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date (1868-01-08) newspaper_issue lASWtK 


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— 



THE WEEKLY MAYSVTLLE EAGLE. 



STIPl I.ATION* .WITH A 

\m  _ -m 

A Jvertisemen'-: ordered for le*» 
I will be eharve i t« cnty live renti \* 

insertion after the first. 
Special notice* fifteen cent* a 

insertion, and ten cents a line for 
insertion. 



 r each 



Mlfrcbant bailors anil (Tlotl)ifrs. 



B. KAHN & CO., 

CLOTHIERS, 
MERCHANT TAILORS. 



AND RETAIL 



m*G EN T L EM ESS WEA R,-m 

Kn.S?, Kecend afreet. 

North fide, adjoiniag "Chine Palace." 
MATSViLLE. - - - KENTUCKY. 



VOLUME I 



M A YSYILLE, KENTUCKY, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY *, 1868 



NUMBER in 



WEW YKAirs a i i k ess William Hooper s Lipase. 



FFUHNOS AND PATRONS 



OF THE 



Mays vi He Eagle. 



the 
afe. 




liberal 
he fart 



FALL IMPORTATION 



and DOMESTIC CLOTHS. 
— confuting of— 

BROADCLOTHS. BEAVERS. 



READY MADE 

CLOTHING! 

Of OUR OWN* MAM' PACT I" RE. far excellinr in 

ever 



TS. 



DKAWERS. 



IVATi and HANDKERCHIEFS. 
Ac, Ac. Ac. 
all of which we purehaae low, and can ael 
AT CASH PRICES ! 



MHH III*. *v ru|'ri i"i p' w'ii iiur I 

-ted. lOnr "ready-made'* clothin 
a* well aa#t ourhou-e id Cincinnat 
,uld you wish elothei made to *uit 
.1 taste and fanr, . we still retain th 



for smaller profits than ever heretofore done. We 
only ask yon. rentlemen. to call and examine our 
stork . knowing and feeling assured that you will at 
once admit that a superior selection has never " 
imported. (Oar "ready-made" clothing i» 

-ati.i 
it your own 
the services 



Mr. Thos. Summers, 

who has won the favor of so many of oar patrons. 
Ay giving universal satisfaction in his profession 

ah a cutter 

a* w«B ae by his proverbial willingness and readi- 

VT'kahn A Co. 



Dnj 



LATEST MYELTIaiS 



 * o o r  m ! 



nrrounding.counti 



stock 



New 4Dd Fashionable Goods. 



Every department is well filled with a complete 
uaeortaaast of whatever is desirable in the list of 
now t» 



(From Chamber's Journal.] 

Six months ago I was unexpectedly sum- 
moned to town by a letter from mv London 
solicitors. Messrs. Smith and Son, on urgent 
business, the precise nature of which it is 
unnecessary for me to specify here. Living 
as I do some mile* from a post-town. I do not 
get my letters until far into the morning, and 
it was only by dint of a hard gallop that I suc- 
ceeded in reaching the station at Bountford 
just as the mid day express enmc steaming 
in. As I passed the book-stall I called out 
for a copy of the day's Timet, but was an- 
swered by a gaping boy that he had none — 
not in yet, or all out, I forget which. Being 
pressed for time and moreover haunted by a 
vague dread of the live dreary unoccupied 
hours before me, I flung down a shilling on 
the counter, and having caught up nt random 
the first of the row ol monthly magazines, 
hastened to secure mj - seat in a first class 
carriage. The compartment in which I found 
myself was empty, but it seemed that I was 
not long to have* it to myself; for the oppo- 
site seat — I hod taken one next to the win- 
dow, with my back to the engine— was occu- 
pied by a gentleman s hat-box and railway 
rug. and a portmanteau was stored away nn- 
derneath. The rug was of a shaggy brown 
outside, lined with a running pattern of black 
and blue. The hat-box was labeled, 1 W'm. 
Hooper, passenger to London.' 

The comfort of a journey, a long one es- 
pecially, depends in so great nmeasure on the 
nature of one's fellow-travelers, that it is uot 
to be wondered nt that my eye dwelt rather 
loug on the mime, while I fell into specula- 
tions as to its possessor, and whether he 
would turn out to lie a good, bad, or indiffer- 
ent companion. Having scanned his lug- 
gage well. I proceeded to look out of the win- 
dow for the man himself, for we were upon 
the point of starting, and it was time he made 
his appearance. At this moment there came 
hurriedly up a tall young man with sandy 
mtistaehe and blue spectacles, carrying a car- 
pet bag. and an old lady with a dog in her 
arms. Both looked in at my carriage, and 
both passed on, the one up the other down 
the platform, entering respectively the com- 
partments to the right and lejt of mine. The 
only persons now remaining on the platform 
were the station master, who was already 
giving the signal for our departure, two por- 
tors and a bearded man who placed up and 
down with folded arms. Him I was disposed 
to set down as Mr. Hooper; but if it were he, 
he showed a singular indifference to the fate 
of his property, for the whistle sounded, and 
we went off, and he simply stood still and 
stared carelessly after us 

Plainly, it was no Mr. Hooper. But where 
then was the man f It was a question more 
easily asked than answered. I grew weary at 
last of watching his luggage, and turned my 
attention to the magazine 1 had bought at the 
station. Story after story I began and story 
after story I abandoned. 

We had whizzed by four or five out-of-the- 
way stations at express rate; now we were 
slackeuing speed cousiUerably, and presently, 
bump, bump, we drew up alongside of the 
platiorm at the Tamwell Station. 

Here we had a stoppage of ten minutes, to 
enable northern passengers to lunch; a te- 
dious delay t« those who like myself had no 
better occupation for the time than walking 
up and down the platform. Among some 
half dozen others employed in the same man- 
ner, one man in particular attracted my no- 
tice. He Was below the middle height, broad 
shouldered, thick set, and red-haired. His 
eyes were red and bright; his face not a 
pleasant one to look at. conveying as it did 
a most unmistakable expression of crafti- 
ness. 

"If I were a policeman," said I to myself, 
" I should keep a sharp look out on that fel- 
low." 

His movements struck me a3 peculiar. He 
walked right down the platform, peering into 
one carriage after another, as though undeci- 
ded which to enter. Having arrived at the 
end of the train, he turned and came leisurely 
back towards where 1 was standing. This 
time he stopped tor a moment at my carriage, 
and an undefined instinct made me watch him 
still more narrowly. He glanced backed at 
me, and for an instant his eyes encountered 
mine , then he turned his head and walked 
on. A sudden idea struck me: could this by 
any chance be William Hooper, who, having 
inadvertantly got into a wrong carriage at 
Bountford, was now come to look after his 
luggage? But I dismissed the notion imme- 
diately; he was so evidently not a first-class 
class pussenger. The ringing of the first bell 
took of!' my attention, and 1 hastened to re- 
sume my seat. 

" By your leave, sir," said a voice at my 
elbow, and there, te my no small astonish- 
ment, was the same objectionable individual, 
actually preparing to enter the carriage. 

" Perhaps you are not aware that this is a 
first-class carriage." I said in my haughtiest 
tone, and not budging an inch to facilitate 
his entrance. 

".lust so, sir, " he replied, with provoking 
Never plowman trod the furrow ol ■ richer coolness; and he proceeded to push his way 

soil than our6. — I in. 

To a Worn more prolific never came the 

summer showers ; 
Corn and wheat in rolling billows flood the 
acres with their gold, 



A DDE ESS. 



We have filled with recollections all 

calumets to-day. 
And from this clearer present floats 

cloudy past away ; 
We have burned to finer ashes all the 

of the years, 
That so late amid the homelauds brought 

us misery and tears. 

Farewell to all the memories that preyed 
upon our kouIb, — 

That made us in our carnage-time I popu- 
lace of ghouls ;— 

Farewell to every record-mark of cruelties 
and crimes, 

And a welcome to the sunlight of our 
dawning better times. 

Already from the havoc fields where rolled 

the battle drums, 
The busy beat of hammers and the din of. 

labor conic.- : 
The plow-share in the sodden ground it? 

fruitful passage takes, 
And toil i  in its triumph from the bayous 

to the lakes. 

Ob. blessed land ! where swords arc drawn 

to hew the armied grain ; 
Where lines of com are stricken down 

upon the harvest plain ; 
Where every stalk beneath the stroke in 

golden beauty bows. 
And men are counted noble who have 

sweat upon their brows. 

Oh, blessed land ! oh land of toil and land 

of human love,— 
There MM page- of repentance in thy records 

ill. above ; 

And onward, onward through the days of 

glory yet to come. 
Shall march "thy legion, labor, shall beat 

thine auvil drum. 

Our sinews sfroug from North to South 

arc wrought of irou bands, 
And rivers wind like silver threads adown 

our shining sands ; 
Brave Progress with her certain pulse — j 

her mighty breath of steam 
(toes out in power on the earth -in glory 

on the stream. 

And westward far. by plains abloom and 

mountains rich in ore. 
Our engines bear their burthens to the 

great Pacific shore ; 
Our sails are white on all the seas — with 

gleaming track behind. 
At peace to-day with all the world!—  Jood 

will to all mankiud. 

Thus much fen all the nation, as a grand 

majestic whole, 
Made up of smaller portions, 

make up the soul, 
Cod hath trusted us with talents— each 

and all of us a trust, — a 
Howsoe'er we please to use them, He is 

merciful and just. 

Let us do our share of labor;— let us toil 

and sweat to-day. 
Let us lift our burthened neighbor from 

his falling by the way ; 
Every impulse of our kindness — every act 

we do of love. 
Hath its record to our 

ives up above. 

* * ft y T vMJ" 

Bv the broad and fair Ohio in the rich 

lands of the West, 
We have builded up our mansions- here to 

live and here to rest j 
And the loug grass waves in greenness 

over plains and over hills, 
And the sunlight gives its shimmer to the 

ever going rills. 

Land of Peace and land of Plenty— richer 

far than any yet. 
May thy rising sun of glory in the shadow 

never set ; 

fioodly arms and sturdy spirits over all 

thy fields be spread, 
Teach the" children of thy people fo be 
to earn their bread ! 



TRIWEEKLY. 



tiRKAT BAHRAIN- 



i m«Ae at recent aaotion sales in 



MULLIN8 A' HUNT 
CHEAP DRY GOODS STORE 

as t aa « aireer, 

MATSVILLE. - - - KENTUCKY. 



Build the goodly track of iron— through 

the pasture lands and fields. 
That its greater strength may gather in 

and gamer up the yield*. 
Let the ' palpitating engines spread their 

steam adown the vallh-s, 
\nd the woodlands, hanging over keep it" ' '*ke hi s way. hoping 

widio in tla^iry^fy^ A JijAJ - j 

outward -bear 
and kine 

Oj»e#) u|  tfie'*e«r et treasure of the under- 
lying mine. 
Show tho world your share of ru be- -pu t 
what you 



Send the golden 



e corn a 



ness of man ! 



you can, 



"It is William Hooper, ' was my mental 
conclusion; but this was negatived the first 
moment. 

"I'll thauk you to allow me to move your 
rug and hat-box to the next sent, sir: 1 wish 
to see the last of a friend." 

And suiting the action to the words, he not 
only displaced the articles in question, but 
squeezed his bulky figure out of the window 
in such a manner as almost to fill up the 
aperture. It was very annoying ; but by re- 
monstrating with a boor I should, I knew, but 
expose niysPlf to a disadvantage ; so I let him 
that when the tickets 
inspected he would he sent to the 
right-tiborrt But I was disappointed. Not 
only was {he ticket he produced ns genuinely 
nVrt-ehvw as'was my own, but the designation 
thereon marked was the sane — Paddington. 

"Odious?" f ejaculated to myself, as the 
earriage was locked and the train off' again. 
However, if he makes himself disagreeable, 



^yHO] 

FALL AND WINTER 

r  R Y o o o r  H ! 



To oar frieads among the merchants of Mason, 



TRI WEEKLY SUPPLIES 



Master. Lik.i; Ib» , James Hogg 
tells us this story of bis dog : — "It's a 
good sign of a dog when his face growa 
like his master's. It s a proof that he s eye 
glowing' in his master's e en, to discover what 
he's thinking on : and then, without the word 
or wave o command, to be aff' to execute the 
will o' his silent thought, whether it be to 
wear sheep or run down deer. Hector got sae 
like me afore he deed, that I remember when 
I was owre luzy to gang to the kirk I used to 
cend him to take my place in the pew, and 
minister kent nae difference. Indeed he once 
asked me. next day. "what I thought o' the 
sermon for he saw me wounderfully attentive 
amang a rather sleepy congregation." Hec- 
tor and me gied ane annilher sis it look ! and 
: I was feared Mr. Paton would have observed 
I it ; but he was a simple primitive, unsuspeciu' 
auld man — a very Nathaiel without guile 
—and he jealoused nathink, though bote Hec- 
! tor and me were alike to split ; and the dog, 
• after laughin' in his sleeve for raair than a 
hundred yards, could stand it no longer, but 
i was obliged to loup awa a hedge into a pota- 
; toe field, pretending to have scented part- 
riggea" 

General Grant baa 
condition of the people in Mississipp 
near ao bad as represented in the recent or 
der of the District Commander. 



to a first oUas lobbing house, and 
kdeof • 



CASH. 

MXJLLlNS & HUNT, 




standing General 
troops. 



Last Wednesday night, near Perdido, 
Baldwin county. Alabama, a mulatto named 
Caesar Morris, his wife, mother and child, 
all murdered by some unknown part}'. 



I had procured a newspaper at Tramwell, 
and was busied in its perusal, when, looking 
up suddenly. 1 caught my companion's eye 
fixed on me with an expression absolutely 
staaling in its keen scrutiny. 

Yet more startling was the immediate and 
remarkable change which came over his coun- 
tenance when he saw that he was observed — 
bia eys dropped, a dull stupid expression 
overspread his face, and he turned his head 
away. However. I had seen enough to set 
me on my guard After this I resolved to 
watch him steadily, though without appearing 
to do ao. 

Acting on this resolution I soon became 
aware that for some rcasou or other, he took 
considerable interest in the luggage he be- 
lieved to be mine; in reality the property of 
the invisible William Hooper. At last, go I 
judged from the circumstance, that although, 
so long as I looked his way he took no notice 
of either hat box or rug, no sooner did I turu 
rojr head towards the window by which we 
were seated, than I was conscious — I may al- 
most say instinctively— that both were sub- 
jected to the sharpest investigation from his 
toxy eyes. 

I had really forgotten the existence of the 
portmanteau, when a particular thud, repeat- 

ed at intervals, roused me to the conception 

uformation that the ' hat »J .companion's heavy heel waa from 
i is not i l ' rae t0 tirae striking with some force against 
the leather casing. This might have passed 
for mere clumsiness, had not my suspicions 
been already excited. As it was, I could not 
d l ve »t myself of the notion that he had some 
u'terior object in view, though what it could 
be was difficult to divine. I could scarcely 
believe that of sheer malice prepense he could 
wish to damage the portmanteau. Could he 
possibly be trying to get some idea of its con- 
tents, and if ao, what sinister intentions did 
entertain with regard to them ? 



that Indian dep- 
ntier. notwith- 
s disposition of his 



Believing that danger of some description 
threatened William Hooper's luggage, I re- j 

! solved — since he was not here in person to 

The revenue collected in American ports i protect it— to take it under my more imma- 
on products of the Sandsich Islands amounts ' 
to about $100,000 a year. This fact appears 



i diate surveillance, aud, the more effectually to 
do so, not to declaim that ownership of it 



sible, "You find that portmanteau in your 
way, 1 am afraid; pray let me draw it out, 
and take it under my own seat." 

" Not at all, not at all !" returned my t-is a- 
i'is, eagerly ; " it is quite comfortable here, 
sir; don't trouble yourself to move it. 

He was evidently as loath to part with the 
pormanteau as I was anxious to get posses- 
sion of it; but I was the more determined to 
carry my point, which I succeeded in doing 
at last. 

Shortly after this, we passed through a tun- 
nel — a long one — in the course of our transit 
through which, suddenly bethinking me of as- 
certaining the security of the hut-box, I 
stretched my hand across for the purpose. I 
had just touched the encircling strap, when 
my fingers encountered those of another 
hand; there was a mutual start, and 
both hands were simultaneously withdrawn. 
This was a disagreeable confirmation of my 
suspicion, and at the same time I felt consid- 
erably out of countenance myself— my object 
in feeling must have been so palpable, where- 
as, after all, the position of his hand was not 
very unnatural, sitting as be was beside it, 
with his arm, it might be, on the cushion par- 
tition. Neither of us said a word, and pres- 
ently wc emerged from the tunnel close to 
Whitworth Station. 

Our tete-a-tete ended here, and though I am 
no coward, I must own that I was not sorry 
for it. The two passengers who joined our 
parly were a white-haired lady, in Quaker 
costume, who took the vacant seat next me, 
opposite Mr. Hooper's possessions, and an 
elderly gentleman in an Inverness cape, and 
wearing a respirator, who seated himself be- 
side them by the other window. 

As he appeared to be in delicate health, I 
ventured to suggest that the seat opposite 
would be less liable to draught, but he raplied 
that it did not suit him to sit with his hack 
towards the engine. I then proposed to move 
the hat-box and rng, so as to vacate a seat 
further from the window; but this he also 
declined, saying that he preferred his preseut 
seat. So I left him to himself and hepresent 
ly dozed. His sleepiness seemed to infect my 
opposite neighbor, who, leaned his head on 
his arm, closed his eyes, and soon began to 
snore audibly. 

My lady companion alone continued wide- 
awake, and was very chatty and communica- 
tive. She appeared to be of a philanthropic 
turn of mind, and entertained me with ac- 
counts of various institutions she had lately 
bei-n visiting; among others that of Whit- 
worth jail. It was at this part of the conver- 
sation that s sparkle, as of a weakful eye ap- 
pearing just for an instant in the mass of red 
hair and beard reclining on the seat opposite, 
both warned me to be on my guard, ' If my 
friend over there is not well acquainted with 
the inside of that jail 1 am very much mis- 
taken." 

1 think he must have caught my eye fixed 
on him. for, from that moment the snoring 
gradually ceased ; and by and by, he began to 
wake up. in a very natural manner, I must 
allow. He took no interest in our conversa- 
tion apparently, for|he kept his face turned 
toward the window, and occupied himself in 
dotting down with a pencil, in a large pocket- 
book, sundry lines and marks. One would 
have almost thought he was sketching, or try- 
ing to do so : rather a novel experiment in a 
railway carriage, even in this age of utiliza- 
tion of time. 

The Quaker lady evidently adopted this 
view of the case. "Thee musf excuse me 
friend," she said; "but the motion of the 
carriage is surely not favorable to drawing 
If thee does not take care, thee will injure 
thine eyesight permanently." 

" Never fear for my eyesight, ma'am," was 
the gruff reply ; " it has held out good enough 
so far, and is like to do for a good time yet" 

"If a lady takes the trouble to concern her- 
self in your behalf, you might at least be at 
the pains to give her a civil answer," I ex- 
claimed indignant at h'inlbrusquerie. 

But li- gave me uo answer but a grim smile, 
and I felt vexed that I had been betrayed into 
addressing him. The lady's equanimity, 
however, was not in the least disturbed, and 
she quietly resumed the conversation as 
though nothing had happened; our compan- 
ion, meantime — the one who was awake — 
continued to divide his attention between the 
window and his pocket-book. 

"I have a little book here concerning the 
Blind Asylum at Nothing I was telling thee 
about, that it may interest thee to see. said 
the Quakeress, taking a pamphlet from her 
bag. 

1 put out my hand to receive it, but at that 
moment my opposite neighbor by 9ome 
awkward movement in turning sharply round, 
jerked my elbow, and it feb to the ground. I 
will do him the justice to say that he had the 
civility to 9toop down to pick it up j but he 
bungled stupidly about it, droppiug it again 
two three times, and when at last he really 
had it in his hand, retaining it to scan the 
title-page with evident curiosity, instead of at 
once restoring it to its owner. 

I felt inclined to resent this as imperti- 
nence ; but the lady took out another pamph- 
let, saying good naturedly, "If thee is inter- 
ested in the subject, here is another little 
book for thee." ■ * 

"Thank you, ma'am. " he replied, a little 
more graciously than before. "Hand it over 
to the gentleman, if you please, and I will 
keep this here one." 

He was very much interested in the subject, 
if one might judge from the earnest attention 
with which he perused each single page; but 
it would aeem that it was a little beyond his 
depth — he had not the appearance of being a 
well educated man- -for he looked up at the 
end with a peculiarly baffled and puzzled ex- 
pression. With an odd sort of a grunt, he 
folded the pamphlet into bis pocket-book— 1 
thought he might at least have offered to re- 
turn it— and then set to work with his pencil 
again. 

' It M a good work they are doing there, 
remarked the Quakeress, "one would be glad 
to forward it all one could." 

A nod was the only reply he vouchsafed. 
It was a drowsy day, dull and close. Alter 
a while we relapsed iuto silence. We stopped 
at, but few stations, and no fresh passengers 
came in to rouse us — Before long, my three 
companions all seemed to be dozing, and had 
it not been for a vague sense of insecurity, 1 
should have followed their example. 

