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THE FRANKFORT COMMONWEALTH. 



A. G. HODGES 



VOL. IS 



FRANKFORT, KENTUCKY, DECEMBER 2(i. 1 8 6 5. 



PROPRIETOR. 



NO- 51 



THE SEMI-WEEKLY COMMONWEALTH 

will bo imbliMhcd every T uesday and Fri- 
day, by 

a. HODaKS, 

At FOUR DOLLARS PER ANNUM, payable 
in advance. 

Our lernijJ for advertising in the Semi*Weekly 
Commonwealth, will be as libaral as in any of the 
newspapers published in the west. 



STATEMENT 

or TUB 

ST'. LUEIS MITUALLIFF. 

mSURANCK COMPANY, 

the let day of ^uijutiry, 1»66, madtt to the Audi- 
tor of the State of Kentucky, in compliance with 
an act, entitled An act to reyul^e Agrnciee oj 
Foreiyn Ineurance CompaH%r»f* approved 3d 
March, 1856. 

First. The name of this Company iff the *^ST. 
LOUIS MUTUAL LIFB INSURANCE COM- 
FANV,” and is located in the city of St. Louis, 
county of St. Louis, State of Missouri. 

Second. The amount of capital stock 

$ IU0,UU0 00 

The nmo ^nt of capital stock paid up 

ig 70,000 00 



ASSETS. 

Third, Loans secured by deed of 
trust, first lien of record, on real 
estate in the city and county of St. 

Louis, per schedule 

Stock Bonds, sixty days demand, se^ 
cured by deed of trust on real es- 



MISCELLANY. 



Loans on policies in feree, bearing 

SIX per cent, interest 

Loans on undoubted personal secu- 
rity, due within sixty days..... 

Stock bonds subject to call at sixty 
days notice, approved personal se- 
curity 

Premiums due on Policies in bands 
of Agents and others awaiting re- 
turns. • 

Amounts due frem Agents not in- 
cluded in above • 

Cash on deposite in Banks anci in 

Office 

Office furniture, iron safe, Ac., (home 

offices and agencies 

Missouri defence warrants 

Revenue stamps 

Total amount of all assets of tbe- 



18V 


045 


15 


11 


lUO 


00 


299 


145 


15 


174 


830 


21 


« 


425 


99 


19 


900 


ou 


17 


,95. 


49 


1 


,004 


45 


5 


,098 


46 


1 


,914 


U9 




411 


06 




15 


90 



Company, except future premiums 
receivable ^ 430, d90 36 



LIABILITIES. 

Dividends to bo redeemed this year, 

oradded to policies 4,425 80 

Present value ef dividends to be re- 
deemed in 1, 2, 3 and 4 years, or 

added te policies 59,012 85 

Unmatared interest en bonds and 
netes due the Company to reduce 
them to present value 40,412 85 

Claims on two policies resisted by the 

Company, because of violation and 
forfeiture $7 ,000. 

No other claims or liabilities, except 
the liability on policies in force, 

Insuring in the aggregate $3,357,- 
900 00. 

STATE OF MISSOURI, 1 ^ 

CiTT AND County or Sr. Louis. ) 
Samuel Willi, President, and William T. Selby, 
Secretary of the St. Louis .Mutual Life Insurance 
Company, being severally sworn, depose and say, 
and each for himself says, that the foregoing is a 
full, true, and correct statement of the affairs of 
the said Company — that the said Insurance Com 

t any is the bona /ic/eownor of at least ONE liUN- 
iRED AND FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS 
ot actual Cash Capital invested as before stated, 
of which the principal portion of that invested 
in real estate security, is upon unincumbered 
property in the city and county of St. Louis, worth 
double the amount of said principal loans, and 
that the above described inveslmenU, nor any 
part thereof, are made for the benefit ot any In 
dividual exorcising authority in the management 
of the said Company, nor for any other person or 
persons whatever; and that they are the above 
described officers of said St. Louis Mutual Life 
[nsuranceCompany . 

(Si^Yod) SAMUEL WILLI, f^reetdent. 
(Signed) Wm. T. Shi.bY, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me the undersign- 
ed Recorder of Deeds for St. Louis ceunty.— In 
testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand 
and affixed my official seal this ttxiA day of March, 
Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-Five. 

(Signed) A. C. BERNONDY, tlerorder. 

AUDITOR'S OFFICE, » 

Frankfort, May 21, 1866. | 
THIS IS TO CERTIFY, That Albert G 
lioDOES, as Agent of the St. Louis Mutal Life 
Insurance Company of St. Louis, .Mo., at Frank 
fort, Franklin county, has filed in this office the 
statements and exhibits required by the provis- 
iuns of an act, entitled *^An act to regulate 
Agencies of Foreign Insurance Companies,'* ap- 
provod March 3, 1856; and it having been sbown 
to the satisfaction of the underrigned that said 
Company is possessed of an actual capital ef at 
least one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, as 
required by said act, the said Albert G. Hodges 
as Agent as aforesaid, is hereby licensed and per 
milted to take risks and transact business of in 
surance at his office in Frankfort, for the term of 
one year from the date hereof. But this license 
may bo revoked if U shall be made to appear to 
the undersigned that since the filing of the stHte- 
ments above referred to, the available capital of 
said Company has been reduced below one han 
dred and fifty thousand dollars. 

In testimony whereof, I have set my hand the 
day and year above written. 

W. T. SAMUKL8 And%ui 

RUka iHkrii :iiid Policie^^ itsued pioiiipt- 
ly by A.4i. 3IOIK4RS, Ag**ni 

Frankfort Ky., April 25, 1865— sw— .32V. 



THE NIGHT AFTER CHRISTMAS. 

The lollowing iff an amusement parody 
upon Clement Moore'a unequalled “*Xiglit 
before Clirisimaa ” 

'Twas the night afterCbristmas, when all through 
the bouse, 

Every soul was abed, ami as still as a mouse. 
Those stockings so lately St. Nicholas* care, 

Were emptied of all that was eatable there, 

The Daslingi bad duly been tucked in their bods-- 
With very full stouiacbs and pain in their beads. 

I was doting away in my new rotten cap, 

And Nancy was rather fur gono in a nap, 

When out in the Nurs'ry arose such a clatter, 

I sprang from my sleep — crying — ^*M'hat ii the 
matter?*' 

I dew to each bedside — still half in a dote, 

Toro open the curtains and threw off tho clothes. 
While tho light of the taper served clearly to 
show 

The piteous plight of those objects below, 

For what to the fond father’s eyes should appear. 
But the little pale face of each sick littlu doar, 

For each pet that had crammed itself full as a 
tick , 

I knew in a luoiuont now fult like old Nick. 

Their pulses were rapid, their breathing the same, 
What their stomachs rejecte l I’ll mention by 
name — 

Now Turkey, now ^stuffing, Flum Pudding of 
course. 

And Custards, and Crullers, and Cranberry sauce, 
Beforo outraged nature, all wont to the wall. 
Yes-- Lollypops, Flapdoddle, Dinner, and all. 

Like pellets, which urchins from pop-guns lot fly, 
Whet figs, nuts, and raisins, jam, jelly, and pie, 
‘Till each error of diet was brought to my view, 
To the shame of .Mama and of Santa Claus too. 

I turned from the sight, to my bed-room stepped 
back, 

And brought out a phial marked‘*Pulv. Ipecac,** 
When my Nancy exclaimed — for their sufl'erings 
shocked her — 

Don’t you think you had bettor, love, run for the 
Doctor? 

1 ran— and was scarcely back under my roof, 
When I heard the sharp clatter of eld Jalap’s 
hoof, 

1 might say that 1 hardly had turned myself 
round, 

When the Doctor came into the niom with 
bound. 

He was covered with mud from his bead to bis 
foot. 

And tho suit ho had on was his very worst suit; 
He had hardly had time to put that on his back, 
And he looked like a Falstaff half fuddled with 
sack . 

Uii eyes how they twinkled! Had tho Doctor got 
merry? 

His cheeks looked like Port and bis breath smelt 
of Sherry, 

He hadn’t been shaved for a fortnight or so. 

And the beard on bis chin wasn’t white as the 
snow . 



IMIO K m;ESAB‘il\ . 

% I R.S. O’Douoghue, widow of the late James 
^ Y I O’Dnnoghue, Piotographio Artist, begs to 
inform the citizens of Frankfort and vicinity that 
tho business herctof««ro carried on by her latahus 
band will be conlinucvl under the management 
of first class operators. 

The very liberal patronago beiiowni upon Mr. 
O'Donoghne up to the time ef his decease, she 
l^opes still to receive and to merit which will be 
her oonstanl ondeavnr. 

N. B. Mr, David C. Rowland is authorizud to 
collect all accounts due the late Mr. O’Donoghne 
Nov. 3, 1865-tf. 



Fair Warning! 

.\ll porsons owning or having dogs in their pos 
•lession are hereby notified to keep them confined 
upon their premises for sixty days from this date, 
under penalty ef twenty dollars fine and the loss 
o( the animal found riinniq* at large. 

July 11— 2m. G. W. GWIN, May.or 



Bui inspecting their tongues in despite of their 
teeth; 

And drewing bis watch from his waistcoat bo- 
neath— 

He felt of each pulse — saying — “each little belly 
Must get rid**~-bere ho laughed — “of the rest of 
that jelly.*' 

gazed on each chubby, plump, sick little elf, 

And groand when ho said so — in spile of myself. 
But a wink of his eye when he physicked our 
Fred, 

Soon gave me to know I had nothing to dread. 

Ho didn’t prescribe — but went straitway to work, 
And dosed all the rest — gave his trowsers a jerk, 
And adding directions while blowing his nose — 

He buttoned bis coat:--from his chair be arose, 
Then jumped in bis gig- -gave old Jalap a whistle. 
And Jalap dashed off as if pricked by a thistle, 
But the Doctor exclaimed ore ho drove out of 
sight. 

They’ll be woll by tc-morruw- -good night! Jones 
— good night! 

DOCTOR HOLFORD’S PATIENT. 

We liail been great cliuiiia at College, 
John Baring and I, and having both eaten 
our terms at the Temple, we continued last 
friends, inliahiled tli« same nliamliers, and 
waited together, wiili as mucli patience as 
iniglit he, for briefs Briefs, however, were 
so long in coming, tliat we had a great deal 
of spare time on our hands, and we used to 
run down often in the country for a breatli 
of fresli air, and to look up ol l triends and 
acquaintances On one of these occasions I 
took John down into my own county, Suf- 
folk, on a visit to my fatlier. He was glad 
enoiigli to come, for, if tite Irutli must lie 
told, a pretty sister of mine liad made a 
deep itnpression on iiis susceptible lieart 
during the season in Condon. We liad a 
merry lime of it The birds were plentiful, 
and several halls and parties were given in 
tile neightiorliood, at which John and Emily 
enjoyed tliemselves, 1 have reason to believe, 
to their liearts’ content. A very good lel- 
ow is Jolm Baring, and I shall not object to 

him as a hrotlier in-law some day, if 

but 1 must say r.o more on this sulijeci, lest 
llie paper sliould meet llie governor’s eye. 

Among tile nelglibors w lioiii we visited to- 
gether was Dr. Holford, anotlier olil crony 
of mine in college days, now an M. D., 
practising in a country town a few miles 
from my home. 

“What a pretty woman. Mrs. Holford i.s!" 
said John to me, as we liglited our cigars 
outside tlie doctor's door one niglit, previous 
to starting on onr walk liome alter a dinner- 
party 

“A nd yet tliere's something uncanny in 
her look, too," lie continued. ‘‘I can’t make 
it out. Is slie wicked, I wonder; or lias slie 
a liee in tier tionnel?' 

■■.Slie's ns good ns slic’s pretty," 1 rejoined 
warmly; for Mrs. Holford was a great friend 
of mine, and I did not lil«; Jolin'. criticisms. 

“My dear fellow. I daresay slie may be, 
Imt you won t make me lielieve you don’t 
see wliHt I mean. Siie lias lovely eves" —   
Jolin was a bit of an artist — '•luit there is a 
queer look tliat conies into tliem now and 
tlieii — looks ns if she had seen a glioal once, 
and never got over it” 

‘ I’erhaps slie did," ( said, a little stilllr. 

Jolin stopped, and stared at me “I lie- 
clare you know all about it, old l oy Here’s 
a lark! A genuine gliost story in real life 
— iriitli voiiclied for hv tlie gliost himself, 
eh?" 

“Well, not quite tliat,’ I answered laugli- 
ing, ‘ but there is a story aboiq Mrs. Hoi- 
ford tliat may account for tlie look you no 
ticed. You certainly mistook your vocation 
You sliould offer your services to tlie spirit 
rappers, if you liave such a knack of read- 
ing people’s faces." 

"I always knew my talents were tlirown 
away,’’ reoiarkeil John in an aside. 



“However,” I continued, “tliere’s no se- 
cret in this case that I know of, so yon sliall 
liearthe story if you care about it." 

“ All riglit," said Jolin, puflingout acloud 
of smoke. “Fire away, Dick: I 'm prepar- 
ed to believe in any number of gho.la after 
that woman’s eyes." 

it’s too long to tell now," I said, “hut if 
you like — I jotted it down in llie shape of a 
story at the lime — when we get home f’ll 
give it to you to read . ’’ 

Accordingly, before going to bed, 1 added 
a few lines to the old MS. for John’s bene- 
fit, and handed it to liim, and if lie read it 
at all — of whicli I liave niy suspicions, 
judging from the total oblivion of it which 
lie showed when sitting by Emily at break- 
fast next morning — lie read as follow.s: 

But what on earth am 1 to do?" asked 
the doctor, in a tone half humorous, half sad, 
as lie walked up tlie High street wiili his 
friend, Mr. Bailey. “If I warn lier slie 
won’t slop with me a week; I’ve lost two 
governesses already liy listening to your ad- 
vice." 

Well,” doubtfully rejoined Mr. Bailey, 
“perhaps von are riglit. He may he sale 
enough alter all; but wlinla silly girl slie 
must be! ” 

"till llie contrary, ” inlerriipfed tlie doctor, 
warmly, “she's a Irea.siire! .As like her 
poor fatlier as can lie — full ol good sense and 
riglit feeling. I cutn’l tliink wliat posses.ses 
her not to let tliat unfortunate man alone, 
and I can’t warn her. Nobody lias managed 

my poor hrala tlie least like lier since ” 

and tlie doctor couglieil away a sigli. 

A soiiiewliat wliimsical expression passed 
over liis friend’s lace. Dr. Holford liad l»nl 
Ills wife six montlis before, and had been in 
a peck of troubles ever since about liis three 
children, tlie youngest an infant six montlis 
old. 'I’lie doctor knew no more of tlie de- 
tails of household economy (linn his liaby, 
and it liad become evident to all liis friends 
tliat lie could uol exist long witlioiit a wife; 
hut wliom .should he marry? tliat was tlie 
question To complicate matters, Dr. Hoi- 
lord was obliged to eke out the profits ol a 
not very remunerative practice, liv receiving 
a patient at liisown lioiise, and rich patients 
were not always easy in tind. At tlie lime 
we write ol he had just received as an in- 
mate a soi-disant nervous invalid, Waller 
Stone by name, whom he watcheil willi sin- 
gular oarcful ness. lor ill hissccrect soul tlie 
doctor knew llie man was insane, and al- 
thougli in irulli he believed him to be per- 
fectly liarmless, yet he daily expected some 
mad freak or lolly to appear. 

None had as yet, and ail tilings liad gone 
smoothly for two or liiree weeks, wlien, ac- 
cording to tlie usual malignity of circum- 
stances, a most inconvenient and aggravat- 
ing interest in Waller Stone licgaii to appear 
in tlie conduct ot Miss Stuart, tlie cliildreii a 
governes.s. It is true that Mr. Stone was a 
liandsonie young man, willi a manner in 
wliich none but a professional eye could de- 
lect any taint of madness, but tliat made it 
all tlie more alarming, and feeling himself 
as yet not tlioronglily acquainted willi tlie 
slate of his patient’s mind tlie doctor was on 
tenterliooks As he said, he dared give no 
serious warning. A nervous patient iniglit 
be all very well, but no governess would 
stay with a live lunatic loose about tlie 
liouse. So Dr. Holford was lain lo let mat 
ters lake their course, trusting lo the chap- 
ter of accidents, and to Miss Stuart’s good 
sense, to set her right in lime. Alter all, he 
tlioiiglil tliere could be no great ri.sK. Wal- 
ter Stone had come lo liim willi an excel- 
lent cliaracter for quietness, and miglit, lor 
all lie knew, be curable. So lie determined 
to iiold his tongue, and hoped tliat no bad 
consequences would ensue. Wlial diil eii- 
siiu we sliall iTcseiilly see. 

