 
seolioii of the amenilments proposed by the 



Jerome and the 
eeparation a 

- Aiat t iiuvi^y ), or 

and board), or in anyollj 
•which may God prevent ; 
said Elizibeth Patterson shall have a right 
to the properly and to the full and cudre 
enjoyment of one-third of the estate, real, 
personal and mixed, of the said Jeiome 
Bonaparte, for herself, her heirs, executors, 
administrators, &c. 

And the said Jerome ISonsparte, hia heirs, 
&c., shall, on every requisition of the said 
Elizibeth Patterson, and of W. Patterson, 
or of the one or the other of them, perform 
all the necessary acts and agreement), tu 
secure and confirm in the person of the 
said Patterson or his heir.^), ka., the said 
third part stipulated ko., ko. 

Alas.' poor old man! He knew this gay, 
beautiful and happy daushter! If he had 
been obeyed, he would have snatched from 
her the cup of sorrow; but Miss Patterson — 
ire are compelled to write it — was a eelf- 
irilled, ungrateful child; and the father's 
'Will is a sad record against] her. We shall 
copy it, in justice to the truth of history. 
"Pride goeth before a fall," the good book 
■ays, and how well the history of men and 
women illustrates its truth. Here is part 
of the will: 

The conduct of my daughter Betsy has all 
her life been controlled by such a feeling of 
disobedience that she has never consulted, 
in any ciroianstances, my opinions or feel- 
ings, and has caused me more anxiety and 
grief than all the rest of my children to. 
gether. Her folly and her misconduct have, 
on former occasions, cost me very heavy 
expenses, and from the beginning to the end 
great sacrifices of money. Under these 
circumstances, it would not be proper, just 
or right, that she should, at my death, 
inherit an equal part of my property with 
my other children. Considering, notwith- 
standing the weakness of human nature, 
and that she is no less my child, il is my 
will and pleasure to declare in her favor as 
follows: 

"I give and bequeath to my said daughter 
Betsy," &o., &c. 

She had high qualities, however, this 
same Miss Patterson. She maintalne«i her 
marriage vows with heroic devoj^; and 
after she was deserted, and the Legislature 
of her State granted a divorce, she remained 
unmarried, and watched tho interest of her 
son, and left nothing done that labor and 
self- Icnial could do to vindicate her honor 
and his; and she is now before the highest 
French court with the cause. 
iii.r— Aid Jerome, the UflutpnaSJt '^'^^i nine- 
teen years old, he, toe, was a naughisy, un- 
grateful boy. He held position by favor of 
hia brother; for he Bad no quaKties of bin 
own to recommend hiin. He was the brother 
of Napoleon — that was all, poor devi^ His 
brother was the patron of his family. He 
made all his brothers princes, and BJeraed 
to feel more than a brother's intetj^it in 
young Jerome. It was na'ural thit ho 
should feel indignant at Jerome and ar .Miss 
Fattercon, considering that he Had warned 
her family of the law of France. He ordered 
Jerome home bIoub. Jerome, ho*ver, 
stole off to Lisbon with his wife, whe^ he 
met an order to come to the Emperor, with 
an order to Miss Patterson that she should 
not land on the Continent. Jerome obeyed, 
and his wife was compelled to obey. She 
•went to England, where Jerome, jr., wa^ 
born. 

About this tiiuo, and for years after, 
Jerome writes to his wife tha most affec 
tionate letters, that all would be well. He 
loves her — oh, dreadfully! He lives only for 
her and their son! All stuff; poor wretch 
Perhaps he felt bo; bat he was nobody. Hi 
consented to mary a princess, and be King 
of Westphalia. He writes to his injured 
•wife, deploring his ill-fate; heaps regret»ou 
regrets. In the meantime, the Emperor^ad 
granted to Miss Patterson a pension of 
60,000 francs, on coudition that she wculd 
drop the name of llouaparle. SyicT^. 
oepted the gift, knowing nothing aboutjt' 
conditions. Why sVe accepted the gift, fj^ 
letter of her husband will explain. H^ 
it is: 

Gtxov July ^.i. i5ic: 
Man Amie: You must — tliesc are tlie of- 
ders, nay, the wishes of your husbanilT 
you must have patience; above all, 
must be very particular not to refase wltV 
the Emjieror has sent jou — that is a proof i 
hie regard, and one must n.-ver irritate * 
Sovereign. To do so would be the ruin Jf 
me, of yourself and of our child. If t 
two months from this time you are n? 
recalled, return to America, lake a hou^ 
and settle yourself as before. I will sen*' 
jrou a great many things, bat you must bS 



uih. It wiu our July in liie Nurih, tiio 
ity of every patriot, to withhold all man- 
festalions of hostility, to show the South 
that we wcro their brethren, that we were 
eady to conoiiiate theui, and to do so by 
doing all that we ever agreed to do, and 
then oill upon them to do everything that 
they had agreed with us.The country wa^ 
passing through a terrible crisis, but he 
believed that tlie patriotism which presided 
over its birth wouM ultimately save it. 

^•One of the Secession expedients now 
is t) publish letters from a Secessionist that 
the Republicans regard Rentucky, Tennes- 
see and o'hsrs as fast friends of theirs. 
There is not a word of truth in such state- 
ments. The Kepublicaus understand very 
well the position of Kentucky and Tennes- 
see; and the ultras are more alarmed at it 
than they are at that of the Cotton States, 
i'hey fear that the men of sense in their own 
party will concede to these Slates what they 
ask, and leave them high and dry. 



The Hickman (Kentucky) Courier 
proposes that Southern Tennessee and 
Southern Kentucky shall secede from the 
Stale Government and join the Davis con- 
federacy, (jentlemen, let us know when 
you intend to begin, Ihat we may be enabled 
lo furnish the brass baud and the State 
Guard. At the eame time they have no 
right to call thoir's the Lynn Boyd district. 
Lynn Boyd was a warm Union man. 

|@~In the midst of Louisiana secession, 
ith the Convention setting for a month, 
13 remarkable that, upon the vote of the 
State, three hundred and twenty majority 
were given for the Union and against seces- 
eion. 



Commenting on Lincoln's speeches, 
the New York Herald advises him to slick 
to Divine Providence and cut tha Chioago 
latform. We fear that the Platform will 
stick to him closer than Divine Providence.. 



I^^The State of Georgia has passed an 
ordinance legalizing all indictments and 
convictions by the United States courts. 
All warrants and processes of the United 
States courts are declared lawful. 



|Sy*A few— yB:»rB since a "Hover," in 
RCSfrch of a "KemeJy" that would confer a 
lasting benefit upon his race, roamed 
through I he forests of the great west. The 
men of science and of large experience, who 
dwelt in the thronging cities, had failed to 
give relief. He went forth, almost hope- 
ess. Long yc:ir» of persevering toil and 
unumerable hardships did not stay bis 
footsteps. Westward, still westward ! Be- 
yond the Missis.'ippi and tho falls of Min- 
nihalia, towiirdj the im|hing waters and 
he setting sun. He scales the summit of 
the Kocky Mountains, and from their icy 
peaks views the valley of the Great Salt 
Lake. He still pushes onward, o'er soli- 
tudes, where the foot of C'viliziiion had not 
entered, where rolls the Columbia, and hears 
no sound save his own dashingt'; where the 
Indian warrior still wields the tomahawk, 
and i-pceJs the poisoned arrow, as wild and 
uncultivated as when Powhatlan ruled in 
Virginia. At last he halted near the waters 
of the Indian.^' "liougi Homa," and there 
on the sunny slopes of tin- mi.sty mountains, 
beneath the fprcading branches of the Cuis 
D'Arc, and Ihe gloom inspiring cypress, he 
di'-covercd Uools, B.irks and Leaves, whoA- 
virlucH semicd almust to work miracles 
The lungs expanded beneath their iolluence, 
new life gushed through every vein, and 
coursed along each nerve. In the forest's 
great laboratory he found that which the 
shelves oi the apotbccary failed to furnish, 
the discovery of which will cause unborn 
millions to rejoice with feelings of joy and 
gladness. These Boots, Barks and Leaves 
now form the principal ingredients of the 
Cherokee Kemedy, ' of which a new ad 
verlisemenl appears iu to-day's paper. 



d, w.V{wll 



Further by the Canadian. 

PonTi,A,Ni), Me, February 118 — Mr 
Cameron, Grand Master of the Loyal 
Orange Association of British America 
made an address to the Queen from their 
Grand Lodge, expressive of their loyalty, 
and representing that the Association was 
under no legal disability in British North 
America, and therefore their claims to be 
publicly recognize ! during the progress of 
the Prince of Wales through Canada ought 
to have been admitted by the advisers of 
His Koyal Highness. 



li.e inii i , , ' - 

Becoming identified with the business they 
had embatked in, they made themselves so 
useful, nay, so iudispensiblc, that their em. 
ployera could not afford to lose them; and 
thus advanced into a membership of the 
firm, they laid ihu foundation of a fortune. 

If the yeuug nM.u now were like those 
of a past age, we : hould not dissuade th^m 
from embarking ^^trade. But the case 
now is entirely ui^^^ '- Young men from 
the country, like I-base brought up in a 
city, seem desirous lo get situations, in order 
to have plenty of pocket money, and to play 
the gentleman. The consequence is that 
situations are scan e. While our merchants 
and traders need boys and young men who 
will earnestly go work, they do not want 
young men to loaf about their stores with 
pens behind their ears, who insist upon doing 
as little as possible for the greatest remu- 
nation they can obtain. True it is, they 
sometimes take such young men into their 
stores at the request of wealthy parents, 
who arc willing to support their sons in 
such idleness during their minority, as a 
me.ans of keeping them out of mischief. 