Time went on. W r e were within half an hour 
of London, and nothing had occurred to ratify 
my suspicions. The first movement was on 
the part of the invalid, who as we neared Chel- 
ston, our last stopping place, roused himself 
from his slumbers, and took down his umbrel- 
la from its resting place above the seat. At 
the same instant, he of the red hair sat up 
wide-awake, though but a moment before he 
had been to all appearances, buried in sleep. 

The tickets are always given up here, and 
we were called upon to have them ready. 
Tha ticket cottector came round in a hnrry, 
as usual, took the four tickets, saw that the 
door was locked, and was about to move on. 
when the gentleman in tha respirator placed 
his hand on the door, saying. I'm for Chel- 
ston— let me out, please.'' 

The man glanced back at the tickets in his 
hand, and read out, " Northsea, Buntfort and 
Whitworth— all for Paddington, sir." 

" I know," said the invalid, feebly. " There 
was some difficulty about booking me through 
to Chelston, and they tald me that a Padding- 
ton ticket would do. The advantage, if there 
is any. la on the Company's side." 
"All right, sir;" and he unlocked the door. 
At the mention of Korthaea being on one of 
the tickets, my opposite neighbor and I ex- 
changed a momentary glance. I made sure 
I had discovered one fact about him — namely, 
that he had been in the train longer even 
than I had, and had only changed carriages at 
Tamwell; a circumstance which ] hardly 
know why, confirmed ray belief in his being a 
suspicious character. As for his face, I con- 
fess I could not make oui its expression ; but 
be must know now that I suspected him, I 
thought, kf any rate we both looked a little 
conscious I fancy; both turned our heads 
away, and to show that we were not thinking 
of any thing in particular, both began at the 
saaae time a low whistle, the effect thereof, 
the tunes and keys being different, may be 
more easily imagined and described 
The elderly gentleman had, in the mean 



Mar 



arriaice ;m«l death nutiees inserted xratnitowelv. 

"tuarv notice.- ten .-eiit.j i«tr line. 



privileges extend. .1 t., inn(i:»l advertiser* will 
...etly wsataed to their   wn bnsiaess. and ad- 

verti- mentsoeeui.yinguii.re space than contracted 

for. or advertisements foreign to the le 
lMi.-int-s »f the contracting parties, will be 
for extra, at our imMished rates. 



do me a tritling favor, I shall be gn-atlv tMI 
ged." 

" If I can serve you in an, wnv. I shall be 
happy to do so," returned the other "but 
there is no time to lose- you will be off' in 
another minute.'' 

I judged from his tone that he was not over- 
well pleased with the style of address, and no 
wonder; but the nnmunnerlv fellow did not 
seem to see it. With a careless " That - just 
why I ask you," he scribbled a few words on 
the page of his pocket-book, tore it out, and 
twisted it into a sort of note, handed it to the 
gentleman, saying, "Will you be so kind as 
to take this to the telegraph office? See. the 
door is over there. Thank you sir. There's 
the shilling. Ask 'em to send it off at once, 
please." Then, by way of explanation, he 
added. "I'm bound to let my mother know 
I'm coming, you see. It might make her ill 
if I was to look in on her all of a sudden." 

" I don't see that a telegram will mend mat- 
ters," I muttered ; but I don't think he heard 
me, and I did not care that he should. 

The old gentleman made his way to the 
door indicated. Wc were off before he reap- 
peared. 

" I began now seriously to consider what 
steps it would be well to take with regard to 
William Hooper's luggage on reaching Pad- 
dington, to which we were drawing very near. 
If, as seemed the most natural and straight- 
forward course, I went off to the superintend- 
ent at once to acquaint him with the circum- 
stances, I should have, meantime, to leave 
it to the mercy of my red haired friend, who 
had already interested himself so much con- 
cerning it. And yet, what other course was 
left open to me ? 

I was quite at sea a« to what plan to adopt, 
when we rushed shrieking into that Babel of 
sights and sounds, the Paddington Station 
It was more than a year since 1 was there, 
and it seemed to me more bustling than ever. 
Not that I could see much, however, for my 
friend opposite quite monopolized the win- 
dow. 1 regretted it the less that I now hasti- 
ly made up my mind — no better course sug- 
gested itself to my mind — to keep my seat 
until a favorable opportunity offered of secu- 
ring the services of n porter to convey the 
luggage is my charge to safe quarters. Hav- 
ing watched it so far I was not going to aban- 
don it now. 

The object of my suspicion, seemed in no 
hurry to go; he retained his seat, his bead 
still out of the window, till the lady rose, say- 
ing, "We are at our journey's end, if I mistake 
not. May I trouble thee to let me pas  out. 
friend ?" 

" I beg pardon, ma'am," he exclaimed, and 
opening the door, he sprang down first him- 
self, and, with more politeness than I should 
have expected of him. helped her to alight. 
This done, he seemed in some perplexity 
what to do next. With his hand on the door 
handle, he looked after her as %he walked 
away towards the barriers raised around the 
luggage; then back at me, and finally around 
and behind him. Suddenly he darted off, 
and the next tning I saw him talking with a 
man in a snuff colored coat at some distance. 

I had pulled the portmanteau from under 
the seat, in readiness to have it taken out.'.but 
had not yet succeeded in geitiug hold of a 
porter, when my friend returned, alone, and 
offered his help, observing that the train would 
be shunted almost immediately to make room 
for another, and that I had best look sharp. 
There was reason in what he said; and con- 
sidering that the luggage would be at least as 
safe on the platform as in the carriage, I 
thought it well to avail myself of his assist- 
ance. 

My companion showed no disposition to 
run off with any thing, but neither did he take 
himself off. and there was that in his manner 
I did not like. It was in vain that I gave him 
sundry hints to begone about his business ; he 
met them all with the most impenetrable ob- 
tuseness, real or feigned, and kept hanging 
about me, never going more than a dozen 
}-ard8 or so from the place where I was stand- 
ing. I was in an awkward predicament. I 
did not dare to leave my charge to call a por- 
ter, and they paid no heed to my shouts and 
gesticulations. Other trains were coming in, 
moreover, and taking oft" their attention. At 
this moment I observed .1 man coming towards 
us, who at very first sight 1 should have said 
was the very same with whom my companion 
had been talking a few moments back ; I had 
not seen his face very well, but the hue of his 
coat, and a somewhat peculiar slouch in. his 
shoulders, were identical. But when he pass- 
ed close to us, going on toward the luggage 
van, and there was, so far as I could see, no 
sign of recognition betweeti the two, I thought 
I must have been mistaken. 

Presently my quondam traveling compan- 
ion, the Quaker lady, came up the platform, 
followed by a porter, who was wheeling her 
luggage on a truck : and he again was follow- 
ed, rather to my surprise, by the same man 
who had passed us on his way down, just be- 
fore. This time I particularly noticed both 
him and my red haired friend. Their eyes 
met Was I mistaken in fancying that they 
exchanged a glance of intelligence? The 
Quakeress nodded pleasantly; I raised my 
hat, and then called out to the porter to re- 
turn for ray luggage when he had disposed ol 
that of the lady. The row of cah3 was \ isii.le 
from the spot where I was standing, and 1 
watched the Quaker lady enter one. Judge 
of my astonishment when at the last moment, 
after the luggage waa adjusted, nnd ihey were 



when the policeman returned, and with elon- 
gated face ami hurried manner, requested to 
speak to Mr Smith alone. To me he would 
uot vouchsafe a word of explanation, and I 
hail to wait in a ^niall ante-room in no very 
amiable frame of mind, while they two were 
closeted tugother. 

The interview did not last. long. There 
was an explosion of laughter in the next 
room, and then out came Mr. Smith, looking 
exceedingly amused. 

" My dear sir,'' he exclaimed. " whom do 
yon think we have been setting this good fel- 
ow to watch ?'" 

" How should I know ?" I replied with 
some acrimony. Some one who's no better 
than he should be. I'm quite sure !" 

"As to that," said the lawyer, "I've never 
yet come across the man who was. But set- 
ting jesting aside — it's too ridiculous. Why, 
it s one of its own feather, a detective, with 
whom he has often done business; and the 
best of it is, he — the detective, that is — has 
bid him keep a sharp look out on you, and not 
let yon get out some back way unobserved. 
He says you are a scoundrel, and a very deep 
one; and that the account you have been giv- 
ing of yourself is all humbug." 

"Preposterous!" I cried, indignantly. 
" You arc making game of me, Mr. Smith." 

" No such thing, my dear sir. Calm your- 
self, and 1 will explain. In the first place, I 
must tell you that he takes you for one WW- 
liara Hooper." 

" Well, and if he does ? What, in the name 
of goodness has that to do with it V 

"Just this ; that William Hooper, or rather 
a fellow assuming the name, is suspected, on 
gcod grounds, of having been concerned in a 
robbery of jewelry at Northsea last night, and 
of carrying off his spoils with him to-day. 
This detective was put on the scent, and flat- 
tered himself that he had secured both his 
person and his ill gotten goods. It is not to 
be wondered at when you took such good care 
of his luggage, that he should take you for the 
man himself. " 

The policeman at this moment cnlercd the 
room, followed by my late traveling compan- 
ion, who now. to my enlightened eyes, looked 
no longer disagreeably crafty, but simply 
clever and shrewd. It is not necessary to re- 
capitulate all that passed, nor how Mr. Smith 
at last succeeded in convincing the detective 
that L his client of twenty years standing, 
was a man of the most respectable antece- 
kents, and in no way possibly connected with 
the so-called William Hooper. Suffice it to 

say, that he was persuaded of the mistake in 
time, aud that we all had a hearly laugh over 
what had occurred. The detective went so 
far as to read out to us the instructions recei- 
ved that morning, on which he had been act- 
ing. These were a few hurried lines, direct- 
ing him to be on the look out for a man trav- 
eling up to town under the neme of William 
Hooper ; to get a seat in the same carriage, 
and keep a stric t watch on all his movements; 
also, particularly to notice any communica- 
tion that might pass between him and any 
fellow traveler, as there was reason to l»elieve 
he was accompanied by an accomplice in the 
shape of an elderly woman. Hence the inter- 
est lie hail taken in ray conversation with the 
Quaker lady, of which he had in reality been 
taking down uotes in a peculiar short hand of 
his own, fancying that more was meant than 
appeared on the surface; and the eagerness 
with which he intercepted the pamphlet, 
which must have edified him extremely. It 
was left to bis discretion either to arrest the 
parties on reaching Paddington. or to let 
them go their own ways, following them up 
closely; by which means it was hoped he 
might be able to find the clue to some other 
robberies that hud lately taken place in the 
same neighborhood. This latter plan he had 
resolved to adopt with regard to me, and had 
also sent a colleague to accompany the poor 
Quaker lady orr*her route, ascertain where 
she went, and whether she was truly what she 
gave herself out to be. The detective had 
beeu staggered a moment by tny voluntarily 
resigning the luggage to the charge of the po- 
liceman, but had thought it explained by the 
fact that I saw myself suspected, and hoped 
by that manner to get off even by the sacri- 
fice of the stolen goods. But if I were not 
William Hooper, where then was the real 
man ? That was the question now upper- 
most in all our minds. " There was but one 
Northsea ticket," remarked the officer. '" I 
thought I was sure of you, then." 

" That was yours, sure!" 1 exclaimed. 
" No, indeed, sir ; I got in at Buntford ; was 
in a hurry, and had not time to look about me 
till wo got to Tamwell. It must have been 
one of the two others." 

"Not the lady, 1 said "I happened to 
notice her ticket as I handed it — it was taken 
at Whitworth, where she got in." 

" Then, there is c nly that fellow in the res- 
pirator. Ha?" he exoiaimed^uddenly. "If I 
haven't be  n and let the right man slip 
through my fingers after nil! AVhat a fool I 
was not to suspect it !" And he quite ground 
his teeth with vexation. 

" It can't be he;" I said. " He took no no- 
tice of the luggage whatever ; and he could not , 
have failed to recognize it, sitting close beside 
it as he did." 

" I don't doubt he knew me better than I : 
knew him, replied tie- detective, and thought ' 
it best to keep quiet 1 might have guessed it   
when be was so bent on getting out at Chel- i 
ston ; but, then 1 was so certain that it was 
3'ou. And then t.. go and give him that tele- | 



J toliions lor January 

;Vn tn M. d une Demorest's Monthly Magaxiae.] 

The short walking-dress has become an ad- 
mitted fact, and has taken its place among 

the institutions." We rejoice at this for sev- 
eral reasons, one of which is thehealthfulness, 
second, the cleanliness, and third, the econ 

oaay of suc h a costume for street wear. 

It nlan eoannell a distinction between the 
out-door and in-door toilette, which is condu- 
cive t" both neatness and elegance of appear- 
ance. 

It has l een too much the habit to trail about 
in the streets the one, two, or three handsome 
i who h are all that the generality of 

women possess, and this soon destroyed the 
beauty of the fabric round the bottom of skirt 
to such an extent as to render them unfit for 
either in-door or out-door wear. 

The temptation and tendency now is to 
make the short dresses too costly for their 
purpose. 

For useful street wear, gray serge, cloth, 
linsey. wool reps, alapaca, or a wool stripe, 
eheek, or plaid, are altogethar the most suita- 
ble, aud it is not only a useless extravagance, 

but outrages all sense of the fitness oft" ' 
to see expensive silk, satin, and 
expended on toilettes, which can never be 
pronounced " dress." or fitted for any thing 
but street wear. 

The newest walking costumes are made of 
cloth, en suit, and trimmed with black silk 
cord or braid, or with silk or satin folds, or 
pipings stitched on. 

These trimmings are sometimes put oo 
plain, but more frequently to form some 
ol 'design, sheaf, coil, fan, leaf, or the like. 

A plain Boulevard skirt is the best to I 
under these dresses, as the upper skirt is only 
simulated by the trimmed. 

Short dresses, made of linsey woolaey tweed, 
rge, or water-proof cloth, are simply trim- 



med with cross 
or edged wi 

color. The 
however, an 
finish. 
Silk and sc- 



ut bands of the same, piped 
Ids of si lk of the 
large and handsoi 
ifficiently ornai 



and all wool are 



V .e out- 
, alpaca. 



ge costumes are sometimes made 
with doable skirts, the upper one being prettly 
looped v.p over the under one, with long straps 
or tabs, bound witht silk, and fastened with 

enameled buttons or slides. 

The simplest and most useful costumes, how- 
ever, are of water-proof cloth, Bismarck, or 
of dark gre. n, with double-breasted paletots, 
the whole trimmed very simply with bit 
braid, doubled and stitched on the 
edge. 

New elan tartans in popli 
extremely fashionable this 
arranged to from the most pieturesqu 
door and in-door toilettes. 

A short tunic dress of gray, or black i 
worn over a complete high dress of Scotch 
plaid, is a favorite style. 

Enbroidered belts of black silk or velvet are 
also worn over iradntd tartan dresses, with 
long, rounded tabs or sash ends, which descend 
low upon the skirt behind, and granduate to- 
ward the front. 

A short dress of Stuart plaid is very distitt- 
hue. worn over a petticoat of shepherd s cheek, 
particularly it' the Highland scarf, fastened 
with a white rose in coral, mounted, as|broocb, 
be added to the costume. A white rose, by 
the way, is the emblem of the Stuart clan, and 
a white rose in coral, fastening a Stuart 
'plaid,' or decorating the dress, is a mast 
elegant ornament. 

Very rich fabrics are used this winter for 
visitingand evening dresses. SUksare heavily 
corded or embroidered," and sarin and velvets 
are also in great requisition. The highest 
colors are in vogue in these splendid mate- 
rials, such as crimson tiame color, and the 
deep "Nasturtian, sometimes called rapucine. 

White lace is generally used to tone down 
these gorgeous tints, and ropes of pearls, un- 
less the wearer can add diamonds to the splen- 
dor of her toilette. 

Low neck and short sleeves have always 
been considered indispensable to "full dress" 
abroad, but not until this season have they 
been adopted to any great extent in this coun- 
try. The fashion is particularly hurtful, be- 
cause it is liable to be much abused. Young 
girls sacrifice to it their sense of modesty, and 
old ladies all ideas of propriety 

A square body cut high, or low, with a 
chemisette of handsome lace, is a becoming 
compromise with fashion, especially if under - 
sleeves of lace are added to rich hanging 
sleeves of the material. 

BsaIVH Costi -me.— Gray and scarlet, green 
and brown, crimson and Bismarck, are the fa 
vorite combinations for skating attire. A 
gray Wensey dress, a scarlet Boulevard skirt, 
and a black or gray pelisse, warmly lined, is 
a pretty mode. The " Norwegian Costume 
is very styli h. and is composed as follows: 
A dark green dress, consisting of a skirt and 
lined pelisse, which may be of empress cloth, 
poplin or Wensey. A talma or postillion 
cape of \he same material buttoned upon tha 
belt in the back and front. The latter has 
apertures for the arms, and these, in addition 
to the fastening, prevent the overeape from 
being of any inconvenience. The pelisse of' 
this suit crosses from the throat diagonally to 
the bottom of the skirt. It has a separate 
belt and sash. Gray " Boulevard," embroi- 
0  r d with scarlet, and green hat with scarlet 
pompon. The. dress is trimmed with croaa 
cuts set on in sections, edged with bullion 
fringe in blocks of green andscarlet. 
Jewki.uv.- The new designs in gold aad sil- 



on the point of starting. I saw the wearer of graphic message to send off' He took t  re- | ver filagree are very pretty. _ The most admi- 
the snuff colored coat, the same who had 
been following in her wake as she passed me, 
jump up nnd take his seat beside the driver ! 
The porter did not return as he had promised 
— I suppose some one else snapped him up — 
and I was beginning to grow very weary of 
my position. For the I ,st quarter of an hour 
a policeman bad been pacing up and down 
the platform where we were standing It had 

struck me that he was keeping an eye on my feeling some curiosity as i  
companion --who was very possibly known to j fair, in one phase bfit T b: 
police as a d&ngerom* character— but 



cioiis good care that it should not go, no 
doubt. No wonder they weren t Quite on the 
lookout for me when' we got to Paddington. 
However, 111 have him yet. Good morning to 
you. gentlemen, there'a no time to lose. 

At the next a.~izc.:,tue great jewel robbery 
at Northsea earn. mi. I uo not in ge 
take interest in snen ksifvrsi 



red are roses or dahlias, with jeweled hearts, 
a duster, or large single flower forming the 
Voueh, and a small blossom the earring 

Veils. —Small veils are again fashionable. 
The bottom reaches the chin. It is 
:tu-e. or umre points which end in 
general tAsels. Many hate *cfrtfs ' 
but bearing chignon. Spi tted silk net is much) wstii ; , 



that my friend Smith was to be present, and •..» m-t epiMiKl. d w.iaja 



the police as a dangerous character — but it 
only just now occurred to me that I could not 
do better 1 than make over to him th   guard 
ianship of Mr. Hooper s property Accord- 
ingly I beckoned him to my side. I half ex- 
pected that my companion would have bolted 
on this, but he kept his ground. 

" You wanted me, sir?" asked the police- 
man, looking rather odd, 1 fancied. 

"Yes; I wish to give over this luggage into 
your charge. It is labelled William Hooper, 
you will observe. It does not belong to me. 
but was in the carriage when 1 entered it. I 
cannot guess what has become of the owner; 
will but it no doubt be inquired aft* r before 
long, so you had best give it up to the care of 
the Company. I recommend you not to let it 
out of your sight until it is safe in their keep- 
ing. I wash my hands of it." 

As I said these words, I looked slernly at 
the man whose evil designs, whatever they 
might have been, I hoped thus effectually to 
foil. So far from looking abashed, however, 
he returned me a smile, the very embodiment 
of impudence. 

" Have you no tongue in your head?' he 
said rudely to the policeman. "Can't you 
tell the gentleman that you will do his bid- 
ding?" 

It was, to my mind, like a rat challenging a 
terrier, and I should have liked to see him get 
a good set down ; but the policeman was too 
forbearing by far. Taking no notice of his 
in«olence, he simply turned to me with a 
"Very good, sir! ' and then beckoned to a 

fiorter in the distance, who obeyed hit signal 
ast enough. 

With a parting admonition to look well to 
his charge, I took up my bag and walked off, 
very glad to be free. 

I called a cab and drove at once to my so- 
licitor's office. I had got out and dismissed 
my vehicle, when whom should my amazed 
eyes light on, standing a few paces from the 
door I was about to enter, but my late travel 
ing companion, whom I had left twenty mm 
utes before, by the side of the policeman, on 
the Paddington platform ! There was no mis- 
taking the man, though he affected not to see 
me. Beyond doubt be had either followed, or 
not impossibly accompanied me. 

Indignant at this espionage, yet uncertain 
how to act. I determined to consult my legal 
adviser; who, without more ado, sent for a 
policeman. To him I pointed out my obnox- 
ious fellow traveler, who was lounging about 
time effected his exit, and was on the point of ; thje nearest lamp post, and then leaving him 
going off down the platform, when ray ets-a- [ to take what steps he thought proper, Mr. 



the end of this af- 
d beeu so strange 
wnv rrr the as t7. 



ly mixed up, I made my 
town. 