A day or two after liis conversation willi 
Mr. Bailey, the doctor happened lo lixik out 
from liis surgery window on the little plalof 
ground at tlie back of liis house, n hicli he 
wa.s pleased to dignify willi the name of a 
garden. Dr. Holford worked in it a great 
deal liimself, and look great interest in tlie 
one or two llower-heds, and tlie border ricli 
with hrigiil colors, in llie arraiigenieiil ol 
which he Battered himself Sir Joseph Pax- 
ton could not liold a candle to liim The air 
was scented with llie breatli ol lilacs and 
hyacinths, and the iierfiime ol two gnarled 
old hawthorns, covered, one witli wliite and 
tlie other with pink blossoms, that stood on 
the grass-plot by tlie side of llie patli, and 
that was the pride ol the doctor’s Iieart. 
The garden was a kingdom for Lees and but- 
terflies, and lliey liiimmcdand danced mer- 
ily ill the sunsliine. On one particular May 
afternoon, a fresli little liutnan flower moved 
quickly lo and fro among llio butlerflles, 
clad in a soft gray stulV gown, wiili pink 
rihbona qt llie tliroat and wrist. It w»s the 
young governess, Lizzie .Stuart . 

Slie was a pretty girl ol about twenty, witli 
large gray eyes and fairsliiny liair A sprig 
of pink may was stuck in tlie waistliniid 
tliat girded a small round waist, and they 
were very little feet tliat tapped impalicnily 
upon the gravel walk. Tlie doctor coulil 
not help walcliing lier from the window ns 
he smoked his pipe; slie made such a preltv 
foreground lo liis favorite flowers, as slie 
went and came under the liawtiiorn.s. Pre- 
senlly a young man came out and walked 
across the grass plat towards lier .Slie met 
him witli oiilslretched hand, and they strol- 
led along the path togetlier. It was per- 
fectly natural tliat lliey sliould do so, and 
tlie doctor ouglit lo liave l een glad lliat liis 
patient sliould lie subjected to sucli sootliing 
influences: but soiiiehoiv lie siglied a little 
as lie saw liow earnesilv lliey were talking, 
her face raised up to liim. and liis heni 
down to her. C'ertainlv Lizzie did not seem 
afraid of Walter Slone. The doctor put 
Ilia pipe in the corner witli another sigli, 
and went up siair.s to ilress for liiniier. 

Tlie pair in liie garden did not remain 
long togetlier. Waller Slone saiiniered hank 
inlo llie liouse, and Lizzie went on walking 
up and down, up and down ike slinrl gravel 
walk. 

For fenrof mistake, we liad heller let tlie 
reader into a secret at once. Almost from 
llie moment, three montlis ago, when Dr 
Holford had done her the ininieiise lioiior ol 
conBding to lier care Ills motlierless cliil- 
dren. Lime .Stiinri’s lender little heart liad 
been in llie tiocior’s keeping. Indeed, slie 
had loved liini all lier life, as her father e 
friend and lier own-- but of late wliat was 
it that made LiAie blush, all lo herself, 
ID the solitude of her own zoom, when 



she thought of llie gratitude and affection 
slie owed to the. doctor? 

All! wliat a wealtli of pity and devotion 
slic poured out upon liim in secret, and 
wliat romantic castles were built up in 
tliat graceful little head of hers, as slie sat 
of an evening looking out upon the haw- 
thoriis, of tlie wonderful ways in wliicli she 
was to he a help and a comfort to him, with- 
out liis knowing who liad done tlie work! But 
lliougli her love was an “open secret,” 
there was no one lo find it out, except, in- 
deed, the doctor liimseU, tlie last man on 
wliom tiie idea was likely lo dawn, and it is 
doubtful if ever Lizzie had more lliaii an ink- 
ling ol the triilli. If slie had, slie guarded 
her secret jealously, and only let it appear 
in a most tender ami zealous performance 
of lier duty towards liiscliildren,as to wliich 
tlie doctor said no words, hut tlianked and 
blessed lier in liis heart. e 

But witliin tlie last forlniglil it liad oc- 
curred to tills young woman to set lierself 
up in judgment upon the doctor's conduct, 
and after mature delilieratloii, slie liad come 
to the conclusion tliat he had eillier made a 
great mistake, or was doing very wrong. 
Tlie ide.'t troubled her sorely. Miss Lizzie 
was a young lady wlio rather piqued lierself 
upon llie possession of an independent jiidg- 
meiif, and pa.id llic youtlifiil penalty, of 
course, by sometimes ion miicli underval- 
uing file experience of her seniors Her 
early training liad perliaps encouraged this 
elate of mind; lor lier fatlier, dear as slie 
iiud been to liim, liad not iieen able to steer 
allogetlier clear ol tiial wretclieil system of 
"spoiling till five, frying experiments lill fif- 
teen, and coniradicting up lo Iwenly Be- 
side.s all tliis, Miss Lizzie liad lately been 
sliidviiig Dr. Winslow’s “Obscure Diseases," 
lliai most popular of scientific works, and 
relielled against ilie llieorie.s llierein pro- 
pniiiided witli all tier lieart “/ery Hard 
Ca.'lT liad Inllen in lier way immediately 
aftei ward.s, and she liad gloweil willi syni- 
[lailiv lor .Alfred's wrongs and .lulia's love, 
and for all lliesiipposed victims detained in 
a lliousaiid lunatic asviunis by commission- 
ers in lunacy like those descriliod liy Mr. 
Bead. 

.And now Waller .Slone had cro-seil lier 
patli, and lo! tier dreams were realized. He 
wa3(ileasanl and lianilsonie, and ns gentle as 
.Alfred; and, more lliaiiull, lie liad appealed 
lo lier eonipas.-ioii, and poured into lier ear 
a pileoiis story ol llie iinnaiiiral lirother, 
who for llie sake ol oluaining' the manage- 
ment ol ills (Walter’s) property liad con- 
demned him to lifelong captivity. Lizzie 
knew as a fact flint liis brollier )ind consign- 
ed liiiii to Dr. Holford's cliarge, and in spile 
ol all ilia apparent litierly, lie was narrowly 
watched — in itself a suspicions circumstance, 
considering tliat nervous ailmenis only 
were liie plea for liis incarceration filie 
liad even heard Dr. Hollonl cliuckle over 
llie story of the way in wliicli lie and E l- 
ward had iiianagCil to entrap Waller inio 
voluntarily giving liis purse inlo their care, 
so as 10 render his escape, by train or 
other conveyance, iiiipossitile. 

f 7s be Continued.^ 

Tlie Perfection of Itrd 'rape, 

I’lie undergraduates of the English Uni- 
versity at Oxford have lately quarreled with 
their bread and butter — or, more correctly, 
with.lhose who provide these and other ar- 
cles of food in the colleges, .A student 
writes to an English journal some account 
of his siiH’erings and his searcli for a res- 
ponsible liead upon wliicli lo lay the blame, 
from which we gel a glimpse of a division 
of lalsir and respoiisihilily exceeding even 
that practiced in our city governmeni: 
•'Yesterday evening the dinner provided 
for llie mess lo which 1 belong was, as usual, 
perfectly cold We accordingly sent for tlie 
manciple; an-l after complaining lo liim, re- 
quested him lo observe that iho hot water 
iii»!i on which the moat i.s placed was not 
only not properly healed, but as cold as the 
meal upon it 

“Oh ! .Sir," replied the official, "1 have 
nothing to do with that. That is the busi- 
ness o I the general butler " He is accord- 
ingly .sent lor j 

“Have yon the oliarge of heating these 
dishes'?" , 

"No .“sir; the other butler does that. 1 ve 
got to look alter the spoons and forks ' 

".^eiid the other butler, then 
1‘resenlly ‘ the oilier biiiler ’ arrives, and 
the following dialogue ensues 

“You have lo see that this dish is [iroper- 
Iv heated ? 

"Yes. sir.” 

‘■Then, why is it ns cold as ice to-iiigliT?’’ 
“But 1 haven’t the charge ol heating the 
wafer, sir. ” 

“We were getting tired of ser.iiing lor peo- 
|ile, now; but, determined lo gel to the bot- 
tom of the mailer, if possible, we had up the 
cook’s hoy, who, as huder No ‘J said, had lo 
heat the water. 

“We expostulated with the hoy, and re- 
ceived some excuse about ‘a hole in the boil- 
er, an. I 'not being aide to gel it iiieiiiled on 
.Suiidiiy.’ ■.Anyhow,’ said we, "if there isn't 
more water in the ihing than I here is lo-dav, 
it will never keep iiiiythiiig hoi.' ()|i. sir,’ 
rejoined the hoy, I have nothing lo do with 
putting the wafer in. I've only lo heat if be- 
fore it is put ill " 

Tliat is perfect, and caniiel he heaten anv- 
where out ol England. 



Proclamation by The Oevernor. 



$(300 REWARD. 

CouiroXWKALTH or Kintucky, ) 
Kxrcctiti Drpabtmixt. j 

W HEREAS, It has been made known to me 
that JACOB OILTNER, standi indicted 
in the Clay Circuit Court, for the murder of Wil- 
liam Clark, and that said Jacob Giltner has fled 
fromjustice, and is now goinj; at larice. 

Therefore I, THOS. E. BRAzMLETTE. Gut- 
ernor of the Commonwealth aforesaid, do hereby 
offer a reward of THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS 
for the apprehension of the said •Jacob Giltner, 
and his delirory to the Jailor of Clay County 
within onoyear from the date hereof. 

IH TJSSTIMOyr WHEREOF,! have 
I L S t hand, and caused the 

( ’*’  seal of tho Commonwealth to be affixed. 

' Done at Frankfort, this 2d day of De- 
cember, A. D. 1865, and in tho74th year of the 
Commonwoalth. 

THO.S. K.BRAMLETTK. 

By the Governor: 

E. L. V AN W iNKLB, Secretary of State. 

By Jas. R. Paur, Assistant Secretary. 

Deo. 5. .3in. 

':riIE RnACE TO HUT 

PTNK OLOTHI2STG 

— -I.V! — 

GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS 

CHEAP! 

mbwilSjsjco, 

^o. We*wf fc’ourtU JyJi., 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

\\ u manufacture all ef our own Goods, and 
get them iu stylo oqiraled by few and surpassed 
by none. 

CALL AM) SKK IS UIIK.Y l.\ Tilt CITY. 

Dec. i, -2(u 



L. WICITZRL. 



V. BKKBBBICH. 



WEITZKL iV HEKBERICH, 

'I Elio II ANT T A I LORS, 

W OULD respeotfuHy Inform the oitiziens of 
Frankfort and vicinity that they have 
removed their establishment three doers below 
their old stand, next door lo L. Weitael’s Cenfeo 
tionery Store. 

They wilt be happy to see their customers at 
their new stand, where they will continue to car- 
ry on the 

TAILORINQ BUSINESS 

in all its branches, and will warrant their work 
tc give satisfaction, both as to its execution 
anJ the charges made for it. 

Deo. 5, Im. 

'■ J (Complete |]rctorial |)rstorn 
of tl;t CImfs.” 

o 

“The best, ohrapest, and most vuccessfiil 
Family Paper in the Union.” 

HARPER’^WEEKLY, 

SPLEXDIDLY ILLUSTRATED 



A CARD TO INVALIDS. 

A OlzKRQTMAN, while residing in South 
America as a missionary, discovered a safe 
and simple reiuedr for the Cure id Nervous 
Weakness, Early Decay, Diseases of the Urinary 
and Seminal Organs, and tho whole train of dis. 
orders brought on by baneful and vicious habits. 
Great numbers have been nlpb'udy ourcil by this 
noble remedy. Prompted by a desire to benefit 
the affiicted and onf»«rtunato, I will send tho 
rocoipe for preparing and using this medicine, 
in a sealed envelope, in any one who ape«ls it, 

Free of Chm'ijr. 

Pleaso inplrt.«e a past paid cizKel«*po, Htldruased 
to Toursulf. 

Addreen. 

JOSEPH T. INMAN, 

StATInV D, BiRLB Ilm'HK. 
tJel 34. 186s. ly. Ki^~York (Ify 

'r H 

.Mv«. 1 1 -Vi.i.i u: K. a'onij-ts! 

N.li - il fur Children, will eomineuee on 

.Uonilav. September 4, ISit.i. 
nnd mintinuc twenty weeks, at $19 the spsKion. 
Kn exlrns. 

deduction made for ab«onc ^ except in 
ease of slckneas. 



CITY ELECTION. 

OFFICE CITY COUNCIL. 

Pbavkfobt, Deo. h, 1865. 

Ordered: That an eleetion for City Attorney 
and Eight Oooactimen lor the eity af Frankfort, 
to serve the ensuing year, he held at the Court 
House in said city, en the 1st Saturday in Janu- 
ary next, and that L B. Crutoher and John 
Balttell he jndgos to superintend said eleetion. 

By Order of the Board. 

G. W. rtWIN. Mayor. 



MEXICO! JAEXICO!! 

S:^(), 000,000 ' LOAN 

nir THK 

REPUBLIC OF MEXICO. 



Critical .Yoticcs of the Fresj. . 

*‘Tbe best Family Paper published in the 
United States” — S^ew London Advertieer. 

'*The Mobbl Newspaper of our country- 
complete in all the departments of an American 
Family Paper — H arpbr’s Wbkely has earned 
for itself a right to its title ‘A JOURNAL OP 
Cl VILIZATIi^X.* ” — .V. Y. Eoeniny Po$t. 

*^This Paper furnishes theb itluntratione. Our 
future historians will enrich themselves out of 
Harper’s Weekly long after writers and painters, 
and publishers are turned to dust.”— zV. r. Emia- 

yeliet. 

**A nece.^sity in every household .” — Hoeton 
Traiucript . 

*^It is at once a lending political and bisturioal 
annalist of the nation.”— /*A g7. Preet. 

**The best of its class in .America . — Boeton 
Vraceler.' 

SUBSCRIPTIONS— 1866. 

The publishers have perfooted a system of 
mailing by which they can supply the Magatine 
and Weekly promptly to those who prefer to re- 
ceive their periodicals directly from the office of 
Publication. Postmasters and others desirous of 
getting up Clubs will be supplied with a hand 
some pictorial Show-bill on ayplication. 

The postage rm Harper’s Weekly is 20 cents a 
year, which must ho paid at tliesiibsoriber’s post- 
office. 

U" ii: II M . 

HARPER’S \YEEKLY, one year -$4 00 

Am Extra Copy of either the WbbkLT or MaO- 
ABINB will be enpplied yratin for every Cluh of 
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Rai knumbere can be supplied at any time. 

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neat cloth binding, will he sent by express, free 
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prising Eight Yolnmee, sent on receipt of cash 
at the rate of $5 25 per vol. , freight at oxpene* of 
pnrrhaeer. Address 

HARPER A BROTHERS, 

Framkltx Si^tJARB, Nbw York. 

Nov. 24. 



Twciilj-year Coupuii liuiiils In Sumii uf Jit), 
$100, $’)00 Hiid $1,000. 

interest SEVEX PERCENT , PA Y- 

ARLE 7.V THE CITY OF NEW 

YORK. 

Principal anil Inicrcst Pavabicin 

GOLD. 

*10,000,000 to be Sold at SIXTY 
CENTS on the DOLLAR, 

*n interest of 

pVELVE PER CENT. IN HOLD, or SEVEN- 
TEEN PER CENT. IN CURRENCY, at Iho 
present rate of premium on gold. 

THE FIRST YEAR’S INTEREST ALREADY 
PROVIDED. 