This last mcniionod class is very numer- 
ous in our cilies, and being willing to spend 
(heir time in stores, for a tritle, they stand 
in the way of country boys who have aa 
inclination to embark in trade, but who 
cannot eft'ord it unless their remuneration 
shall b-j equivalent to their current expenses. 
WbHt then shall country boys do '.' We 
answer, emphatically, slaji- at home and 
cultivata the earth. There you will be free 
from the perplexities and cares of a com- 
mercial life, of tho annoyance of which you 
have no conception. Y'our profits in the 
country may not be largs, at first, but as 
you add acre to acre, and become scientif- 
iciUy acquainted with the best modes of 
cultivation, you will find that your assets 
are exceeded by tho«" of lew, "very few, cf 
oar merchants. 

Bat we are again told that a rural life is 
mouotonom. So is a city life when devoted 
to trade. The merchant who is successful, 
^as little time and less inclination to avail 
himself of the alluremento of the city life. If 
ho yields to iV.ese, bis ViiiinesB and his 

is at 
. ..:in n 



aiuit^eiueats and relii:L'itioQ8 of tho day, be 
ii debarred from even domestic ccmforl, and 
bis \\U, somewhat like that of an editor, is 
one incessant routine, which depresses the 
spirit and renders him unfit to appreciate 
the amenities of life which every where 
surround him. 

We would prevent, if we could, the hale 
and vigorous young men of our rural dis- 
tricts from rushing into such a vortex as 
this. One, perhaps two or three, out ot a 
hundred, might escape the consequences we 
have portrayed, but the chance is so limited 
that the effort is not worth making. At 
home, on the farm, or ii the garden, you 
arc sure of a competence if not of a fortune. 
In trade, there is ninety-seven chances out 
of an hundred against you. If successful 
in trade, that success mu-it be obtained at 
the sacrifice of social, intellectual and do- 
mestic enjoyment, and when, finally, you 
have amassed a fortune, yon will find that 
from too great commercial absorption, you 
bare not the capacity t} enjoy il. 

Therefore, we repeat, slay at home. But 
we are again reminded that neither agricul- 
ture nor horticulture offers any scope lor 
intellectual progress. Let us gee. .Vround 
our own, aud contiguous to most large cities 
arc many gardeners who, by their knowl- 
edge of seeds, soils, forcing processes, etc , 
supply the city market with the necessa- 
ries and luxuries of life, some two or three 
weeks in advance of the general crop. We 
need not tell you that those who thus get 
their crops ahead, receive double, treble, 
and sometimes quadruple of the current 
rates of vegetables and fruits after such 
vegetables become common. Now, if you 
think you have sagacity, skill, perseverance 
aud self denial enough to make a successful 
merchant, just apply those qualities to the 
earth, and you will asoertain thit your 
profits will not be exceeded by those of any 
branch of business. 

rVgain, wo are frequently told that a rural 
life is too devoid of excitement. Se is a 
city life, if you mean to make a man of 
yourself. You must plod through the minor 
fetalis of business for years before you will 
attain ease of action and comprehensiveness 
of %i£Un. .'Vnd when these are attained, 
you will find that the enterprising farmer, 
who has compelled Mother Earth to return 
the greatest eqaivaleni for his labor, is not 
a whit behind you in a high intellectual 
development. But if you mean that the 
country does not afford you sufficient ex- 
citement, outside of your rural vocation, 
then we eny to you, particularly, stay at 
home. If youp object in coming to a city is 
to make business a pastime, and plunge, 
whenever you can get an opportunity, into 
the dissipations of city life, you will never 
make a merchant at all. Thousands of such 
young men now enc^amber our cities. They 
are of no advantage to their employers, and 
are certainly destructive to themselves. 
Their income does not afford means to 
gratify their taste for pleasure, and whit is 
lacking must be made up by relatives and 
friends, to whom Ihcy are a burden. 

No right-minded young man will, at the 
present time, enrol himself among the class 
just described. Without personal independ- 
ence, first secured by the ability lo support 
one's self handsomely by the avails of his 
labor, no man is fit for anything. He had 
better deny himself everything than sur- 
render his independence. That independ- 
ence, not one young man in ten doet 
maintain in our cities. It is, and can be, 
different in the country. There, idleness is 
more disreputable, and each member of the 
family finds himself, upon doing something, 
able to increase the common stock. Hence, 
habits of industry become chronic, and 
economy, joining hands with industry, lays 
the basis of a character which is proof 
against temptation, and is the precursor of 
success in any enterprise which may be 
undertaken. 

Rejoicing. 

RisiNO Sfs, Ind., Feb. 28— The news of 
the passage of the compromise measures by 
the Peac»Conference, and Corwin's resolu- 
tions by the House to-day, was received by 
our citizens with great manifestations of 
joy. A salute of h\ guns was fired, and 
all the bells of the city were rung. 




■ rae lawTii the Is 
... ni any constitution or ordinance of 
any citate or Legislature to Ibe contrary 
notwithstanding. 

The report and amendment and joint 
resolution were ordered to be printed and 
laid over. 

Mr. Trumbull presented 'the credentials 
of Mr. Lane, Senator elect from Indiana. 

Mr. Trumlmll reported from ihe cJimiiiit. 
tee appointed to wait upon the President 
and Viae President elect. 

Mr. Lincoln said : " With deep gratitude 
to my countrymen for these marks of confi- 
dence, and with great mistrust on my part 
to dischargr the duty, even in favorable 
circumstances, now rendered doubly diiBoult 
by the existing perils, but with a firm reli 
ance on the strength ol our free government 
and the uliimale loyalty of the people to 
the just principles of which il is formed, 
and above all, with unchanging faith in tho 
Supreme Ruler of the universe, 1 accept this 
trust, and shall be pleased to signify my 
acceptance to the respective houses of Con- 
gress. 

Mr. Hamlin said— Please communicate to 
the two Houses of Congress my acceptance 
of the trust confided in in» by a generous 
people, and while the position was neither 
sought or desired, I am truly gratified for 
the confidence reposed in me, and deeply 
sensible of the obligation imposed, it shall 
be my effort to discharge n.y duly iu such a 
manner as shall subserve the interests of 
the whole country. 

Mr. Mason offered an amendment to the 
Posi-olfice bill, changing the Biitterfield 
route, and providing fjr a mail by the cen- 
tral route to California and the Pony Ex- 
press, for 5115,000. 

One e'cloc'ic arrived. 

A discussion arose whether the report of 
the Select Committee was in order. 

.Messrs. Hall and Fesseuden argued 
against it, and Mr. Crittenden replied lo 
Mr. Fessendeu, Baying "the Senate had no 
light to charac:eriza anything he said as 
pro.scription." 

Mr. Fessenden — '-Did net say any such 
thing." 

Mr. Crittenden— "You did. Sir, if I un- 
derstood you." 

Mr. Fessenden— "Well, Sir, I did not; 
but the Senator can hear as he pleases." 

Mr. Crittenden moved towards Mr. 
Fesscndea's desk, with his back to the 
tlhair. Going close to Mr. Foesenden, he 

said [ fheir conversation was in 

audible in tha galleries.] 

The Chair called the Senators to order. 

The re solutions w»re taken up — to 23 

Mr. Hale objected to their going to a third 
reading, and ttiey were made the special 
order for \- \ o'clock to morrow. 

The Senate resumed Ihe consideration of 
the pist- flipe bill. 

^ "'a amendment was adopted ! 



llie Senate, iy a vote ui ~ii ugaiugi --1, 
went into executive session. 

The Senate, after ttie Kxecutivo session, 
resumed the consideration of tho posloffice 
bill. 

The amendment was agreed to. 

Mr. Hale offered an amendment that the 
Postmaster. General refund Franklin Haven 
ihe amount deposited in the Boston post- 
office mailer. Agreed to. 

After further consideration, the bill 
passed. 

The bill relative to the distribution of 
books and reports of the Supreme Court, 
etc , was passed. 

A bill donating land in Oregon and Min- 
nesota for school purpo.ses was passed. 

Several private bills passed. 

Adjourned. 

W.\sm.vGTON, February 27. — House — The 
Committee concluded by saying tncy are 
unable to resist the inference that in the 
beginning of the movements against the 
Government, there were relations of an 
extremely friendly character between those 
contemplating rebellion, aud those whose 
duty il was to suppress it. 

John Cochran's minority report is a 
virtual defense of the President, and denies 
that he recognized the Commissioners 
otlicially, and attributes the censure of the 
President to party feeling. 

Washi.noton, February 28. — House. — Mr. 
Gilmer presented a petition signed by the 
ladies of New York, Pennsylvania, Mary- 
land, Virginia, Ohio, Rhode Island, Dela- 
ware, Illinois, Vermont, Indiana, New 
Hampshire, North Carolina, Wisconsin, and 
the District of Columbia, and proceeded to 
state its contents, saying that they pray 
Congress to lake measures lo restore peace 
and reconcile existing difficulties, when Mr. 
Craige, of North t'arulina, interrupted and 
demanded the regular order. 

Mr. Barr supposed the right of petition 
was in order at any lime- 
Mr- Gilmer withdrew the petition for the 
present. 

The motion to reconsider the vote by 
which Mr. Corwin's proposed amendments 
to the Constitution yesterday failed to 
receive the required two thirds vote, was 
announced as the first business in order. 

After speeches from Messrs. Kilgore and 
Stanton, the former in favor of the propo- 
sition and Ihe latter against it, a reconsider- 
ation was carried — 128 to 05. 

Great confusion prevailed. 

The question was then taken as yesterday 
upon agreeing to the amendment, and it waa 
adopted — 132 to tj"). 

Tremendous applause from both the Re- 
publican and Democratic sides aud the 
gillenes. 

The report of the committee was tempo- 
rarily poBiponed. 

tlatcoiioa Mr. Colfa's tlia TT aiiqp nnn — 
curred in the Senate's ameoJB ut7o the 

bill sloppingthe mails in the seceding States. 