When this particular vase was called, two 
prisoners, a man and a woman, were led into 
the dock. I looked nt them eagerly, fully ex- 
pecting to recognize in the former thealderly 
gentleman w ho had been riiy companion in 
the railway carriage on that memorable jour- 
ney to London But no; he was tall, and 
young, and sandy haired. Surely I have seen 
him some where before, though ! And his 
companion ? Yes, now I recollected. They 
were the same two, with the blue spectacles 
and lap dog, respectively, whom I had obser- 
ved getting into tl 
before it started. 

The red haired detective was present, and 
gave important evidence. The case did not 
last long, it was so clear against the prison- 
ers, and both were convicted. 

'' You succeeded in getting hold of the 
right man at last. " I remarked to the detect- 
ive, when the business of the day ended, he. 
Smith and I met to dine aud to talk matters 
over together at the hotel. " But you made a 
mistake the secoud time, 1 sec. That old fel- 
low in the respirator was not the fellow Hoop- 
er, after all." 

"Don't be too sure of that, sir," returned 
the detective. And then he proceeded to tell 
me the whole story, as far as he had been able 
to make it out. How the saudy huired young 
man having got into an empty carriage at 
( Buntford, hrd contrived, by means of the ap- 
pliances contained in his carpet bag, to trans- 
tor himmself iuto.au old woman, so effectual- 
ly disguised as to be, he thought, quite safe 
from detection, On returning to his own car- 
riage at Whitworth, he had, however, recog- 
nized the detective, and seeing that 1 had ap- 
propriated his luggage, judging it wisest to 
make no fuss, but quietly decamp at Chel- 
ston. 



Bit. i. 1»ke—!.s. Tarlatane dresses are fash- 
ionablv made with tWre»-#r*wir ikirts. TWn* 
ill iiimaw Marf ranrnsw tkmrte • a hare ha en red 

lived in i iiln j hjia lijjBjfriirii'rnnir o*» 

white o C colored, satin. J !gej may be, 
bound in the satin, or sllVj nolfcned out. • 
Sashes —Sashes have cense *ry impor- 
tant ac cartes in n lady a let lev* ,  *ttr 
paletots have bean worn short enou*^ lo reu-^ 
der them such conspicueuf object?. SnVaMr* 
are mad* of wSite ribhons.  w" fcHh grnfln, OS* 
satin, and of velvet, all cut Ireonthe piece. 
This season they are not confined to dresses, 
but are largely worn as a dressy addition to 
hand* ome dlk and velvet paletots. 

II us —The Tosaae.— Low crown bhtek v»l» 
train at Buntford, just | vet hat. with brim of medium width, slightly 
rolled at the sides. The trimming consists of 
sprsys of green velvet leaves, and a 
of black velvet in folds, with two wide 
e \s lined with satin, and trimmed at the end 
with silk fringe. This is one of the pretties' 
hats of the season. * 

The Yelverton — High crown white felt hat, 
with a heavy roll brim covered with velvet, 
ending with a broad scarf with fringe, and 
gilt leaves set in a knot of white velvet, sup- 
porting a rich Marabout feather at the state, 
which gives it a very rich appearance. 

The Wanda Turban — Blue velvet, quilled 
brim. A blue ostrich tip, set in a small rol! 
of velvet, completes the trimming. ^ 



Ox Wednesday next about $23,000,000 in 
coin will be taken from the vaults of the 
Treasury, to pav the semi-annnal interest on 
the five-twenty bonds of HG7 and 1S68, and 
the semi-annual interest on the bonds of 
1881. 

It was held iu the Superior Court of Cin- 
cinnati, yesterday, that a bank sending a 
draft, deposited with them for collection, to 
another bunk, is liable to the depositor in ease 
the amount is lost by failure of the bank to 
which the check is remitted. 

The tobacco crop of 1867 was one hundred 
and sixty-three thousand hogsheads against 



A Montgomery, Alabama, dispatch says a 
Frcedmeu's Bureau officer, who was trying to 
collect a dollar and a half apiece from negroes 
upon contracts he had approved, in Alabama, 
was recently tarred and varnished by the ne- 



There are over a million and a half of old . 
maids in England and Wales. Sad to say, 
one third of^jfe number cannot hope to mar- 
ry, tor ther^Ba not men enough to go round. 
Of every hundred women in England fifty- 
eight are wives, thirty-nine are spinsters, and 
three are widows. The old maids are more 
numerous in high life than low. 

A Washixutos dispatch says an estimate, 
compiled from statistics collected by the Gov- 
ernors of the Southern States, nlacea the 
number of whites and blacks in Louisiana, 
Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and tkw) Cnro- 
linaa, who are in a starving condition, at 
three millions. 

The engineer on the train that met with 
the awful disaster at Angola, has testified he  
bra the coroner s jury that the speed of taw 



to c 

I u' , 




WEEKLY MAYSVILLE EAG 

Pl'BUSHED ETERY WEDXES1V1T, BY 



TWO DOLLAR? PER ANNI'M. IN ADVA.WE 
OA"' S**omd it ml . brtumm Cumri and Maikrt. 



MAYSV 



THi: F i  LF. FOR IKCS. 

In presenting the Eagle to the publi 
st the mrnmeneemenT °f the new ye.ir. w 
deem it nut improper hs^ fl BO)OOOUM 
it* po-Wiou in Mtion .. e p i : 

aud ttp  u other qtn -t . i, - ... •» pu..r 
e*t. Without ni" ' V-tp !.. pr ii -'pV w. 
have m   c BfwfaeH • nr entr tiK  • 

politit .. lie. th- .i.l F. W i fu-.-.'f '1 

election of the Uetu m r»ti  • uA ... u- 
Proidcut .aid Vice Pr» i..e!it, up -n * p 
form wh'ch i-hali re.-.pn'.;t - the indixMi i - 
bility of the Federal I'tibm and the r pi ts 
of the State* within that I'niou to t-outn 
and regulate their own municipal, dorne*- 
t c. and police affairs. In \&X. when tl e 
war was racing most fiercely, we urged the 
election of the Democratic- candidates, auu 
there Uuo p. . ]iriety iu now opposing them, 
when the return of peace has failed to abat  
the fanaticism of radicalism or to place any 
check upon their .-ippression? upon the 
Constitution, the rightful powers of the 
States, and the liberties   f the | eople. 
Even the rebuke received at the recent 
elections iu the North, although SO&OOtf 
to prevent the impeachment of the Presi- 
dent and the threatened subversion of the 
State Government   f Kentucky. w:.  not 
potent to induce an abandonment of their 
evil principles or to lighten the oppressive 
yoke imposed upon the necks of the sor- 
row-stricken people .1 the S.uth T   
renew the lease of power of such a party, 
having no respect for law. for coustitu- 
tional restraint*, or the obligations of the 
most solemu and sacred oaths. — but guided 
by avarice, hate, fanaticism, and an insati- 
able lust of dominion which stops at nousur 
nation or tyranny. — would be to give fresh 
impetus to all the evil principle? which un 
derlic their mischievous action ; and thus 
consign the couutry and all its hopes of 
liberty to a reign of misrule and despotism 
which could finally be overthrown only hy 
a resort to the sword. It would he diffi- 
cult to present to us an alternative we 
would not embrace rather thau aid in the 
perpetuation of the power of a party com- 
posed of the worst element* that ever used 
their talents and numbers to curse any na- 
tion. We shall labor to unite all the ele- 
ments of opposition to radicalism iu one- 
harmonious organization, and discourage 
every attempt to weaken the opposition to 
radicalism in Kentucky hy dividing the 
force* of iu antagonists 

In State politics, we will advocate State 
aid to a system of internal improvements, 
so that the hidden resource* of the Cum- 
Mtonwealth may l e developed: an exu-n- 
siou of the imperfect educational facilities : 
fall protection to the right- ..J bssjooo and 
of every human heiug in the St:, it ; 
ivor to wield our influence to the 
end that we may not lag behind the ml "i 
th»« civilised world in its intellectual and 
material progress 

The Eagle wili he a zealous, advocate ol 
the local interests ol Maysvillc and Mason 
county, and will urge every mca-itrc which 
will advance either city or county to that 
position which the natural advantage- of 
both entitle them to occupy. 

We solicit the patronage of all to whom 
this editorial conduct will commend it- 
self, and of the bu-iness community irre- 
spective- of their political opinions. Every 
effort will be made to render the Eagle 
and profitable to all. 





We are unambitious of a controversy 
with Gen. Brisbis. whose skill iu villifi- 
cation has been recently as fully attested 
by hi6 communications to the papers, as 
his unwillingness to protect the people 
from robberies and outrages by negro sol- 
diers wss proved during the infamous ca- 
roar of km friend Bcmridge But ths 
rooaot letter to the Cincinnati Commercial 
in which an attempt ia made to throw the 
reaponai bility of tho extortion* and outrages 
of Br/BMiDGE upon General Sherman, 
to be accepted by that 
himself prohibit* us from 
that ailence which would 
suffer the triumph of falsehood Gen. 
BrRiRiDGi muat not be permitted 
to avail himself of Shermans in- 
cs'i' u- !e'*er ■• - '""ii nor ninst 
PUKRMAS be suffered ft. ocevjf the 
ialee ]M.siti..n in mhUk it would place 
kin. Geu. Sherman's general order of 
June 1st, lbt»4. is sufficiently har.-h and 
riporou.- to satisfy tlu appetite of ordinary j 
malignity, but it is not for carrying out I 
order for which BCRMtmot is eemA 
by the people of Kentuc ky irrespect- 
ive of partisan difh n !■  t - i, n   n t.i; man 
instrocted Bt KiiRUx-t t«  shoot down guer- 
rillas like wild hea.-ts. to protect honest 
jieoplc from rubbery, murder, and insult; 
and to send beyond the lines those who 
encouraged or harbored robbers or guer- 
rilla*;. It i- not for doing these things that 
BraiutilM.Kis so generally detested in Keu- 
tuofcy.  Ieu. Palmer executed ten guer- 
wherc one was shot by lii i:i;k;ik.i: s 
yet we have never heard I'almkr 
©lamed for shooting Si i MoxiiV. Ma- 
ooi I'Eit, or any other murderer or outlaw 
of like character. Public sentiment justi- 
fied the measures resorted to to rid the 

. o( such !■ 11 '^gF- 

he used his short-lived i owcr TTTmurder in 
cold blood men who were not guerrillas, 
while notorious robbers whose friends used 
money liberally never failed to escape : that 
hundreds were arrested on his order without 
a charge preferred against them, and only 
rcU**ed upon the payment of money as the 
price of their^iberty that men of proved 
patriotism were arreted and banished from 
the State under penalty of death if they 
returned ; and that his orders were so con- 
trived and executed as to euabie his kin- 
dred and satellites to extort 



be proved. But now to the specifications. | lie speeches declaring that the payment for \ killed or crippled him !" *. very hold man j somewhat stronger : .n numbers though not 

In the fall of 1864, a youug man named \ property' seized by the Federal army is Captain McK f.k ! Iu tlii . ease he was ( more distinguished forTie^oic explbits. 
Hi nt born iu this county, but who had j would depend on how the claimant voted protected wot hy the presence of Captain J Col. Tan asserts? positively that lie " knows 
more recently resided in Illinois, in which | in that election ? Roberts, but by his own 'buld effrontery." ,b -»  MeKV.a teas prhehted from speaking at 

"thn points In these ( Floyd and Morgan) covn- 
1t*s because of threats made against him ." 



 tatc he had been occupied as a school 
-eaeher. came to Maysville ou a visit to hi - 
irieuds. While here he determined to go 
to the rebel army, and started IB) COBS] . y 
with two other young meu. named Lom 
nd PraTHER. On their way to the v. be! 
rmy they l'e!l in with several rebel sol- 
:*r-, a'-d in company with them pr- ceeded 
• ' «' — .• t i,., t " ,, bu* 'h " |   'x 
t n | ol u«t « p'ui« dby ihe u 
r it- C  ;»KKW(Vit » H hand • robber  l 

Ha eh m 1 

tief cover pr c d •• - 

•••it w y t.» Ia-x i p •■ » rr v 

p o, but the i.i. .11   - ' 

RAXHKR were iakeu iu Lex g • 
i d been there but a tea o y ■ 
i re ordered it* be shot H^jpneii w 

u  a trial or auy sort of proof m.. h  - 
were men of that description. lit'N'i 
LOW were shot in pretended retaliation 
ior rJae murderof a negro in Henry c-ouuiy, 
which had l eeu committed several months 
before, while Hi nt am* qnietty teaching 
school in Illinois and Loncj was peacefully 
mindiug his own business in l)over It was 
uot even allleged that they had ever had 
the slightest connection with the perpetra- 
tors of the murder for which they were 
shot. The friends of young 1'rathlr 
heard of his sentence in time to procure 
his release by a liberal bribe, and he was 
permitted to return to his home iu this 
county upon a simple bond to keep the 
j ■ Hp He was equally guilty with Hi nt 
and LoMi. If it was right to release l'R a - 
jiii:: the execution of his companions was 
a murder. If it was right to execute them 
as guerillas for an act with which they had 
no connection, then how defeud the re- 
lease of Pkathf.r? Gen. Sherman in- 
structed Bi KBRli'UE to shoot guerrillas as 
wild beasts ; — but did he intend that hoys 
proceeding to the rebel armies, who had 
not yet committed auy acts of hostility 
against the Government, much less any 
outrage upon private citizens in defiance of 
the rules of war. should be shot ass guer- 
rillas '.' Ckathkks release was secured 
by the use of money. The friends of 
Hi nt and Loncj did not learn of their 
seuteuce until after their execution, or 
they might have been saved by the aaflM 
means. This is hut one instance of many 
similar butcheries ^hich can be substan- 
tiated. 

In l«rU, a Union man was brutally mur- 
dered iu Henderson by a band of rebel 
guerrillas. Shortly afterwards one of the 
band, who was present at the commission 
of the murder, though he had not him- 
self perpetrated the act, and who was one 
of the most desperate of the banditti who 
infested Southern Kentucky, waa captured. 
He was sentenced to be shot in connection 
with another man who was uot within 
a hundred miles of Henderson wheu 
the murder was committed. His mo- 
ther aud si.-tcr interceded with Bl*r- 
BE1DOE beggiug the commutation of the 



Roberts, but by his own "bide/Trout, /•»/. 
We wrote an artiole similar to this iu The writer happened to be present on that 
1865, while Bt'RBRlItOE was still in the ar- occasion. The ctfrnnUr,," which 

aiy. though uot iu command. Iu that ar- fc aved Captain JdclvKE b life in this instance , Captain McKkk commenced the canvas at 

tide we invited Gen. Bl UBHinr.E to take consisted in his standing perfectly still ?;,:inton ' in PcmeH county, on the 16th day of 
-ueh measures as would give us an oppor- ; until the noise, which lasted about % uAxh March - and lie s P oke ev  r  ' dfl J"' except on 
tunity to produ-e witnesses to prove^these utc, had subsided, and then rcmarkiug very Sundi 'J" s - from tnat timL * unt 'l the day before 

U 1 the erection on the 4th of May. He made his 
entire list of appointments himself, to suit 
bit OWR eonveaieee* and pleasure, without 
enasaltinf cither of his opponents — he 
m de tliem l)*!oro entering into eith 
.1 ¥ .yd or M..r ;; n counties, and bHore 
H i u o h:.v l.i 1 1. i flin i.eed ir. I fee ir telee* 
.. fij Rig line.. is He bad two appoint- 
no is n F \.i i-. iu iv. . up i t PfeeetiNMiMMV, 
W dti. -il k, Apr . 10. I he ..Hi n.i W dow 
Hat.hku's, on Thursditf, April 11th. He 
sp ke ul 1" tl p in i s. w ili. ui i in i'i t uption, 
a ii ti nt i i ti. pi. ii * he i eeupied ail the time 
h 1 1 owed hi iu for debate The shortness ot' the 
time allowed him tor the canvass, and the 
kise of the district, prevented him Ironi mak- 
injt other nppointinents in that county, and he 
had no other appointments in Floyd. He had 
two appointments in Morgan eouuty. one at 
West Liberty and the other at Blair's Mill, 
and he spoke at both places and occupied his 
full »ime at both places. The writer was with 
him at all his published appointments from 
the 1st to the 27th of April, except at Rac- 
i.a\ s Mid. and we know that he spoke every 
day except Sunday, and frequently at night, 
and that he filled every appointment in 
Floyd and Morgan and all other counties in 
the District as originally made by 
himself On the 27th of April he spoke 
at Olympian Springs in Bath; on the 
30th at Olive Hill in Carter;— at both 
of which places his friends were largely in the 
majority in the crowds. On May 1st he spoke 
at Cracker's Neck, in Morgan, and he told the 
writer he never saw a quieter or hotter behaved 
audience. On May M and 3d he spoke at 
points in Carter, and on the Ith was the elec- 
tion. Now will the gallant Colonel tell the 
anxious public when and where Captain 
MrKni: was prevented from speaking in Floyd 
ami Morgan counties by threats that were 
made against him ? 



•tatements. either before a military or civ- ' pleasantly' that he did not mind "such ' thc e ^ 0,ion on ,,,e 4tn of Ma J 
.toiirt. Wc now extend to hiniMhe same interruptions, hut was glad to hear the 

ivitiitjfw (ii RMiioffVip ying BftKAIfl people express their ^ntiwcntfi ; he /hen 
a* ie.\..-l. n.m, continued his vpeeeh. cccnpy'tg nil his 



i. ke lu- 
ll Ui Ii I 



i. i tl 
11 I. 



nt a eb.-.m •• 



fnio. 



4 i 



nd nir"'c h** r. j • i (\ r of fi''tccn 
\v  V „. ?, •p, r ,.p.:, iri T, 

' • T ' l»»'d •!! ••.''.. 



1 .- «• 



i.N 



pu p 



J^TTLISfl BQ I ' I P A ( r MS ! 

(ARRIAGES, 

SI PERIOR IN STYLE AND FINISH 
AND AT LOWEST RATES. 
REPAIRING DON I PROMPTLY ON LOWEST 
TERMS I 
ALLEN Jt BURROUGHS. 



iu r ig j be KeU'U ky oflit el- ol ihe 
/..id. , ,ii.y to eUutete to M& i inm-ln 
t!-..' withdrawal of that proclamation. Iu 
ease this reque.-t was not acceded to, he 
then proposed that all the Kentucky legi- 
ments should leave the army, taking tlttir 
onus icith thu.i. This conversation occur- 
red in the Burnet House, on the night of 
September 22nd or 23rd. 1SG2. One of the 
witnesses was Dr. John T. Fleming, of 
Fit ■lninifsb urg. 

A KJKMIMM t:.M'F. 

Col. OHM Bi -ruridge recently whip- 
I»ed and shot the poor cowardly fellow 
Morey for publishing an article concern- 
ing his brother, Stephen (J. Bi rbridge. 
Wc propose to refer to a little trnnsac-tiou 
which will require another answer than 
either whipping or shooting. 

It will be remembered that the notori- 
ous " hog order " was so executed as to 
leave the farmers entirely at the mercy of 
the so-called agents. It was done in this 
way : The farmers were prohibited from 
shipping their hogs out of the State or 
from one point to another within the State. 
A number of agents were appointed to buy 
nop for the Government. These agents 
told the farmer-s that unless they bold the 
hoy.- to them they were in danger of being 
seized for Government use, in which case a 
string of oaths would be required before 
any payment could be obtained. Hogs are 
of such a character that when properly 
fatted they must be 6old. If kept ou hand 
long after this point has been reached, 
they will consume more food than their 
valuei and the season for slaughtering 
them will iu the meantime have passed. 
Thus the farmers being prohibited from 
otherwise disposing of their hogs, were 
compelled to sell them to the agents of 
Bt RBRinoE at such a price as might be of- 
fered, which was usually greatly less thau 
their market value. These agents then sold 
the hogs to the Government at the highest 
market rate, pocketiug the difference be- 
tween the buying and selliug price. The 
Government profited nothing by the in- 
famous transaction, but the friends aud 



relations of Gen. Bi'Rbridge had a very 
death seutence to imprisonment, but he re- I pleasant and pretty prospect of wealth at 
jected their prayers. They were nlrieed I expense of the ptafcdered people. The 



to employ Col. Mark Munday, who nm 
Br r bridge's receiver, and upon payment 
of a large sum of money Hut Colonel enga- 
ged to secure the release of the condemned 
guerrilla, even though the order for his ex- 
ecution had then been given. His influ- 
euce was potent, as it never foiled to be- 
when paid for, and the condemned man 
was released, and an innoeent man. who 
had had no connection with the gang who 
had perpetrated the murder, was shot m 
his place. An effort was then made to in- 
duce Bl ruridge to turn ovei this guerril- 
la to the civil authorities to be tried fur va- 
rious outrages and robberies he had com- 
mitted. But the blood money had been 
paid to the General's meaner, ami the 
guerrilla was given inilit;uy protection and 
seut back into the rebel line-. l»id Gene- 
ral Sherman order Bi rbrili.e i.. do such 
things a- this£ Our authority for this 
statement is ex Governor Titos F. Huam- 
I.ETTE. 