The .flout DESIR.^BLE F.YYESI.flE.YT ever Of- 
fereil. 

tracts OF MINING AND AG- 
RICOLTUR.AL LANDS: SIXTY PER CENT 
of PORT DUES. IMPOSTS, and TAXES, in tL 
Slates of TAMAULIPAS and SAN LUIS PO 
TOSI; and the PLIGHTED FAITH of the said 
Stales sod the GENERAL GOVERNMENT are 
pledged for the redemption of these 
Bonds and pojrment'of inlerost. 

THE SECURITY IS AMPLE. 

$.10 in U. S. C'y will buy » 7 perot. O’d B'dof $50 

$.100  • .. ,, 1^"? 
$600  . ^ .. I. « 

Let every lover of Republican Institutions buy 
at least ^ 

ONE BOND. 

Circulars forwarded and aubsoriptiuns receive 
t’v .r . JOHN W. CORUES i CO., and 
J. N. TIFT, Financial Agent of the Repuhlio 
of Mexico, 57 Broadway, N. Y. 
SdfSubscriptions also received by Banks and 
Bankers generally throughout the United Slates 
November 3, 1865. 

“Jnqufstionably the be.st sDstaiiied work 
of the kind in the YVorld.” 

H-A.RT ER’S 

NEW MOiHHLr MAGAZINiI 

Crilicdl Xolices of tho Press. 

It i* the feremosi Magazine of tho day. The 
fireside never bad a mere delightful companion, 
nor tho million a more enterprising friend, than 
Harper’s Magazine — MethodUt ProYcAfaiil (Balti- 
more). 

The most popular Monthly in the world. 

New York Obeerper. 

Wo mu9t refer in terms of eulogy to tho high 
tuned end varied excellences ot Uarpbb’s Maua- 
xiwi — a journal with a monthly circulation of 
about 170,000 copieS'-in whose pages are to be 
found some of the choicest light and general read- 
ing of the day. Wo speak of this work as an 
evidence of the American People; and the popu 
larity it has acquired is merited. Each Number 
contains tally 144 pages of reading matter, ap- 
propriately illustrated wito good wood-cuts; and 
it oumbines in itself the racy monthly and the 
more philosophical quarterly, blended with the 
best features of tho daily journal. It has great 
power in the disseminaiiou of a love of pure lit- 
^^^^^^••■“"Tbobskr S Ouideto American Literature, 
London. 

The volumes bound constitute of themaelvos a 
library of miscolinnettus reading such as can not 
be found in the same compass in any other publi- 
cation that has o«)me under oitr notice. 

Courier. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS— 1866 . 

The F ublisbera have perfected a system of mail- 
ing by which they can supply tho Maoabinb and 
Wkbkly promptly to tho9o who prefer to receive 
their periodicals directly from tho Office of Pub- 
lication. 

The postage on Hahpbr’s Mauasinb is 24 cents 
a year, which must be paid at the euheeribcFe 
post-office. 

X K It M W : 

Uarpkr’s Maoaxinb, one year $4 UU 

An E.etra Copy of either the MaOaZINB or 
W rrkly will be eupplied grade for every Club of 
Firs SUBSCBIBKRS at $4 UO each, in one remit- 
tanre', or ,Six Copi^e for $2U 00. 

Back Numbers can be supplied at any time. 

A Complete Set, now comprising Thirty-one 
Volumes, in neat cloth binding, will bo sent by 
express, freight at expense of purchaser, for $2 25 
per volume. Single volumes, by mail, posYpard, 
$3 00. Cloth cases, for binding 58 cents, by 
mail, postpaid. Address 

HARPER A BROTHERS, 

Franklin Squaek, Nkw' York. 

Deo. I . 



LAND FOR .SALE. 

\ FMALL tract ef Land, ofabant4d acres. 
In Franklia County.# miles from Prank- 
fort and 2 miles from Forks of Elkborn , lying on 
the Cincinnati road. It adjoins tho farm of H. 
M. Bedford, Esq. It bns on it a small heuse, 
two rooms aud a kitchen, fee. Aheut 30 acres of 
the land is under cultivation — the balance well 
set in blue grass. Any per.^en desiring such a 
tract of l»n l will do well to call upon the under- 
signed. J W. PttRKCH. 

Oct. 31 . Im. w. • 



i’ & 9&48 aU( C. B. €. C. 

tc, — Yromaa Copy. 



NEW WHOLESALE 

PAPER WAREHOUSE! 

?!I0 flBin St., Sonlh side, bflwftn 7lli A 8th. 

icv. 

UIIJJA.M EIULMKV, 

WHOLE.SALK DEALER IN 

PAPER OF ALL KINDS. 

HINDERS' HOARDS, CARD BOARDS. 

ENVELOPES, PRINTING INK, &C. 



H aving Uad nearly twenty years experience 
in this branch of busines.s, I feel confident 
I can make it to tho interest of all persons buy- 
ing Paper to examine iny stock before making 
their purchases. 

^iT’Orders by mail #r otherwise shall receive 
prompt attention. 

fligtirai mtirliPi price In ('ash, paid for 
Kog* « Hemp and C4ra« H Hope, Jkc. 

Nov. 21-lm. 



LARD KEGS FOR SALE. 



Ho. 1, 

I. f and for sale by 

Nov. 22 — Im. 



Lard Kegs in store 
GRAY k TODD, 




TH E COM MON WEALTH. 



TUESDAY DECEMBER 22, 1805 

A Message from President Johnson, with 
accompaning Report of Lieutenant- 
General Grant. 

Washint.to.n’, December 19, 1S05. 

Im llie .Senate, to-day, Mr. Cowan said a 
message bad just been received from the 
President in response to a resolution calling 
for information ns to llie condition of the 
Stales lately in rebellion, lie called lor the 
reading of the message. The tnessage of 
the President was read, as follows: 

To the Senate of the United Stater. 

In reply to the resolution adopted by the 
Senate on’ the 12lh, 1 have the honor to 
state that the rebellion waged by a portion 
of the people against the properly constitu- 
ted authorities of the Government of the 
United States has been suppressed; that the 
United States are in possession of every 
State in which the insurrection e.xistcd. and 
that, as far as could be done, the Courts of 
the United .Stales have been restored, post- 
offices re established, and steps taken to put 
into effective operation the revenue laws of 
the country, as the result of measures insti- 
tuted by the E.vecutive with a view of in- 
ducing a resumption of the funetions of the 
Stales comprehended in the inquiry of the 
Senate. The people in North Carolina, 
South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Missis- 
sippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee, 
have organized their respective State Gov- 
ernments, and are yieldine obedience to the 
laws and Government of the United States, 
with more willingness and greater prompti- 
tude than, under the circumstances, could 
have reasonahly been e.vpected The pro- 
posed Amendment to the Constitution, pro- 
viding for the abolition of slavery forever 
within the limits of the country, has been 
ratified by each one of these States, with the 
exception of Mississippi, from which no of- 
ficial information has been received, and in 
nearly all of them measures have been adopt- 
ed, or are now pemling, to confer upon the 
freedmen the privileges which are essential 
to their comfort, protection, and security, 
lu Florida and Texas the people are mak- 
ing commemlable progress in restoring their 
State Government, and no doubt is enter- 
tained that they will, at an early period, be 
in a condition to resume all of llieir practi- 
cal relations with the Federal Government, 
In that portion of the Union lately in re 
hellion the aspect of atlairs is more promis- 
ing than, in view of all the circumstances, 
could well have been expected. The people 
througheut the entire .South, evince a laud- 
able desire to renew their allegiance to the 
Government, and to repair the desolations 
of war by a prompt and cheerful return to 
peaceful pursuits. An abiding faith is en- 
tertained that their action will conform to 
their professions, and that in acknowledg 
ing the laws of the United .Slates their loy- 
alty will be unreservedly given to the Gov- 
ernment. whose leniency they can not fail 
to appreciate, and whose fostering care will 
soon restore them to a condition of pro«per- 
ity. 

It is true that in some of the tJtates the 
demoralizing effects of the war are to be seen 
in occasional disorders, but these are local 
in character, not frequent in occurrence, 
and are rapidly disappearing as the authori- 
ty of the civil power is extended and sus- 
tained. 

Perplexing questions were naturally to be 
 -x|ieclcd from the great and sudden change 
in the relations between the two races; but 
symptoms are gradually developing them- 
selves under which the (reedman will receive 
the protection to which he is justly entitled, 
and, by means of his labor, make himself 
a useful and independent member of the 
community in which he has his home. 

From all the information in my possession, 
and from that which 1 have recently re- 
ceived from the most reliable authority, lam 
induced to cherish the belief that personal 
animosity is surely and rapidly merging it- 
self into a spirit of nationality, and that 
representation connected, with a properly 
adjusted system of taxation, will result in a 
harmonious restoration of the relations of 
the States to the National Union. 

The report of Carl Schurz is herewith 
transmitted as requested by the Senate. No 
report from the lion. John Covodehas been 
received by the President. The attention 
of the Senate is invited to the accompany- 
ing report of Lieutenant General Grant, who 
recently made a tour of inspection through 
several of tiie States whose inhabitants par- 
ticipated in the rebellion. 

[.Signed] ANDREW JOllN.'^ON. 
Wasiiixgtox, December 18, 18C-5. 

LIEUT. GENERAL GRANTS REPORT 

llKAD-Qc.VUTlii;8 OP THU Armv OF Till; 1 

Unitku St.vtks, December 18, 1865. j 
To Ills Ej:ccliency Axdrkw Joiixsox, Presi- 
dent of the United States' 

.Sir — I n reply to your note of the 16th in- 
stant, requesting a report from me giving 
such information as 1 may be possessed of, 
coming wi’bin the scope of the inquiries 
made by the Senate of the United States in 
their resolution of the 12th instant, I have 
the honor to submit the following with your 
approval and also that ol the Honorable 
Secretary ol War: 

1 left Washington City , on the 27th of 
last month for the purposes of making a 
tour of inspection throughout some of the 
Southern States lately in rebellion, and to see 
what changes were necessary in the disposi- 
tion of the military forces of the country, 
how these forces could be reduced and ex- 
penses curtailed, Ac., and to Icnjn as far as 
possible the feelings and intentions ol the 
citizens of those Stales toward the (ieneral 
Government. 

I'he .State ol Virginia being so accessi- 
ble to Washingion City, and information 
from this quarter, thcrelore. being readily 
obtained, I hastened through I he. Slate with- 
out conversing or meeting with its citizens. 

In Raleigh, North (,’arolina, 1 spent one 
day; in Charleston, .South Carolina, two 
days; and in .Savanaah and Augusta, Geor- 
gia, each one day. Both in traveling and 
while stopping, I saw much and conversed 
freely wfth .the citizens ol those .States, ns 
well as with officers of the army who have 
been stationed among them. The following 
are the conclusions come to by me; 

I am satisfied that the mass ot thinking 
men of the South accept the present situa- 
tion of affairs in good faith. . The questions 
which have hitherto divided the sentiments 
of the people of the two sections — slavery 
and .State rights, or the right of a State to 
secede from the Union — they regard as hav- 
• ing been settled forever by the highest tri- 
bunal — arms — that man can resort to. I 
was pleased to learn from the leading men 
whom I met that they not only accepted the 
deeision arrived at, as final, but now the 
smoke of battle has cleared away, and time 
has been given lor reflection, that this decis- 



ion has been a lortunale one lor the w hole 
country, they receiving the like benefit from 
it with those who opposed them on the field 
and in the council. 

Four years of war, during which the law 
was executed only at the point of the bayo- 
net throughout the Stales in rebellion, have 
left the people possibly in a condition not to 
yielii that ready obedience to civil authority 
which the American people have generally 
been in the habit of yielding. This vyould 
render the presence of small garrisons 
throughout those States necessary, until 
such time as labor returns to its proper 
channel, and the civil authorities arc fully 
established. I did not meet any one, either 
those holding places under the Government, 
or citizens ol the .Southern States, who 
thought it practicable to withdraw the mili- 
tary from the .South at present. The white 
and the black mutually require the protec- 
tion of the General Government. There is 
such universal acquiescence in the authority 
of the General Government, throughout the 
portions of the country visited by me, that 
the mere presence ol a military force, with- 
out regard to number.s. is sufficient to main- 
tain order. The good of the country re 
quires that the military force kept in the 
interior, where there are many freeJ- 
men, should all be while troops. The 
reasons for this are obvious. Without men- 
tioning many of them, the presence ot black 
troops, lately slaves, demoralizes labor, both 
by their advice and by furnishing in their 
camps a resort for the freedmen, for long 
distances around. White troops generally 
excite no opposition, and therefore a small 
number of them can maintain order in a giv- 
en district. Colored troops must be kept in 
bodies sufficient to defend themselves. It is 
not the thinking men who would do violence 
toward any class of troops sent among 
them by the General Government, but the 
ignorant, in some places, might: and the 
late slave, too, who might be imbued with 
the idea tliat the property of his late master 
should, by right, belong to him, at least 
should have no protection from the colored 
soldiers. There is danger of collision being 
brought on by such causes. 

My observations lead me to the conclusion 
that the citizens of the .Southern .States are 
anxiou.s to return to self-government, within 
the Union, as soon as possible; that, while 
reconstructing, they want and require pro- 
tection from the Government that they 
think is required by the Government, and is 
not humiliating to them as citizens, and that 
if such a course is pointed out they would 
pursue it in good faith. 

It is to be regretted that there can not be 
a greater commingling at this time between 
the citizens of the two sections, aud partic- 
ularly of those intrusted with the law-making 
power. 

I did not give the operations ol the Freed- 
men's Bureau that attention I would have 
done if more time had been at my disposal 
Conservations, however, on the subject, 
with officers connected with the Bureau, led 
me to thinK that in some of the States its 
affairs have not been conducted with good 
judgment or.economy, and that the belief, 
widely sprea d an.ong the Freedmen of the 
Southern .States, that the lauds of the form- 
er owner will at least in part be divided 
among them, has come from the agent of 
the Bureau. This belief is seriously inter- 
fering with the willingness of the freedmen 
to make contracts for the coming year. In 
some forms the Freedmen's Bureau is an ab- 
solute necessity until civil law is established 
and enforced securing to the freedmen their 
rights and full protection. At present, how- 
ever, it is independent ol the military es- 
tablishment of the country, and seems to be 
operated by the different agents of the Bu- 
reau according to their individual notions 
every-wliere. 

General Howard, the able head of the Bu- 
reau, made friends by the just and fair in- 
slriicliona and advice he gave, but the com- 
-plaint in .South Carolina was that when he 
left things went on as before. Many, per- 
haps the majority, of the agents of the 
Freedmen's Bureau, advise the freedmen 
that by their own industry they must expect 
to live. To this end they endeavor to secure 
employment lor them, and to see that both 
contracting parlies comply with their engage- 
ments. 

In some cases, I am sorry to say, thefreed- 
man's mind docs not seem to be disabused of 
the idea that the freedmen have the right to 
live without care or provision for the future. 
The effect of the belief in the division ol 
land is idleness and .accumulation in camps, 
towns and cities. In such ' cases I think it 
will be found that vice and disease will tend 
to the extermination or destruction of the 
colored race. 

It cannot be expected that the opinions 
held by men at the South lor years can be 
changed in a day, and therefore, the Ireed- 
mcn require for a few years not only laws to 
protect them, but the fostering care of those 
who will give them good counsel and on 
whom they can rely. The Freedmen's Bu- 
reau being separated from the military es- 
tablishment of the coiinlry requires all the 
expense of a separate organization. One 
does not necessarily know what the other 
is doing or what orders they are acting un- 
der. It seems to me this could be corrected 
by regarding every officer on duly witb 
troops in the Southern States, as agents of 
the freedmen’s bureau, and then have all 
orders for the head of the bureau sent 
through the department commanders. This 
would create a responsibility that would 
create uniformity of action throughout the 
.South, and would insure the orders and in- 
structions from the head ol the bureau being 
carried out, and would relieve from duty and 
pay a large number of employes of the Gov- 
ernment. 

1 have the honor to be, very respeolliilly, 
your obedient servant, 

[.Signed ] U. S. GRANT, 

Lt. General. 

Eeconstiuction. 