Mr. Garley, from the printing commiilee, 
reported in favor of printing 216,000 copies 
of the agricultural, and 40,000 copies of the 
mechanical part of Ihe Patent Office report. 

The report of the committe of conference 
on the disagreeing vole on the Oregon and 
Washington war debt was concurred in. 

.Mr. .Morris reported a joint resolution 
appointing commissioners lo make an equi- 
table seltlement with W, H- Russell, on 
account of the nbntraotion of Indian bonds 
Rejected — 10 against K14. 

Mr. Wa«hburne, of II inois, from the Com 
mittee lo inform Messrs Lincoln and Hamlin 
of their election, reported in similar terms 
to those which Mr. Trumbull used iu the 
Senate. 

Several hours were consumed on the forty- 
two amendments from I he Senate to the civil 
and miscellai;eous appropriation bill. 

Mr. Stanton indiecluully endeavored to 
have the volunteer bill taken up. 

Adjourned. 

Connecticut State Convention. 

New Havbn, Feb. 27. — Tho Republican 
StateConvcntion met in tbisoi'y to-day, and 
was largely attended. Daniel P. Taylor, of 
Brooklyn, was chosen President. E. K. 
FoBier, of l^ew Haven, was proposed for 
Governor. He handsomely declined, and 
recommended a nomination of the present 
Governor, and thereupon. Gov. Bucking- 
ham was unanimously nominated with great 
enthusiasm. 

Honor to a Kentnekian- 

CiNolNN.'iTi, Feb. 28, — The City Council 
last night adopted unanimously a resolution 
expressing confidence in the patriotism and 
ability of the Hon. John J. Crittenden, 
regretting tho close of his public career and 
inviting him, as he returns home, to accept 
the hospitalities cf this city and address 
onr oilizens. 

A resolution was also adopted extending 
the same invitation to the Hon. Andrew 
Johnson. 

Escort for Mr. Buchanan. 

BaLtimork, February 28. — X battalion 
of the City Guards design showing their 
respect lor President Buchanan, on his 
retiring from ofhce, by giving him an escort 
with full ranks from this city to his home 
in FennP\lvania, 



W.K''- ' Ueiiu. 

WASlliSdtoS, The I'escs Coh- 

feroncT has nriji.uti.i:i .-.-.nr I'ir, atd many 
Commisi. loners have alre&dy left for home. 

The pi'opositions before tho Peace Con- 
ference (were voted on by sections. Tho 
lirst W.I.* in reference to dividing the terri- 
tory, an! was barely adopted Indiana did 
not.vote ul all. Kansas and New York were 
divided. North t'^roliua, Virginia and 
Missouri voted negatively. Tho result was 
|j against 7, but for the temporary absence 
of one of the New \ oik Commissioners, 
would have been a lie vote. Ex President 
Tyler coDiniunicatcd to Congress the propo- 
pnsilion, but the House has not been 
officially informed of its contents. Some 
Coiiinii«sioneis say if the conference has 
been proJuclive of no other good result, it 
has produced a most friendly feeling among 
ihem. " 

A soldiT killed a sergeant on Capiiol 
Hill this afternoon by shooting him, the 
iailer liwing had the former punished. 

Heads of.Department, Clcrkx, and Judges 
of the Court of Claims paid farewell visits 
lo Buchanan tc-;lay. 

The Setale, after executive session on 
army appointments, directed Ihem to be 
returned te the President. 

Late private telegraphic advices from 
Texas say Tfic ar.senal at San .Yutonio has 
been taken possession of by Texan troops, 
as well as fome military posts in Northern 
Texas, anl cannon and other munitions at 
Brazos, Sanlisgo and Brownsville. The 
repnrt is previilent here to-day that Gen. 
Twiggs ha.s been shot by a soldier, but these 
advices do not mention il. 

The city authorities waited on the Presi- 
dent this evening lo take leave c f J im. A 
complinientarj short address by the Mayor 
was plcasanlljr responded to by Mr. Buch- 
anan. 

The authorities then called on Mr. Lin- 
coln, who warmly welcomed Ihem. In re- 
sponse lo the Mayor, Mr. Lincolrrsaid much 
of the bad feeling between the North and 
South was through misunderstanding, and 
he begge.l to say on this occasion that he 
never had feelings ether than kindness to- 
ward his fello  -citizens ; he had no desire 
or intention fo withhold any of the rights, 
and expressed the tiope ihat they would be 
'letter iileased when they came to know one 



rJcred a salute of HXt 
of ihi  Peace Congri/-»e. 



fror;: . u 

wit) plan ot aUjustmcut, and 

expi lerniination to make it a 

lea ir the approaching electioDS. 

Thr y inl their States can be held 

in tlie I '11.11 I. J it. 

Air. Oiitenden is confident that the Vir- 
ginia Covention will acquiesce. 

At a tteiing of railroad officers held 
yesterJaj to arrange a schedule for the 
greil Soiii*rn mail so a^ to avoid the seced- 
ing Slates will probably go by Ihe Baltimore 
and Otiiowlroad to Columbus and Cincin- 
nati, and arosi Kentucky direct lo Memphij- 

Advioe/rom Charleston stale that shortly 
after the urival of J«ff. Davis at that city 
he paid i visit to Fort Sumter, and had a 
long interiiw withMsjor .\nderson. it was 
afterward given out in Charleston that 
there wouJ be no fight at Sumter. 

The Vrginia Commissioners left much 
dissatisfid wiih the result of their labors 
here. Tfcy maintain, however, that Vir- 
ginia wil not secede unless coercion be 
atlemptedly the administration. 

A nun»«r of Gen. Twiggs' staff, now 
here, snyTv.iggs had declined to enter the 
service o Georgia, and will also decline 
service itthe Southern Confederacy. 

The ripior.^d d.-^ith of Qenerul Twiggs 
was recered here from several sources. Tbe 
story is, that Gov. HouEton sent his aid to 
T'iggs tc remonstrate against the meditated 
treachery when an alterc ition ensued which 
resulted :ii tlic aid's Hhooling the General 
dead. Tie rnuior .s;iU lacks confirmation. 

The Srittte to day was in executive session 
upon thetorrespondence between the United 
States nid Great Britain concerning the 
case of he fugitive slave Anderson. 

W'ash-votos, February 28. — The Post 
nsaster (rneral was thi-i morning advised by 
lelegrap. from Fort Smith, thai the over, 
land mal'was slopped by the Indians and 
taken bjttie Xexans as lias been reported 

The postmaster at Madison, Florida, is 
using doiiesiic manufactured poi'tage stamps 
contrary to law. The department here has 
been fjoished with a specimen. 

The stlect committee of five on the Pres- 
ident's ipecial message, in their report on 
general iubjects, argue against the doctrine 
of secession, and atsert Ihe duty of cen- 
traliziot the powers of the Government to 
enforcCjthe laws over every part of the 
countrv-, with military, if the civil authority 
is iueuttlcieut. Messrs. Cochrane and Branch 
dissent. 

Oencial Twiggs has been stricken from 
the armv roll as a coward and a traitor. 

The (^lect ('ommitlee, on the abstraction 
of boots by members of Congress, report 
that they regard the entire charge as being 
groundless. 

\ew York Items. 

N I'eb. 28 —The bark Nicola 

Dp.- to-ni(rhf bringing Captain 



aau was iroiu uaboou for New Vork, with 
palm oil. 

A party ' of gentlemen started in a pilot 
boat, to be present nt Wsshington at the 
inauguration, but being overtaketi by sea 
biokness off Barnegatt, they employed two 
steam fdgs to low them back, and were all 
put in quarantine. 

Who is Mbs. Winslow? — As this ques 
lion is frequently asked, we will simply say 
Ihat she is a lady who, for upwards of thirty 
years, has untiringly devoted her time and 
talents as a female physician and nurse 
principally among children. She has espe 
cially bludied the constitution and wants of 
Ibis numerous class, so generally overlooked 
or carelessly treated by the faculty in too 
many iastancos; and, as a result of this 
effort, and practical knowledge, obtained 
a lifetime spent as nurse and physician, she 
has compounded a Soothing Sirup for 
children teething. It operates like magic- 
giving re ■it and health, aud is, moreover, 
sure to regulate the bowels In consequence 
of this article, Mrs. Winslow is becoming 
world-renowned as a benefactor of her race. 
Children certainly do rise up and blcsa her; 
especially is this tho case in this cily. Vast 
quantities of the Soothing Sirup are daily 
sold and used here, li has got lo be acorn 
mon remark, "1 had rather depend on Mrs, 
Winslow's Soothing Sirup for my children 
than to have the united advice of the 
medical faculty of the city." We think Mrs. 
Winslow has immortalized her name by this 
invaluitile article, and we sincerely believe 
thousands of children have been saved from 
an early grave by its timely use, and that 
millions yet unborn will share its benefits, 
and unite in calling her blessed No mother 
has discharged her duty to hor suffering 
little one, in our opinion, until she has 
given it the benefit of Sirs. Winslow's 
Soothing Sirup. Try it, mothers — try il 
now. 

fe26dli:wl Ladies' ViuloT, N. Y. CSty. 

(^.Hypochondriasis, distaste for every 
thing, whether sustenance for mind or body 
lassitude and exhaustion, imperfect secretion 
and circulation, are effectually relieved by 
the timely use of WRIGHT S REJUVENA 
TING ELIXIR; ihis great tonio and restora 
live remedy will expel every unpleasant 
symtom, imbue both body and mind with 
energy and vigor. By its continuous use 
every animal fluid will be purified, every 
obstruction in the evacuatory channels 
swept away and every organ regenerated 
These may seem strong statements, but they 
are fully borne out by the unquestionable 
te8liQion  ' ' ' ! --^ '■•'Fses. 