In 18»U. about the time of the August 
election, aud apparently to influence its re- 
sult. Gen. Bl'RBRlOGE ordered the arrest 
of a large number of gentlemen in this 
State, and among others the father and 
brother of Mr. Carlisle, the State Sena- 
tor from Kenton couuly. The prisoners 



beneficiaries of the order were generally the 
friends, satellites, flatterers, aud instru- 
ments of Bt'RBRiDtiE, and one of them 
was his brother Oscar By their means 
the people of Kentucky were defrauded of 
money to the amount of hundreds of thou- 
sand--. There is no means of telliug the 
extent to whieh the extortion would have 
been carried had not the order been coun- 
termanded by instructions from Washing- 
ton. 

It so happened that Messrs. CooNs A 
Chansi.or. ot this city, had made their 
preparations to slaughter n large number of 
boo* th:it fell. They saw a peoejpoM of 
ataking a good deal of money. This was 
clouded by the order of Bi rbridge. But 
;hey were shrewd business men aud knew 
the power wielded by the use of money. 
They therefore agreed to pay Os AR Bl R- 
bridge and hi.-, confederates the sum of 
s^.ono for the privilefa of packing hogs in 
thi- city. We received this information 
from Charles B. Cooxjuiow unfortunately 
dead. His partner. William Chansi.or, 
is still living in this county, and can testify- 
to the facts of the transaction. 

Now. will Oscar Birbridge let the 
public know what right he or any of the 



m'y 

tmi v 
he nrm 

' • 1 • n*V •  . ^"u. 
A*' • y ( | ' i Mi I  f   n.ioVof very 
pem" r 'ifl : v»h«i he b i »h . most 
n.ii :.e; i '♦(• ; t d Un V, It not on!y 

cb cs not  T nuh his equaii:mify. but it 
«etunl!y i ffoids him pie.-.suro for the dear 
people to express their s. ntimeuts by 
threatening him with 'several drawn 
pistols ." It is to be hoped that it will not 
detract from the reputation for courage 
which Captain Roberts' account of this 
affair will give to Captain McK EE to state, 
that immediately behind and around 
Mc K ee sat quite a number of ladies whom 
some of the bullets from the " several 
drawn pistols ' w ould very likely have shot, 
aud whose position, facing the crowd, 
would have enabled them to see the 
" several drawn pistols" levelled nt Captain 
McKee, and yet they demurely and quietly- 
kept their scats and manifested no alarm 
whatever. Captain MoKee's "bold 
effrontery"' was infectious, or else the lair 
one.- in West Liberty are made of " sterner 
stuff"' than any whom we have met in other 
portions of the State. Even Captain 
Roberts caught the spirit of the occasion, 
and did not think it necessary to approach 
the friend of whom he had assumed the 
" guardianship," for the purpose of protect- 
ing him from the deadly fire of these 
"several drawn pistols. " 

We cannot help but think that Captain 
lbmi ins apprehension for the safety of 
his friend is due. in a great measure, to a 
very vivid imagination, or to his h iving 
been imposed on by 'cock and bull sto- 
ries ' related by" some prominent citizens " 
of the radical persuasion. We remember 
that when wc were in Paintville, the Radi- 
cals there confidently asserted that neither 
Mc K ee nor Mr. Green would be permit- 
ted to speak at Prestonsburg the uext day. 
We are uot one of those who snuff danger 
or battle from afar off', and laughed at their 
real or assumed fears. The Democrats, or 
the rebel sympathizers, as they called them- 
selves, said there was no intention of mo- 
lestiug eUher McK EE or Green. When 
we reached Prestonsburg wc were kindly 
and courteously received by all: but very 
much to our amusement the Democrats 
were surprised that Mr. Green had been 
permitted to speak in the radical strong- 
hold of Paintville without insult or vio- 
lence. Judge Young advised us not to go 
to Blair's Mill, a strong radical nest in 
Morgan, because he did not believe Mr. 
Green would be permitted to speak there. 
The Democrats at West Liberty insisted 
that Mr. Green would be treated with in- 
dignity by the Radicals at Blair's Mills. 
When we reached the latter place the 
Radicals professed to us some astonish- 
ment that the rebels at West Liberty had 
suffered anyone professing to be a Union 
man to speak among them. 

AH the talk about danger to McK EE 
originated among bis own friends* and was 
confined to them. The rebels, with whom 
we conversed freely, hooted at the idea. 
They said they knew McKEEand hisfriends 
would manufacture some such yarn, aud if 



jan4 tw*w1y 



MA YSV1LLK, KY. 



JJOOK BINDING. 



AH j  t 9 

to. 
j»n2U.i. 



BOOKS NEATLY 
Asn 

SUBSTANT1ALY BOUJJD. 

fi at thin office will be promptly »iien letl 
H . H. C .X. 

'"' 



c. 



fs 1 



AM ON & CO. S 



ltJatcl]C£;, JeiDclnj, 



LIST 1 



y H CI. AUK 

WATCH MAKKli 
A N I  J E WL E K I ! 



Next Joor to George Co* A Son's dry cootl «tore 
May.ville. Ky. Reluros tkuixj to bis nw»*r. S 

Mtroaf I. f Maysville aotl the . u Touodiac counties 

tor their liberal p itv. n»«t- ber««w(o2 received 
would respectful y uforvj tHt-iiithat h# er»» be 

at lii.- jew b* alum .(n.-iui all business bt.ura.ta 

0  

U'athces aad Clock- warruol-.l ty.ke?p too 
one yar. My skill a-.i *u#rr:» was II id 
watch re parrer is loo wett kn..wn to n o,a~ 
comm. in . 

I. ' a y e a J» r «* w«" -el.eteU stock . f foods 

Wiiteho-. Clocks. Silv.-r Spoons. Silver Butter- 
kaives, Sitrsr T; imbles. Sb*wl 1'ins. Port M. aies. 
Nnpkin Kinits. CM. Sil»tr an«l  t :el Spectacles 
and Cases. PUte.l ware of all kinds, su h as Tea 
S ts  p .ons. F r*s Cast rs. Cups. 4c, Gold Pens 
ami Casus. Beaut, tul Coarru*. PL.-uu liold King* of 
22 and Hand 14 Carat Go!. I. also a »ne stock of -.t 
rings in cluster and single .stone, gold charms, spy 
glasses brushes, ami combs. 

Ho! eTcry one. come r.gh along with yoar watch- 
es. clo  ks. and jewelry for repairs, and dww't f. n»t 
10 •■§ lor a self needle threader, both for sewias 
ami darning needles— free of charge as a christmas 
gut. at 

decl-wrim 




The ^t. Louis Democrat, one of the 
ablest and most vehement of all the radical 
organs of the United States, transfers to 
its columns, without a word of objection 
or comment, an article from the Londou 
telegraph, which speaks as follows of the 
overwhelming triumph of the Democracy: 

The defeat of the Republicans in the Northern 
elections is not measured simply b» the success of 
the Democratic party, which, of itself, indicates an 
immense reaction in public seutiuent. It must be 
taken into account by all who would folly appreciate 
the position, that the defeat of the Radicals is two- 
fold—that the Republican party to which they be- 
long is defeated by the Democrats; aud that within 
the Republican party itself the Radicals have been 
defeated by the Conservatives, and have at last be 
come almost powerless for mischief in a country 
where their rule was rain. 



GIFT BOOKS. 
WRITISO DESKS, 
PORTFOLIOS. CHESS 
BOARDS. WAGONS. CARTS. 
WHEELBARROWS, 
TOYS, BASKETS, 
PIGAIi STANDS, 
PATENT AL- 

BUMS, 
TRAVELLING COMPANIONS 

ALPHABET BLOCKS, 

TOY OAMKS, 

PICTUBES, 

VIOLINS. 

.CHILDREN'S CARRI- 

j POCKET 

BOOKS. 



Jewelry Store. 



Photographer. 



pHOTOGRAPHIC. 



SK ON l  



arccwoK to 
R McREYNOLDS 

STREET. NAT.4VILLC, 



I would respectfully inform the public that I have 

eparcd to ei 



I am prepared to execute all orders in the 
line, viz: 
Photographs. Amkrotypes, 

Opalotypes. MelUcnotypen, and 
Ivorytynes tacen in all style-". 

Daguerreotypes copied and enlarged 



LARGK PHOTOGLAPUS C'l 



IRED IN 



Ot7d  Water Ci'lor»,and For'ftita I'ninfxl. 
novS wlv 



s*?rocrrn mO Cjimniaston ill err 



MAliHlKI*. 

SNEDEKER— LAN U AM— On the2f th but.. ky 
Rev. Mr. Hitchings, at the M. E. Church, Cation?- 
burg, Ky.. Mr. Samuel H. Sneaeter, of this city, 
late of Brooks county, West Va., to Miss Levera 
M. Lanham, of Catlettsburg, Ky., late of Ironton, 
Ohio. 

K ERR— GURNET— At the residence of Mrs. T. 

B Hurrieon, Dec. 23rd, 'fi7, by Rev. Taylor. 

Mr. James M. Kerr and Miss Lute C. Guraey. 

BOYD— IIELLON— At the residence of the bride, 
in Newport. Ky., Christmas eve. Inn", at 7V o'clock, 
Mr. R. A. Boyd, of Concord, Ky.. to Miss Mollie A. 
Uellon. Attendants— Mi.-s Lena Breight. of New- 
nort. Mr. Hook. ot Columbus. Ohio, and Mr. IL W. 
Sccrist and lady, of Concord. Ky. 



HORNER— SEDGWICK 
on the 19th 

M. Horner, of West Virginia, to Mils Jennie Nedg- 



At the parsonage it 
Poplar Plains, on the PJth instant. Captain Fred. 



wick, .laughter of Rev B F. Sedgwick, of the Ken- 
tucky Conference of the If. E. Cnurch South. 



NANNIE— At the residence of Mrs. Mary J. 
Waller. Dec. 2»th, 1867. Nannie E.. daughter of 
Girard and Nannie E. Hord, aged nine months. 

JOHN-At Sardis, Ky.. Dec. 27th, 1887. at half 
past one o'clock, John A., infant son of Jarues and 
Mtry Cogan, aged one year and four days. 

CHILES— At the residence of L. n. Long. Mayf. 
ville. K . ( January 2nd. 1S68. Mrs. Eliiaheth U. 

Chil 



n Iter sixty-st venth year. 
Surrounded by friends and relatives who have for 
for no Other reason than that they were | y n is enjoyed her society, and will ever remember 



PERFUMERY, 

CARVED BRACKETS, 
WORK BOXES. 

JCVENII.KS 

TOY BOOKS 
Ac. 4c. Ac. 
C. L. STANTON & CO. 

dec21tw*w 



Ulatcl)C9, jjfiuclni, ^"c. 



determined that he should not have a 
decent excuse, for contesting- the election, 
every precaution was taken that he should 
not even Buffer rudeness from turbulent 
drunkenness, much less violence from 
deliberate malignity. They all studiously 
avoided giving offense or creating di.Mur- 
bance. and though di -likiug McKke 
exceedingly, ihejr scrupulously abstuiued 
from any act which could be construed 
into an attempt to interfere with the most 
perfect liberty of debate. 
Captain McKee has another witness in 



were takcu to Louisville. Betotor Car 

lisle tried in vain to obtain the release of M the price ot ^f^'mg hogs in this 
his relatives. Finally he reported to an ,Stale ? W,th who,u was lhe luoue  ' divid " 
argument that never failed, and paid to ed? Did brother, the General, know 
Col. Mark Mi ndav $5,500, to procure I ll0W newas rewarded for the suspension of 



other persons who surrounded Geu. Bl'R- ; the person of Col. C. J. True, of this city, 
URlDtiE had to exact such sums as this | tbe substanee of whose testimony is very 

similar to that of Captain Roberts'. 
Col. Tin E was convinced that neither 



their release and that of others. No soon- 
er had ha received the mouty thau Col. 
Munday produced a general ordar from 
BuRBRiDGE containing a long list of names 
of prisoners to be released, and proceeded 
with it to the post commandant, pointed 
out the name* of the men for whose release 
he had been paid a fee, and asked that 
they should be released It was immedi- 
ately done. Col. Munday intimated to 
Mr Carlisle that he waa required to di- 
vide hia fees with the military authorities 
Subsequently one of the Carlisle'* im- 
iMudetitly revealed that bu bad procured 
bis release by paying #1,0»J0. and was re-ar- 
rested by order of BcBMUfMlK for expo- 
sing the transaction. Senator Carlisle 
theu had an interview vuth Gen. lit it 
UKiiMii;. and told him of Jlrxiav's inti- 
mation that there would have to be a divis- 
ion of the plunder. He further rcmarkid 
to Bi MBMUHiM that if he arrested his broth- 
er for telling that he bod paid for bis re- 
lease, he certainly ought to arrest Mt'xn.w 
who ha«l received the fee and intimated 
tha .he would divide it. BvBMtUMHt re- 
fused to interfere with Mi nhav.  aying 
that it w:;  a case for the civil authorities, 

a ith which he had nothing to do. After | description for political effect. Captain 
this he visited Louisville, and took rooms K 0 „ E |, TS was with Captain McK EE from 



the order iu the case of Messrs. Cooxs; A 
ChaxbLuh t What part of this S2,000 ever 
fuund its way into the Oovernrhent Trea- 
sury? How many other men obtained 
leave to pack hogs in this State by a similar 
bribe? 

THE CONGRESSIONAL CAW ASS 

We publish to-day the depositions of 
Capt. David E. Roberto, Col. C. J. True, 
and Thomas M. Green in the case of the 

contested election between Capt. Samttel 

Mi Kkf. and John D. Yocnu. Wherein 
the statements of these persons conflict, 
the public are left to judge of their relative 
truthfulness, and to give credit to which 
they please 

Captain B OITTlTn tOOtHflll that *' MclVEK 
was threatened. //' tin nord uf mutu of . : u 
mott prominent cMoioo cam iar nUtd 
upon." Captain BoOjtatTI knew of no 
tWoata koviog been made, but some prom- 
inent citizens told him threats had been 
made. These prominent citizens were not 
upon oath, and what they may hove told to 
( 'apt. Bout in - is no evidence. But who 
were they? Most probably supporters of 
Captain M« Kel. coucocting stories of this 



with Munday, whom he had denooojeed to 
Carlisle as a swindler. Their friendship 
continued uninterrupted, and Bi'KBUlDtii: 
frequently acceded to his requests after he 
kuew thatMi Xl  ay was practicing this plau 
of extortion. Our authority for this state 
mcnt is Senator Carlisle, of Covington, 
from whom we received it in the St. Nicho- 
las Holei. in New York city, iu lKtl4. He 



T I UMAX'S Ferry till the close of the cau- 
vass. and yet he heard no threat against 
McKee. nor did he witness any distur- 
bance except that at West Liberty. Xot- 
\vith t;;n linj; ail this he swear he would 
bare regarded A/.* own life in peril had he 
made the eanvass advocating Captain 
McKee's principles, and would not have 
done it without a Mifb  u nt guard Well ! 



Sami ki. McKee or hisfriends would be 
allowed to make the canvass in Morgan, 
Floyd and a part of Carter county, " unless 
they tcerc accompanied by their friends in 
such numbers as to be able to overaw* cr 
prevent the friend* o/JoHN D. YoUNoyrom 
committing acts of violence." Accordingly 
the gallant Colonel, with the redoubtable 
Robertb, went along with McKee through 
the whole canvass to do the " overaxceing 
and prevention" for the distinguished ex- 
Congressman, and we are left to infer that 
it saw their war-like pretence alone which 
kept the returned rebel soldiers from killing 
Mc Kee The gallant chief of the Bureau slso 
saw " half a dozen pistoh 'Irntni" by returned 
i-2bel soldiers at West Liberty. At this j.lace 
tin- Colonel did the ' overaweiof" by main- 
taining his position obliquely to the re%r of 
the crowd — no doubt a brilliant Mrntegelic 
movement, which would have been of signal 
advantage to MVKkk in ease he had been ac- 
tually attacked. Fortunately the dauntless 
McKtu did not " quail," and there was no ne- 
cessity for the display of the virtues of tbe 
Colonel s new tactics upon the rear of the 
crowd of ferocious secessionists who were 
between him r.ud Mi Ku:. The gallant Colo- 
nel says that some of McKu;'s friends went 
with him from Paintville to i'restonburg, and 
"I hat their presence" at Frestonsburg "onfy 
jii'ictnted the comunsnvu of tfc/jf oj ttoit ncc." 
Three parson* went with McKll from Paint- 
ville to Posatonshorg, and these were Colonel 
Tarn, Cnptain Roberts, and a miserable fel- 
low named Low man, who shortly afterwardswas 
made (o run like a scared dog to escape a ca- 
ning at the hand* of \Vm. M. Stroxo, a gen- 
tleman of Paintville, whom ho had lied upon 
Xow Colonel Tare swears that he is satisfied 
that the presence of himself, Robkbts n nd the 
dirty fellow, Low\u\% was all that deterred a 



her virtue*. Her life was lontcand eventful, for forty 
years a widow. She displayed remarkable energy 
of character, and was prompt in every duty. She 
bore a painful illne s of 17 months with wonderful 
christian pittance; and shu Lad much xorrow, but 
through her living faith she was able to endure and 
triumph above the rormt earthly ttinl.«. Devotion 
to her Master's cause was a distinguishing character- 
istic, and a* the shades of death drew near, she 
could well exclaim, "I bare fought a good fight, I 
have kept the faith, henceforth there is laid up for 
me a crown of righteousness, and not for me only 
but for all those who love Uis appearing.'' Weari- 
ness, and suffering daily made her eternal homo 
dearer, and we can never forget how earnestly she 
would request her favorite song: 

"0 land of rest for which I sigh. 
When will the moment come, 
When I shall lay my armor by. 
And dwell in peace at 



Law of ■trSAXm IS Rki.atiox to Social Evils. 
—An Essay for Young Men. on Physiological Errors 
and Abuses, incident to Youth and Early Manhood 
with the humane view of treatment and cure. Sent 
in sealed envelopes,, feee of charge. Address. Dr. 
J • SKILLI.N HOUGHTUN. Howard AjooeUtioa. 
Philadelphia, Pa. [••26tw*w3m 



R ALBERT'S 
CHITXTA PALACE. 

FINE GOLD 

AXD 

Silver Watches, Chains &v. 

FRENCH AND AMERICAN- CLOCKS. 
A T WHOL ESALE rf RETA IL I 
Having received 



|^ A B i. I P H I S 1 1 1 | 

T. K. CALL. W. B. PRESTON. 

A\'hol('sjih' Grocers, 

Forwarding & Commission Men-bants, 
Liquors. Hour. Sail, 

— A3ID— 

COUNTRY PRODUCE. 

OUR STOCK THE BEST IN THE MARKET 

•aTOl K PRICES LOW AS ANY"«i 

Prompt Attention pet id to ail Order*. 
GIVE US A CALL AT OUR STAND. ON 



jy3 



MAYSVILLE. KY. 

wShn 



Q uari.es a. love, 

GROCERY, PRODUCE. 

Commission & Forwarding 
mer c: ii ,v   r , 

Seeead si. tx l«wr Mutton. 

MAYSVILLE, KY. 
DEALER IN 



Farm implements, grain, trass 
every variety, my stock ..i heavy 



am"er'ic 

SI XV E R 1 W ATC HES. " V 
following extraordinary low 



Watches worth- 



Ladies watcher worth 



Aicency for the celebrated 
•GENEVA GOLD AND 
will sell them at the 



MM at S1A5 

.. 2W at 136 

.. 166 at ino 

.. 150 at 90 

.. 126 at 75 

.. IU  at 66 



rfO at 86S 
75 at 46 
CO at 40 



Coffee 

iplete. Having been purchased 



decline in goods, we are prepared to compete. boSS 
in quality, and price with any house in the city. 
I am offering below Cincinnati prices a large «- 



Ta CovscarTiTss.— The Rxr. EDWARD A. 
WILSON, will tend (free of chars*), to all who de- 
sire it, the prescription" with the directions for mak- 
ing and using the simple remedy by whfch ho was 
enred of a Inns affection, and that dr ead diseaa 
Consumption. Hit only object is to benefit the mf- 
flioted and be hopes every sufferer will try this pre- 
scription, aa it will coat them nothing, aad may 
prove a blessing. Please address 

REV. EDWARD A. WIL80N. 

No. 106 South Seco nd Street, Williamsburg. N.Y. 

ma" wstwltprw 



IxkobvatiO!!.— Iuformatitiu guaranteed to pro- 
duce .i luxurious growth of hair npon a l uld bead 
oi besrgflssa face, ul*o a recipe for i he reiuwval «f 
PI aspics, plotehes, Erupt iou.t, etc.. ou the saxs, 
leartSf tin- fame * ft. clear and boautiful, can be 
obliliucd without charse by udtLcsniug. 

T1I0S. E. CHAPHAV. COsWST, 

ie2J twswTtprw ?i! Broadway, New Vork. 