On Tue.sday, Dec. 19lh, Mr. Stilwell, 
Union member from Indiana, offered the 
following in the lower House of Congress: 

‘•Whereas, The war for the preservation 
of the Union and the Gonstilulion is now 
over, and its counterpart, insurrectional re- 
bellion, been put down by the strong arm 
ol Government, and peace and Union being 
the object, and that having been obtained, 
therefore, 

"Resolved, That the peofde who have been 
in rebellion against the Government, and 
who have submitted to the laws of the Unit- 
ed .States, and adopted a republican form of 
government, repealed the ordinance of se- 
cession. pas.sed the Constitutional amend- 
ment abolished slavery, repudiatingtherebel 
debt, and passed laws protecting freedmen 
in tlieir liberty, the Representatives ol the 
people elected to Congress, having received 
their certificates of election from their re- 
spective Governors, should he received as 
members of the Thirty-ninth Congress, 
when they shall take the oath prescribed by 
Congress, known as the lest oath, without 
lurtlier delay,' 

The above was referred to the Coiiimillee 
on Reconstruction. 



Mexico. 

Recent information from Mexico .abun- 
dantly confirms the favorable accounts of 
the Liberal cause heretofore received. Not 
only have the Liberal forces enjoyed suc- 
cesses in different engagemcnlsi-the result of 
the campaigns as a whole is in their favor. 
The French generals do not seem to have 
comprehended the plans ol ihe'^Mexican 
leaders until loo late to thwart them. .\.s 
always happens in the attempt to occupy a 
great extent of country ^with ,^a '^^limitcd 
force, the division ol the hostile army de- 
stroyed its efficiency. The I’rcnch have 
maintained many garrisons, but they have 
been stationary. The Liberals, with a 
force less, collectively, than that ol the in- 
vaders, have been able, by rapid maneuver- 
ing through a country with which they were 
perfectly familiar, to present at many points 
successively a stronger] front than the 
French. 

It appears, moreover, that khe generals of 
Juarez, as the result of their previous victo- 
ries and of the combination of their forces, 
are able to threaten the city of Mexico it- 
self. Shortly after the capture of Tehua- 
can by Gen. Figuera, Col. Diaz escaped 
from his prison in Puebla, all the troops 
under different leaders in Oaxaca were or- 
dered to report to him, and with these 
forces, numbering 7,000 infantry and 13 
guns. Col. Diaz succeeded in joining Gen. 
Alvarez. Their combined forces, amount- 
ing to 15,000 men, with -12 guns, are at 
•\juchithan, within le.ss than six days' 
march of tlic capital. .Subsequent reports 
represeat them as moving northward 
ihroiigii Michoaoan, with uninterrupted suc- 
cess. 

Not less than three-fourths oi the whole 
territory of Mexico is estimated to be under 
Liberal rule. In inaiiy important Stales, 
there is no vestige of the authority of Max- 
imilian. Yucatan is free of him. Sisal 
Merida alone excepted. The successes and 
advances ol the troops of Juarez have 
obliged Marshal Bazaine to concentrate his 
troops for the defense of the city of Mexico, 
and the effort at subjugation of the Repub- 
lic seems to be narrowed down lor the pres 
ent into an effort to protect the Imperial 
conquests within a narrow bell ol territory, 

American interests continue to be involv- 
ed in many ways in their protracted strug- 
gle. From Havana, we hear of a success- 
ful attempt to supply arms to Maximilian, 
through the .-\merican and Mexican .Steam- 
ship Company, one of whose vessels look 
17,tK)0 muskets to V'era Cruz. The Ameri- 
can Consul at Havana at first detained this 
ship, but is reported to have withdrawn 
his pwotesl at the intercession of the Eng- 
lish and French Consuls and the Ameri- 
can agent of Maximilian — a matter that 
certainly needs to be inquired into. On the 
other hand, the Liberals receive supplies to 
some extent by way ol .‘8an Francisco. 

The bloody decree of ilaximilian, that 
Liberals taken in arms should be shot in 
cold blood, is producing ii.« natural fruit — a 
war ol exlerminalion. 

The Mexicans will neither surrender to a 
certain death, nor give quarter to those who 
give no quarter to them. Tiiose who are re- 
ported by the French to have given them- 
selves up, prove to be merely rol^bers, be- 
longing to neither army, and preying alike 
on both partie.s 

-V considerable number of Americans 
have been arrested in Nazas on the pretext 
that they were concerned in or cognizant 
of the assassination ol a French Prefect of 
that .State riieir real ofl'ense seems to con- 
sist in the fact that they were .-Americans — 
.V V Trihone. 

Indians Rewarded for Resening White 
Women from a Hostile Tribe. 

riic following official paper, elegantly cn- 
gro.s.scd on parchment and ornamented by a 
border of red, white and blue ribbons, was 
recently signed by the President and deliv- 
ered by the .Secretary of the Interior, to the 
great delight of the recipients : 

Execitive Mansio.n, I 

Washington, Nov. 24, 1865. [ 

1 have learned firrm the commissioners 
sent by me to treat with the Indians, whose 
country borders on the Missouri river and 
its tributaries, that two of my red children 
— Nortay-u-hah, or Short Gun, and lbs 
brother of Norlay-u hah, of the Blackfeet 
tribe of the Sioux or Dakota nation — have 
rescued two white women from my enemies, 
and gave their two horses in exchange for 
them. I am greatly pleased with this honor- 
able and friendly conduct of Nortay-u-hah 
and his brother, and direct that one hun- 
dred silver dollars be given to him and one 
hundred to his brother, to enable each one 
to buy for himself another horse. I also 
direct fifty silver dollars to be given to each 
to pay him for his trouble in rescuing these 
while women an([ sending them to the while 
people, and as a momenlo of my perpetual 
friendship lor Nolary-u-hah and his brother, 
so long ns they remain friendly with my 
while children, I direct that a silver medal 
be given to each, with a suitable inscription, 
that all my red children and all mv while 
children, when they look upon it may know 
that their Great Father at Washingion is 
greatly pleased with Nortay-u-hah and his 
brother. 1 also write my name on this 
paper and direct that it be given to Nortay- 
u-hah, and a duplicate to his brother, that 
they may know that the silver money and 
the silver medals have been sent by me to 
them from Washingion. 

ANDREW JOHNSON, 
President ol the United .Slates 

Affairs In Florida- The Negroes at 
Work- -The Civil Law in Vogne. 

It appears that a large majority of the 
negroes in Florida are quietly at work under 
written contracts, mostly lor their old mas- 
ters. These contracts expire next Christ- 
mas, but it is expected that a good propor- 
tion ol them will be renewed, and others 
made for the present year. The adminis- 
tration of the bureau has been almost wholly 
turned over to the probate judges, and Colo- 
nel Osborn has already coni missioned sev- 
eral ol them, with the provision distinctly 
understood, that negro testimony is to be 
admitted. Every civil offence committed by 
a negro in the State, in fact, is now tried by 
the civil officers, only those of high crimin- 
ality being re.served to the courts-martial. 

It may be set down as well determined 
that there will be less suffering here ihre 
winter, both among white and blacks, than 
in any other Southern .Slate, in jiroporlion 
to the population. I here is less actual des- 
litiitiou and lack ol provisions than could 
have been expected. In the first place the 
war destroyed less, and then multitudes of 
the people find an inexhaustible supoly for 
the winter in the fish and oysters that abound 
in the sea and numerous lakes and rivers, 
and game is also abun.lant in the forests 
Hogs, too, are very numerous in the .State, 
scarcely a planter of any pretensions, own- 
ing less than from fiftv to one hundred and 
filly. 



Fruin ths Raw '.  rk Uaratd, Dee. 1. 

The Man who Refu.s d to Haul Down the 
American Flag. 

There died yesterday at the United Stales 
Hospital at the Brooklyn naval station (a 
palace among hospitals, by the way) an old 
sailor, who, though, in hiimblu station, made 
himself a lasting fame. William Conway 
was, in 1861, an old sailor in our navy, hav- 
ing served over forty years as an enlisted 
sailor. In April, 1861, he was stationed at 
Warrenlon (Pensacola) naval station, Flor- 
ida, and was the man whom the traitor, F. 
B. Renshaw, of the old navy, ordered to low- 
er the United .States flag on the secession of 
the State. Mr. Conway, in reply to this or- 
der, answered that he “couldn't do it." The 
order was repeated more positively. “Lieu- 
tenant," answered the old sailor, “I have 
served under that flag for forty years, an-d 1 
wont do it.” 

The rebel lieutenant did not insist. Short- 
ly alter Mr. Conway was sent North, and 
here remained during the war. He received 
from the citizens of ■San Francisco a gold 
medal commendatory of his gallant action 
on the occasion referred to, and this he had 
on his person at the lime of his death, to- 
gether witb letters from Secretary Welles 
and General Halicck praising him for bis 
devotion to the flag. He was a native of 
Camden, Maine, and about sixly-tbree years 
of age. 



.Mr. Seward's First Knowledge of the 
Death of Lincoln . 

Mr. Seward had been kept in ignorance ol 
the attack on the President, his physician 
fearing the shock would be too great for him 
to bear, and all newspapers were rigidly ex- 
cluded from his room. On the Saturday fol- 
lowing his asssssinalion, the Secretary had 
the bed wheeled around so that he could see 
the tops ol the trees in the park opposite, 
just pulling on the spring foliage, when his 
eyes caught the stars and stripes at half- 
mast on the War Department, on which he 
gazed awhile, then turning to his attendant, 
said: “The President is dead!” Tlie confus- 
ed attendant stammered and changed color 
as he tried to say nay, but the sagacious old 
man said: ‘Tf he h.ad been alive he would 
have been the first to call on me; but he 
has not been here, nor has he sent to know 
how I am, and there's the flag at half-mast." 
The old statesman's inductive reason had told 
the truth, and he lay in silence, ihegreat tears 
coursing down his gashed cheeks, as the 
dreadful truth sank into his mind. — E.vch. 



W. H. AVERILL, 

OKVaOIST, FRASKFORT, KT., 

S ells Pure and Genuine DRUGS and MED- 
ICINES, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISIIK.S, 
DYE STUFFS, 

Coal Oil and Lamps, 

A large aad beautiful asiortment of 
l*4,‘rfuiiiery, SonpH. Toilette, Sc l^Vn- 
cy j^rticleu. 

Together with an aisortment i f 

ittusical Jn.strumcnto, 

—and— 

MUSICAL [MERCHANDISE. 

Onlcru for SlIEKT aMUSIC promptly attended 
to. Doer 

WM. H. UUAT. Jia. M. TODD. 



GR^Y & TODL , 

MAIN ST., FRANKFORT, KY. 

OEAI.1B3 IN 

Fine G-roceries, 

PURE OLD WHISKEY, 

BR.\.\DIE,S WI.\E, m, VIPiEGAR, Stc,, kt., 

CIGARS. TOBACCO. SNUFF, PRESERVES 
FRUIT, PICKLES, TOY.S, 

  to -N IPKO X'lOTS ICRI Ks-i. 
 VC., JkC. 

Nov. 2S, 2m — Yeoinan Copy. 



FKI0*^n OVSTEHSll 

We «re regii1arl  in receipt of C. S. WALTBY’S oele- 
bratcfi 

T^earl Oysters, 

which we will sell low by the Can and half Can. 

GRAY' A TODD. 

November 28, 1806"2m — Yeoman copy. 




SANTA CLAUS 

oodS/diinsron 



I^OUIK 

I Has a largo and well selected Stock of j 

OVS & FANCir ARTICLES! 

ALo n full supply of 

OF ALL KINDS. 

For sale ohean, at hia 

II E ad-quart ERS 



On Saint Clair street. 




ROBERT CLARKE & CO., 

55 West Fourth Street, 

W OULD RESPECTFULLY CALL TIIE AT- 
TENTION of tho Wholesale and Retail 
Trade to their new and varied stock of Books 
and Fancy aitationery, Kuitahle f« r 

Holiday Presents. 



TUEIR STOCK OF 

ILLUSTRATED GIFT BOOKS 

lias been selected with great care, fiom the latest 
and best published in this country nnd Great 
Britain, and is superior to anything that has ever 
been offered in this market before. In addition, 
they also offer the works of 
IRVING, 

CARLYLE, 

COOPER, 

SCOTT, 

BULMER, 

BANCROFT, 

PRESCOTT, and 
MACAU LET, 

With the other Standard Authors, bound up in 
Calf and .Morocco bindings, suitable for the Holi- 
days, 



.HJVEt\llzi: BOOKN. 



They also have an extonsire assortment of 
Juvenilo and Toy Books, which cannot fail to 
give satisfaction to all who desire to purchase, 
and being composed extensively of the newest 
English and American Fublications, are unusual- 
ly attractive. The Toy Books, in particular, are 
exceedingly Cne, being colored far more artistic 
cally than is usual !n that class ot Books. Also, 
an endless a.^sortment of 
Games, 

Toy Books, 

Juveniles, 

Paints, 

Alphabet Blocks, 

Drawing Slates, i:c. 

FOR THE CHILDREN 

FANCY STATIONFKY. 



Writing Desks, 
Portfolios, 

Pocket Knives, 
Portmonnaies. 

Scrap Albums, 
Ladies’ Tablets, 
Pocket Book.-*, 

Gold Pens, 

Paper Weights, 
Inkstands, Ac., Ac. 



Backgammon Boards, 
Chessmen, 

Draughts, 

Paint Boxes, 
Dominoes, 

Drawing Books, 
Transparent Slates, 
Drawing Cards, 
Cribbage Boards, 
Games, Ac., Ac. 



Trade supplied on tho most liberal terms. 



ROBERT CLARKE & CO.. 



No. 55 West Fourth Street, 



CI.N’ClNNA'n, OHIu. 



FINE LIQUORS! 

The best quality and favorite brands of 

OLD WHISKEY, 

WINE AND BRANDIES. 

For sale by GRAY A TODD. 

Nov. 28, lS66-2m — Yeoman copy. 



Dec. 15, 1885-5t. 




WATSON’S HOTEL 

AND 



Te our stock of 
Ooufectionerios and 

IPsmey .'Vrtioleii, 

We invite the attention of Ladies and Strangers 
visiting the city . 

Xev. 28, 1885^2m. GRAY A TODD. 

Yeoman copy. 

:P£iTjrTS, &c. 

Te KEEP ON HAND A FULL SUPPLY 
of the following Fruits. Nuts. I*re«erres. 
Sauces. Ac. . Ac. 

ORANGES, LEMONS, FIGS, 

APPLE.S, PRUNES, RAISONS, 
CURRANTS, PECANS, ALMONDS, 
FILBERTS, PEA NUTS, BRAZ. NUTS, 

ENilLISIl WALNUTS, FRESH FRUIT IN 
CANS, PRESERVES, SAUCES, Ac. 

GRAY .1- TODD. 
Nov. 28-2ui — Voomaii copy . 



RESTAURANT, 

Opposite Louisville and Frankfort Depot. 

JAMES R. WATSON 

A NNOUXCE3 that, for the oonvenience of the 
traveling public, ho has opened a 

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT. 

Opposite the Louisville nnd Frankfort Depot, 
where he is prepared, at all times, (day and night) 
to serve parties, from one to one hundred, with 
meals. He is constantly supplied witb the best 
the market affords, together with 

FISH, 

OYSTERS, 

YEmSOy, AND 
O.iME OF ALL KINDS. 

His btir is provided with the best uf 

LiaUORS, CIGARS, AND TOBACCO. 

Dec. l5-tf. 




SUGARS, COFFEES, & TEAS. 

( ^RUSHED, POWDERED, AND GRANU- 
J lated Sugars ; New Orleans, Porto Rico and 
Coffee Sugars. 

Choice Rio, Java, aud Laguira Coflee. Gun- 
powder, Young Ujson, and Oolong Teas. 

Nov. 28-2m GRAY A TODD. 

Yeoman copy. 



SUNDRIES. 

Clmcolate, MolaRScs and Syrups, aMac-kcrel in 
barrels, half barrels,  [uartor barrels, and kits, 
White Fish, Potomac Roe Herring, Scotch Her- 
ring, Sardines, Fresh Salmon and Mackerel in 
Cans, Star and Tallow Candles, Soap of various 
kinds; Pine Apple, Dutch, Hamburg, English 
Dairy, and New York Cream Cheese; Tobacco, 
and Cigarfc of various brands, uiut all articles 
usually kept in a flrst class Family Grocery ee- 
tablishment, on han«l and for sale by 

N v. 28-2m GUAY A TODD. 

Yeoman copy. 