Sajj^^.. I'isis' through 

ouCln^r u 1 1 . .1  ..tn:* .ill Canada.' J. 
WRIGHT & CO., sole proprietors. New Or- 
leans, La. Sea advertisement. fel3 d&wlm 

UOUK TKS'X'IUUNII. 

Ikdsfendixci, Er., Aug. SO. '59- 
D». C. W.RoBiCK. U. D.: . 

Dear Sir: For the past several months I 
have been laboring under great weakness 
and gtner.'il debility, much of the time 
confined to my bed, and from which I 
receivel no benefit from my physician. 
After using some of your bloo l pills and 
blood i^rifier, purchased of your agent, 
Mr. Wm- II. U. Plummer, I feel as a new 
person, almost entirely free from disease, 
and would recommend your medicines to 
all who are in need of so invaluable rem- 
edief- 

Yonrs, trulr, MARY Y. HOFFMAN. 

I^See advertisement in another col- 
umn, d&w 



it 



tint fnct that we Arc oLlii tit^juuil ib tbe-iutiuulucturr cf 
all ktnJfl of 

WAGONS 

For Uilri an.l the Southern Couotrr. Onr Wan^ati Arfl 
niJide vlth Iron nxle-trces, of pll&l Iron of thy best 
(jualtty. water hjuumered, with tn xea cut ou cbilU. 
ilavlog ft 

Foundery of our Own, 

Wo gro maklnz oor Rcvtral klnJii of 

Center-Draft Plows, 



wrra i.m proved i'attern.s, botu wbocoiit 

AND CAST ! IIAltE3. 

We wonli i-t.-",'i i.''"-.TA 

Mv-i oltierg to ' I 
lii'avy ..teil, 

wii'rh tt'o wdr' l . . ,'. 
ci'iinlry. 

We aUn hsve for 8.i'.n MOI,D-BO.\HDfl nn.t VVAOON 

jmXKS of all lcln.1.^ nitK-BKNnKK«. IVi-ors 

V ; UlCg [XlUlltVlUd will ll'.fcaiji! BlVO 

ilA'. 

Comer of .Main An.l : i, 

|.ll9 r|4wtf ! , .^ 

Coal Oil and Lamps. 
Coal Oil and Lamps. 
Coal Oil and Lamps. 

/"10A1, Oil . I.ONAR OIL, LAIIP Oil,, AND FI.CID 
\  l AMPM of t-vt^v mvio ar.a fnil raclnK alt ttip Iti('..-t 

Imp- I • ■ • . . tli.^r wltli all It . iif ■ ! \ ' ;   -! I .s 
aii ' ' D »f tha i 

V. ' I y low. \V .- 

( -lie of ttlf llr . 

(If . Hil l I'.r LuDarOll ami L-ian,:.; ainu, u.r 

t: t.ls for tho Lunar Llit'it. Who w.-.nlJ 

1 1. h.-n a llgtlt t.Tt'il tn fi\ .  or six candles 

caii tui'i . : iiall tbe coat " i.iiBar aoii 

Coal-OU Lampa arw Ju.^t a& ^ . 

iiEAITY, 

m Ak ^fm ^K-Mii lli ■ . . '. Vt"' iyytt"i| ''l 

COUNTRY MERCHANTS. 

SliOW-CASSa FOR SALB CIIKAP AT 
UKNJ, KI/XID'.S, 



Ttilr.l ..ftrnot. 1.CI. .M:iin ami Marki-I. 



H. G. VAN SEGGERN 

Franklin VVmw^ Mill, 



Tea A*l.vLaASiATIJX Of IJlSoDAaiS.-Th' f tn a eta 
ln*( tendPTicy In tbln age toappa'priata themoRtezprefft' 
Ivo ^'ords cf otiier linsnaxms and dlVr awhile to Incor- 
porate th»m Into onr own; thus tit* word C"; h(tiio 
urMch ts fiom ttiB lirutk. ulyulfj Iiig "for tbe bead." 4 
now t »ToiTlnif popalarlxud In coniicrllun with Mr. 



firanor horn.' 



.' If. c r. 1 :.r ■■ '■■ i m be 

. will 

'.\»AH^ uiiUi iU :  Bbem "uallvd ai.d to the 



D 

f.l!- ■, 

ara I 

Uli. 
U1.1 ' 



Di ■ 



OeW fi¥l?! 



to 

■ M« 

■an 
?ci 

i ' ■ I lo ob- 
UX Ot tliat tttiut 



-lA.i.j .o A-..; t.'vj,,;:;.A'Ii!tNb 

FREE f»F CHARGE 



Fruit" viues, 

OK. -^LS, 

-AT THK- 

(.V 

FUL'IT TK. 
f l-M, 




I tut for J 



'arnly Realized. 

HI 'ail "a 'orrlt.lo 'ealulio tliU liaft !rDoan. hand 
sUpIHtil Into the h H'OiheciTlt-s haml say lit to the man. 
' ^in yon heain i 
'arl." rays 'e. " 1 '■ 
't'lravp me a Op: 
m» «  qolclc thai I 



'.I an 



 - tl 1,: 



ttW lIcinacHa la t1i ! (avorite alitn by wlilcli p.aluii- 
uukrit known any ileviatlcn whatever from llie oatura 
alMo cf till) bratn, and rieweil In this light It may be 
looke.l on as a pafcirnard InlendM to plve ncttte of dt»- 
ca-'e which TiilBht olh'Twl.sp ei"cnp« attention, till too 
titf lo be rempi'Ifil; and Its Indications should never be 
heKtected. Hpatlachea may ba claAslfl'^d nn-lcr two 
nunici, viz: Syniptouiitlr and I Jlnpathlc. Symrtomattc 
Headache Is e.xceedinffly common and la the precursor 
of a great variety of diseases, among which are Apo 
plcxy, Goill. Rheiimitlsm, and all febrile dL u a^i«3. 
ll.H ' _-. ■i .tthetlc of dlneape of 

si ./ ic'. , of hepatic dUa 

con- ' . ) ; of wurin.4, connllpat 

and other di-^ordor--' of tli«d*owela. aa wall oa renal 
uterine affectlonii. Dlsea^a of the heart are very 
qneiitly attended with headaches; Ana-mla and Plethora 
are also an'r.-tlons which freqn.?ntly occasion hea.Iarhe. 



WalnnlJ 



MANTI.; 
aL'.\ H-. - 

f. ■ 



aOUBT MCntBIU, 



fflce BuUdlnu. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. ' 



litiaU*4he Is i ' 



';ichi?ls also vpry coramoTj, } ^\nx ncuallv 
the name of nfrrfrus hMd^icht. some- 
- ! 1 ! rl   1 1 » ,:■ it*- of apparently found 
:entiil and physical 

.11 slowlr, li^-rnMpil 



v.'.rii'K'.' 'iift'ic 10 paiitiiitA lur ihc application 01 M«v*'to- 
KlcrtrlclU 

Femttle Oiseas€S» 

Fr7f,4:.i T-'.ni,i...1 w' }i !»nt t're'W^''ri'-. I rrfiT. Nvritloe 
r ' ' .»of 

nl) 
' I'-ii, 

■ 'd 



rth 
Tire 



I iMf- 



I. 1 IIR- 



BLOOD PURIFIER & BLOOD FILLS; 




Dr. Eoback's Scandinavian RemedieB! 



to N'l 

nnd i-.t 
fiMo I': . 

IV -"III u 

conn'.ry. 



ai:d 1 



■ 1 varle- 
tor em* 

1 klDdii, 

several 

• . "rmoro 
' I .x-r hardy 
A. at very 
If. iind other 

hi gratis 
PHI ked 
. : *. .iiial, or 
. iu*y be *ar »- 
fiom all paitu tha 



u\ *-s\)T*-^, or oLli^r«.lst 
A'Idrifw 

BATKUAM. IIANFOKT) & CO , 
teZi dlAwi t »tuiijt,ns uhlo. 



ZSZCSXiSZOB.! EZCBLBIOKI 

I.. r . SINK S 
ULKVFVr" '• ■ M f'-n U.I - .v-TilH 
l,,\l:' . I I.K 



I'RI/ 



I'll) 
W II 



y woul D I 



III 



tly 
.-d 



to Mjrni 
Tickeu 
; I l .^ \ATI,0 , 

INTOPM Mr TRtESDB 



lllo 
l&ri!T 



?Al 



..a 

.:id 



; now of OIK mnU 



. 1.1 (itiHld uud N«ck 
  t both I.a'I1eB' and 



. li-^l K..u» t. i.!*i.i . -/^r -alw ays 

. :aa:iafactuTe U kiln drto-i. 
;iti 7 atwnded to tor24 d«wtf 



0. 0. Bowu 

MURRELL & BOWLES, 

Commission Merciiants, 

No. 7ti Cbbip fltrset, 
ocS0d4w«mo • Mf ORLBANS. 



Xffotice. 



THB PART.NKI 
between .1 
18th of Marrt] , 

I Hi ■ ' - 

be; . 1 . 
U..,'-.I .e. lv\ . .^CH. 



SXI8TIN0 
1 on ttie 



1,3 t'l.li 11 

east side , 

.,11. J. 



Useful as well as Ornameutal 



I 

and 



Market 



-.IT- 

WM. KENORICK'S 

2'2a Third Street, bet. Main 

MY sitK-K OP 
WAICtI«8. 

jkNvelrv. 

silvgk a\d 

PLATED W.iKB 

Waa never belKT than at prenent, and oiiend on as 
feood larmi as can Of found in the cUy I Many stviea 
entirely new. Call aiiri eximiine. dnasd^y 

X* ZVeg^ress for Sale. , 

AFIKPT-OLAaS IIOt'SK SBKVANT, WITH t 
twoChll lien.ls otlcre l for --.ide. iShe U ab-iot J* 
twonty-elxht yeai.s oil. and nearly Hack. ForMK 
further parUouUrs, liiqulrtt at th« Democrat oi-_^B 
flee- lalldAwtf 



Garden Seeda. 