Silver watches. Gents and Ladies' chains, etc. 
from 35 to 40 per cent, below the retail SSSSSS 

$3000 Worth ot Solid Coin 

SILVER AND FINEST PLATED W A RF. 
CHlUPiiR THAN AT ANY HuL'SK 

at H Ci»oi*ns4L Erery artisle fwllj 

R ALBERT'S 

CHINA PALACE. 



Canne.l IV nils , 

Jellies. 
Pickle*. Sardines. 
Oysters. Raisns. 
Currant*. Figs, 
green A dried apples, 

WOODEN AND WILLOW WARE 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

Farmers wanting a reaper, or mower will find 
tuier interest to call and examine the 

 J II A  x I» ION. 

the best and cheapest machine ever sold ist th»s  
market. Circulars sent free on receipaof address. 

I am prepared to receive«cd forward ast 
of goods at lower rates than the low e?t ,ps 

TO BA CCO, 

I or anything to ship, will do well to call aad see u 
before making their arrangements. 
marl4 twAw ly CHARLES A. LOVE. 

! rpo ALL 

Whom It May Concern ! 

I see from some of oar city papers that someo 
our merchants advertise 

NEW ORLEANS SI/GAR 



IV. O. SUGAR 



AND SHALL XOJjBA : 



M decrTtwav 



JUST KKC 



Drugs, Ciquors, $Tf. 
RTVE1) 



— BY — 



BSSQS'S OS Yotiu — A Gciitkmau who suffered 
Cross Xcrvou- Debility, Piimatinc Deeiiy, and all 
the efeeU of youthful isxliseretioa, will, for the 
sake of stiffetiutf liumsnity, send tree to all who 
need it, the recess* and directions for BSakSBO the 
simple remedy by \«hich he was cured. Suffercs 
wi.-hing to profit by the advertiser's experience, can 
do so by ssMwiisinSi in parfaet ct.ntidencc, 

JOHN B. OGDEN, 

ma7 wttwltprw 42 Cedar street. N. Y. 



AVOOD & SMITH, 



7 MADE 



YOU 



H F A 0 D RE B fof E B B u|P° K B " 



1 """" 



MsxjrawSHej SurkriH. 



. i !...!.■ i ' 1. WKKkl.Y BT 
Wholeiiite (t -(/f.  -, ntrmr Xttojit/ 



-. CIA V, 

u»d Sittlou td f^t*. 



crowd of more ihan a hundrod rebels, mnnv 

pave u.- irec perims^ion then to use lus , Mi Kee made the eanvsHs; Robehts went of whom had SPet1 wnrl -„ n )\ ;„ terrors, from 
name, and pledged us that he would bear , w ; t h him ;-wos it his purpose to permit j C ommilli!*g pre meditated violence sfoinst 

thfe person of McKke ! Of a verity the most 



lony \rheuevcr called upon, 
undanee of further proof of 



the same t 
We have I 
the same sort. 

Qoo. Siiebman it^tructed BcEPBtpOE 
to send out of the State the t-ncourapers 
and harborers of robbers and guerillas :— 



Mi Kee to be .slaughtered without assist 

ance ;— or did he regard himself as a suffi- , worshipful Colonel lina-nn exalted conception 
cient guard ? and is the fact that McKee 0 f the " oversweing" powers of his mere pres- 
oas not molested attributable to the fact Pncl i or ^ j ie ,hi'uks thesa reikis were a 
that he was escorted through the District v , , v cowardly set ot fellows. Without tae 
by the redoubtable Captain David K. , i,. nR , desire to drroyote from the reputations 
but did he tell him to banish such I'niou ROBERTS? Captain Roberts swears that of these donirhty meu ot war, we must con- 
men as Jacob and Huston, for no other several pistols were drawn"at West Lib- fe*s tbsA,bad tee felt disposed or thought.it 
m his crime than that of opposing M r Lincoln's eriy and '' had it not been for M  Kee s Laid nccessaiy to do any "overaweing" on our 
Ul and will election'' Did he advise him to make pub- iiTront- in x\\c\ would no doubt have either side, we would hava carried a posse along 



Corrr.r. — common to choice 21 to 27V.. 
Suoac-N. 0., Wi^lfi; p. R.. 13 i*5I4)il Dcma.. 
1, MJ a ; ,SortRefincd,16^(gl»;HardRcfint .l, l.v.t 

iSJi. 

MoiaSSES-N. 0.. 51; M bhl. $1 Oi; P. R.. 7^85. 
Fun-tt— Ws quote at«10 OOrt.ia. 
\«MK*T-SVhite (No. 1.) S2 40; No. 1 Red. $2 Oil. 
Gu.un Rye. Sl.($ OaU.lAc; Corn. $1 OU to 1 |Sj 
Barley. *l j0to l CO. 
Wuisky ~S2 Zk .2 40. 

Pbovisioxb— Lard, 10  12c. Bacon, from UJs to 

U, 

14 t k f.rfl — Bbl. No. I, MO 00; do. No. 2, $») 50 
bbl. No. L 512; do. No. 2. $11 00; ^ Bbl. No. l ; 
W; do. No t 2.L  bU. S5 50. White Fish. 99 50. 

Fsatheb?-- fioiftTOe. . 
|Ues— Stodc. 

gF.r.D-Clover. f8 50 to S8 00. Flax, 52 00®2 25; 
Timothy, ?2 mVi- 

Tallow— per lb. 9 to 10c. 

Casdi.es— Tallow, 15@17; £tnr, boxes. 26» . 

St. n.\— American, 8)i; English. 9J^. 

WooDr.SW.vttE -Buckets, IS 00; Tubs, nest three 
do ?75- net eisbt, ?3 10. 9525 Washboard. 93 10. 



*o. .», r.mnt 

MA y.SYl/.LE, KY., 

PI KE IMPORTED 1-KEXCH BRANDY; 

PI' 111; IMPuKTED SHERRY WINE: 
PERL IMPORTED PORTE WINE 

Th.. e wishing a 

PURE ARTICLE FOR 
MEDICAL PURPOSES! 



O C E R I E^, 

fully e%aal to the demand of thii aSSfltui, AI- ». 
C.OOD ASSORTMENT OF 

fl 

CIGARS 

OP MY OWN MAMTAriTlM 



RIFLE A BLASTINli POWDER. V 
RKANDIK& liINi WINES. 



The public will always find the above named arti- 
cles at 

X». IT Market ^trr^t, 

MAYSVILLE, KKXTl CKT. 
As long at my name is pointed ou the Wall.. 

Dt'DLEY A.RTCITARD-. \ 

dec 1 4 »*I»i'.iii 



liusmcas Carfjs, $St. 



^yADSWOKTU & LEE, 

W. H. WADSWORTH. JAMBS A. LEE Jr 

ATTORXEYS AT LAW, 



would . 



to 



gitk rs a call, 

as the above articles afe warranted to be .»oeh. 
jal wlv . 



MXTSTILLI. 

Will practice ia Mason and adjoining counties. 

•*-prompt attention given to the eoUaetioa of all 
Maims. 







^7 H. SAVAGE, 

* ATTORNSY-AT-L A W 



}al7 twawly 



Will pra 
gSSBBI ■ 



tice in 
Will 



am* 
iptcy 



WEEKLY MAYSVILLE EAGLE. 

M A VsVl I.I.F.. KV JANUARY 



The City Cvuvcil of J h6r has reason to he 
proud of its recdrd. Aciing constantly under 
a deep bcnsc of its dnties to the public, and 
~ * profoundly impressed with tlie nature and 

»■ 1 l * A L BOM Ml TTKK importance of tie HaplieslhilUi I which it 



184 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY 
A MEETING CALLED FOR Sth JANTAKV. 

The Chairman of the National Democratic 
Central Committee, in view of the present 
political condition of the conutry and of the 
State, the coutinued aggressions upon the 
Constitution, by a party reckless of all regard 
for the true depositaries of power, and aiming 
to take the rule from intelligence to confer it 
on barbarism and ignorance, an*!, as advised 
by members of the Committee, think it proper 
that there should be some deliberate and ma 
tare action and advice by the C' .ltral Com- 
mittee and other distinguished members of 
the National Democratic party. 

Therefore, by order of tne Committee he 
issues this call for a full meeting of the Cen- 
tral Committee, and such other distinguish, d 
Democrats as Senators Guthrie nud Davis. ex- 
Governor Tbos. E liramlctte, Col. II. T. 
.laeob. Gen John M Harlan. Hons. Jos. V. 
I'nderwood, B. C. Ritter. Aaron Harding. W. 
R Kinkead. Harrison Taylor, Ceo. S Shank - 
lin, T. T. Alexander, Geo. M. Adams. Thos. 
M Green and others from various portions of 
the State, to be holden on the Pth day Jan- 
uary. 1868, in the city of Louisville, that a 
true representation of the feeiir.g of the peo- 
ple may be had as to the propriety of calling 
a State Convention, and also snch proper and 
suitable measures and concessions as can l e 
made to heal the divisions among ail prof. «s  
ing Democratic opinions, that the entire Con- 
servative element of this Stat. may. irrespec- 
tive of the past, be united imo one solid and 
effective l»ody of opposition to Radicalism. 
Rv order of the Committee. 

J H Harnt.y. Chairman. 
Jas. Wn.sox, Secretary. 



bad consented to assume, it conducted* its 
monthly del ilirm; ions witli a degree of cir- 
cumspection and judgment that no one having 
any knowledge of the peculiarities of the 
deliberative function conld reasonably 
anticipate. And this exhibition of delibera- 
tive capacity was nil the more striking that it 
occurred under circumstances of general 
depression and special difficulty exceedingly 
unfavorable to the resolute aud vigorous exer- 
cise of any function so heavily weighted with 
personal and official responsibility. The City 
Council of lpoT rarely if ever committed the 
grave error of confounding recklessness and 
P'ecipitation with the effectiveness and bril- 
liancy of judicious executive vigor. In- 
deed in several instances it has incurred the 
somewhat flattering reproach of over-pru- 
dence; but having observed their delibera- 
tions with great constancy and interestduring 
the more stormy sessions of the spring and 
summer, we feel justified in declaring that, 
whenever the Council moved with circum- 
spection, the wisdom of its conduct was 
abundantly confirmed by the character of the 
result : and that so far from meriting reproach 
for excessive caution, they desene the high- 
est commendation for resisting the prcsurc of 
considerations which under similar circum- 
stances might have impelled n different body 
to a course of action indefensibly precipitate 
and indiscreet. 

It will scarcely he alleged by thpse who 
have observed our course with reference to 
the Council, that we arc influenced in these 
expressions of opinion by any other motive 
Am a disinterested regard for the public wel- 
fare, and a desire to commend in suitable 
terms, a constant manifestation of Metal 
zeal and a righteous discharge of representa- 
tive duty. That we have never regarded the 
Pity Council as infallible, the City Council 
itself will bear witness; but we do not believe 
that a body inve&ted with similar functions 
can anywhere be found that has proved itself 
in all things more patient, scrupulous, labori- 
ous, and circumspect. During the past year 
we have furnished numerous illustrations J 



Street Car:.'— Not satisfied with the'.-plendid 
achievements of the pust two years some of 
our citizens are discussing another enterprise 
which promises to assume very speedily a 
practical shape. Men of judgment and ex- 
perience, atlirm that the construction of a 
iine of railway connecting the extreme east- 
ern and western limits of our city, is not only 
practicable but that it ran be carried through 
nt an expense comparatively trifling,— will 
pate* ■ highly profitable investment, and will 
result in general and special advantages of 
which it is impossible in advance to appreci- 
ate the true charncler and extent, bnt which 
once secured will amply justify the most 
sanguine expectations. The citizens of the 
Eifth Ward are peculiarly interested in this 
movement. None can appreciate better than 
they the advantages of frequent, eas\ and 
pleasant communication with the central 
portions of the city; and certainly the en- 
hanced value of property will ot itself abund- 
antly compensate for any pecuniary sacrifice 
which the inception of the enterprise may re- 
quire. 

Let no one say it is "impossible." The 
w nd "impossible " is becoming unfamiliar to 
Maysville lips. Always excluded from the 
vocabulary of Progress, it should be eternally 
banished from too dialect of our daily life. 

It is a wretched verbal ■obstructive' 

A Good l'lace to Slop, — We lake pleasure 
in copying and endorsing the following para- 
graph from the Cincinnati Knquir r of recent 
date. The hotel spoken of lias more of home 
comfort about it than any other in the Queen 
City. The EkquireSr .-ays : 

I'm: Mkociuxt's IIoth- — Since the advent 
of the Messrs. Gallaber, Nelson A. Co., the ge- 
nial hosts of the- Merchants' Hotel, among us, 
this popular bouse has fast been growing into 
public favor, and now stands pre-eminent 
among our first class hotels. 

For many years it w«i favorably known as 
the Dennieoa House: but under the auspices 
of its present energetic proprietors, and to 
keep pace with the times, it has beeu remod- 
eled and enlarged, and its accommodations 
are now extensive and magnificent. Their 
gentlemanly and atte ntive clerks, in the office, 
are ever ready to give their attention to their 
gneetl Jn the dining room are active and 
attentive waiter*, and the general personal 
supervision given the whole Ivy its deserving 
proprietors, is being appreciated by its nu- 
merous patrons, who unanimously pronounce 
it the model hotel of the West. 




TU R CONTESTED ELECTION. 



8 A M McK EE VS.). D YOUNG. 



THE TESTIMONY 



H. Rierbower, attorney for Samuel 



drawn from the proceedings 



the C. 



The Law Concerning Foreiyii Insurance 
Gumtpmnies — In Maysville there are many 
agents of insurance companies which are not 
incorporated by this Commonwealth, and we 
wish to call the attention of these gentlenu n 
to the la* - prescribing the conditions on which 
they are permitted to transact business of in- 
surance in Keutucky 

We wish particularly to call their attention 
to section* IV, V. and VI of the act to regu- 
late Agencies of Foreign Insurance Com- 
panies, appproved March 3d, IV,,. Sf-mt-ai s 
Revised Statutes, 2 volume pije, L'75. They 
read as follows : 

"SkttioxIV. The statements required by 
the foregoing sections shall be renewed in 
each year thereafter, either in the month of 
January or July, and the auditor on being 
satisfied that the capital or deposit consisting 
of cash, securities, or investments, as provided 
in this act remain secure to the sum of one 
hundred and fifty thousand dollars, shall 
renew such license. 

Section V. Every agent obtaining such 
TLee/ise or renewal thereof, as required by this 
act, shall, before transacting any business of 
insurance in this State, file in the office of the 
clerk of the county court, in which he 
or they may desire to carry on the busi- 
ness of the agency, a copy of the 
statement required to be filed with the 
auditor, and a copy of the license, which 
shall be carefully preserved by the clerk, for 
public inspection : and such agent or agents 
shall also cause the statement and license to 
be published in some newspaper of general 
in the country, for at least two 
weeks; and in case of a renewal, 
shall, in like manner, file in the office of the 
■clerk of the county court a copy of such 
renewed statement and license, and cause the 
same to be published within thirty days after 
it shall be filed with the auditor 

Section VI. The statements required by 
the foregoing sections shall be made up to a 
period within six months preceding the filing 
of the same with the auditor." 

It will be seen from section V that it is 
rendered obligatory on every agent, before 
he transacts any business of insurance, not 
only to file a copy of the statement required 
to be filed with the Auditor in the office of 
tnc clerk of the county c^urt in which he may 
desire to carry on the business of the agency 
— but also tocause such statesnesl and license 
to be published in some newspaper of general 
circulation in that county for at least two 
weeks. In case of a renewal be must cause 
a copy of the "renewed statement awl /must 
to be published in like manner within thirty 
day after it shall be filed with the Auditor." 
The provisions of the law are unmistakable. 



of the individual and collective manifesta- 
tions of interest in the proper conduct of mu- 
nicipal affairs, and yet only those who are 
fully acquainted with the interior workings 
of the Council can appreciate the amount of 
personal sacrifice required for the enlcieaj 
performance of the various duties devolved 
upon each member of this board. 

We are now standing upon the threshold of 
a new era. It is highly necessary that our citi- 
zen- shall be duly impressed with the charae- 
acter of the exigencies which spring from the 
changing situation. There must be no more 
trifling with public interests. The atmosphere 
in which we move has been freshened by the 
breath of Progress, and n healthier public- 
sentiment demands that every influence shall 
be brought to bear which can permanently 
fix the conditions of our individual and cor- 
porate prosperity. To this end it is requisite 
that our counsellors should be honest, able, 
resolute aud discreet. 



Tobacco carried by the Steamer Magnolia 

from January 1st, ls(J7, to Dec. 

From Maysville and Abfrdeen 

" Logan'*  i.ii au l CharltMou 

" Ki| ley 

" Dover 

11 ifrtcin sport 

•' Augusta 

" himiU e Landiutc and Kural. 

" k ■ 1 -i : i 'i-' 

•' t hilo 

" liradforti 

" Foster 

•' Neville 

'• Stet*t«Fie, Ky 

" Motrow 

" Point Pleasant 

" California, Ky 

*• New Kiehuiolid 



1st, lHtiT : 

_att iii.d- 
.... je •• 

.._l«5 
... 9SM 

.. j. ;:•.» " 

.... 788 M 

... W 

.... ±A * 

... 2IN " 

... 270 

.... 185 

... W 



12 



Total. 



.fit;., 



Thi 



City Election.. — We have not been able 
to obtain the official returns of the vote on 
yesterday in time for to-day's paper. A - 
nearly as we can ascertain the following gen- 
tlemen have been elected, viz : 

For Mayor. Wm. P. Coons: Marshal. Henry 
Johnson; Clerk. John Rrosee. jr ; Treasurer. 
Thomas A.Ross; Collector, W .Rees Dobyns; 
A an m or. James Hunt ; Wharfmasrer. George 
Graham; Wood and Coal Measurer. Wm. l a- 
vis , Marketmaster, James Alexander. 

For Councilmen in the First Ward, J. P. 
Phister. George W. Tudor and Morris Hat- 
chings. 

Second Ward, John A. Loughridge, Keith 
Rerry and Thomas Jackson. 

Third Ward. R. A. Cochran. Unread Stock- 
tuo and James H Rains. 

Fourth Ward. Charles R. Pearce, I., ft Long 
and Wm. Hridgcs. 



Failed '.—We regret to find the following in 
the Cincinnati Commercial of Thursday last : 
"Many persons will be- surprised to see nn- 

j nounced the sale by Mr. [* C. "Hopkins of his 
internal in the dry goods business. This 

| measure is forced by heavy losses in the 
decline in goods under a severe competition 
ou a sluggish market, and is preliminary to 
an adjustment of his affairs to meet eml.ar- 
rassment or failure. He has not yet been 
protested f,n his bills payable either here or 
elsewhere in the prosecution of an enormous 
business during the past fift een rears; but in 
vie* of his crippled condition, that mortifying 
event is inevitable, and he will be at the 
mercy of his creditors when his next bills 
mature. " 



Type- Ottilia Machines.— The Hartford 
Ottrfo- report I that the New York Time* has 
given an order for a considerable number of 
Alden's type setting machines, to be used in 
the composit ion of that paper, and that the Tri- 
bune contemplates doing the same thing. 
Other papers will follow if the machines 
prove a success, and a complete revolution 
will be wrought in newspaper printing, for 
these machines, it is claimed, will do good 
work vastly cheaper than it can be done by 
hand. 



.,,1 




ii at mach required aa the filing of the state- 
ment with the auditor or county clerk. This 
publication mutt be made by every agent who 
doetbutineat for any foreign company. It 
mutt alao be made in tomenew«paperof genera' 
circulation within the county in which he 
intends to do ouerneas The circulation of 
ice document* containing a copy of the 
license is not in compliance 
law. The pnblicaiion must be in a 
The publication of one state 
went in one paper with the names of the sever- 
al agents in the different ervi irics is. not suffi- 
cient Every agent, rft every county. must 
publish the statement, accompanied by a copy 
of hi* license, in some newspaper of general 
circulation in the county in which he desires 
to transact any business for the company. 

There is not one agent in five in this city 
who regularly complies with this law. At 
lca6t four out of five fail to make the publica- 
tion required by its terms. No action has 
ever been taken in this county against any 
one for violating it, though we understand the 
matter was before the Grand Jury last fall. 
We now call the attention of all the ngents to 
it* provisions. The law provides a penally 
•.for its violation at follows, viz 

" Srctiox VIII. Any person who shall de- 
liver any policy for insurance, or collect any 
preaatam for insurance, or transact any busi- 
ftess of insurance in this State for any com- 
pany not incorporated by the law of this 
without baring obtained license as by 
I required, or who shall in any way vio- 
provisions of this act, shall be fined 
for every such offense, not leas than one bun 
or more than five hundred dollars, at 
of a jury. 



Steamboat Explotron. — The Cineinnat 
Marietta packet Hany Derm bound down, ex- 
ploded her boilers and burned to tlie watei s 
edge, Saturday morning, two miles below 
Gallipolis. Eight or ten persons were killed, 
and at many more badly burned. Captain 
George W. Norton, of Ironton, Ohio, and 
Captain Bigga. of Atbland, Kentucky, were 
lott, and Captain Sayre. clerk Booth and 
both pilota, one engineer, one cabin boy. 
several firemen and the barber badly burned. 
Fortunately she had a tlim passenger, but ex- 
tra freight trip, inc'uding 400 bblt oil and a 
large lot of nalt. 