Court of Appeals 

1 am u Union ('Hudidnio for CMrrk oi the 
Court of Appeals. 1 urn in favor of (he 
Coneiitulional A mehilinetii. ‘‘For ihe Uni- 
ion at nil h.-izanN .MlIIN SKATON. 
Dec. S, Im* (Ireenup couniy, Ky. 



ii.kCMFi.orrs iiviK dyi:: 

The Original and Best i» the World! The only 
true and perfect Hair Dye. Harmless, lleliablo 
and Inst.intaneous. Pr'^duces iiumeiliiitely a 
splenuid Black or natural Brown, without injur- 
ing tho hair or skin. Remedies the ill effects of 
bad dyes. Sold by all Druggists . The genuine 
is signed William A. Bachelor. AUo, 
RIlGENEKATIXO KXTK.ACr OF MIU-KFLRUKS 
for Restoring and Beautifying the Hair. 
OHARLK BATCHELOR, New Yoek. 

Aug. 15, 1 865-1 y. 



BULL’S COLUMN. 

Si. O. TFtTT T .T 

fk.wkfort, ky., 

I, D.w r.ceiving for tbc approaching 

HOXjIID A. YS! 

One of tho largest acd be. 't assortment oC 





illfl 








im 


u 


UVI 


y\ 


. J 


L 


'LJ . 



Ever lirought :o this City 
Au endless uariety of 

BIBLES, 
IIYM\ BOOKS, 

— .YN D— 

PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS! 

Also, a few very line EN'(JU.8H fiO(4Ks5, 
eonsiHting ot 

THE IPOETS, 

AN'D A CHOICE EOT OK JUVENIEE.S. 



Kearly all of the latest ptiLlinaliond such as 



DJJil iaWMAi Jfa!13ai), 

Can Y"on Forgive Her, 



&c. &c. 



Special attention ‘ripen (p furnishing 
''Kentucky Reports," 

STANTON'S 

REVISEDSTATUTES, 

AND OTHER 

LUV BOOKS. 

STATIONERY. 

FRENCH, ENGLISH AND AMERI- 
CAN Note, and Letter Papers, 
and Envelopes of the very best. 



ARNOLD’S, 

STEPHENS, 

MAYNARD & NOYES 



1 ^ M 


T f 


1 ft 


4. ! 



Also, that beautiful 

moolis? asiiK, 



GOLD PENS! 

STEEL PENS, PEN HOLDERS, 

And everything in the Stationery 
line. 

I will liavo in a few day.s tho larg- 
est lot of 

KODOKIRS’ 



To be found iu the City. 

If you want the beat article of 

MENS, 

LADIES, 

BOYS & 
(HRI.S 

BOOTS (t SHOES! 

THI.s LS THE PLACE 'M COME 



A good as.qortmeiit of 




— AND-- 



RESORTE HATS! 

Something new and neat 

Together with many oilier ariirle- Kyj 
niinicroue to mention 

Remember the name, 

S. O. BULL, 

Opposite tbe jPost Office. 

Dec. 1—1 ni 



THE COMMONWEALTH. 






TUESDAY DECEMBER 22, KSf.5 



ArrIvBl Hnil Dpparluro of Trains. 



FRAXUrOBT ANI  LoC 1ST IM.I!. 

4 

I.KiirES. ARUIVI.^. 

Morning Expre$. t 7:48 a. m. 9:15 a. m. 

Eroning Express 3:33p.m. 5:45 p. w. 

pRANKrORT KND LrXIMQTOK. 

Morning Expresfl 9:20 a. m. 7:45 a. m. 

^Evening Kxpre  « 5:60 p. m. 3:. 0 p. m. 

Mnge DepHrlure**. 

U kEAVKi. 

Uarrodaburg and Danville, (Daily) ..9:30 a. m . 

Shelbyville, (Daily) 8:00 a. w. 

Georgetown and Paris, (Tri-Weekly )10:00 a . m. 
OBQdo at Capital Hotel. 



fia^Keading mailer will be found on each 
page ol our paper to-day. 



Ratification ^ of the Constitutional 
Amendment. 



Oiliclal 1‘roclaniation of Secretary Seiy. 
ard. 

AVilliaiii H. .Seward, Secretary o.' Stale of 
tlie United Statee. To all to whom these 
presents may eome, areeting 
Know ye, that, wliereos, tiie Congress of 
the United .States, on the 1st of January 
last, passed a resolution, which is in the 
words following, namely: 

“A resolution siibmiltitig to the l.egisla- 
tiircs of the several States a proposition to 
amend the (.foiislitulion ol the United 
States : 

Resolved, By the Senate ami House ol 
Represenlntivcs of the United States of 
.America, in Congress assembled, Iwo-tbirds 



sebetue was proposed to the border slave 
States by Dresident Liucolo, and lor reasons 
wliicb appealed to the heart of every patriot 
and statesman. It was promptly and em- 
phatically refused. It was proposed by Con- 
gress. Kentucky threw back the proposition 
with scorn — to offer to pay her for her p.rop- 
erty without her asking it was an insult. 

: Thus toiled in its attempt at a peaceful 

I riddance of slavery, the Government 'vas 
I obliged to appeal to force. I’resident Lin- 
|Coln, as Commander-in Chief of the Kation- 
! al Army and Xavy, issued his proclamation 
freeing the slaves in those states and terri- 
tories whicli were iu rchellion. Tie gave due 
warning of what he was about to do, and 
left it with the South to save slavery if they 
willed It — they had Only to lay down 'their 
arms and stop its efforts against tlie life of 
the T'nion They would not do this, and 
their great engine of warfare had to be de- 
stroyed. The Emancipation Proclamation 
freed the slaves. 

But that wau not enough. Slavery had 
long been a standing ineuace — it had now 
become an open enemy against the Union. 
Itself had declared that the Union should 
not exist- it opened the '‘irrepressible con- 
flict.” Our pco|de were forced to the con- 
clusion that henceforth its removal was nec- 
essary to the peaceful and permanent ex- 
istence ot the Union. To abolish slavery 
forever that the Union might live, was the 
object ol the Constitutional Amendment. 
This has not been done by Government pro- 
clamation; hut the people ol the .Stales, even 
ol the South, have decreed it. as the law of 
the land, that Slavery shall no longer and 
never again exist in ilie United States. The 
Amendment proposed h  Congress has been 
ratified by the people. And now .Slavery is 
d est roved 

We believe that we have been led to this 



of both Houses concurring, that the following . consummation by a higher hand 

article he propcse i to the Legislatures ol the , p,o[,osed, hut God has 

several States as an amendment to the Con 
stiliilioii of the United States, which, when 
ratilieil by three-fourths of saiil Legislatures, 
shall he valid to all intents and purposes as 
a part of said Constitution, namely : 

ARTICLE XII 

Section 1 . \either slavery nor involuntary 
servilude,excepl as a punishment for crime where- 



disposed. That whichjhas i lways troiihlcd 
our nation's peace, (lirealened her perman- 
ency ami impaired lier prosperiry, has in 
five years' time been utterly destroyed. 
Though ot every step it was resisted the 
work is done Providence has wrought 
out its will- -that now is seen and we 
should acknowledge it, accepting the re- 



0 / the party shall have been duly convicted, shall ' as from its hand. Though now we 
exist within the United States or any jdnee sub- ace it not, in the future we will be thank- 
ject to their jurisdiction. j (ul for our country’s deliverance from its 

Sec. 2. Congress shall have power to enlorce iong enihralineni. 

this article by appropriate leyislation. j To-day not a slave elands upon the soil of 

And, whereas, it appears from official doc- j the Union. In its full and highest sense 
uinents, on file in this department, that the , ours is tlie land of the free. Disguise it as 
Ameadmenl to ihe Constitution of the Uni- ' «e may, we havegained a boon and a hless- 
ted Stales proposed as aforesaid, has been ing — we and the four millions whose bonds 
ratified by the Legislatures of the Slatses of j are stricken off. Liberty is dear to every 
Illinois, Rhode Island, Michigan, Maryland, ' liuman soul, and we sympathize witli the 
New York, West Virginia, Maine, Kansas, ! freed in their at length gaining that which 
Massachusetts, Pennsylvaoia, Virginia, j God gave them— loo long have we kept 
Ohio, Missouri, Nevada, Indiana, Louisiana, ' back the gift, as the blood and fire and ter- 
Minnesoia, Wisconsin, Vermont, Tennessee. Ivors of the five years just past well prove. 
Arkansas, Conneclicul, New Hampshire, | That there are sufferings in store lor them. 
South Carolina, Alabama, North Carolina consequent upon their new stale, none can 
and Georgia, in all twenty-seven Siale.s, doubt But be it ours to lighten those suf- 
And, whereas, the whole number ol .Slates 

in the United Slates is thirlv-six . 1 aHainment ol the full blessings of lih- 

And, whereas, the before speciallv named Through no fault of theirs our slaves 

States, whose Legislatures have ratified the '“V not the sii.-as some account 

said proposed amendment, constisute three- 1 ““I" Kentucky now should 

fourths of the whole number of Stales in ihe|ac«P‘ ' '« fi""' consummation of lliis long- 
United Slates ; jagiiating queslion, and address herself to 

Now, therefore, he it known that 1, Wil- '’v«' order of things, manfully, honora- 

UAM U. Sewako, Secretary of Stale ol the , “"'I gracefully. So will she do well. 

United States, by virtue and in pursuance | We liave heard the Christmas hells again 
of the second section of the act of Congress pealing forth llieir annual tidings of "peace 
approved Ihe 20ih of April, ISIS, entitled on earth, good will toward men" To us 
"An act to proviile for the publication of tlie j these tidings had a higher meaning than ev- 
-laws of the United Stales, and lor other pnr- I er before and have given us a deeper and 
poses, " do hereby certify that the amend- more sacred lesions as (o oiir duties towards 
inent aforesaid has become valid to au. in- our fellow-men. With their old-limed mes- 
TKNTS AND PLRfOSKs AS A I'ART OS THE ('oNSTi- Sage they also '■proclaimed liberty throiigh- 



TfTION Of THE UNITED St.ITES 



out the land, unto ail the Inhahilanis lliere- 



In tostimonv whereof, I have hereunto .set VN e must accept the me.esage and make 

my hand, ami caused Ihe seal of the De- . "" eternal blessing, 
parlment of Stale to he affixed Done at I ‘ ' 

the City of Washington, this ISih day of! Reconstruction going on. 

December, in tlie year of our Lord, 1805, We publish to-day ilie order of the Presi- 
and of the Independence of the United ' dent relieving the Provisional Governor of 



Stales of America the OOtli. 

WM. H. SEWARD, 
Secretarv of State 



iugtou, watchiug the course of Cougressiou- 
al debate and action, arc hopeful of this. 

Let us hope that all the inemhers of Con- 
gress will return from their liolydays llior- 
oughly imbued with the spirit of that season 
which always speaks of peace and good will, 
of sympathy and forgiveness, of concession 
and love. In the spirit of Him whose birth 
they celebrate, let them act. Then the 
whole land will rejoice and, from Maine to 
the Pacific, all will welcome the happy New- 
Vear. 

(^iiartcrraastcr General’s Itcpurl. 

The disbursements of tlie  iuarterniaster s 
Department during the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 18G5, amounted to the enor- 
mous sum of $431,706,057.4-1. How this 
money was spent for liorses, and forage, and 
sliips, and clothing, and ten thousand otlier 
things Gen. Meigs, tells us in liis annual re- 
port. During the last year ol the war there 
were 304,102 horses and 58,818 mules used 
by the Government. It cost $1,000,000 
a month to feed the animals of Grant's army 
alone. During the war, there was fed to Ihe 
horses and mules employed in the army, 
32,000,000 bushels of corn, 70,000,000 bush- 
els of oats, and over 1,500,000 tons of hay, 
at a cost of $155,000,000. The clothing and 
equipage for the boys in blue cost last year 
$105,019,400. The fleet of vessels in the 
employ of the Quartermast.-r's Department 
has averaged 719 vessels of 225,000 tons 
burden. It.s average daily cost wa.s $02,- 
414. 



Hit .\t.KEAUV — The price of copper has 
gone lip forty pounds sterling per ton. and 
England has begged Spain to leave Chili 
alone But Spain is not to ready to listen 
to England’s voice. .She answers Lord Riis 
sell's remonstrance with the assurance Hint 
Spain ‘‘has resolved not to permit its dig- 
nity, causelesslyand gratuitously affronted, ]to 
remain witliout the just reparation to whicli 
it is cnlille.l;” Tlie .Spectator remarks : "If 
England goes a step lurther than advice, it 
is very doubtful whether the Spanish nation, 
morbidly proud and sensitive, aware tiuit its 
trade is of minor importance, and conscious 
tlia'. at the worst it could lose to us only the 
Philippines, would not accept tlie challenge. 
Short ol force there appears no remedy, and 
no English Ministry would willingly give 
the signal for what might prove a general 
European war, more especially while a false 
precedent, still unremoved, would allow Spain 
to rover ever)' sea with American Alabamas ' 



Alabama from his duties and relinquishing 
the control of the. State to the Governor elect. 
By a later dispatch we learn that the same 

: thing has been dgne a» respects .South Caro- 

Slavery at length Abolished. lina, Gov. Perry liaving been relieved and 

It is with extreme pleasure that we pub- , Gov. Orr iiislniete.l to assume the duties of 
llsh tlie above edict proclaiming freedom | his office. 

tbroughoiu all the land. By a strange way ' ilie work of reconstruction goes bravely 
have we been led to llii.s happy re.sull. . and steadily on The .Soulhern.Statesare tak- 
.Slavery, become liold by its growth and en jing their old places in the good oM family of 
croachments’, iiiangnratcd a rebellion to j the Union, and wedoiilu not. are glad to return 
bend Ihe l.’nion to its sway, or to esiahlisli ^ home again Neither do we dciihi that in the 
a Confederacy of which it should he the cor- j hearts ol the Northern people a cordial wel- 
ner-slone. In its .leleiice, or rather lor its | (.oiue hails them Instead of separation and 
aggrandisement, il.s advocates and friends j (]j,ipQ]„tion hv fire and blood — the fire and 
ruslied into war against the Ijiiion ami for Ploofl may work a closer Union. 



four years atlemple.l its destruction, 

* When the Government first drew the 
sword against the rebellion, it had to 
thought Ilf doinir harm to slavery, .Step hv 
step it was le.t to this. And each step was 
taken unwillinglv amt slirinkiiigly II ii 
ooiilil have saved the Union without injur- 
ing slavery it would have done it gladly. 
But when it hccaine evi.letil llinl slavery 
had not only inaugiiraied the rebellion, hut 
that it was its cliiel aid and support, supply- 
ing the .Soulliern armies with men and pro- 
vision.", then it was forced to assume Ihe of 
fensive against it. There was no alternative. 
It was a question between its own life or 
the life of slavery, ami the Ooverninenl 
chose the former. 

The Government did not, however, al first 
resort to measures of lorce against slavery 1 n 
ihemarch ol our armies it could not but be that 
slaves would become free — the (.resence ol 
the arinv itself was a proclamation of free- 
.lom. Bui there was no proclamation from 
itie Goveriiiucut to this ert'eet Its first es- 
say was to remove its arch-enemy by a grad- 
ual an.l compen.sated emancipation. This 



Congress now should work lor this, and is 
working. The President's policy is approved 
and will he carried out. In his last message 
he says "1 am induced to cherish the belief 
that personal animosity is surely and rapid- 
ly merging itself into a spirit of nationality, 
and that representation, connected with a 
properly adjusted system of taxation, will re- 
sult iu a harmonious restorations of the re- 
lation ol the .Stale.! to the National Union." 
The lime of that full reslorslion iscerlaiiilv 
not far d 1st an I 

fleneral Oram’s modest observation lliat 
'it is to he regretted that there can not be a 
greater commingling at tliis time between llie 
citizens of the two stetions, and particularly 
of those intrusted with the law-making power; 
will strike a chord in the liearts ol the peo- 
ple responsive to liis regret. And the re- 
gret w'll lead to action. The people are not 
sitting al the feet of .Sumner ami Stevens — 
they are not ruled by their will. Nor is 
Coiigiess. The true men ol the Union are 
rallying to President Johnson's support 
Hie administration policy will prevail. The 
Southern members now wailing in VVash- 



Tue National Policy. — Tlicre are two 
possible courses ol policy for this country to 
adopt, says the New York Times — on tlie 
one hand to go to work energetically reor i 
ganizing, develojiing, ami consolidating the I 
political freedom, the institutions, the indus- 
try, the labor, Ilie commerce, the finances, 
and the power of the nation; or, on the oth- 
er hand, neglecting the.se things, to pick 
quarrels and get into wars with foreign pow 
ers. .\ few years ol time spent in tlie first 
mentioned manner will vastly increase our 
economic forces and our national power, 
will give us the results of permanent inter- 
nal pacification ami the vigor ol renewc.l vi- 
tality. We will lose nothing that we now 
have, ami will acquire much that we do not 
now possess. The various diplomatic prob- 
lems now unsolved will become no more 
formidable by the postponement lor a time 
of their soliilion, and qiieslious that are 
now menacing may become harmle."S in their 
character. Those who find fault with our 
diplomacy because it is not sufficiently 
“fast” or aggressive to suit their views, will 
do well to consider these things 

Pruvisioiial Governor of .\liiliaiii t Ite 
lieved. 