THR LARQKSr A.M) MOST tYIMPLETR AS.SORT- 
me it over oifertd lor naio la this market, livery- 
tiilnu wsrranled. For sale by 
|»»d*w PITKIN. Wl 



PITKIN. wiARD * no.SIl Main at. 



QauT DisooTiRT,— Among thesomo Important of r:i 
th.i great medical discoveries of this ago may be consid- 
ered the system of vaccination for protection from 
Small Pox. tbe Cephalic I^ll for relief of Headache, and 
the ulc of tjalnlne for the prevention ot Pevera, either 
of wiilch la s avire aocclttc. whose beneflu will be ei- 
perleaced by anfferlng hnmanlty long after ttielr dla. 
soverers are forKottau 



Did yon ever have Ihe ?lck Headache T Do -on 
reraoiiiber the throbbing temple*, the fevered brow, the 
loathlu); and dlsftsst at tho alght of food (— ho-^r totally 
unlit you were for pleaaure. cunverfatlon, or btady T 
OfiP tli.1 C. nhallc IMll-i would have relieved yon from 
al v^-hlch yon tlien ejtperlenred- Kor this 

11,, ■ ,-ea you ihuiild always have a box of 

tti.'i:. ..... . ' use a^ occasion requlrea. 



BDinoCT.-Mlsani wants yon to s« htr a boi o 

Cephalic Olue- no. a bottle of Prepared PUIa— but I'm 
tl lijk'.ng that's not Ju.st It taither; but perhaps you'll be 
afler knowing what Ills. Ye see she's nigh deail »nd 
gone with the 81ck Headache, and wants lome more of 
that same an relalved her Iwfore. 

Z)riians(.— You must mean Spaldlus's Ophallc Pills. 

Bn'.foit.— Orh : sure now arid you've ae^l It: here'* the 
qnarther and glv me the IMUs, and don't t« all day about 
II attber. 



PURIF¥ THE BLOOD. 

M()FFA.TT'a 

Vegetable Life Pills 

AND 

PHtENIXBITTERS 

jMIK mon AND KMVIKD f'EL1?HRITY WmCIl 



kuuwu by ibelii rului; Lliuti i;o. .l   



oil,:. 



_ ilv lor Uium, 

and the; thrive not by the i'alth of tbe credujooa. 

IN ALL 0ASB8 
Ur Asthma, Acnto and Chronic Khetuaatlsm. Alfactlo 

of lb'  lll,-.d ti riin'i Ki Ineys. 



..■:;f 

L ji ' er 



t»N80Ml'ilo:i 
e,ise. . 



' l»osc;iesa, Bllea, Costive- 

Chidlc. 

'tth great ancceas Inthlsdlir 



■ —  alng diaoaae 



lillY:ill'tl.AS AND iLAiULKNCJ. 

PF:vmt ^vii .^(^'K-!'''^r 'Ml v-ir-? cnii 



W.-'itern 
If 



fOULNSUa t)F 00MPLK.\.10N. 

GK.S'KKAL DKBlLtTT. 
Gont. Old.llneas, Gravel, H-.-adachesof e-irykind. In 
ward Fever, Inrtammatory Uhenmati^c:, Impure Blood. 
Jaundice Loosof Api-etlte. 
UVKRtXJMPLAINTit, 

LKPKIWV, iXXJPKNKSa 

»LERCUliIAL DISBASKS- 
Never falls to eradicate entirely all the ellbcU of Uei^ 
ctiry lotlnltely sooner thau tbe most powerf-a prepar- 
ation «f tMrsapartll.t. 

NUht Sweata, N'ervens Debility, Nervous Complaints 
of all kinds, Orcanic AtTectioua, PalplUtlou of tlie 
Heart. Painter's Chollc. 

PILKS. 

The orlitlnal proprietor ol the.-e medicines waa cnred 
of Piles oiVi y^ara standing by the use of these Life Med- 
icines alone. 

Patua lu the head, side. hack. llmt», Jolnta and organs 

RHBUMATllJM. 
Those affilcted with this terrible dUeaae will be gnre 
of relief by Ihe Life Medicines. 

UU.su OF BLOOD TO Til K IIKAD. 8CPRVY. 8AI.T- 

IlIIEUM. 8WELLlN«a. 
BCRUFOLA.or KINUS KVIL. In iu worjt forma, Ulo«ra, 
of evety description. 
Wonns of all kind.! are effectually cxprdled by thAW 
medicines. I'areiiU ■h'iU do well to administer them 
whenever their eilstence la suspected. ItoitetwlU be 
certain. 

XHK UFK PILLS 

AND PHltNIX ItlTTKRB 

PLKIFY TUU DIXXID, 
And thns remove alt diseases fl-oni the system. 
Prepared by Dll. WM. U HloFKATT. 

No. 3» Broailway, (UoOiitt Bulidln;cl N. T. 
Vor'aale by all Dmggtsta. aplT deoilAweow 



HI II 



J. H. CUTTER & CO., 

DIB'TILLKIO' OF AND RliTAlL DEALliKg IN 

rmzi BotrnBoxv whiskies 

HKCONL) HTREET 
BET'WEKbf MAIN A *fD MARKET, 
'"^ t* !" i.mi-wi.i n 

LASD. WEBSTBB. dL CO.'s 
Z.ASD. WBBSTER dL CO.'a 
ImJLDJ , WEBSTXSa & CO.'s 

BEWINQ M.\CHINE3 I 
SEWING MACHINES 1 
8EW1N0 MACIIINKS I 
ornrii aiii;k on both sidss. evsry ha 

HANTItl). 

4A' them, at No I Haaon Temple, 

-1.1 . IT P. L. FOtlKICTT. 



X 
X X 
XXX 

WS HATB RKOGIYKD, BT LATM OUNSIONMINTi 
Afoll snpply ol 

rxTTSBima albi 



A COMPOUND HKMKDY, DKi*IONKT  T.l THK 

UK. ALTKRAXrVK IhM Me. 

It Is u ; exlraci of Parii ■ -o 

coniMi : jitih-itances of Bill ;a- 

t' ■ ■ . . it'tijcilve an' s- 

: to cure li : .ii 

lllKM" who - II- 

;,, - t uiu' which V- . 1 "h 

lli. !r-,ur. must luuvc ui luiineniw sctvIlc li,.. ;.irjfe 
class of our aflllctcd fellow-cUlxoiis. How compltlely 
thlB compound will Jj It hM b*«^u proven l«y exp-^rl- 
mt-nt on many of the wonit caries to bo found Id the 
followln;r cooipliilnia : 

SCROFULA AND 8CROPTILOU3 C0MPLAIMT8. 
KRUPnoNS AND KRUPTIVE DldKASKS. UIX'KRS. 
PIMPLBP, BU TCHES. TLMORa, 3ALT RIIKUM. 
SCALD HEAD. SYPllILIrt AND SVPHILITIC AFFEC- 
TIONS, MERCURIAL DliiKASK, DROI'^V, NEURAt- 
OIA OU TIC DOULOURKUX. DEBILITY, DV8PKP3Y 
AND 4NDIliJKSTlON, EKY^IPKLAS. R08B OR ST. 
ANTHONY'S I^IRK. auil, lotleed, the whole elated of 
coniplalnU arUiiu from Impurity of the BlooJ. 

I'hts compound will be found a Br*'*t promotor 0 
ht^alth, wbt-n tak  n lu the Njirlng, to t^xpfl thu ton) hu- 
Hiorit wliict) If.Hier lu tbt  blotxl at thai t^i:a-u3 ul th« 
yi ar. By ihe timely expulsion of tlu-m, mauy ranklti k 
JlN r-ler» are nlpp"l lu tii*^ b '.d. Miililtudes can. by 
the uM 'A Oils rtimrdy, ?i)are theniM-Uen from tbu en- 
(liirance o! foul enip'lotii an l uk f-rous s :ret», through 
which the nyht.mi will strive to r:il lihelt" of i .trn|itlf»nK, 
If ii Jt ai*»ltiled 10 do this Oiruui^h thr ii.i' , - (i 

u( Ihe bo ly by aw alteratl\ uif liciiif. . i.; 

vlti.'lcil l l*'Od whenever yuu lUni iLs ! ; ,1- 

Iny thr-'Ufih Ihe Kkln In plmph-H, rmi. .rot"; 
cleaubeltwhen you Und It obstructed and !iiuj;»;i.^h lu 
the veliH; cleanse U when«'Vi.T il N loul, and your ftM*l- 
ncs will t«ll you when. Even where no particular dU- 
order U felt, |M*ople enjoy better health, and live longer, 
for tlfdUtiind th« M'tO't. Kefp the blood healthy, and 
nil !(* wt U: t nt with thl-* pabulum of lUe disordered, 
t ' I • . alth. Soonor or later (tome- 

I !ie Kreat mat-bluury oi U'e 1« 



f'l ttjr !t, I.i-t . I '■■(', I. i- 

IDC to b« con but little 

of the virtue 

Durln«i lat" y . i . , ii . , - ' .nee 

bottles, preteadink^ lo ftUe a  )UH ' - j.- 

parllU fur on..- doltu*-. M i-'..  *t i' . \a 

Upon the sick, for i':" 'i ' ' ■ . ;v, 

Sarsaparilla. i ut o!t r. 
ileii:e, hitler an I i . , i 

the use of the vaii. , . 

ti  tKl the market. UiiL. v:.. suui • u \- in-ii.- . .. -i di- 
ed, and hart become svni»b 'mou« wtih ImparfUlon and 
rhfit S'lll vc t al' tMs t r.nii' 'li'^d f^arsaparllU, and 
1 ' '1 ■■ ' i -hall rescue the 

. rest* upiin It. 
• ^ \un U hat vlr- 

t , " I : , ;i iiiary run of the 

dHea.'e« U i-  UiteiKi. ii lu i.ure lu or-ur t3 »r  ur'e their 
coEDph'tfl %radlcatl  n from the (i r.Leni*. the rriuedy 
should be ludlct'fUdly taken according to dlrectlousoB 
the boltlo. • 

PREPARED BY 

Dr. J, a AYER & CO., 

LOWELL, MASS, 

Price $1 per Bottle— 6 Bottles for $5. 