[Mi MMl Rehold-Style. — At the 'A-seinblie 
re unions held fnrtniehtly nt Dclmonico's a 
marked 'feature of the dress" is the downward 



A Delightful 'JYcat.— -On Wednesday a par- 
ty of gentlemen met at D. A. Richardson s, on 
Market street, to celebrate the incoming of 
the new year, and to test the quality of his do 
mestic wines. The wine was excellent in 
quality, ver}- palatable, and with sufficient 
body to enliven the spirits of all the guests 
and make them wish the return of many a 

happy new year to the hospitable host. 
^ 

AteUkwA — We regret to learn that William 
Lloyd, Esq , of Plug-town, whose recent efforts 
in behalf of the Railroad will be gratefully 
remembered by our citizens — was seriously 
injured a few days since by a heavy fall. It 
is feared that several of his ribs are fractured. 
As he declines medical attendance, however, 
we trust that we shall soon be permitted to 
announce his entire recovery. 

Our Thanh — We are indebted to Major 
Thomas Chenoweth for Lite New Orleans 
papers. He has our thanks for the kindnrss, 
with our wishes that many a happy New 
Year may return to to him and the fs.ir bride 
he recently carried with him from our city. 

Our Aberdeen Friends have been much in- 
terested in the tastefully conceived and bril- 
lantly illuminated tableaux so effectively ex- 
hii'ited at the Town Hall in that place during 
be recent Holiday Season. 



Wtomm$ in Hiyh Places— The Princess of 
Waits, it is said, never buys a new dress 
without especial reference to its "making 
over" qualities. 



 ck. 



Jt is rapidly ruin - 



tendency ot til 
ing to "wai t. 

Concerning this inter p sliug innovation, a 
lady remark.- : "Heretofore low necks have 
been the exception-now, they are the nule : 
and covering— wkere it is MM— seems to be 
employed only to couccal the icon/ of phy sical 
charms, not the charms themselves. " 



At Borne — We were greatly pleased \;\?\ 
week al -i cing Surgcc n Wm T. Hord, who is 
visiting his parents in 1 1. : ^ eity. Dr Hcid 
is suffering from ill health in consequence t f 
expo.-urc in many years of service, but inr re 
particularly from the terrible scenes through 

which he passed during the recent volcanic   were several women engaged in rail-riding the 



Paddt in a Fix.— A gentleman in Newport 
R. I, baring a large tree which ht wished re 
moved, proposed to gira it to one of the Irish 
man of hit acquaintance if he would cut it 
down and take it away. The offer was ac- 
cepted, and the recipient decided to trim it up 
before attacking the main trunk. With this 
intent he began at the bottom and worked 
upwards to the top Arriving at the upper 
limb he was dismayed to find himself clinging 
;r, n fcmHrmM trunk, with no perceptable 
mennt of descending. He immediately began 
his cries for help, ami having arrested the ar 
tentioii of other parlies was brought down 
with the aid of a ladder. Pat was then so 
disgusted with the whole affair that he con- 
cluded he did not want any firewood, ami 
cleared out. leaving the owner to complete 
the job. 

SOME half a dozen prominent Republicans 
it; the town of Wrentham, Massachusetts, have 
had a verdict rendered against them for riding 
Patrick Kennedy and 1'atrick Travis on a 
rail on the day after the assassination of 
President Lincoln. They defended their 
course on the ground that one said he was 
glad ;be President was dead, and that the 
other hung and burned him in effigy. There 



l l I'ONi : l«» \ OF DAVID I . 

State ov Kkntivk.y. County of Ma. inn : 
The deposition of David E. Roberts, laken 
on the If.th day of October, 1KT, in the 
city of Maysville, in the State and county 
nforesaid, in the office of the mayor of 
said eity, before Charles Cady mayor of said 
city, to be read as evidence in the case 
pending before the fortieth Congress id' the 
United States, in which Samuel McKee is 
contesting the right of John D. Young to 
a seat in the said fortieth Congress, 
liy V 
McKee. 

Q. What is your name, residence and occu- 
pation ? 

A. David E. Roberts, jr.. Maysviilc, Ken- 
tucky; clerk. 

Q. If you travelled through any of the 

counties of the ninth congressional district 

• i I 

prior to the last May election, and observed j 

the feeling and conduct of the people, state j 
whnt you observed, and whether in your judg- 
ment Union men, and especially Samuel 
KtKee, and others advocating bis claims to 
election, could safely address tin citizens of j 
Floyd and Morgan counties in said district j 
upon political question without an accompany- 
ing guard of their friends for their protection. 
Tell also whether or not you heard or know of 
any threats of violence to McKee or any of 
his friends in any of the above named coun- 
ties or in any part of Rath county in said 
ninth tlistrict, and aiso if you know of anj" 
disturbance or violence at any point in said 
district in the presence of Samuel McKee 
during the time he was addressing the people. 

A. I was during the month of April in the 
following counties : Lewis, Lawrence, Boyd, 
Floyd Morgan, Pike. Montgomery, and Rath, 
anil had an excellent opportunity of ascer- 
taining the feelings of the people in those 
counties, (in Morgan and Floyd particularly) 
where the rebel element prevails. Captain 
McKee was threatened, if the word of some 
of the most prominent citizens can be relied 
on. As for myself I would not have under- 
taken to canvass those counties advocating 
the principles of Captain McKee without a suf- 
ficient guard to prevent disturbances; I 
would consider that I was hazarding my lib. 
In West Liberty. Morgan county, the meeting 
of which Capfain McKee was the speaker was 
interrupted by a gang of returned rebel sol- 
diers, and several pistols were drawn, anil had 
it not been for Captain McKee' it bold effront- 
ery they would no* doubt have either killed or 
crippled him. I heard previous to Captain 
McKee' s going there that it would be unsafe 
for him to attempt to speak there, as there 
had been threats made against his life. Dur- 
ing the disturbance I heard some of the crowd 

say "kill the d d nigger." (referring to 

McKee. i 

if. From what you saw and know of the 
-tate of feeling at certain points in this con- 
gressional district in May, 1S67, do you or do 
you not believe it would have been danger- 
ous for men to vote for McKee at some of the 
precincts of the upper counties, and do you 
or do you not believe that some loyal men were 
deterred from voting at said may election for 
Samuel McKee because of a dread of violence 
then or hereafter to themselves? 

A. From what I saw and heard I do firmly 
believe that there was danger of men voting 
for McKee being either violated or disturbed 
either in person or properly ; nt some of the 
precincts in the district it was not safe for a 
man to vote his sentiments. 

Q. What judges sheriffs, and clerks, who 
were appointed to serve nt the May election 
in 18i 7, and who did serve at said election, 
were notoriously southern sympathizers? 

A. Joseph Frank, Maysvill«, precinct No 
2. judge: Frank Long, clerk, precinct No. 2; 
John Grant, sheriff, precinct No. 2. 
And further deponent saith not. 

David E. Roberts, Jr. 
Stati: oi Kenti c kv. County of Mason, set: 

1, Charles G. Cady. mayor of the city of 
Maysville, do certify that the foregoing depo- 
sition of David E. Roberts was taken before 
me, and was read to and subscribed by him. 
in my presence, at the time and place and in 
the action mentioned in the caption, the said 
David K. Roberts having been first sworn by 
me that the evidence he should give in the 
action should be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, and his statement 
reduced to writing by him in my presence, 
Samuel McKee being present at the examina- 
tion by his attorneys, F. H. 
C. Campbell. 



deterred from speaking to the people and? get 1 of arrest. I felt it my duty 
making a thorough canvass, by threats of per- : ' audiences tbaf .fudge Young 1 



sonal violence. State these facts as ( laborato- 
ry as may be, that the true condition of affairs 
may be understood. 
A. I did have an oppnrt unity of a* ■ rlaJning 

the state of feeling existing in those counties 
In most of the counties- mentioned the people 
seeiued to be considerable excited. In Mor- 
gan and Floyd, and in a pari S)f Carter county, 
the state of feeling was such that I dtd not I 
coudidcr Samuel McKee or his friends would • 
be allowed to make the eanvt they 
were accompanied bj their friend- in jueh 
numbers as to be able to overawe or prevent 
the friends of John D. Young from commit- 
ting acts of violence, i did not consider thai 
Itastl MrLTrr rrniTd hayrflQiir fin mgh Mo-- 
gan or Floyd countie.t alone without jeop- 
ardizing his life. His triends advised him 
not to go to West Liberty, in Morgan county, 
or to Prestonburg, in Floyd county, as threats 
had been made that he would not be allowed 
to speak at those points. I beard Greenup 
Hickell say, M the presence of Samuc! McKee 1 
and others, that the rebels of Morgan county 
had threatened violence against. McKee if he 
attempted to speak at West Liberty, and that i 
he l Hickcli i. had made an arrangement with 
the sheriff of Morgan county to preserve the 
pence, but that he feared there would b  a ,! : - 
tnrbance. I was with McKee ai \\ e I Li hi rlv. 
The meeting was interrupted ' v returned 
rebel soldiers. I taw at least n half dozen ' 
pistols; drawn by them, and they eoawnet i pd 
yelling and hurrahing, and I Believe ' ' i: 
Samuel MclCee had qn.iilod before the mob, ] 
his life would have been sacrificed, S_v, :..! 
of his friends went with him from Pai 
to the meeting at Pre -ton'. ut,t'. a , .i ,l. c 
i threats I had heard previous |o thsjl seewl / 
i I am satisfied thai their presence only pn n 



sjmpiy He- 



cued with arrest by Dr. Shnrj 
as provost Marshal of Bath eon 
cause, as an officer uftbo, Vate, he had ' su d 
a writ o! habeas   »rj'ti t In'the. case of citi 
n hrrested By said SI 



.ken* «na aeon tea with LafteJS£ 

vfcKcc al West Lioerty. It had been hia 

habit  v:r. v.g the canvass to describe t|»a 
democratic 1 party with the most offensive 
language. He 



j • led the lea 



• r....l ,« them as tiait.ws 



pirate! MoESf 



iriithonir hpd ngdinM law. jnrrory Lnrtk-o : guerrii :: •, honsoi^mer^ and plunderers, bnt 



 • uspected of southern sympathies, , he spoke of tkc nuwees 
ou; , iy accusation »,f any iiUaal or e«n»allv harsh — sayina 



iug p 



they were 
and with 
disloyal ac 

slated, flirt 

laid Sharp 
this.! : : 



since Col Jacob and other known Union men, 
and federal soldiers, had been ■neeli 1. inv 
pftsoaj d t r i stilt I. Captain McKee did net 
contradict this statement, then or tin ■;■ 
Cap:/.,! McKee said at Gray in and i (h t 



i f the party in terms 



I were let*. 



all 
eft 



these 
,1 the 



that 



I if:'. l 



place-, that John D. 
touburg duri..,. im 
liasas in iSfif. Thai 
tiee lie would lw h 



n-.tlii: vbi 
had turned the c« 
around, aud if y« n 
would thr.rW up th 
pecnliar rebel yell, 
Yon aw." MWtl*. 



it and the 



Droiner u  



r?ble 



tain MrKr ,- Vtf that 

epili p -y, with which the   
was said to.be afflicted, ho did not think if h 



disease of have just dcdcribedt 
hcr-in-law the plact of sneakfa 



had epileptic fit-, 
tha\ time bo weal 



in 



hm w 

Loataa, 
gen tie m  



1 . Y 
i friei 



?ate 1, 



biag of the fa 
n Lawix'iiuo 

n who had ht 



!»tv. L met 



that time, and I inters sated them in refer- ti. . . fa] aieu 



enoe t*   she tenia el t^eptwi.. \U4w*« a ~t**..;- 

ment. With one accord they replied that it 
was wholly untrue. That JadgS Young bad 
gone to Prestonburg. as he had stated, to bring 
home his brotber-itvbnf, SrhojfwaJ r. ally sis 1 . 



nrmy or aiding the rebel cause, directlf or in- 
directly; that he was not in* or near IV 
Kurg more than four or fl«a (toy*,' aud 1 :'r . - 
h j soon as the business which took aim there had | Kee 
T | been concluded: that* nt the time Judge , ; ,j n j 
Young was in Pre-tonburg the rebels coll, rat- 
ed there had uot Bcmi organized, and that 
said judge Bad left before the organization of 
them had commenced On the road from 
Peach Orchard to Paint •il!e, in Johnson   oun- 
ty, I told Colonel True, who was one of Cap- 
tain MeKee's traveling companions, of the in- 
formation I hnd obtained in Loni a, and 
offered to bet him fifty dollars that Captain 
kfeKt ■ would not dare to make his sneering 
allusions to the afflictions of Judge Young's 
brother-in-law in Judge Young's pn 
when they met at Prestonburg, nor would 
he there either say or insinuate that Judge 
Young had beeti at that place for six weeks 
while the rebels were there. Col. C. J. True 
declined the bet. but said he believed that 
Cap*:.i n McKee would at Prestonburg, when 
confronted with Judge Young, ai d on the 
giound where the thing was said to have oc- 
curred, reiterate the statement he had previ- 
ously made in the canvass in reference to 
this matter. In flic am . a.. :itfon hen 
tared me that they had proof that Judgo 
^onag had been a candidate and had beenvo 
ted for for t;ob 
ment  in PrVsrodl 
him, if this wet I hi 



ted the comiuiaiion of acts of violence. Ii 
was generally believed by SfcKffe's frltwds 
that hewonktn^he p. rmitted to com;,;,:" 
the canvass in' those counties, (Morgan ..ml 
Floydj 1 know that .MeKce w prevent d 
from speaking at other paints in 
counties because of threats made affinal liim. 
In t'ner. if wn- consitlt*re | ,.y M.-iv...- - ,.„.,, 
that he would not be safe in speaking at any 
point where there were not Union men enough 
to stand by him in case be was attacked, 
would further state, that there was, a distur- 
bance at the Olympian Springs, in Rith 
county. I was informed that tho use*! ing 
was broken up, that several Union men were 
badly beaten by the supporters of John D. 
Young. 

Q From Vhat you saw nnd*know oF the 
condition of affirirs in different parts of this 
district, in May, 18G7, do yon, or not, believe 
it would have been dangerous at some pi t - 
cincta for men fo vote for Cnptain McK, e. 
and do you, or not, believe that loyal men 
were deterred from voting their sentiment M 
said election ? 

A. From my knowledge of affair., in ibis 
tli'triet, I do believe there are several pre- 
cincts where loyal men were deterred from 
voting their sentiments. 

C. J. Tr.t t 
Stati: ok Kkntccky, Mason county, $ct. 

I, Charles G. Cady. mayor of May n iile. do 
certify that the foregoing deposition of C. J. 
True was taken before uie, and was read to 
and subscribed by him in my pretence at the 
time and place and in the action nenjionfrl in 
the caption, the said C. J True having lioeu 
first sworn by me that the evidence he should 
give in the nclion should be the truth, the 

whole truth, and nothing but the truth, and his j proprirt" , • . , McKe* re make tbei 



up their hat.; 
!  i ,i ng. 



'•b-K  



1 i.f ■ of tu;« rebel regi- 1 



nrg nt time. I told 

ease, it watdd be moat ap- 



tlleeted around soma 

or grog-shop they would ,say 
i'* 1 1" -ing, bnt after yon 
mer they would peep 
f t looking, they 
■ ■'■ give that 
Hurrah for J »hn D. 
• Bit esaiagsess, I 
y. reaching there after 
•• did not arrive till the 
xt morning 
ind particu- 

1 ' cKce's speeches to the 

I around me. amoug 
Ifcinsji reeasnthag she pa":age which I 
Bat as 1 was going to 

I was informed that 
u»3 l-,rt i,i his speech 
aag, some 
cuds of Judge 
Hurrah tor 
I to dissuade 
he would ex- 
.pKo make capital out of 
incident. A  agreed upon, when McKee 
" John D V .'ing." some 
ir feet, tbrew 
rrah for John 
u i shout d several times, 
I them to hear Cap- 
ag thai I won Id not *peak 
was further interruption, 
quested me to take my seat; 
mat be was not annoyed, and that it would 
■ i |n i do r..,t think that the 
, c .■;!.] have been for more than 
one mis When it ceased. Captain He- 
1 t,, the crowd that he did not 
•• - I ' • hear the people*-- 

• -nt li I a tinned 
hi i ipeeeh without interrupt.on or demonstra- 
" on poet from the audience. There 

tho time any demonstration of 
vi ten "--ward? Captain McKee. Xeither 
"■ ; ' friends seemed in the least 

ted, nor was there any- 
  iciinn of the crowd either to 

alarm or intimidate him or them. I etood 
immediately by the side ot' Captain McKee, 
" n "  ■ above the audience and 

igtbfm. It w,-,u!d have been impossible 
to have drawn a pistol on Captain 
McKee, or to otherwise have menaced or 

• ;« .u my seeing a at) 
1 there was nothing of the sort 
knowledge. The oniy inasda 

offered to McKj0 •onsietad in the scene. I 
c jjbed, if that was an iusnlt. 

, o . ^ tio *' 5,1 * ^n^rsation with 
o i ( J h ue. he stated to roe that he 
n Captain McKee • i 
v v. bat that he hnd 

' l , ' ■ ' ■.»!'. ahoeo neme 1 caa- 

ent'. had expressed a wish t.r determina- 
t h -n. I ulonel True ; that upon 
v «ge to the man that he 
i a i d would wnit in 
the man denied 
« f the kind. TheaaVirt 

.nt r*f llu' 



df 

r\fti r 



the 



West Li 



In Cotorado —We acknowledge the receipt 
of the Daily Colorado Tribtnu of the 23rd 
December, published at Denver. It was sent 
by our young friend Malnor C. Blaine, who is 
practising dentistry in that city. We trust 
he may detain his full portion of the products 



irruptions i»i Bt Thomas. We hope he may 
now obtain leave to puss a few years in enjoy- 
ment of a quiet and domestic life with his 
fsmily and frie nds. 

Mayor's Hejun-t, — The following is a synop- 
sis of the business done in the Mayor s office 
for the year 18f»T. as appears on the docket : 

Mt2 civil suits, amounting to * 0i^,K2 : 220 
arjrests. fft for breaches of pence, 142 for 
breaches of ordinance; Font to jail, ii.H ; 
amount of fines assessed, SlamViO. collected, 
•109:1,10; the balance were either remitted, 
replevied, or sent to jail. arrests for the 
Commonwealth ; 2 V* vegetable stall licences, 
21 wagon and cart.- ; ii drays : 2?  merchants : 
P meat stall; 2H coffee house and tnvern ; 
9 hoarding houses ; T billiard tables ; H  show? 
and exhibition*. Ferry and wharf boat rent, 
1260 00 Citv Hall rent, $128,08. 



pirltes, but no action has yet been brought 
against them. 

Two men wulkiiig-sikmg ill Arkansas Inst 
week, within twenty-five miles of Memphis, 
were followed for three miles hy a catamount. 
Tho beast finally sprang upon one of the men, 
led him shockingly 
before his companion succeeded in despatch 
ing the desperate varmint. I 

Tin; Superior Conn in New York, yester 
day week, granted Mrs. Forrest, the divorced 
wife ofthe tragedian, the alimony *l KI,uO0. 
which she claims t.  have been unpaid for 
a numher of years. 

'I n i. rnilroad bridge nt Omaha having been 
completed, the firs* train that ever crossed the 
Missouri pa^ed over to Town, shore on Thurs- 



C G Cadt, 

DZPOMTIOH OF COL. C. J. THCE. 

Cocxtt or Masov, Statt of Kentucky : 
The deposition of C. J. True, taken on the 
16th day of October, 1867, in the ciry of 
Maysville, in the State above named, in the 
office of the city mayor, before Charles 
Cady, mayor aforesaid, to be read as at*, 
denes in the case in which Samuel McKee 
is contesting before the fortieth Congress of 
the QrrifedStatee the right of Johe D Y^n | 
to seat in snid Congress. 
My Samuel McKee through attorney: 
i). State your name, age. place of resilience, 
and occupation. 

A. C. J True, thirty-one; Maysville, ktm- 
tucky; agent Rureau Refugees, FreeaSni n, 
and Abandoned Lands, fifth distric^ Lexing- 
ton sub-district, Kentucky. 

• Be] whether or not you are acquainted 
with Hon Samuel McKee ami Hon. John D. 
Young, or with either of them: if with but one 
of them, which, and say how long you have 
known both or cither of them. 

A. Am acquainted with both of them; have 
known Samuel McKee between three and four 
years; have been personally acquainted with 
John D. Young since April, 18GT. 

Q. State whether or not you were in this 
Congressional district prior to the said May 
election; if so, in whnt pnr*. of it. and'how re- 
cently before the electiou? Answer this atrta- 
tion fully and at length. 