Washington, December IS. 

Tlic following has been addressed by Mr. 
.‘Reward to Mr. Parsons- 

DEPARTMENT OF .STATE, I 
Washington, Dec. 18, 1 86.5. J 
To Ills Excellency Lewis K. Parsons, Prov. 
Gov. of the State of A labama, Montgomery, 
Ala.: 

Sir — The time has arrived when, in the 
judgmeiil of the President of the United 
.Slates, tlie care ami conduct of the proper 
atl'airs ol the Slate of Alabama may he 
committed to the constitutional authorities 
chosen by the people thereof without dan- 
ger to the peace an.l safely of the United 
.States. 

By direction ol the President, therefore, 
you are relieved from the trust which was 
lieretolore reposed in you as Provisional 
Governor of the .Slate ol Alabama. When- 
ever the Governor elect shall have accepted 
and becomes qualified to discharge the du- 
ties of the Executive office, you will transfer 
the papers and property of the State now in 
your custody to His Excellency the Govern 
or elect. It gives me especial [ileasure to 
convey to you the President’s acknowledg 
nicnis of the fidelity, tlie loyally and the 
discreliou which have marked your admin- 
istration. 

You will please give me areply specifying 
the day on which this communication is re- 
ceived. 

I have the honor to he, 

Yodh Excellencv’s most oh't serv t, 

W. H. SEWARD. 

[.Wf. Seward to the Governor of Alabrnna.2 

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, 
Washinoton, D. C., Dec. 18, 186-5. ) 

Sir — By direction of the President, I have 
the honor lierewilh to transmit to you a 
copy of a couiiiiiiiiication whicli has been 
addressed to his Excellency, Lewis E Par' 
sons, lute Provisional (loveriior of Alabama, 
whereby he has been relieved of Hie trust 
heretofore reposed in liini and directed to 
deliver into your Excellency's possession 
the papers ami property relating to those 
trusts 

I have the honor to letider you the co- 0 | - 
eralioii of the Governinent of the United 
Slates wlieiiever it may he found necessary 
ill effecting the e.’rly restoration and the 
permanent prosperity and wcDare of the 
Stale over which von liave I.een eatle.l to 
preside. 1 have the honor to he, 

With great respect, 

Your most ob’l serv'i, 

WM. H. SEWAUD, 
Secretarv of Stale 



Cotton Alunufactorics. 

Statistics in the Interior Department, says 
the Philadelphia Press, show the number of 
cotton manufacturing establishments in the 
United States, in 1800, to have been 1,091. 
The aggregate amount of capital invested 
was $97,585,269, being an increase of $22 
552,691, or 29.'6 per cent, over the total cap- 
ita! of 18.50. The qnanlily of cotton con- 
sumed (exclusive of 15,200,001 pounds 
wrought into mixed fabrics of cotton and 
wool) was 422, 704,975 pounds, equivalent to 
1,656 hales of 400 pounds each, which was 
250,177,97.) pounds, 55. .5 per cent, in excess 
of the consumption of 1850. Tlie total cost 
of raw material was $57,285,534, and of 
labor, $23,949,108. The average number of 
male hands employed throughout the year 
was 40,859, and ol females, 75,169. The ag- 
gregate number ol spindles in operation was 
5,235,727, and of looms, 126,313. 

The total value of all kinds of cotton 
goods manufactured was $115,681,774. The 
product of cotton cloth, including 271,859,- 

000 yards of printed cloth, amounted to 

1 148.252,406 yards, the quantity of yarn 
and thread to 47,241,603 pounds, and of bats, 
wicking and wadding to 12,967,956 pounds. 
In addition to the foregoing, the product 
embraces a large aggregate of miscellaneous 
articles and fabrics, among which were the 
following: Coverlets, 11,590; table-cloths 
and counterpanes, 11,600; quilts 122,000; 
mosquito netting, 1,.5S2,400 yards; cotton 
cordage, lines, Ac., 4,870,277 pounds; web- 
hidg, 4.50,000 pounds; quilts, 195,391 pounds; 
seamless hags, 6,235,600. The number of 
yards of sheeting, shirtings, printed cloth, 
Ac., amounted to thirty-six and a quarter 
yardg per capita for the total population of 
the Union. 

CitriNO AT Weddings — A recent writer 
says it is surprising how inlectioiis tears are 
at a wedding. First ol all, the hti.lc cries 
because slie is going to he married; and 
then, of course, tlie hridcsiiiaids cry, per- 
liap.s, because lliey are not; and the fond 
mama cries because she'll lose her d-d-dar- 
ling; and then ilie loud piapa cries because 
he thinks it, proper; and then all the ladies 
cry, because ladies, as a rule, will never miss 
a cliniice ol erving: and then, perhaps, the 
grooiiismeii cry to keep the ladies company; 
and then, the old pew opener cries, to see 
wliai deep pecuniary iniere.st she lakes iu 
the proceeding: an.l llieti, perliaps, the pub- 
lic cries, the puldic f.eitiL', of course, compoe- 
e.l exeliisivelv of pi-llieoalM But iiotwitli- 
Blainling all these Niohes, who inako quite 
a Niagara ol eyewater around him, we own 
we never yetjliave seen the hridegro«)m cry, 
and should ahoui as soon expect to liear the 
beadle whimper. 

The 'I'eXH" ('niton Crop 

Tlie Boston .Journal says that a letter from 
Galveston, Texa.", stales that the cotton from 
lhal port this year will he nl least 200,900 
hales ^whicli is about one half the aggre- 
gate export from the .Stale 'Tlie same letter 
stales lliat much of this cotton is paid lor in 
gold, and mentions the extraordinary influx 
of gold into the, -Stale. The value of this 
Texas cotton, eoiiipiited at 400, (XK) hales at 
forty cents | er pound, woiiM t.e $SO,000,000, 
or eqiiiviileiit to 1,500,000 hales at the prices 
of 1859 It allowance is made for tlie 
wheal, corn, wool, hides, growth ol slock 
an.l other pro'lnci", Texas will probably 
litUe given this yep.r a greater product in 
value, in proi«irtioii to iiopulation, than any 
other State in the Union. 

The Memory of President Lincoln 

Mr. Fool, from Ihe Joint Coinmitlee, to 
consider and report what token of respect 
may he proper for t.'ongress to express the 
deep sensihililv of the nation on the death 
of the late i’resideni, ,\hraiiani Lincoln, re- 
ported the following resolutions, w hich were 
adopted: 

Resolved, Tlial the melanclioly event of 
the violent and tragic death ol Abraham 
Lincoln, late President of the United Slates, 
having occurred during the recess of Con- 
gre.sH, an.l llic two Houses sliaring in the 
grief, and desiring to manifest llieir sensi- 
bility upon the occasion ol that public he- 
reaveiiicnl; therefore, 

Jle it Resolved ly the Senate (the House ol 
Representatives concurring), That the two 
Houses ol Congre.«.s will assemble in the 
hall of the House of Ifeiircsentalivcs, on 
Monday, the 12ih ot February next, that 
being his anniver.sarv hirlli day, al tlie hour 
of twelve meridian, an.'l lhal iu the piresence 
ol llie.Uvo Houses Hiere assemhled, an ad- 
dress upon the lile and character ol Ahra- 
liaiii Lincoln, late Presi.lent of tlie United 
Slaic.s, he pronounced hv the Hon. E M. 
.Sin II toil, and that the President of III e Senate 
pro tern., and the Speaker of the Hou.se of 
Hcpreseiilalives be requested to invite the 
Presi.lent o*" the United .States, the heads ol 
the several DeiiartiiicnI.", the .fudges ol ihe 
.Stipreiiic Court, the representative.! ol for- 
eign goveriimcnl.« near this government, 
and Bucli officers ol the army an.l navy as 
have receive. 1 i;.e ihariks oi Congress who 
may then be at the seal ol government, to 
he present on the occasion. 

.4n / be it further resolved. That tlie Presi- 
dent ol Hie United .Stales he requested to 
transmit a copy o! these resolutions to 
Mrs Lincoln, and to assure her of the 
profound syiiipaihv ol the two Houses ol 
Congress lor her deep personal ntlliclion, 
and their coiidolenee lor ilielale national 
hereavemenl. 

BayWe oli|. ilte lollowing from tlie Louis- 
ville Conner. We hiid not expected iiiiicli 
loyally to appear in lhal paper hut the ut- 
terly grouiiilleS" mi-repres( niaiions of this 
appende.1 e.xir.icl hav.* rather siii pri-e. I n.«. 

Wiiz was iiiina in WHshinglon, .lay he- 
loie yesterday, niiiid nil the impressive and 
Milemn a.ijiincis which were necessary to 
make his late a lesson to cruelty and treasou 
This was well, lor we believe that he was a. 
monster whose Ureulliings wrre a disgrace 
to liiimaiiiiy, and lliesurred and martyred 
names of departed heroes, starved and tor- 
lureil to dcaili in .-bii.lersonvillc, called upon 
the (loverniiiei.t l(.r liis forfeile.l file — [Nt. 
L"v!S Prei.s 

'The balance •! sJie article is very well, 
sorter iiiiich heller than this al any rale. 
But ho-.v about I he men on the other side? 



We have always heard that a violent devil 
was lees a devil than a mean devil. Starv- 
ing prisoners, keeping their money, keeping 
them from having their clothing, driving 
them into the snow and ice, unclad, and 
keeping them there, presided over in ranks 
with pistol and bayonet, to keep any one 
Rom stamping his feet to keep them from 
freezing; withholding their letters lawfully 
brought; beating them over the head with 
sticks to drive them from their stoves on 
nights which were colder than — what's bis 
name— all these things have been the habit 
in Northern prisons, besides from four to 
fifteen murders per week, in most of them, 
just added on by way of legnappe 
Wo love devils. 



The Resonrees of the North. 

The array of figures presented in the re- 
port of the .Secretary of War must certainly, 
if nothing else has, convince tlie late insur- 
gents of llieir utter folly in making war upon 
the North, and dissuade them from ever 
again essaying rebellion and a separate Con- 
federacy. When the war ended .Secretary 
.Stanton informed us we had between six and 
seven hundred thousand troops in the field, 
not to mention 400,000 more who were in 
the service, though not in the field, while 
the insurgentarmies which surrendered num- 
bered, all told, 174,000. 

In other words, after the war had contin- 
ued tour years, the North was enabled, with- 
out any seeming difficulty, to send four men 
into battle to every one which the South 
could muster only with the most herculean 
exertions. 

While the former continued to swarm 
with able-bodied men, polling a larger Pres- 
idential vote in LS64 than in I860, the latter 
was completely stripped of all her arms- 
bearing population. Unable, each one of 
them, to whip four Yankees the overthrow 
ol tlie .Southerners was, and would be, in 
another such contest, only a question of 
time. 

The .Secretary's report likewise shows 
that our re.sources in material were in keep- 
ing with our resources in men. When the 
struggle closed, oiir Government granaries 
were full to overflowing, and there was suf- 
ficient war material on hand to prolong the 
contest, Mr. Stanton says, fully three years. 

Whatever any dissatisfied portions of the 
country may hereafter attempt to do, it is 
very evident that they will never make war 
upon the General Governinent — New York 
Commercial. 



c' 



A LIST OK LETTERS 

R emaining lo the post OOlce at Frankfort, 
Kentuckj, on the 23th day of Deo.» 1866, 
which, if not called for in one month, will be sent 
to the Dead Letter Office at Washinjcton, D. 0. 



Ashlock, George 
Bandy, J. P. 

Burloy, Mrs. .Mag 
Bell, Lucy 
Batts, Tilden 
Burns, Wm. 

Cummins, Edward 
Cook, Jedertion 
Clay, Mrti. Nauc  

Ganity, P. 

Hamer, Mary E. 

Humphrey, K. P. 
llaldridge, Judaon 
llewell, 8. \V. 

Joeclin, Hiram (2) 

Knight, Mr*. Margeret 

COLOBKD. 

Chilea, Mra. Ann Marshall, Sidney 

Clair, Mrs. Molan, William 

Chinn, Fanney Smith, Miss Luble 

Thos. A\lorrow, William*, Mrs. Ann 

Persons calling for any of the above letteri 
will pleaso say ^'advertised’’ and give date of list 
Office open from 8 o’clock, A. M., until 
6, P, M. 

40 W. A. GAINES, P. M. 

Doc. 26, 1866-lt. 



Mills, D. P. 

Null, Dennis 
Osborn, James M. 
Pyno, W. H. 

Rein, R. C. 

Sewell , G. W. 
Schmdsuiine, Huury 
Scott, A. H . 

Shivell. 11. 0. 
Thump.’-on, Theodore 
Thompson, Miss Della 
Veuer, Miss Emma 
Woods, Henry 
Williams, Henry U. 
West, Miss H. B. 



M OORE’S RURAL NEW YORKER, 

great Agricultural , Literary . and Family 



tb( 



TAKE TIIE BEST ! 

OORE'S 

Weekly. Ably conducted and 6nely printed and 
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and one wanted in every town. A'oio t« Time 
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Webster’s New Illustrated Dictionary (price $12,) 
given to every body sending 20 new subscribers 
at club rate! Specimens, Bills, Premium Lists, 
drc., sent free. 

Address D. D. r. *M00RE, 

Dee, 22-lt. Rochester, N. Y. 



WATCH MAKER, 

I N ADDITION TO HIS LONG ESTABLLSH 
ED business as Watch-maker, has imported a 
slock of goods which ho can recommend to the 
public, and which consist in p.irt of 

WATCHES, CLOCKS. 

JEWELRY, 

Plated and Britannia Ware, 
TABLE k POCKET CUTLERY. 

Spectacles, P^je-Cillasses, 

AND 

|aiui| irtidts, 

TOO .\U^fEIlOUS TO MEXT/Oy. 

Those wishing to make Christinas or New Y'ear 
presents, will find a class of goods suitable for 
vueb purposes, and which are rarely brought to 
this market . 

Ho is constantly rccoivingadditions to his stock 
from first bands, and the public arc invited to 
examine these goods at the store on Main street 
which be has occupied for twenty-fi ve years. 

Dec. 22 tf 



CAPITAL HOTEL ICR-HOUSE. 

1 PROPOSALS will be received until Jan. let, 
for filling the Capitol Hotel Ice'^Hoose. 
Those desiring to secure the contract will please 
call and measure and leave proposition. 

Dec. 22 tf J. B. AKIN. 



?? u 0 K E \\ A II D ! 

S TOLEN from thopasturo ofH. C. VAUGHN, 
near Paynes’ Depot, on tho Frankfort and 
Lexington R. U., about the 26th of November, a 

B R O W N M A K E, 

si.a years old; with both hind feet white; and a 
star in tho forehead; about fifteen and a half 
hands high, woll brokeu, and goes well under the 
saddle. 

A reward of FIFTY' DOLLARS will be psid 
for the delivery of the Mare at the stable of Em- 
erson A Nutter, etOoorgotown, or for lutorma- 
tioD which may lead to her recovery. One bun* 
dred dollars will be paid for the return of the 
Mare and the conviotion of the thief. 

W. V. JOHNSON, 

Dec. 22, 1865. 3tw. J. W. FINNELL, 



HAGAVS MAGNOLIA BALM. 