Constipation or Oostiveness. 

No onr. of the "many Ills fle^h Is heir lo" \- ^ prevs 
tent, Bo llttl« DDderstood. and much neglected a 
CosllTtnffss. Often orlginatlnx In carelefl^, or sedentary 
htb!tf , it is regarded as a tlUht disorder of too lltiln con' 
sc ineTice to excite anxiety, while n reality It Is the pre- 
cursor and companion of many of Ihe most fatal and 
dan«erou3 dlsteanes, and, unless early ernillcated, It wU! 
hrlnj the suOerer to an untimely prave. Among th 
lighter ov!l9 of which costlvencM U the UBual attentlant 
are Headache. C^dic, RheninatWm. Foul Breath, Pile; 

of Ilk" nature, while a Ions train of frlghlfn) 
^och Malignant Fevers, Abcessea, D -sen 
. .rrhea, Dyap*fpRy, Ap'plexy, KpUepsy Para 
lysis. Hysteria, UypochoiiUrlaHls, Melaiictioly and In 
fiantly, drat Indicate their presence In the fystem by 
thlst alarming symptom. Not unfretiuently the diseases 
named originate In Constipation, hut take on an Inde- 
pendent exlfitence uuleca the ciluse Is eradlufttert in an 
early stage From all tliei»e con^lde^aUon8 It IbUow 
tliat tho rtlsonler should receive irnnio. ii.it" attont! ^n 
whenever It occun*, and no 1 - 
i box nf Cephalb- Pills on i : 
complaint asthelrimudy ii 
approaches of uti»e«i6e and de-i i • . « ■-■ . 

human life. 



Iiai.' ■ 

tact. 

pro-. 

this i 

n/if 

otb. 



I ha : 
an l ■ 

tntic 

to l. n«tlit 
iHK il'.rfcl!\ 
Uu-y - - 



1 win 



ever 

lb-*: 

di^e.^'■' ..... 
VOU" fi^ htelii . liie tf ».) It, - 
ARlSUiti FHO.M iMPi 
OF THK Hl.i'' 

In V. 
m'.ri 
va 1- 
!!■ 
BLK 
lb ■ 



t-0 t ; 
to i : 

.1I^. : 

and 

Nu 
trial 
ih«i. 
to I t 

P; 



onp can il-. 



•he 
for 
ite 

,»'.i'in; 
: 11 i.jrdul 

that they recruit 

■. , •.. . : ...Tid 
rat- 

ise; 



XCTIONS 

.., :. ail.i (If ail- 
: life baa be«n In 

\ M N 1 f'liF.T.' 

..Ita 

, , , mt J 

I ...D i.l ^ In 1 » .,::. rt-'l 
Inis of III health. They hunt 
. Lit II I'l ..rt^an of tUe mbtwui, 
iitly. 

,' alter one RiDifle 
. . Id faet, cbearer, 

1 ..^ 1 .1 t. -.1 i.uuiber of them 



. . ian Vejfetable Ulood rnrlfler, 
.... ..I . , i . ;..i.f Joaen. CM" the tkanilloavlau 

Ketabie lliooJ fillji, 24 cents p r tioi, or Ave boxes 

^"keLl Dr. Roback'a Six-clal .Votlcea an.l Certlticate™, 
publl-he l IB a codjuiIcuouh part of thla paptrlrom time 

^^l^*^"li.-)htick'^ ^I.^tl|,.,il Alrranftc and Family A ivUer. 

it' ititercslltjg aud valuable 

,11, I .id (fratU of any of his 

;;, 1 1 • c.uies. Dr. Boback may be 

cou.-ultc.l i.,i:ouaiij or by luiier, lin-loatng ono aunio 

^^I'Hr. McHulUn, Itutar tf KobtrU ChajKl.] 
I\T.MX.(POU«. October 6. 1*57. 
Dr. 0. W. ROB.*cE-Dear( lr: 1 have naad your Blood 

I'urlller lor a ceivcjUti Bflect'on 'r "t m t !.  ' I ti iv^ 
lereil ninch al time*. While t 
II ei^rtalnlv ha.H n huppy t Ili'tt 
accept u.i thaukl lor yuur kill . 

a^Filncipal Offl:e and Halesroouia.flu SKaJt  'aurth 
street tltlrd tivilldlni? frnm Mala ftritel, CInr.lnuatI, O, 

Ijilt.i-'. ' ■ ' 1 1 .1'. t, .1,.! street. 

i iTvl. r.I/i. I- 

C. * Wallii i ' 

.sv;,^ t.. A. a. sbiv.-... 

DruKKUta autl .Mctcuanta ienc-i.lty th .j i^ii. 
Union. de^'i a*y l yeon .l..a.t' 



'  ll: k 
' Ii 
1 Ly 

u the 

imot* 



LIVER iNVIGORATOR 



T li^ ('t 



NEVk:!! UEBIl.lT.VTK.S. ' 

nip r .iir.ii :.NTi;;: ' ■. Fi:''M HUMS, AND 



eases l-jr -AJIt. u .1 i.--- - 
11 haa cur.Mi thouiiauda 
who hail Klvin up all 
luerous uuaoliclieJ ctrtll- 
W11I show 



i-  
M . 



- 1 .Mcilclne, 
iMid It, and 
all the dla- 



^ wlthWi the laat two yeani 
^ hop«a ul relief, as the nn* 
0 lLat«s In Uiy poaaetttilott 

rUa dose mn»tb« adapt- 1 J^ied to Ilia temperament ol 
ll and naed In audi quantl' 
l' Rowols. 



the IndivUDal takioji It, 
tleaaa ts a.'t irntly onthe' 
Let the i 

of th 



I, I 



Cll 
Die 



\.STLM. 
VVK.tK" 



1)V.-1.  
I TU * I 



1 KUV 

n 



t'nthe 

,'U.- 

. , liltOl'SY 
TIVF.N'K.!'.-'. 
M 0 K B U.s, 
'K, JAUN 
I may be 
; A M I I. Y 



Brook county. Va. 



:ia 
t.e«a 

. ih..it5 I- ' . iie, 
ff'a dltwSm 




OLD POSTDFFICE BUILDIN8, 

Corner Jefferson antl Third streets, 
LOUISVIZiZiB, KT., 

The Oldest Commercial College 

IN KK\Ti (:i6r. 
Eighteenth Yf^r "Without Vacation! 

T HE DES: ITLTMIS IH TO 111- 

i-ait to Practical Bualneaa 

1 - - 1 .'t\ from 

Ileal 
iiu 
.Ida 
-*f, 
the 
. itiey 

a. ., J It 1; a /'/ .. -. ■ i tl I. I ' \ . ; ..- 1 I,. .1-5 rul ^^iciiLi.-. 

Coarse of Stady. 

Book-Keeping, by f ln :« acd Doub'.a Entry, as appUeil 
10 every branch of trade and conimerco. 

t; b.Suyd; 

Business and Ornamental Penmanship. 



K 

llooki 



In this department we n 
thorough tralnlii]; tliaij 
Htatc. C*iU ant! fz.tmt.'i- 



t.dvantagei for a 
-tUutlcn In tha 



lUN, Penman. 



Commercial L^vt. 

REQUUtIt I.ECTCRKS BY S. N. IIODOB?, ESO. 

Commercial Calculationfi. 

fHndentfi ar'.' nixlr lamipar Kith the sUortoat and 
nioAt approved ni.'tho.lH of c. nipu'lL2 interfsT, bank 
dlscouuta, dl^'tmnts prop.-r, i iiiiaM.iu ot* payueata, Ac. 

Hours of Instruction, 

From 9 a. u. to 13, from 2 to 5, and tram 7 to 10 p. H. 
Average lluia lor thu acvuuipHahment of tbe work 
cUhi weeka. 

Term*. 

For Full Court.-. IncludInK Book-Keeping Cora- 
mt-r '.M l' - ''i.n« and Penmanshhj. $30 60 

Writ; 6 00 

Sliiti »3 soto   ao 

F  i   . .1 - . .titalnlnglurtherpartlcularsaudrefer- 

ences, i .ili al ihe College or addresa 
f.6dl *wlm J. J. BOT D. Prlnclpa L 

Nurserymen & Florists 

OIKECTOKY 
JF LOUISVILLE AND VICINITY 



A Real Blessing*, 

f^yjtnan— Weil, .Mrs. Jotien. bow l.-* that haadachef 
Mrs. Joiifj— Qonel I octor, all gone! The p!U yo 

a.'iit cnred me In Jufit twenty mtnntca, and 1 wish yo 

« i ' , - ( ii re, m that I can have them handy. 

  ' u can pH thorn at any I ruKKtt t'8. Call 

f » . . ri; 1 tli.d they rit'ver fall, and I recom- 

n.i 1 tii. 1.; il -til caic-* of HpadachP. 
JUrs.Jonti~l Bhull ?end for a tox directly, and shall 

tell all my .^uiicrtitif friunds, for they arc a real blessing. 