A I was residing in the tlistrict at the time. 
I left Maysville on or about the 2*th of March, 
isf»7, and visited the counties of Lewis, Green- 
up, Royd, I-rfiwrcnce, Carter, Rowan, Morgan, 
Magoffin, Floyd, Pike, Rath Fleming, and 
.lolmson, nnd was travelling in those counties 
until on or about the 2d daw of May, 18G7. 

Q. State whether or not you bad an oppor- 
tunity, during your travels through the coun- 
ties named, tn ascertain the state of feeling 
in them — whether or not the peoplo were ex- 
ciietl and turbulent: ami if so, you will 
whether or not there was such a state of U 
ing in nil or any of those counties ns permit- 
ted Tree and fair ducu^sion on the part of 
Hon. Samuel McKee and his friends, or 
whether or not both be and bis friend? were 



statements reduced to writing by him in my 
presence, Samuel McKee being present at the 
examination by his attorneys. F. H. Rier- 
bower and T. C. CampbeTT. 

J C. G. CADY, Mayor. 

DEPOKITIOM or THOMAS M. tiltr.F.X. 

The deposition of Thomas M. Green, taken 
before me. presiding judge of the Mason 
county court, and State of Kentucky; taken 
in pursuance of notice hereto attached, at 
the town of Maysville. Mason county. Ken- 
tucky, at the office of .ludge Phister in said 
town, on the 1 4th day of November. A. 1 ». 
1807, to he read as evidence on behalf of 
John D. Youug. in the case of the contest 
of the right of snid Young to a seat in the 
fortieth Congress ol the I'nited State- n a 
member elect from the !* t h district of Ken- 
tucky, by Hon. Sana;,'! M, Ke.e, from said 
district and State, claiming the right to 
said seat in said Congress. 
The deponent, being of lawful age and first 

duly cautioned and sworn, deoaaas as (ah 

lows : 

Ry John D. Young's attorney : 

Q. State whether or not you were ■ candi- 
date for the fortieth Congress in the 9th dis- 
trict of Kentucky, when John D. Young and 
Samuel KcKee were candidates for the same 
office. Did you or not canvass the district 
with said McKee; and if so, how was mid 
canvass conducted, from the time you snot 
him ^McKee) at Grayson, until the and ef the 
canvass? State whether or not there was any 
row raised at West Liberty, Morgan conutv, 
to prevent McKee from speaking, and wheth- 
er or not there were pistol drawn to intim- 
idate McKee ; or whether if he (McKee) did 
have a body guard, it was necessary for his 
safety or protection. Also, give the deport- 
ment and action of McKee, and what he laid 
about Young before he met him at Preston- 
burg; aud please state all that you know in 
reference to the manner in which the canvass 
was conductedthat would be of any interval 
on this occasion. 

A On Thursday, the 2rth day of March 
last. T was nominated by a L'nion conserva- 
tive convention as a candidate for a seat in 
the fortieth C'ongrtis of the United Stati 
from the f*th congressional district of K 
tucky. On the Monday previous to my nora- 1 
ination the Hon. John D. Yonng, after the tie- i 
bate at Flemingsburg, had declined t   accom- 
pany Captain Mchlee any farther daring the 

canvass, but made a li-l of appointments of 
his own. and only afterwards met McKee on 
the stamp nt Prestonburg, Wid ,\v Hatehi 
and Piketoa. I first met Captain Me kee !: , 
debate at Grayson, in Carter county, on Moil 
day, the 1st day of April, and met him in dc- i 
bate at all of his subsequent appointments, 
except that at Uuglan's Mil! I think, in Ruth 
county, in this district— The 0th, until after 
the meeting at Mt. Sterling, in Montgomery 
county, on the Saturday pre\ions to the elec- 
tion, in the debate nt Grayson, and in every}' 
subsequent debate, I stated to the audiences 
that Captain McKee !,..„ promised iu M 0 
ville that he (McKee) would not contest the 
sent of Judge Young", if h 
by a majority of the legal voters of the dis- 
trict, even though that majority was made up 
of rebel soldiers, whom he recognized as be- 
ing legal voters under the laws governing the 
election. Captain MeKee did not contradict 
this statement, either at Grayson or at any 
point. In bis speech at Grayson, and at eve- 
ry dehateJinrll we mat Judge VcmsatlPrcs 



charge af Pre-fou':urg, when it coufd 
tabhsbed if true, or refuted if false, am! 
challenged him to do Wb\ I belieaa this con- 
versation was repeated by Colonel True to 
Captain McKee, and I desired that it shpnl I 
be so repeated. When Captain MoKec . . 
Judge Young be said nothing about tin- afflic- 
tions of his brother-in-law, nothing con ern- 
ing Judge Young having been in Prestonburg 
lor six weeks, nothing concerning his having 
been a candidate- for colonel orf :. rebel r^ r : 
mem 



 nt of the" 
d p«»rs. ' ly ! e construed as 
i 'i M Kee. in the least de- 



al the 



tiience 
banea 



during 
had an 



» B ' ! ! 

on eac 
hity 1 
re-pee 



co denounce and rev: 
itc par!} . Capfain 



nent, ami ii' t one word chat 
ting that Jnd- Vcnhg l.n,| 



At Widow Hatch, r - and el Piketon, Captain 
McKee WM e,|iTnlh' Vilcnt upo:; "ill thene 
points I was the more forcibly struck with 
this fact, because on several occasions Cap- 
tain McKee hail asked !',»r   vtension of time 
in debate, iu order to bring in the matter i f 
the epileptic fits, and because at Prestonburg 
at Wi.b.w Hatcher's, ami at Piketon. then:., 
placi s at vli'.c'i ^ Jhag a-ni "Ie.iv • ..i -i .• 
T entered the canvass, Judge Young boldly 
defied and challenged Captain McKee or any 
one in the tlistrict in name one single act of 
disloyalty uf. which he lYodngl had heed 
guilty. 

I here state upon oath, with a fuM Maee • f 
the importance of telling- tl»  truth, that along 
the whole route, and more parieul.trly at 
Preetoah ig end at Osraaaaville, where Jadgs 
Young lived. 1 made diligent inquiry to 
tain it' Judge Young hadoeen guilty of any 
treasonable act. I interrogated those who 
intended to v,,»e for Captain MeKce. Union 
men who inttuded to vote for me, and rebei 
aoldiera and rebel sympathizers alike. I was 
especially careful to quettion men who had 
been at Prestonburg at the time alluded to 
by Captain McKee. I made these inquiries 
for the purpose of uiing any information I 
might gain against Judge Youug and for my 
own benefit. The result of all my investiga- 
tions was. that i cou'd learn of no act on the 
part of Judge Yoang whicii v.** tre«ouuab!e 
in it." » Ttent or nature, and to my owa ' 
vantage I was compelled la aequic him, 
.Judge Young, of any such act 

As J have before stated. I whs with Captain 
McKee at all of his appointment-, from Gray- 
son to Mt. Sterling, except the one at Ras  
Ian 

hat 



The l 
prev, 

, prev, 

I ensw 
Jade 



•r t 
  "V 



Mills. During all of thi* time i: wouW ! half of Captain McKee. 



d a candidate 
!e the voters of 
McKee did hia 
w which I met 
lore uniformly 
our audiences 
V r " " !1 '-• 1 "a* surprised at 

1 ! 1 and reepeet with which rebel so L 
;n,i symp'irh r, r  !:-:  n. d at the abuse 
and jknunciation of themselves hv Capuin 
MeKee. At no tin   prior to the war could 
any speakrr have denounced hia political 
in Kent ickyas Captain McKee did 
' - then rasa, without being 

hooted and drisen from the -tan I. He not 
l,,, '. v haoel freedom and libertv of 

without molestation 
use ot detraction of his State 
t people. There was n   attempt at 
any place whatever to prevent him from 
speaking, or in any way to interfere with the 
the eaavaaa Captain 'MeKee's 
t : hearing, and language was never mate- 
! '"'rent in neighborhoods where his 
neve in tho majority from what it 
iieal neighborhoods. 

Liberty was not t» 
aking, and did not so 
• l - ply to give an 
eh. by cheering for 
t MeKee's friends 
gave no indications of apprehension, as they 
would have d ine had pistols been drawn upon 
Cap! lin Mi Kee. or had there been any men- 
they qui, r I v kept their seats. 
Colonel Tree was in th  
I not approach Cap 
his 1  ^.tioii in the rear.dui 
I nNsnme that had he 

as being in personal dancer, he would 
have dra .. to his personal and politi- 

cal friend, in order to protect him. After the 
election I met Captain Mcslet in Maravule. 
He to!d me that atter I bad lets him ha had 
had a very fine time He said that while in 
Rowan sod Carter, he had bees informed by 
his friends of e report that thaeaceaanoeists 
at the Cracker's Neck precinct intended to 
prevent him from speaking there; that 
this information he had taken about a   
armed men to thet precinct, ead thoagh 
there were abc.it 160 seceeeiomete to ahoatlO 
I to be had never seen e more peace- 
9 orderly end respectrui eadieaca 

- - re Si ■ *v- .• .u^e j, T h a t *heiH» 
r U' nt, led interference generally p»n» 

— • ii l- f the man whom the 

iterfeapl with, and that 
the otner . • knows _ . .  ut them, 

g State if yon know of any effort oa the 
mny (■ int in the fiistrict 
. my person from speaking in be- 



f the crowd, 
i n MeKee, or leave 
:g the disturbance, 
regarded Captain 



en impossible for any one to threaten, 
molest, or to attempt to intimidate Cap'ain 
McKee without uiy knowledge. I ' • .!. 
Captain MeKee at both of hks appointments 
in Fkijd county, where he sa\ s lie w,, | - 
polled to carry an r.rmed m trd '   protect hi« \ 
life. At neither of tnese p'ac' 
id by a'.u-.'. iiilvrruptcil ii; ui: -;• 
molest, d in any way He was ti"t in danger 
of aimed violence, of any discriptlon. He 
did not ( nter ar go ihrough Floyd cotinty 



A I 
that Hi 



•ii 'in 



rati 



H. lb 



f Ml 



wiiti i.. arm 
violence, nn  
lainD. E. Robert-, comp  
Atiei- ti v i' election, in 
Colonel Cfj, True, I refi 
Kee's stattment thajl h 
panicd to his appointm 

,e elected h * ! '° *' " ^ 

protecting his poison nn, 



escort to protect bim from 
Colonel C True n".d Cap- 



tj thai guard, 
conversation with 
en to Captain Mc- 
he.il ncen necom- 
ts in Floyd county 
:or tho purpose of 



intcricred with 
sonic of them h 
ing ai the place 
him. From aii 
from all partie 



. 1 do not know 
see, canvassed 
n or inferfer- 
• I also know 
one William 

Heerliai 

1 that he tltV  
n i would 

interfe 

;. :nv.' 

to Masoa county to caaaaaa 
id for himself; ha waa aan 
■ y of hi-, appointments 
i not fill becsjase uu arriv- 
re uo evowtb, to bear 
f mation I can Iraru 
• p it t . graphed and 




di 



North eon 
i sre 



tl'air at fiermantown 
slanderous, and msiiciesse 



and if need ' 



deposit, ' 
caption ti 



J °' readin 



fae?- 



lint. In his speech at Grayson, and nt e 
dcbnte'nnrll we mei .1 ftdge Yoara?attPr 
tonburg, Captain McKee told his audiences 

that Judge Yonng had fled to Vermont in , l'"n»^ ' m '' M ' kc ' 



of risking their own lives in his defence. 
t,,!,| c.,!on, l True thai t!; : . was untrue, 
that I would twearHhat it was false. I al 
ga'd to Colonel True that there was no guard 
with McKa-' at these appointments, uelcas it 
was himself and Captain Boberta, Colone 
True, sea ieik that he w«s ,q4 w»lh Captaii 
MeKee ou any sin h business, or for any snel 



tne toi 
t the f 
b ■ 'ins hotl no su 
depositions, or i 
u a*, the ti,m 
caption : •■ als • 
I much of the foi 
statements.   
md hflereay. 





i pnesiiasji 
ai place mentH/n  
to fl - readi 
ng deposition as details 
thers, ia the same ia Ule- 



T. 



lst'.J to avoid being arr' -o 
was prima facie evidence 
Bufllcieut to insure hu 
because, as he said, n 



. wbi 
of 1 



rejectn 

, fnval r 



IU«d 

ilty, 
ess ; 



was 
tion 
bra vi 



:t1»d 



of 



10 : i id len- 
til at no 
. ij ,J in iu 



Judge Jc 
ie tiling 
ey.T. C 
ml did i 



P CaJtracix, 
Hojftttei McKee 
and objects t 
c Kee a i 
was 
: to th* 



(fit u i ri n an . £ tmumsfton Hlfrcljanta 
G. JANUARY * CO., ' 

(SuocwMor* to Jam ast A Hoar..) 

WHOLESALE GROCERS, 

LI Q LOR DEALERS, 
Forwards & 



— AID DIALERS IK- 



d* Produce 

Ml A Ml 1 1 oil 

AM YSYILLE. KY. 

WiaX  IWAI 



N " 



net to 



(T l)ino, (_Mass ano iDuccnsiDarc. 



R. 



StoBcs ani) (Eimoarc. 



.va-fp 



CHINA PALACE I 

The Largest and Cheapest Cash 
House in the West 

Ko. S5, S«   oti.i street. Worth (tide, 

MA YSYILLE, KY 



« two yean, we have 
•«ain at oar old sti 

.\o. 19, Market Mrrrl. 

onitaatlr on hand 

stock of 



IC' «r* we will endeavor to keep e 
a large and well selected 



which we will offer for tasb or in exchange for 
country produce very cheap, or to our old and 
prompt customer? at fair profits   n short 
time. We propone to buy everything but 



Sell Everything but Rifled Whisky! 

AM), WE COME TO STAY! 

_■ _ _ THOMAS A CO. 

, Ky., Feb. 1». 1967. 




SELL SALT, 



|J S. BUNDED WAREHOUSE 
MICHAEL WARTMAN, 

1 Wa_tma_.  



MERCHANT, 

IN V. Water at. * IM X. Delaware Are., 

PHILADELPHIA. 
mall twaaly 

^yjADDUX BROS A CO., 

LKWII M AUDIT. TBOS. A. MATTHEWS, J. W. l.r.VINGfi. 

t«o«. MaDDrx. 0/ MatmvilU, Ky. a. o. mxtos. 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

MAMTACTIREO TOBACCO, 
CIGARS A  ir  TEA, 

Ke. -7 Weal Pearl htreet, 

•aOtwAwSm CINCINNATI. OIIIO. 

QROCERIKS AND LIQUORS. 

W. L PEARCE, 

W r holefsale Grocer 

(COMMISSION MERCHANT, 

MA YSYILLE. KY. 



The undersigned begs leave to inform hit friends 
and customers that he hh-   n hand oneof the largest 
and finest stocks ever imported in this section, com- 
prising 

CHINA. GLASS and QUEENSW ARE, 

LOOKING GLASSES, 

FANCY and HOUSE FURNISHING G00DS.C3 

My new stock having been imported at very low 
fold rates, enables me to 

Undersell Considerably all Cincinnati 



will 



FIVE TO TEX PER CEM. 



JJKW STOVE AND TIN STORE 
HUGH JPO WER, 

[Successor to Power k Spalding, ] 
SECOND ST.. SOUTH SIDE. MA YSYILLE. 



Would respectfully call the attention of the public 
to the variety and styles of stoves which he now 
offers for gale, in this market, of the most modern 
improvement, for wood or coal, combining all the 
qualities, making them first class stores, in beauty 
of design, economy of fuel, and quickness of opera- 
tion. 

These stores, which comprise a great variety in 
design, sice and price, have been selected from the 
best store markets in 
the highest recommei 
the public. 



Dooks nnii Stationeri). 



C. ''• 



STANTON A- co.'s 



HOLIDAY LIST 1 



i e trs n \ r o y m^^wVn r t r 8 a oi 



By learning my rrices before purchasing elsewhc 
Perfect satisfaction given, or the good* 
taken back and the money refunded 

TERMS CASH 



R. ALBERT'S 



great dipot or 



HIS FINE PARLOR AND JAMB OR A TES 

Have been selected with great care, and for variety, 
neatness of design and fineness of finish, cannot be 



surpassed. 

I also hare a fine ass 
ware, toilet setts, brass 
Ac. 

I will manufacture an 
good assortment of 



of fancy Japanned 
cre&iu frccxers, __.,c 

onstantlyon hand a 



TIN WARE. 

trade 



And am prepared to offer to 
ments as cannot fail to be si 
attention paid to 

GUUerm *'l'outing, 

General job-work. 
•** All work done by me warranted to gire satis- 
*tion. The highest price paid for old copper' 
HUGH POWER. 



, and 

General job 



faction 

brass and iron 
selfi I 



N. 



COOPER, 

WHOLESALE DKALF.B IK 



TINWARE, STOVES. ORATES. STONE- 
WARE and FRUIT JARS. 

TIN ROOFER, 

and agent for J. L. Haven A Co. 's 

CELEBRATED SORGHUM MILLS 
bissett~a~cooper. 

Steam Fitters and Plumbers, and Dealers 
in Wrought Iron Pipe, arc. 

selO wjrtw y 



Solid Silver, Silver-plated, Albata and 
Britannia Ware. 



A splendid assortment of castors, pitchers, coffee and 
teapots, sugar bowls, cream pi tr here, molasses 
cans, spittoons, mugs, cr.ndlesticks, 
sroocf, forks, knires, lad!«a, 
tea sets, communion 

sets, ice pitch- 
ers, cake, bread and 
caret baskets. 

300 Coal Oil Lamps and Chandeliers, 

or churches, parlors, bedrooms, hall and kitchens 
Chimneys, globes, paper shades, wicks, 
burners, ana pure coal oil. 

100 Pair Flower Vases, 

all styles, from thirty eentc to seventy-fire dollars k 
pair. Tea trays and waiters, all styles, sixes and 
qualities: Japanned tin and toilet sets, plain and 
ornamented: table cutlery, knives and forks; 
silver-plated and steel blades, carvers, 
steels, etc., with silver, ebony, bone, 
Indiarubber and wood handles, 
all at the 

LOWEST CINCINNATI PRICES, FOR 
CASH! 

R.ALBERT'S 



Carriages. 



1 am cow receiving from New York and othei 
aa^tern port*, the following supply of fresh 

FAMILY GROCERIES, 

purchased at the lowest net cash price, and now 
uflW to merchar.tr- and customers at 

CINCINNA TI O UO TA TI ONS. 
Rio, Java and Laguarra coffee, 
i'ru«bed. granulated and coffee A sugar, Lcvering's, 
Choice N. O. and Island sugar, 
Baltimore sirups, in bbls, half bbls and kegs, 
New &sb. in tbls, half bblj and kits, 
Cboice green and black teas, 
Washboard.-, brooms, bucket*, tubs 
Fancy toilet and bar soaps. 
Star and tallow candles, shot, 
Wrapping paper, writing paper, envelopes. 
New Castle soda, indigo, madder, alum, salt, 
Hard pressed and fine cut chewing I 
Smoking tobacco, cigars, blackin 
Core oysters, spieer, matches. 



HOUSE 

FURNISHING 

CARPETS 



CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY! 
Having purchased Mr. Allen's interest in the 
stock and material of the Carriage Manufactory of 

BIERBOWER  fc ALLEN, 

I will continue the business at the 

OLD STAND, 

Where I am prepared to manufacture to order, and 
for sale, all kinds of Carriages and Buggies. 

REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE, 
$W And at Reasonable Priet*. -%*t 



jan31 tw*w 



GIFT BOOKS. 
WR11INGDK-K8. 
PORTFOLIOS. CHESS 
BOARDS. WAGONS. CARTS. 
WHEELBARROWS, 
TOYS, BASKETS, 
CIGAR STANDS, 
PATENT Air 

B U M S , 
TRAVELLING COMPANIONS 

ALPHABET BLOCKS, 
TOY GAMES, 
PICTURES, 
VIOLINS, 

CHILDREN S CARRI- 
AGES, 

POCKET 
BOOKS. 
SLEDS, 

PERFUMERY 

CARVED BRACKETS, 
WORK BOXES, 

JUVENILES, 

TOY BOOKS, 
_c. 4o. Ac. 
C. L. STANTON & CO. 

dec21twaw 




Setuing, ftlacljines. 



QHRTSTMAS GI FTS ' 



FLORENCE 



SEWING MACHINES 



WITH COVER. HEMMER. FELLER. TUCKER. 
CORDER. BRAIDER Ac. 

FOR 

Sixty-Five Dollar*! 



Suitable fur all grades of Work. 
BEST AND CHEAPEST 

MACHINE IN THE MARKET. 

f}^gsk^wsLm^ m ***** 

EXPOSITION U N I V ERSELL E 

PARIS. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE 

NEW YORK. 

NEW ENGLAND AGRICULTURAL FAIR 
AT PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

NEW YORK STATE PAIR 

AT BUFFALO. 

MECHANICS ASSOCIATION 

AT LOWELL. MASS. 

MARYLAND INSTITUTE 

AT BALTIMORE. 



Watdjes, Jerutlrti, Ut. 



SPLENDID STOCK 

JEWELRY, 



JUST RECEIVED 



H. TV. MEYH1H . 

Second street, 

MAYSVILLE. KY. 