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face and bands to a pearly satin texture of rav. 
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in the city belle of fashion. It removes tan, 
freckles, pimples and roughness from the skin, 
leaving the complexion fresh, transparent and 
smooth. Itcontainos no material injurious to 
the skin. Patronised by Actresses and Opera 
Singers. It is what every lady should have. 
Sold everywhere. Ketail price, it) ots. 

Prepared by W. E. HAGAN, Troy, N. Y. 

Address all orders to 

OEM AS BARNES & CO., New-York. 

Dee. 22-ly. 



S— T— 1860— X. 

I  n. jSL I5L E3 » s 

PLANTATION BITTERS. 

They purify, strengthon and invigorate. 

They oroato a healthy appetite. 

They are an antidote to change of water and 
diet. 

They avercome efifecis of dissipation and late 
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mind. 

They prevent miasmatic and intermittent fever. 

They purify tho breath and acidity of tho 
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They cure Dyspepsia and Constipation 

They cure Diarrhea, Cholera aad Cholera Mor- 
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They euro Livor Complaint and Nervous Head- 
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They are tho best Bitters iu tho world. They 
make the weak strong, and are exhausted nature’s 
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when Cork if covered by our private U. S. Stamp. 
Bewar. of eonnterfeits and refilled bottles. 

P. U. DRAKE 4 CO.. 

21 Park Row, Now 'Yotk. 

Deo, 22-ly. 



AGUA do MAGNOLIA. 

A toilet deligbtl Tho ladies’ treasure and gon* 
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est quantity. Manufactured from tberich South’^ 
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It overcomes the unpioaeant odor of perspiration. 

It removes redness, tan, blotches, Ao. 

Itoures nervous hcadacbo and allajrs iDflamns'- 
lion. 

It e *oU, softens and adds delicacy to tho skin. 

It yields a subdued and lasting perfume. 

It cures musqueto bites and stings of inieots. 

It ooDtaios no materia] injurious lo the skin. 

Patronized by Actresses and Opera Singers, It 
is what every lady should have. Sold every’* 
where. Try the Magnolia Water once and you 
will use no other Cologne, Perfumery, or Toilet 
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DEMAS BARNES A CO., 

Props. Exclusive Agents, N. Y. 

Deo. 22-ly. 



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MI BL! BtLL MB! 

The old “Assembly Baft Club” of Frankfort, 
Ky., having been reorgenited, will give nseries of 
FOUR BALLS at tho ^ 

C^ABITAlL hotel, 

the following Wedneedey evenings, at 8 
o’clock: 

Wedn^day, December 27th, 1806. 
Wednesday, January lOtb, i860. 

Wednesday, January 24th, 1866. 

E. H. TAYLOR, /‘vesWva#. 

QfO- W. Mo.vkOXi 
Frankfort, Ky., Nov. 24, lS65-2m. 



NNSCKLLAW 



Mark Smith in a New Character. 

The play-bills of St. Loiii.s.aml Cincinnati, 
in announcing an engagement with the pop- 
ular comedian, Mark Smith, mention his 
“return (rom Europe,” though why, wc can- 
not understand, for he did not go there with 
any intention of acting — taking with him 
only a carpel-bag — intending to see rather 
than be seen. lie was met in London by 
hi.s younger brother, Sol (Tr.), and together 
they went through the agreeable task of 
sight-seeing in that great city. Wc have 
been made acquainted with an incident 
which look place at the celebrated “exhibi~ 
tion 01 Madame Tussard A; Son,” Baker 
street, which will show that though our 
friend Mark did not intend to act in Lon- 
don, he was compelled to do a little bit of 
pantomime, without a rehearsal, and that his 
impromptu acting wasquite effective. 

The two brothers were in what is called 
the “Chamber of Horrors,” viewing tlie 
portraits and wax-figures of celebrated mur- 
derers, when Mark, to obtain a better view 
of a fine painting on an opposite wall, step- 
jied upon a platform whereon stood the 
“counterfeit presentment,” (in wax) of some 
of the most notorious criminals, who had 
been duly executed cluring tbe present cen- 
tury. Just as he had got his eyes fixed 
upon the painting, a cockney gentleman, 
with his wife, and child and nurse, came 
along and one of them asked .Sol. (who had 
a catalogue in his hand) who that figure 
(indicating Mark) represented Sol., who 
is always ready for a joke, solemnly read 
from the catalogue as follows: 

“266. Daniel Good. (Taken from lile.) 
The murderer of Jane Jones, whose body 
he cut asunder and burnt!” 

“Well,” said the cockney, directing his 
look lull upon Mark’s countenance, which, 
by this time, had become fixed as marble, 
"that is natural as life. I’m sure! Did you 
ever see, my dear, such a villainous looking 
face?” 

“I can l say, husband,” replied the wife, 
“that I see anything so very villainous in 
the countenance; on the contrary, 1 should 
never have taken it for that of a murderer: 
it looks rather amiable, I think.” 

The child here put in — “Pa, lilt me up, 
and let me have a good look at Mr. Good.” 
(Mark could hardly help bursting out laugh- 
ing, but decided to hold out a little longer.) 
The child was lifted up so that she could 
look right into the face of the "figure,” 
when the actor could not resist the tempta- 
tion to give a very slight, but very distinct 
wink to the young Miss, who, affrighted, 
exclaimed, “put me down! put me down! .\s 
trueas'tho world, ma. that murderer winked 
at me!" 

“Nonsense, my child,” exclaimed the 
mother, “it was your imagination.” 

"No, ma, indeed it was a real wink; my 
imagination never winked likethat. It was 
a very little wink, but it was a wink.” 

The nurse here intervened to quiet the 
diild, who appeared very much frightened 
indeed. “.See,” said the girl, “ I will look 
right into his face, and let us see if he will 
wink at me."' And sure enough she stepped 
up and faced the figure. Mark gave her a 
most decided wink, which drew up the cor- 
ner of his mouth to a degree that was very 
peculiar. The nurse almost fell hack into 
the arms of her master and mistress, ex- 
claiming, "There’s no mistake about it, 
that was a wink, and a big one, loo! It’s 
done by machinery, I gue.ss 

“Machinery, nonsense!” said the man; 
“let me look into this matter,” To this he 
was encouraged by the mischief-loving .Sol, 
and the lather and husband stepped lioldly 
up and laced the supposed murderer. “There 
is no machinery here — no winking of the 
eyes, that /can precieve.” Then growing 
bolder, he began to address the figure in 
the way of banter: "Yovr'ren pretty fellow, 

now, ar'nt you? Oh, you monster, you 
murderer of innocent girks! if 1 had been 
on the jury that tried you , there would have 
been no need of evidence; your very looks 
would have been enough to hang you.” 

“Pa,” said the child, “suppose you touch, 
his face. That beard looks as if it might 
be real. Pinch his nose, and pull his ears.” 
“Certainly, my dear,” answered the fath- 
er; "I ain't afraid to touch him — let’s see if 
he’ll wink at me!” Tie accerdially raised 
his hand as if to feel the beard ol the actor, 
when — there was no wink this lime, but a 
gradual turning of tbe eyes, (both eyes,) 
upon the cockney, such ns the Commanda- 
tore might turn upon Lepporello, in Don 
Giovanni, and a siidded snap ol the teeth 
toward the uplifted hand. The father, 
inothet, child and nurse, without wailing to 
examine further into the “machinery ” push- 
ed lor the door, declaring that they never — 
never would visit the Chamber, of ’Orrors 
^gain. 

A Philosophic Negro. 

Who can read the following, and question 
whether negroes have the power ol rea.son- 
ing? Wc copy from a correspondent ol the 
Cincinnati Commercial, traveling in Geor- 
gia. He there came acro.ss an aged negro, 
called “Old P en,” of whom he relates this 
incident: 

Old Ben brought us a watermelon; and, 
while we were eating, the old chattel start* 
led its master by a siuiden aggressive move- 
ment of its intellectual machinery. 

“Massa William,” (addressing his master ) 
“da’s one ling: if the slaves gwine to be free, 
what’s gwine to become o' de ole folks?” 
“What do you think should fie done. 
Ben?” said I, interpo.singly. 

“1 link you, Massa William, ought to take 
care ol ’em.” 

"Bui,” said hi.s master, “why should I do 
that when you are free?’ 

“’Cause I done worked for you, massa, all 
my life. You got my labor, when I can’t 
work no more, you have got to lake keer o’ 
me.” 

"Well, but that l.abor of yoiir.s, Ben, I 
haven’t got now; it's all spent if the slaves 
are freed.” 

“Can’t help dat, massa; dat not my biisi- 
niss. You has had de work: 1 liainl had it. 
Now what am 1 gwine to do il you don’t 
take keer of me? Ef I'd bin allowed to 
keep my own labor, 1 would now bab 
enough. Dat’s so, massa!” 

‘ Well, but suppose I have not any thing 
to support you with, Ben? ’ 

"You got de land, massa You jisgib me 
de use ob a little patch o' land, 1 take keer 
ol uivself; you needn’t feed me. 

Hiram Lodge No. ■», of I'. Jii .Masons, 
ITave moved their place of meeting from 
Main .“street to Brown’s Building, third sto- 
ry, on .St. Clair Street. The Lodge meets ev- 
ery second and fourth 'ruesdays in each 
month, at 7 o’clock P. M. 'fransient 
Brothers are invited to attend. 

Dec 12. W. FRANKLIN, W. M. 



NKWJIA^ STORE! 

QUICK SALES &^ALL PROFITS! 

HULL DAY, 

Dealers in all kinds of 

UEOCEBIIBS AND PROYISIQKS, 

Ouritock eonsisla in part of ttie fottowing article*, viz: 

TOBACCO, OF ALL KINDS. 
GREEN AND BLACK TEA, 
SUGAR AND COFFEE, 
BACON AND LARD, 
CANNED FRUIT. 
DRIED FRUIT, 

TIN WARE, 
CIGARS, 

EGGS, 

The celebrated Baltimore I^XAR 

OYSTERS! 

Fresh and fine — received daily 

SODA, 

BUTTER, 
CRACKERS, 

WHITE FISH, 

STONE WARE, 
POWDER SHOT, 

BRO OMS, RR USHES, 
COAL OIL AND LA.MPS, 
WOODEN cV STONE WARE, 
CRANBERRIES, ^C.,  S,C., ^C. 

WY ^ would say to tbo citiKens of Frankfort 
f y and surroundingcounity that we hare just 
opened a 

GROCERY & PROVISION STORE, 

with an entire new stock, in Swigerl’s Block, op- 
posite the Post Office. All are respectfully invit- 
ed to call and examine onr stock before buying 
cisewhoro.— TERMS CASH. 

Wo will pay the highest price in Cash for But- 
ter, Lard, Bacon, Uams, Eggs, and Grass-seed. 
Aug. 25, 1BC5 HULL Sc DAY. 



E 



ECLECTIC . 

diterature, Science, and Art. 

New Volume begins January 1866. 

The Eclectic Magazi.sr is, as Us name indi- 
cates, a 9f lection from other magazines and peci- 
odical.s. These selections are carefully made 
each month, from the entire range of foreign 
Poriodtcals. In this respect it is en/ire?/ unlike 
other monthliei, and has no rival. The following 
aro some of tho works from which selections arc 
made : 

London Quartorl) t Revue de Deux Mou«les 

BntUh Quarterly. London Society, 

North British Review, Bonllcy's Miscoltany, 
Popular Science Review, Corobill Magazine, 

Saturday Review, Frazer*s Magazine, 

l*eUuro Hour, Temple Bar, 

Westminster Review, Chambers's Journal, 

Dublin University Mag. Kdlnburg Review, 

.Art Journal, ‘ * lioiidon National Review, 

We have also arranged to secure choice selec- 
tions from tho French, Orrman, and other Con- 
tinental Periodicals, translated especially for 
tho Eclectic, and it is hoped this new feature will 
add greatly to the variety and value of the work. 

EMBELLISHMENTS. 

Each number is embellished with one or more 
Fine Steel Engravings — portraits of eminent 
men or illustrative of important historical events. 

Volumes coranence i n January and July of 
each year: sub.soriptions can commence with any 
month . 

TERMS: $5 per Year; Single Murahers, 50 
cents. Five Copies, $2U. 

The Trade, Clergymen, Teachers, and Clubs 
supplied on favorable terms. Address, 

W. II. BID WELL, 5 Beckman St., New- York. 

Xov. 11, 5t 

BUR^AM r HICKSON, 

REAL ESTATE 

-AND— 

liiNiiraiaee 

Corner 3d and Main Street, over Davis Drug 
Store, Terre Haute, Ind. 

BUY AND SELL ON COaMMISSION. 

Houses and Lots, VacalTt Lots, Farms, Farming 
Land in all dbe Western States and Territories. 
Loans negotiated, Collections made, Land enter- 
ed, Taxes paid and Titles examined, in all the 
Western States. We are prepared to enter lands, 
with either Land Warrants or Cash on liberal 
terms. 

Particular attention is given to sales of Real 
Estate at Auction. 

Persons desiring to change their residences 
would do well to call and examine our register of 
Farms, A’C. before purchasing. We have a large 
number for sale, on ea.ny terms, located in nearly 
every State in the United States. Wo will bo 
pleased to answer any commumcalion in regard 
to Lands, and we think we can give general sat- 
isfaction a.s our acquaintance with tbe Western 
States and Territories is equal to any other office 
in the country. 

June 1.3, 1865 — Om. 

AGENTS WANTED 

FOR OUR 

tiircat Work 



Sltindard 



THE 

HIslory of 



Ilie War!! 



M lONTAINING A FULL, AUTHENTIC AND 
reliable account of the **grcat conflict,** 
from its coinmonccmont to its close. Complete in 
one very largo volume, of over 1,000 pages; 
containieg reading matter equal to three large 
royal octavo volumes splendidly illustrated with 
over 135 fine portraits of Generals and battle 
scenes. 

This is just the book tho people want. Itpre- 
sents a rare ohanco for Agents. Teachers, ener- 
getic young men, and espeoiall) returned and dis- 
abled officers and soldiers, in want of profitable 
employment, will find it peculiarly adapted te 
their condition. This work has no rival as a 
candid, lucid, cumplete, authentic and reliable 
history of the war. Send for circular and see our 
terms. Address JONES BROTHERS A CO., 
148 West Fourth street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Oct. 10, 18C^3m». 

Proclamation by the Q 

§300 REWARD. 

COMMONWEAI.TU OF KENTUCKY, ) 
Execvtivk Depabtmk.nt. ) 
^ * niEREAS, it has been made known to 
me, that SAMUEL ANDERSON stands 
indicted Jin tho Grant Circuit Court, for tho 
murder of Washington Osborne, committed on 
tho 3d October 1805, in Qrnnt County, said Sam 
uel Anderson, is now a fugitivofrom justice going 
at large. 

Now, Therefore, I, TIIOS. E. BKAMLETTE, 
Governor of tho Commonwealth of Kentucky, do 
hereby offer a reward of THREE HUNDRED 
DOLLARS for tbe apprehension of tho said Sam- 
uel Anderson and his delivery to tho Jailor of 
Grant County, within one year from tho date 
hereof. 

. jy Tt:sTi.voyy wherbof, i 

J I ^ 1 hereunto sot my hand and caused 
I • I tiio seal of tho Commonwealth to be af- 
^ fi.ted. Done at Frankfort, this the 27th 
day of November A. D. 1865, and in the 74th 
rear of the Commonwealth aforesaid. 

TH03. E. BRAMLETTK. 

By the Governor; 

E. I^. Van Winkle, 

Secretary of State. 

By Jas. R. Page, As'st Sect'ry. 

Nov. 28-3mo«. 



GUNrMDER. 

Wm. CROMEY, 

AGENT FOR THE SAFE OF 

ORIENTAL AND MIAMI 

GUNPOWDER, 

No. Ii90 Maia St, bet. 7th and Sth, 

LOUISVUXE, KY. 

A lull supply of Sporting, Rille and 
Rlasting Powder and Safety- 
Fuse always on hand 
and for sale. 



Nov 2l-lm. 



JAMES HARLAN, JB. 



JOHN U. HAR LAN, 

HARLAN k HARLAN, ' 

A-ttornevs at La’w, 

FUANKFOKT, KY. 