TwKfTT Miilio:t8 or Dolurs Havid.— 5fr. 9paldlu 
has 8oM two ntllMons of bottles of hh* ctiebraird Pre- 
pared Ulne. and It is estlmat« l that each bottle mvcs a 
least ton dollars' worth ^f broken fumltarc, thus muk 
TXg an ai^?r«gat« of twenty mlUlous of dol.ara reclaimed 
from total loss by this valuable Invention. Having 
m& le his Ulue a housaholtl word. ho now propoges to dv 
the world &tl\\ sreater sorvice by caring all the achin 
head^ wUh h\» Cephalic Ht1t , and 1( they are as good as 
hia Glne, headaches will &oon vanish away like itnow In 
Jnly. 



Over excitement, and tbe mental cara and anx- 
laty Incident to close attt^ntlon to bn.-lness or atudy. a 
among the numeroQii causes of Nervous Headache 
Tho disorder^ state of mlud and body Incident tc tola 
distressing complaint is a fatal llow to all energy an 
ambition. Suflerers by this disorder can always ottal 
8i eedT relief IVom these dlstresslmr atta^-ks by usln 
on d of tho Cephalic Tills whenever tho symptoms ap- 
P4*Ar. It quiets tho overtasked brain and so »the8 the 
Htralned and Jarrliitf ii«rvu«. and rfiaxe« the tension ol 
the st  iDach whtcn always accuuH'^idea and aKKr ivatM 
the disordered coudlttoo of tho brain. 



lAcT WoBTH KNOwma. -Spalding's Cephalic Pills are 
A certain cure for iiXck Headache, Bilious Headache, 
Nervous Headache. Co^livt-nof and Uencral Debliltv. 



NervousHeadache 

HeadacliG. 



aiVinU their testimony 



i ALL WHO USB IT AKK 
ta liii favor. j 

.MIX WATKR IN THE MOOTU 'WrTH THR IN- 
ViliOKATOR, AND SWALLUW BOTH lUuKTUBK. 
Price One Dollar per Bottle. 



-ALSO— 
FAMILY 

BLOOD PURIFYING PILLS, 

W.MPOUNDKD KROlt 
Pnre Vegetable Extracts, au l put up In OltASS CASItS, 
Air Tight, aud will keep In any climate. 

The FAMILY CATU-I • 1 ARTIC PILL Is a senile 
but active Cathartic, | which the proprietor ha.1 
Qsad In hia practice niorv |i^ | than twenty yeara. 

The constautly Increa^v-i^ | Ing demand from those 
who have long U(te l thej | I'lLLS and the satlafao- 
tlon which all express in;H regard to their uiie, has 
induced me to place thetu within the reach of all. 



The rpife-'slon w.-ll 
thartlcs act on dltTerent 

Till- FtMii.v cvni- 

dn 



cm' 



aitt 



NK--, 1 

tVHOLKHODY 

ly. If nc;.'!i 



this welljO 
ill a va-|^ 
. till h act: 
aii.t trv'fl 
athartlc: , 



know hat dliferent Ca- 
portlons of the howels. 
AKTIC PILL has, with 
e.-^tabllshtvl fact, been 
liety of the purest Vege- 
allke uu every part of the 
(] »I) ;ind gAKK in all 
U iitH'dod, s*i':h a^ UK- 
TOMACU, JiLKKPI- 



K \M» 1 "INS/ 



r welKhl In 
Worms In 
a Krt'at Purld'-T 
dls4.'a.ses to which Hesh Is 
rueiitioD lu. adver- 



l.V THK 
i'AIN AND 

ly. If ne:rl.-. ' ■ *, ■ -i 
Luss of A , 
the bo ! 

(ho heft.i , . ir' 
Children or .\ ... :^ Itir u , . 
uf the Uiooa and nian  fl 
heir, too numerous to 
Osmtint, Dose 1 to 3. [O 

Price, Three Wmes. 
The Liver Tnvlcforator aud Family Calhaiilc Pills are 
retailed by Drugglstrt ^'eneraHy, ant sold wUoleaalo by 
the Trade In aU thii large towns. 

T. W. HAMKOUD, M. II., 
Manufacturer aud ProprleU r, 
J08 Broadway, New York, turner ot Fulton st, 
tar Sold in Louisville by Wilson. Peter A Co., R. A. 
Robinson A Co., Raymond A Tyler, aud by all Drug 
elsU. se29dAwly 



Ayer's Cherry Pectoral 

Ia  won for 't?eir ^'irh a renown ftr the cnr» of every 
■ ' ' ! ' ■ ! ' that It Is en- 

. videncj of it.* 
. ■ It has 



In-.- 1 Iii-l J'MUt)! t-- U. Ill tt.S-UlL' Ihi- p. 

Y- ', r ui  lo the l e-.t H ever hut been. ai. 
rcht'd on to do foi their relief ail It has t 
to do. 



Ayer's Cathartic Pills, 



FOR THE CURB OP 



tiuit A'/icum, tit •lit, ..\ ' urtii^ta, u 
Dintirr tSU, amt f-r i^rxfy- 
inij the lilmni. 
They are -^ngar-coated. so that the mA! t senjiltlvo cau 
take them pleasantly, and tht;y ar* tbe best aperient In 
the world tor all tho purposes of a famiW phy&lc. 
PRICE 26c. P£R BOX-FIVK BuXKS FOR SI. 



Br«wod f X pree^' y \ 

wo ftr«? abi** to li. ; 
t-arrel-*, hnif-turru 
Thlt* Ale U hlfthljr 
nitdklnal parpot es. 



u WINTER D8IC, which 
m suit the tUues, tn 
r bottled for family use. 
: lod by physicians for 
HblnK thu aole a^tUits lu LoalavlUe 



lor the celebrated brated B'lwem 
llh» lea Ac V«rM r A- Wood ■•■r« 

We can confldently raconimend onr stock of ALB and 
PORTMR to the public patronajre. 

LUPK * KVAN8. OiyBtal Palace. 
Oorner of Fiflh and ^feStoraon 6tre«u, 
Mil dAwlT I^oMllo, £7, 



- ■ ... t.,..L'rit 

, I'd dealers with other 
; oTUon. Demand A VkR's, 

,11. 1 1 . .-uiit the teH aid th«re Is 

lor tbt '. have It. 

. .ire lur palo by R. A. Robinson 

A C r .-^1 ; ■ .i liJiihos, LouWvHlo; Allen A Co.. 

ClnclQuui-. and by all dealars everrwboro, 
Jf49 U^dAwfm 



Uy the nse of these PlTIs the periodic attacks of Strv- 
usor .VkJI headache may be prevented ; and. If uken 
at the c  mmencement o( an attack. Immediate relUf 
from pain and sicRno^^ will be obtained. 

They seldom fall In removing the Iv'ausfa and Htad^ 
ache to which females are so subject. 

They act gently upon tho bowels— removing OMAin- 

For LiUroDf Men, Students. Delicate Females, and all 
persons of sedmtary habits, they are valuable as a La»- 
afifv, Iniprovlns the aj^ttU, giving tori'' and vi^ror lo 
the digestive ontans. and restoring; the natural elasticity 

d ktreiiath of the whole |)y^tenl. 

The CEPHALIC PI LLS are tbe resHlt of long Investi- 
gation aud cart;f\illy-cou lucted expiTluient.'^. having 
been tn use many years, during which time they have 
l*revrnlod and relieved a va^t amount of pain and sut 
feting from Ueadache, whether originating in the nerv- 
ous system or from a deranged slate ot the stomach. 

They are eatlrely vegetable In their comix»sltlon. an j 
may be taken at all times with perfect safety with- 
out making any change of diet, and the ab$^ce qf anjf 
disagrefatAt taste renders it easy to adminitUr then to 
children. 

BBWARB OF OODNTERFEITfll 
The genuine have tlve signatures of Henry C. Spald- 
ing on each box. 
Hold by Druggists and all other Dealers In Medlclneo. 
A box will l e fci'nt by mall prepaid ou receipt of the 

All order-; should be addr«'B*ed to 

RBITR'Sr C. SFAIiBmO, 

ooia d.icats  S CEDAR .STliKKl . MiW VUKK 
U - ! I 

Freflli Arrivalii. 

THE rXDERSIOXED ARK . UW RKfiETVTNa ATV 
jltloDn to their larKe stock of l ry tloods, and pai tlc- 
ulariy Invlie the attention of cash and punctual dealers 
lo their Mork. .. -» 

JAMK8 TBABCK * 00. 608 W. Main at . 
rei3d«wtf Oppoalte Louisville Uotel. 



KECKIVF.D- 
KMI canes fresh SprliiK Prlnta: 



Ul I IS. « Ii. iiin-' ttMiis.4HH and rianlatlon Stuffa. 

' ~ • and Khirtlngi; 



O^nabt; 
and rUii l 



Df'n*i*C\ tton Strlpoa 

.1 11.... • 1 ..-1 DrIllliHtt. 

A.MJi:  iiUtllUK « Ci).. 1x19 W. Main et.. 
dA'Wtf OpiM ..tlte LouUvllle Hotel. 



A I.I, KIND8 OF lltlM.MI.NUS AND FANCY UOIDg, 
Hosiery. PIuh Nc.(dU'S aud !3ewin^ Thread, Jaco- 
nels, l.tt ii.), and Canil-riCH 

JA.MBii TKABtK * CO,, (V« W. Main at., 
fr?.' Jtwtf Opposite LouUvllle Hotel. 



QALEN'S HEAD DISPENSARY 

IWTABUSIIKO liS). 