I am now able to offer to the public, at the lowest 
prices, the handsomest stock of goods in my line 
ever brought to this city. It consists of 

Tlie I^iiiesst .Te\veh\v 

of all kinds and descriptions, including GOLD 
RINGS of the purest meal. BREASTPINS. 
NECKLACKS. BRACELETS, and every 
ornament known to tbo trade, plain and 
IN FRECIUUS STONE . 

Gold and Silver Watches, 

of the best make and finest material. Among the 
watches are some of the handsomest and best of the 

AMERICAN LEVER, 

universally admitted to be the best wa. h that is 



Dm (£ootj5. 



W FALL & WINTER GOODS 

D. D. DUTY, J BAR.NE*. O. T AME. 

r . r . duty & co. 

We are pleased to announce to our patrons sad 
the publie generally, that we have just received 
direct from New York, the best and eheapest 



H 



OLIDAY PRESENTS! 



R. C. BIERBOWER, 

Maysrille. Ky. 



Drr. (8 ooos. 



J^EW FALL GOODS! 

GEORGE COX  Sc SON, 



call the attention of purchasers to their fall impor- 

ation of 

Fancy and Domestic Dry Goods, 

S-v s\ /^r-\i*N I • comprising all the leading style of ladies' dress 
VJIVJvJUo ■ i sTooas and good? for men's wear, with a full stock of 
notions, glores, hosiery, «tc. Also a good stock of 
CAKPrlTINGS, FLOOR  fc TABLE OILCLOTHS, 
MATTINGS, and all other HOUSEKEEPING 
' DS, at lowest market rates. 

V. ial twawlr 



Bitisseh, three-ply, twchply, hemp stair carpets 
carpet lining, floor, xtair and table 
oilcloths, mattings, rugs, door 



WINDOW SHADES and FIXTURES. 



KaiMDS. nffs.almondseard.nec. 



I offer V, tbe 



Hemp andjutetwine- 
Rice, starch, Ac. 

also a large variety of 



LIQUORS. 



including choice old Bourb«n, in bbls and bottles, 
fine French brandy, champagne wine, 
ginger wine, natire wine and 

RECTIFIED WHISKY. 

I am prepared to receive all kinds of storage on 
the most reasonable terms. My personal attention 
will be given to tbe sale and shipment of all goods 
consigned to my eare. 

All orders sent me shall be filled in the same man- 
ner with reference to quantity, quality and price as 
if (be jsartisa purchasing were personally present. 

mr I re«f «ctfall  solicit tbe orders of the trade 
generally, promising t-atisfaction in all cases. 

marliU W. L. PEAMCK. 



GILT CORNICE8. 

TABLE AND PIANO COVERS. 
BEDSPREADS, 
TOWELS AND NAPKINS, 
CrRTAIN PINS AND HOLDERS. 

tof 

Wall Paper 

VERY CHEAP FOR CASH. 

Wilson and 



vtailoruiQ. 



|^EW FALL GOODS. 

LOUIS STINE. JERRY F. YOUNG. 

MERCHANT TAILORS 

ASD 

GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHERS, 



JAMES SMITH 



would call the attention of buyers to his large and 
varied stock of books and fancy articles, consisting 
in part of 



WRITING DESKS. 
PORTFOLI 
CHT 



OS. ALBUMS. 
~ i AND CHECKERS. 

AC KG AM M »N BOARD?. 

POCKET BOOKS 



This succession of triumphs should be sufficient to 

of f 
nll 



ry un£remdiced^er. i  on of the great su 



periority of the 
sewing machines. A few 



MACHINES TO LEASE 
The rent to be 



JOHN A. SEAT0N. Aoi  t, 
s*«H 4»ntl and 



R 



J\geiuiea. 

EAD AND SAVE MONEY ! 



MERCANTILE AGENCY ! 



• at large, that I from this 



POCKET, FAMILY AND PULPIT BIBLES. 
ILLUSTRATED GIFT ROOKS, 

AMERICAN & FOREIGN. 

TOY BOOKS AND JUVENILE8. 

OF THE LitrST ISSfK ! 

STANDARD AND MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS. 

JAMES SMITH. 
BOOKSELLER d STA TI ONER. 



Kscond Hlreel. 

decl4tw kw 



yayavllle, Ky. 



MAYSVILLE.KY.. 

Respectfully inform tbe public that they have just 
received a large and well selected stock of Fall 




MACHINE NEEDLES ALWAYS ON HAND 
R- ALBERT'S New China Palace. 



Pi 

O I. 1  



GRAYS 

STA N 1  



R. ALBERT. 

PIANO DEALER 

MA YSYILLE. KENTUCKY. 



goods, comprising everything pertaining to a get 
man's outfit, whicih they are prepared to dis 
of at the lowest rate for cash. They solicit a 
from their friends, and pledge their be^t efforts t* 
FT" 



give satisfaction 



ntle 
is pose 
call 



5 TIN E A YOUNG. 



Insurance. 



MAYSVILLE. KY. 

JUST RECEIVED: 

10 hbds choioe 1 
• " Porto 



• bis crushed sugar: 
granulated -ui 



do 
do 
do 



80 " 

14 " "B" 
U " extra "C" 
Just rece.vec 
\i bbU Bait, golden simp: 
» half bbls Balt.do do 
M kegs do do do 
H " Boston do 

B U,1 bots t cider* 
bbU extra i 



J ast reoeived 
Ml 



Louisville 
J ast received a lai 
This is a very darirs 
sh-ri pr. 6- I 



1 Bourbon wh ! sky. 
d will be sol ' at a 



rived 
ock of i 



MM 

keg- pure English soda. 



My ock or groceries and liquors is now complete 
and I would solicit a continuance of the patronage 
naraiofore so liberally extended to the house. 



Maysrille. September 12. IBM. 



E.GRAY, 
ial Iv 



STEIN WAY k SONS'. CHAS. M. STIEFP'o. 
GROVEN^TEEN k c6.. and other makes of 

Reduction of $25 to $100 

Off Cincinnati prices. 

Full seven-octave Pianos, in fine rosewood case* 
overstrung scale guaranteed at WOO 1325. f.ToO, 1375. 

Extra large, fine square grand Pianos, at from 
M00tot750. 



Pianos for sale, rent, and taken in ex- 
change. All piano rents 



Invariably 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE 



Do not buy third and fourth rate Pianos, at high 
prices, from irresponsible persons, if you can get a 
good instrument, fully warranted, for less money. 



WAREROOM 

AT TH  

CHINA PALACE. 

iallv SrrOKfi STRP.K" 



PATRONIZE HOME INSTITtT. 
TIONS ! 



S01THERX MITIAL 

LIFE INSURANCE 

C O M I 3 A N Y 

i 

KENT IT O K Y . 

OFFICE : XEBCHAXTS BAXg btii.divo. 

Main Street, between Fifth and Sixth 
LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY. 

i 

ACCUMULATED CAPITAL 

OFFICERS : 



J. L. Smith 

J H. Lindtnharger. 

L. T. Tbustin 

('. S. Tucker. 



PretiJent. 

. Vif* President. 

Secretary. 

Tr€0§VT€ I'. 



JAMES SMITH, 



Bookseller and 



offers a complete 
MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS. 



t of all SCHOOL and 
STAT 



embracing staple and fancy WRITING PAPERS! 

ENVELOPES, 

a fine assortment both white and colored. GOLD 
S, all popular brands. A com- 



WALL PAPERS. 

Inks, pencils, slates, portfolios, bibles, testaments' 
pocket books, morocco satchels, willow baskets, 
oval frames, molding, inkstands, momorandums, 
portmoaias, Ac, Ac. 

.LdilL&S SMITH. 
successor to G. W. Blatterman. 

May.ville. E£&3*tf W ^"SalVy 



THE PEOPLE'S AGE1T 

for the purchase and sale of the cheapest goods, 
ever obtained in thin market. All you have to do 
to save money, is to find out the 

The Lowest Market Price 

of the goods you need, and I will funish them to you 

STILL LOWER! 

This rule will FROM THIS DAY. be adopted for 
GOODS 



The very flne.n 

Pebble and Pareoscopic Glasses, 

IN OOLD. SILVBR AND STEEL FRAMES 

FRENCH CLOCKS, 

running three weeks ; and 

AMERICAN CLOCKS, 

running from thirty hours to eight days ; all at very 
LOW PRICES. 
A full assortment of 

SOLID SILVER W ARE, 

which I will guarantee to be the genuine fine silver 
coin, with my name stamped on each ar'.lo'.e. Any 
article of silver ware made to order at strictly Cin- 
cinnati prices. 

the only agent in this city fog tho  -elel*nted 



STOCK OF GOODS 

that we have ever offered in this market. Also, that 

we have associated with us, as a partner in oar 

business. 

MR. D. S. LANE, 

late of Fiemingsburg. Ky. Under the new arrarga- 
ment we hare increased capital, and improved fa«fl- 
itK-s lor doing business in every way. eonsequn'ly 
nope.not only to reiliie a contiuuanreofthepwtroa- 
age already so kii.dly extended to us. but to la- 
the amount of our sale. We invite the atten- 
o tn whul-sal* and retail buyers to ow^tock 
D. D. DUTY Jro.. 



tion of 
Maysville.Nov.6. a 



lamtl 
genuine 



SILVER PLATED WARE, 



CASTORS. 

FRUIT BASKETS, 

CARD RECEIVERS. 

BUTTER DISHES. 

GOBLETS AND CUPS, 
TABLE. DESSERT AND TEA SPOONS ; 
entire sets of ICE PITCHERS. WAITERS and 
GOBLETS to match. 

MEDALLION TEA SETS, 

six pieces in all. All of which I will sell at prices 
TWENTY PER CENT. LESS than they ran be 
had at any other house in this city. 



DRESS (iOODS IN GREAT VARI- 
ETY. From a bit calico to a handsosaa 

SILK. OR POPLIN. 

including intermediate prices, styles, and qualitia* 

of nice 

PRESS G OODS. 

All at the lowest prices. Be sure and see tbam before 
J"« buy. ; D. D. DUTY k CO. 



PALL AND WINTER SHAWLS 

The largest retail lot in the city purckas. 

THE DECLINE, 

and »clling very cheap, at 

D. D. DUTY k CO. 



Q.ENTLEMEN, IN NEED OF 

CLOTHS, 



ov 



NOTICE. 

I have formtd a connection with 

MONS. ALEXIS BARRELET. 

an excellent watchmaker and repairer, direct from 
Switterland, in which country he has had twenty 
years experience in the best manufactories. He is 
confident of pleasing any one who desires a NEW 
WATCH made to order, or an old one repaired. 1 
am certain that he i.s the best mechanic in his line 
who bus ever been in Maysviile. Those who have 
valuable watches needing repair will find it to their 
interest to give him a call. 

S. N. MEYER. 
oct30twaw3m Second st. 



ATINti. 

VESTING 

— AND ALL— 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

in their lines, might do themselves a favor by 
our goods, before they buy. 

D. D. DUTY * CO. 



JJOSIERY AND GLOVES 

THE LARGEST, CHEAPEST AND BEST 



FOR MEN. WOMEN AND CHILDREN. 

including GENTS' KIDS, in blaek. white and col- 
ored, of Superior quality. D. D. DUTY k Co. 



except : Dress Goods, Boots, Furniture, Sto 
and Tinware. Hardware. Rooks, in which I do 
deal. 



n..t 



SAVE YOUR MO N E Y 

by reporting before you purchase, at 



GENERAL AGENCY. 



—AT THt— 



tftyno, tfMass anD tihutnnMrf. 



Q A. & J. E. M CARTHEY, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

CHINA, 
GLASS, 

AXD 

QUE ENS  V ARE, 

WINDOW GLASS, 
Looking Glasses, «&c. 



j^ADIEs* AND GENTLEMEN'S 
UNDERSHIRTS AND DRAWERS 

A nice line of different grades, some very cheap, at 
D. D. DUTY k CO.'S. 



QLOV.KING CLOTHS. 

If you want to see the 

PRETTIEST AND CHEAP 

in town. Call at 



D. D. DUTY k CO. 



Pruus, ilUoiuiics, $Cl. 



MAYSVILLE.KY. 



Having recently reoeived a large stock of English 
and French china ware, we again invite the public 
to call and make their 

Our new ware is of 



CHINA PALACE 
decl7tw*w3m No. 36. 2d street. 



C ottls. 



M E ^ TS fflfco B House. 

GALLEHEK, NELSON k Co., 

PROPRIETORS, 
Firm atrc^t.i 



CINCINNATI. OHIO. 



This house having been thoroughly repnired, reno- 
vated and newlv furnished, is now open. jal ly 



fiariJtoare. 

rpo MERCHANTS AND CONSUM- 

X ERS. 

HARDWARE, 

CUTLERY, 

SADDLERY, 

DOUBLE AND SINGLE SHOT SUM 
AMMUNITION, (all kinds.) 

Hi lies and Pistols. 



'::^»ar. at aas*ksjl)su * A — XXI a  u rasv* t 
Our stock of 

COACH TRIMMINGS, COACH WOOD- 
WORK. SPRINGS AND AXLES, 
AND SADDLERY, 

Is now full an J complete. Wo invite aay persons 
wanting any goods in the abore lines to give us a 
call and examine goods and prices. We are deter- 
mined to sell goods as lew as any house in the West. 

OWENS A BARKLEY. 

TERMS CASH. ______ 



OUR 0 WN IMPORTA TION. 

selected with (Treat care for this trade, an 
dedly the handsomest and cheanest stock 
ever opened in this market, consisting of 

OOLD BAND DINNER SETTS, 



FANCY and OOLD BAND TEA SETTS. 
PLAIN WARE. EVERY DESVRIPTl 



ON 



JfRESH IMPORTATIONS. 



FALL TRADE, 



J. J. 



SILVER PLATED WARE, 

TEA TRA YS. 

and a variety of other articles, bothuseful and or- i 
uamental, all ef which we are now selling at much 

THE LOW RATES OF OOLD. 

While extending thanks for the past, we also ask 
the future patronage of all wanting China. Glass 

and Queensware. . _ _ 

 }. A. A J. E. M. CARTHKV. 

Mavsville. Kv.. Mav A 18Grt. ial ly 



■ IIOL ESA LE D R r G G IS 1 . 



 &rocerp anb Commission filcrrljants 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

J. L. Smith. .1. H. Linderberger, 

W. F. Barrett, Jno. B. Smith. 



by 

GILL A DUKE. 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, 
der27wAtw: m MAYSVILLE. KY. 



Commission jUerTluints. 



(J 



UARLES PHISTER 



jyjQNEY CHEAP AS DIRT! 

Wo will make 
LIBERAL CASH ADVANCES ON 
TOBACCO AND OTHER PRODCCR. 

, or to i 




rjioYS : toy 



WHOLESALE 4 RETAIL E 

#2,000 Worth Of 

BEAUTIFUL TOYS k FANCY GOODS ! 

VERY CHEAP AT 

R. ALBERT'S 
China Palaoa. 30 2nd. Street. 



Agent for Sale of Lumber 
and Coal. 



Offers for sale at lowest cash rates, a choioe lot ol 

Lumber & CJoal, 

SHAVED PINE d SAWED SHINGLES, 
SB A VEDFOPULARd- CHE&NUT SHINGLES. 

— ALSO — 

LATH, SASH, k DRESSED FLOORING. 
0A«s and yard on Third street , near the Court 
House. 



rjlERMS CASH ! 



FIRST OF THE SEASON. 
NEW ORLEANS SUGAR! 

HSdSr-nSl^sw" 1 * * Dd ua,f b * rrc,8  crU8hcd 

NEW ORLEANS MOLASSES, 

Sirup. 
Coffee. 

Gunpowder, 

Cigars 



r ° U C.°ndles. 



Soap 

P ' P Ae. Ac. 

WOOD k WILLOW WARE 

FINE OLD BOURBON WHISKY, 

Gin. Wines, and Brandies, which we will sell any 
ill exchange for Meal, 
leys, Lard, Raoon. Flax- 
d Salt always on hand j. 



way to suit pu 
Butter. Eggs. Chi 
seed and Feathers. 



W. J. ROSS k CO. 
( or. Harket and Third Street, 

dec!7tw*w. MAYSVILLE. K .'. 



M 



A YSYILLE MARBLE WORKS. 



H. GIL MORE, 

Market atreel. 

MAYSVILLE, KENTUCKY. 
Ordtrs from the country solicited. Persons desir- 
ing work, by communicating the same, will he 
_m_._ii» waited unon. . . x»A 1" h 



rpo MERCHANTS. 

BOOTS, SHOES, AND HATS, 

(Direct from the Factories.) 
We have just been receiving the 
LARGEST STOCK 



of Boots. Shoes and Hats, ever before in this 
ket. All our «oods are from the \ ERY B 
NEW ENGLAND FACTORIES. 



Coburn A C Is H ui - best Boots. 
Allen A Flogg/s Boots A Brogans. 
Batchelder's Boots and Brogans. 

s K n w_^ 

' Francis Dane's celebrated Women's and Chil- 
dren's Shoes and Brogans. 

Biyd * Cony's celebrated Women's and Chil- 
dren's Shoes. 

John Hart A Co.V celebrated Women's and Chil- 
dren's Shoes. 

•hoes. 

lints. 

Our Hat stock is large, comprising Fur, Brush, 
and Men's and Boys' Wool Hats, made fo order. 

OWENS A BARKLEY. 
TERMS CASH. noii 



QOOD NlWfi 

FOR EVERYBODY- 

50 FEB GENT, s\YKi  

» * ——AT— , 

The It* Cheap ChlHa Store! 

S. IV. MEYE J_t, 



At bis old stand. Second »t. 



FANCY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 

Corner Market and Front nreots. 
MAYSVILLE. KT. 

CINCINNATI PR ICR* 

(Le-s freight and drajaae.) allowed for 

" ' ***** 



COUNTRY 



+ W iatm 



^y-HERE IS 

THEODORE GAEBKE ! 

Said Theodora Gaebke left his family without 
provocation, in Mayslick. Mason county, Ky.. in 
I8B1, and then no doubt joined the army, since then 
nothing has been heard from him. The undersign 
ed requests any person who may be acquainted with 
the whereabouts of the said Gaebke, either dead or 
alive, to inform her of sueh facts. Should these 
lines meet the eye of said Gaebke. he will take 
i. tice, that unless he communicates with his family 
in the course of four weeks, the undorsigned wiU 
take legal steps to obtain a dtvorc 



orce. 

MARIA GAEBKE. 
Mayslick, Mason co.. kl 



that I 

have just received and i 

A SPLENDID STOCK OF 

qufi:ns\vai;i:. c iiixa. 

(ilassware, 

FANCY TOILET SETTS, MOTTO MUGS, 
CHINA TOY SBfTS, MIRRORS. 

e *~« ~W ft 

COAL OIL LAMPS AND CHIMNEYS, 

and of every other article usually fuund in a first 
class establishment of this branch »ff trade. Having 
formed a connection with one of the largest houses 
in the West, who make their purchases at rates from 
2o to M per cent, les* than they can be bought by 
small houses, I am enabled to offer all good* in my 

unrn aite t 



THE TRADE OF COUNTRY MERCHANTS 13 
PARTICULARLY SOLICITED. 

AND TO ALL WHOLESALE BUYERS. 

I will sell goods, in Maysviile, 

AT CINCINNATI JOBBING PRICES 

S. N. MEYER. 

Second street. 
Next door to S. S. Mine, 's Shoe Store. 
deel7 w*twly. 



A* J. J. W uu D. 

U L H E COPPER ^Jki'lULLED 

BOURBON WHISKY! 

rot MM at 

• t 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

IN OR OUT OF BOND-BY 

J. j. wood. r r, „•„- ,-. 
rjHTTHE PUBLIC! -FOR ECON- 

A i. my. durability and perfectness of color, 

USE THE ROCK PAINT. 



Call at my Drug Store and see 
-»hule«ale at 



For 



MANUFACTURERS PRICES ! 

with freight added to Maysviile and at retail witk 
a small adiaaoe. J. J. WOOD. 



INDOWGLASSAGLJ S iWARJi 
Success, 

Per the above named steamboit I hMfc. 
ceived a large supply of Window 
ware direct from Pitubugh. 

bv. 

££ w*tw y 




14 



OOK AND JOB PRINTING 

NEATLY EXECUTED 

AT THE M A Y \ iI.T.E RAGLE OFICE. 



T 



URN IP SEED! 

LANDRETH'S Turnip Seed for sate by tA* 
" WOOD. 



pound, ounce. »r paper 
il23 



J. J. 



WANTED ! MUSTARD SEED! 
^ The highest phae ^paul i^Caaii, or Trade by 



OR FANCY JOB PRINTING 



.1 



OB PRINTING 



IN THE HIGHEST STYLE OF THR ART, 
Attn* MAiSYLLLK £A JLSo£m. 



The Weekly Maysville eagle, 1868-01-08

4 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt7xpn8xd21s
 Local Identifier: wme1868010801
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Location
  Published in Maysville, Kentucky by Thomas B. Stevenson & Co.
   Mason County (The Bluegrass Region)