For tbe care of aU Private Diseases. 
A XWaDZCAIi RBFOZLT, 

NEW EDITIO.S FOR \m, 
OHUaming THIKTT fine flatet ami HivravinQt v 
the Anaiomn and Phi/sioloov  if t/u HemuU Or- 
ffems, tn a ttaU oj Health and I u«ua. 
rXICJiC ONLY TKN CKXTS. 
lient free of poatage to all parta of the Unlon.^* 
ON A NSW .UKTUOU Ot 
treating Hyphllla. (Gonorrhea, 
Btilctnrea, Qleet, 8«xual Debili- 
ty. Impotency, Female Dlaeasea, 
and all atfectloii!* of tha repro- 
ductive system of both Aexes, the 
■S'-iif V. 11th '111 1 maturity 
' lli-a o 
. '^e ou 
nl.NAL 
.1. . .. ...ie coR- 

. .lU thu uilnd and 
.: out the author's 
. -..inent, the only ra- 
1 cuie, as bhown by the 
A truthful it-lvlser to the mar. 
latluff iuarr1at(e. who enl«rtal!: 
ti\ ttii al contlttlou. Sent to any addrei«» 
er on tbe receipt of TIM OltNTf , or 
f I. 

.t ''.'edlaeaj«ea, before 
.tiueut of any ono. 



C*^' 

rh 

pi- 
tl. 

ol ^• 

tin 

ll.. 

! 

th 

ail 

lu-i .. 

to ail) aiMie.- 
d^ntial, 
enable* 

Km;' 
ait ' 

.Ml 
dv 
h, 




. .■-;.,it.ia 
- y to 1 tuoru 



AUeu'a Nat'aerr. 

V r ' 'i"': I'lis! .'lice— Jefferrontown 

•  PKYB...^^^^S5^ern t^ceaiTTdi 
Cedar Creek Nnk-aery. 

J. JOHNSON t SON PosfilHce-CedarCreek 

Fern Creek Nnraerr- 

a. 8. * C. T. DUNCAN PostolBce-Fera Ci»ek. 

Sprlns Dale NarMerr. 

L. TOOSO k Pi/tloince-Lonk Tttle 

Bearirraaa Nurserr. 

CARKY, PETEil t CAREY PostoCace-LoollTllU 

Kvrrareen Nurserlr*. 

HOBB8, WALKER « 00. PoatofBce-O'BaaiMm's 

)aJ."  wtf 



Allen's Nurseries 



O.V TIIK TAYLOKSniLE ROAD, 
Near LouUvllle* 

ffr !9 S 



w 



E 11-tVK tl .-'Al.K Tit f 
the lar^oft utid niont cci 
TKEKlf, Vl.NES, .-^MALl. H'.l 
before ortered. Wr iirtvt. glvi.Mt ... 
cu'tlvatkin of .utheru varieties i.l . 
whli h We woulii call tlu' attention of 
fiend lor a Catalogue. \^ 
uu4 dlaw^wlf JefTer^onti.- 



NT SEASON 
Jl KRUIT 

r HVfl ever 
ii.i the 
■s. to 



■u I'l-siotBce. ■ 



Van Dcusen'S| An Agent LMa^'ical Blue. 
Van Deusen'.S; Wanted |\Voim Confections. 
Van Deusen'sjin ever.V|Ink Powders. 
Van Densen's, Comity ! French Prep'dGlue. 

SJEND STAMP. AND ADDKE.-i? FOR CIRCULAR 
O and terms the Sou Auisis for Kt iiiuctaF, 

I.KE * T.\rnt'RT. 
Tayloravllle, Spwiii ' . Ky. 

jar For Hale everywhere, and In 1 rrios 
E. Jtnklna * Co . . vly_ 

SAPONIFIER, 

OR 

Concentrated Lye! 

W.VRRANTEU TO 



■^ylTHOUT LIMK, 



. AND WITU VERY UTTH 

trouble. er-. fatully can 

Make their own Soap 

Out of any kind of Keluse t^rease. couiblnc.l with tha 
SAPO.MI'IER. 

It will make hanl water soft, will cle.in type to per- 
f.'ctiou. an l f. r nil pn'ro"'"' where • STRONU LYB U 

rdi.it-i ' ■ ■ . ■ 



u 

tlO!;- 

miii 
FAt 

but.:. . 
C.Ul t.. ^..1.. 
Chloride of tectum 

Mai.'an*^t.e, 

Cll': 

111. 
M 



•n boxes, with full dlreo- 

-e. 

.ll and p9fccte l article la 
i.VANIA SALT MANU- 
]»6 Peun street, Pltl»- 

to 

Reflne^l Soda Aah, 
Soda Saleratua, 



' Soda. 



Copperas, 
"j.ta " ' 



Salt 
pa 

coniitrv 



Soda Ash. 
Aqua Fortia, 
Nllric Acid, 
■tiow Whlt* Table, Dairy aud Packinc 
it-lrely pure aud ilry, put up In vaxloui 

oy all DroKftlsts and Grocers In the 
laHl dIAwiT 




ilevolviiii; Loope,r Doublt-T&i^ailed 

Family Sewing Machine 



■ ."■VERVBODY AND li: 
1 J best In 



ml our larKe 

.rtinl ■ 



t In the world 



llKht leather work. A' 



. .ss welt I 
tltid Dr. 



EITTHB 
lien, Tuck 

..... vtlou, ai «l 

 )m the flneat to 

M:kI||- ■ extant 
Inol 
.lelil 
tuly. 
pur- 
t y If, 



Dii, u.tl.KN .■• 

4»-9mCB-No. 314 FIFTU STii t 
ket and Jed'erson. we»t side, next it 
shop. 



i.t lixjury to 

'. Mf^rled lo 
' I ' V, 
K» 

11 Mar 
..1 llutis' tln- 
noZK d*wtf 



FOP-CORN B4E,LS. 

rrHIS FAVOIUTK ARTK'LE ('F TONFKCTIONERY 

X cam. I." ■ ' 1 it ^v)ioles»l ^off he following houses: 

JiKAl I /.. Louisville, Ky.i 

A. l; .i •. Ky.; 

V. ll . I ll . I » llle. Kv.; 

J.\^. I Ind.; 

Aud at tt. t.ielwceu Main antl 

Ma'ket.iii tiers. )a8dl*«ly_ 

1,400 Acres of Laud for Sale. 



o.ss«aa 



.iron;{ and durable, easily nn- 
and not liable to {et out ot 



l-t 

der-t . . 
onler. 

2d. They use cotton from the ordinary spool wlthoat 

rewinding— stvliin llnte. IrnutiV .in.l wa^t--. 

31 i ' t'.^ Hp 

tba:i  rto 

the tlble- 

looi . '■1 rt 

evt . aa 
the . that 

lh.  1 : . . . I   dl»- 

peUS4.- l V. uu, alid leases J, t'Cllecliv sti.^IlK, sliiuOtU and 
t vtfu seiiiil. 

4th. They sew Cotton. Linen and Silk Thread wiuallr 

well. 

3ih. They VINISII their work. Tlierr la no occasion 
to fasteti tbe lbr.ta'Is «t either en.l of the s.-am, asia ra- 

ijulre I ' . 1 ^' ' '•'i ■■- 

( ; t foot 

•luds. 

. '..tot 

■ tha 
lUlta 




Hlaiup. 



C'JUtltv In the State, to 



11. W ILl.l AM?, Uo.\ 1.. 
i No. »4 Fourth street, I 



an.- dt.t .. u 



' to John W. OillLaiu, ou the premlsea, 
.-r, lu Louisville. 

TUOMAB JOYItS. 



TAKEXV VP, 



supl'v..-.cil to Ik- one  ear an 
six ll .liars before me. Decen. 
Ja30 W4 J. I 



\p;.rat-^e»l at 
, J. P. J. C. 



Y TP I' 



Ky. 

Alld 



/iRA.-iS seeds: 

VX 4UH I It- 1 
aUlM) ! 
1000 t 

SOO 1 
lOU t 

son ! 

m \ 

For sale at tii.- ii.v  
to the trade. 



ORASS seeds: l- 
iiit I extra do Blue Oraas, crop ISA); 
'i;aa. , oo; 

do; 

-t recelveil, do; 

do; 

do; 

s; 

.al m.»h prl. . - V ■ ' il'oiinnt 

t 1', 

434 .M et. 



T IMK! 
J J and 



Tii. 



C11.0TIUSO AND CARPET WAREllOUfR OPPO- 
/ site the LoulavlUe Hotel. 

JAMES TRABUB * 03., 
fe22 diwtt W. Main street. 



BROWN 



EILEJETINOS ALWAYS ON HAND 

lor cash. 

JAMES TRABUK * CO.. r«8 W. Main st . 
fe'.^'.' d Awtt Opposite Louisville Uotel. 



(lav, the 

14 1. ■ 

Pet 
«-| 

tak- . 
lUk' l..* iaw. 
de iai*w3« 



LIMK1:-I n V 
-an inrnlsh Ui 
- I .. t',.. bbl. I.t. 

ers to tbe 1 

Seetl and Ayt 



t N TS 



■aui- 
;r la- 



WARNVR O. HKRR. 



J^QQ BBL8 WalTUia »0J5 SALE BY 



Grass Seeds. 

QAAA ncsuM s iti rKi)m s sekd; 

Ov/UV t lOra.13 do; 



do 
do 
lover do 



do; 

do; 
do; 



Warranted crop ot llKiQ wd lor sale by 

PITKIN. WIARD * 00, 



J»8 4*W 



DE FOREST, ARiaSTRONG & GO,, 

DRY GOODS MERCIIANTS, 7'.. ~. T9. 81. ANU 8S 
l)r.\.NK .STIIECT, -Sew Vult, woull notify the 
trade that they are opening weekly, lu new and beaatl- 
fill Patterns, the 

WAMSUTTA I'lt'NT" .M ■^O TflE AMOSKKAO, 

A New Prlut. will . Print In the Connlry 

bir iterf. . rum .-1 • design lu full Madder 

Col ir  " I' . r than any In market, an4 

meet' -'^le. 

Or -.dto, Www 





...... 




Weekly Louisville Democrat, 1861-03-06

4 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt7tdz030301
 Local Identifier: wld1861030601
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/wld/xt7tdz030301.json
Location
  Published in Louisville, Kentucky by Harney & Hughes
   Jefferson County (The Bluegrass Region)