W ILL practice law in the Court of Appeals, 
in the Federal courts bolden in FraoKfort, 
Louisville, and Covington, and in tbe Circuit 
Courts of Franklin, Woodford, Sbelbj, Henry, 
Anderson, Owen, Mercer, and Scott. 

Special attention given to tbo collection of 
claims. They will, in all cases where it is desir- 
ed, attend to the unsettled law business of James 
Harlan, dec'd. Correspondence in reference to 
that business is requested. 

March 16. 1863— if. 

Kentucky River Ooal. 

1 UAVB just received a fresh supply of the 
BEST KENTUCKY RIVER COAL; also a 
largo lot of CANNEL, Pittsburg, Youghiogheny, 
and Pomeroy, which I will sell at tbe loweei 
market price. All orders will bo promptly filled 
for any point on tbe railroad or city, by applying 
to me by mail, or at my Coal Yard in Frankfort* 
feb2 twtf. S. BLACK. 



JOHN MASON BROWN, 

(LATE COEONEL 45th KY. VOLUNTEHR.S,) 

APIOKNEY A'P LAW, 

FUANKFOKT, KY. 

Special attention given to collections and te 
tho prosecution of military olaims. 

April 18, 1865. 

DOCTOR BEN. MONROE 

H as returneil to Frankfort, and tenders his 
professional services to those who may de- 
sire them. 

OH .Main Sti'r'et tiff fl'iiVs wljotHlnj 
lliirlan'ii oj^ce. RetiJeHce ot Mr$ Lebban’s. 
July 27, 1865 

Q. W. CRADDOCK, 

\ T T 0 R N \i Y A T L A W 

FKANKFtmr. KY. 

O FFICE on St. Clair Street, next dour south 
of the Branch Bank of Kentucky. 

Will practice law in all tbe Courts bolden in tbe 
city of Frankfort, and in the Circuit Courts of tbe 
iidjoining counties. [April 7, l862-tf. 

LTSANDER HOBD, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

FHAS'KFOKT, KY. 

F HACTXCBS Law in tbe Court of Appeals, 
Federal Court, and Franklin Circuit Court. 
Any business confided to him shall be faithfully 
and promptly attended to. His office is on St. 
Clair street, near tbe Branch Bank of Kentucky, 
where he may generally be found. 

Frankfort, Jan. 12, 185V- tf. 



FUANKLIN SPHLNGS 

(LATE KENTCCIlY MILITARY INSTITLTa. 
A Sri.rct School vor Bots and You.no Men 
Six Milr.§ from Frankfort, Kr., 

In Charge of B. B. SAYRE. 

Session opens on tho last Monday in Septem- 
ber, 1865. 

hoard op visitors. ' 

llis Excellency, Qov. T. B. Braoiletto; John 
M. Harlan, Attorney General; Rev. John N. 
Norton, D. D.; John B. Temple, Esq.; tieorge 
W. Craddock, Esq.; Gen. D. W. Lindsey; S. I. 
M. Major, Ei^q.; Col. Orlando Brown, Jr.; Hon. 
A. J. James. 

THE PECULIAR ADVANTAGE.S of this 
school are — A Military Organination^ to be adopt 
ed when tbe number of pupils is sufficient to 
form oue or mere companies — health — seclusion 
^extensive grounds — commodious buildings — 
means of abundant exercise — in.struction obiefiy 
on tbo oral system — ample libraries-freodom from 
malign moral influences of town — long expert 
enee of tbe Principal in the teaching and gov- 
ernment of youth. 

To any one desiring it, and sending address 
to B. B. Sayre, E'rankfort, Ky., a circular will 
be forwarded, giving information in detail. 

July 14, 1865. 



THO. B. BBAMLBTTB B. L. VaKWINKLB. 

BRAMLETTE & VANWINKLE. 

ATTORNEYS AT LAH. 

^B0"ILL practice in the Court of Appeals and 
f T Federal Courts held in Kentucky. 
jlt^O^icein MANSION HOUSE, nearly op- 
dosito Commonwealth Printing Office. 

B. L. J. 5. VANWiyKlB 
.fill practice in tbe Franklin, Anderson, Boyle, 
and adjacent Circuit Courts. 

.^^Offices — Fbankfort and Danvillb. 

Sept. 14, 1863-by. 



REWARDS 



Proclamation by the Governor. 



8500 REWARD. 

Commonwraltu or Krntuckt, I 
Exrcutivk Dkpartmknt, j 

W HEREAS, it has been made known to me 
that JOHN and ROBERT WISEMAN, 
of tbe county of Estill, State of Kentucky, did 
on the 30th day of October, 1865, maliciously 
shoot and kill Clayton Witt, of said county, and 
they have fled from justice and arc going at 
large: 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. E. BRAMLETTE, 
Governor of tho Commonwealth of Kentucky, do 
hereby offer a reward of TWO HUNDRED 
AND FIFTY DOLLARS each, for the appre- 
hension of the said John and Robert Wiseman, 
and their delivery to tbe jailer of Estill county 
within ono year from the date hereof: 

IN TESTIMONY WBEHEOI\ 1 

{ I have hereunto set my band, and caused 
L. S. y the seal of the Commonwealth to be af- 
J fixed. Done at Frankfort, this Btb 
-y-— ^ day of November A. D. 1865, and in 
tbe 74tb year of tbe Commonwealth. 

THOS. E. BRAMLETTE. 

By the Governor: 

R. L. VanWinklb, Secretary of State. 

By Jab. R. Page, Assistant Secretary. 



DESCRIPTION. 

John Wiseman is about 5 feet 6 inches high, 
weighs 135 lbs, dark complexion, blue eyes, dark 
hair, round shouldered, bow legged, scar on one of 
his breasts, supposed to have been shet. He is 
about 34 or 35 years old. 

Robert Wiseman, age about 33 years, about 6 
foot high, weight 165 or 170 pounds, bow legged, 
rather dark complexion, dark hair, blue eyes, 
scar as long as tbe palm of tbe hand on the right 
thigh, made by a burn. 

Nov. 10-1865-3m. 



Proclamation by the Governor. 



J. W. PIXMBLL. 



V. T. CHAMBBBB. 



PINNELL k CHAMBERS, 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW. 

OFFICE — Vfe^t Side Scott St. bet. Thirds Emtrth 
Street. 

COVINOTON, KENTUCKY. 

FeLiruarr 22, l860-tf. 

Lonisville and Frankfort and Lexing 
ton and Frankfort Railroads. 
Sdpkbixtesdent'h Office, 

Tku'I'.viu.r. Kv., .All*: l.i. IS64. 

C I K C U I. A l{ 

B T thb previsioBS of the Excise Law, passed 
June 30, 1864, every person giving a re- 
ceipt for the delivery of property, is required to 
stamp the receipt with a two-ceot Revenue 
Stamp. Postage stamps will not answer. 

Ii“ order to comply with the terms of this law, 
Agents will require Consignees, before tho de- 
livery of goods, to send a written order, stamped, 
for its delivery te another person. 

SAM'L. GILL, Superiotondent. 




«30O REWARD. 

Coumonwbaltu of Ksntuckt, 1 
Exbcotivb Dbpartmbmt. j 

W HEREAS. It has been made known tome 
that WM. J. GRAY, JR.,did,on tho Id 
day of Sept., 1865, murder Policeman Edward 
Bond whilst in the discharge of bis official duties 
in the city of Louisville, Ky., and is now a fu- 
gitive from justice. 

Now, therefore, I THOS. E. BRAMLETTE, 
Governor of tbo Commonwealth aforesaid, do 
hereby offer a reward of THREE HUNDRED 
DOLLARS for tbe apprehension of said WM. J. 
GRAY, JR., and the delivery of him to tbe 
Jailor of Jefferson eounty, within one year from 
this date. 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 
hare hereunto set my band and caused 
tbe seal of the Commonwealth to be 
affixed. Done at Frankfort this IBth 
day of Oct., A. D., 1865, and in tbe 
74tb year of the Commonwealth. 

THO. K. BRAMLETTE, 

By tbe Governor: 

B. L. Van Winkle, Secretary of State. 

By Jab. R. Page, Assistant Secretary. 

DESCRIPTION. 

Win. J. Gray is *bout 33 years of age, 6 feet 
high and stoops a little. Wore, when last seen, 
long^ li^t auburn hair, llaablue eyes, longnese, 
sallow complexion. Acted at one tune as a guer- 
rilla with Capt. Hedge in Nelson, Bullitt, and 
Spsicer ceunties. 

Oot. 24, 1865-310. 




Proclamation by the Governor. 



The above order must be complied with or 
grrods will bo retained in the D^ot at Frankfort. 

T. e.iCYTE, Agent. 



Ancrnat 10. 1864. 



Proclamation by the Governor. 
i$500 REWARD 

Commonwralth of Kbntuokt, 1 
Exbcutivb Dbpartmknt. j 

W HEREAS, it has been made known to me 
that at the February terra, 1865, ef tbe 
Garrard Circuit Court an Indictment was found bv 
the Grand Jury of said Court agaiatt JAMES and 
green SLAUGHTER, for the murder of Abso- 
lum Pollard, and they are now fugitives from jus- 
tice. » 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. E. BRAMLETTE, 
Governor of the Commonwealth aforesaid, do here- 
by offer a reward of TWO HUNDRED AND 
FIFTY DOLLARS each for tbe apprehension of 
said James and Green Slaughter, and their deliv- 
ery to the Jailer of Garrard county, within one 
year from the date hereof. 

, IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, / 

( have hereunto set my band and caused 
tbo seal of tbe Commonwealth to be 
affixed. Done at Frankfort this the 
w .y— ' 8th day of November, A. D. 1865, and 
iu tbo 74th year of the Commonwealth. 

THOS. B. BRAMLETTE, 

By the Geveraer : 

K. L. VANWINKLE, 

Secretary of State. 

Attest; JaB. R. PaGB, Assistant Secretary . 
DESCRIPTION. 

Green Slaughter, is about 35 years old, about 
5 feet lU inches high, heavy set, weighs 1.81 lbs., 
black eyes, hair and whiskers. 

James Slaughter, is about 19 years old, round 
face, 5 feet 6 to I inches high and slightly round 
shouldered and heavy set. 

Nor. 10, 1865 — sw3m. 

Proclamation by the Governor. 

COMMONWBATU OP KbNTUCET, [ 
Executive Dbpabtmknt. j 

n j llEREAS, it has been made known to mo 
that, on tho 15th of October, iS65, an un- 
known woman was murdered in Jefferson county, 
about three miles from tho city of Louisville, and 
the murderer is going at large : 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. E. BRAMLETTE, 
Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, 
do hereby offer a reward of Fire Hundred Dol- 
lars for tbo apprehension and delivery of the un- 
known murderer or murderers to the jailor of 
Jefferson county within ono year from the date 
hereof, and their conviction. 

. — • — . IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 

f I have hereunto set my hand and caused 

-| L. S. V the seal of the Commonwealth to be af- 
[ j fixed. Doneat Frankfort this 24th day 

-y — ' of October, A. I . 1865, and in the 74lh 
yearof the Commonwealth. 

THOS. E. BRAMLETTE. 

By the Governor : 

B. L. VanWinkle, Secretary of State. 

By Jas. R. Pagr, As.^ietant Secretary, 
oet. 27, 1865-Sm. 



Proclamation by the Governor. 
«260 REWARD. 

COMM0XWHALTU OF KENTUCKY, I 
Executive Dipabtmrnt. j 
1 V fhereas, it has been made known to mo that 
y V BEN. JOHNSON, of the county ef Hart, 
did on tbe 6th day of November, 1965 maliciously 
sheet and kill Samuel Mansfield, of said county, 
and he Is now a fugitive from justice going at 
large. 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. H. BRAMLETTE, 
Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do 
hereby offer a reward of TWO HUNDRED AND 
FIFTY DOLLARS for the apprehension of the 
said Ben. Johnson and his delivery to the Jailer 
of Harteounty, within one year from tbe date 
hereof. 

, — ^ IS TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 

have hereunto sot my hand and caus- 
ed the seal of the Commouweath to be 
affixed. Done at Frankfurt this tho 
— . — ' I5th day of November, A. I). 1865, 
and in tbe 74tb ye.ar of the Commonwealth. 

THOS. E. BRAMLETTE. 

By the Governor; 

K. L. VANWINKLE. 

Secretary of State* 

By Jas. R. Pack, Ass’t Sec’y. 



L. S. 



DESCRIPnoX 

Beu. Johnson is about 35 years ut age, about 
6 feet high, weighs 15U pounds, light uomplexion 
and beard, blue or grey sc-ur in one hand, 

and WM asaddler by^rndc. 

— 3ra. 



§’2.'i0 REWARD. 



COMMONWRALTH OP KrKTUCKT, I 
Executive Dkpaetmxnt. j 

W HEREAS, It has been made known to me 
that PINKNEY A. YANCEY, did, on the 
0th, day of December, 1865, in the county of 
Christian, shout ami mortally wound Robert 
Coleman who ba.s since died from the effects of 
said wound, said Yauccy, is now a fugitive from 
justice going at large. 

Now, therefore, I, THOMAS E. BRAM- 
LETTK, Governor of tbo Commonwealth of Ken- 
tucky, do hereby offer a reward of T WO HUN- 
DRED A FIFTY DOLLARS for tbe apprehension 
of tho said PINKNEY A. YANCEY, and his de 
livery to the jailor of Christian county, within 
ono year from the date hereof. 

, IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 

{ 1 have hereunto set my hand and caus- 
L. S.  ed the seal of the Commonwealth tube 
j affixed. *Doooat Frankfort, this 18th 
V— day of Dec., A. D., 1865, and ip 
the 74tb year of the Commonwealth. 

THOS. E. BRAMLETTE. 

By the Governor: 

E. L. VanWinklb, Secretary of State. 

By Jamb» R. Page. Assistant Secretary. 

DESCRIPTION. 

Pinkney A. Yancey is about 28 years of ago, 
about 5 feet 3 inches high, thick heavy built, 
weighs about 14U pounds, auborn hair, florid 
complexion, without whiskers, prominent cheek 
bones, and very small hands, rather stoop s1h uI- 
dered and quick in step . 

Deo 19-3m .—Yeoman copy. 

Proclamation by the Governor 

S200 REWARD. 

COMMONWEALTH OF KENTUCKY, 
Executive Dkpabtmbnt. 

W HEREAS, it has been made known tome 
that, one JOHN SANDERS stands indict- 
ed by the Boone Circuit Court for the murder of 
Joshua Ellis, and tbe said John Sanders is now 
a fugitive from justice and going at large. 

Now, therefore, I, RICHARD T. JACOB, 
Lieutenant and Acting Governor of the Com- 
monwealth aforesaid, do hereby offer a reward 
of Two Hundred Dollars for the apprehension 
of tbe said JOHN SANDERS and bis delivery to 
tbe Jailer of Boone county, within year one from 
the date hereof. 

, — ^ . IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 

{ 'I have hereunto set my hand, and caused 
L. S.   tho seal of the Commonwealth to be 
J affixed. Done at Frank:ort this, tbe 
20th day of Sept., A. D. 1865, and in 
tbe 74th year oC tho Commonwealth. 

RICHARD T. JACOB, 
Lieutenant and Acting Governor. 

By tbo Governor: 

E. L. VanWinkle, Secretary of State. 

By Ja9. R. Pagr, Assistant Secretary. 

Sept. 26 — 3m. 

Proclamation by the Governor. 
i“l,6U0 REWARD. 




CUMMONWBALTU OP KrHTUOET, 1 
Executive Department, j 

Whereas, it has been made known to mo that 
THOMAS JENKINS, ANTHONY SMITH,and 
JOHN BISHOP did, on tho IWth of Angust, 1865, 
in tbe county of Woodford, rob and assault in an 
aggravated mannor, Bcoj. Martin and Faulty 
Johnson, of said county, and did also commit tbe 
crime of robbery and rape upon the person of 
Mrs. Gray in Mercer county, and they now are 
fuigtives from justice and going at large: 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. E. BRAMLETTE, 
Governor of tbe Commonwealth aforesaid, do 
hereby offer a reward of FIVE HUNDRED 
DOLLARS each for tbe apprehension of tbe said 
Thomas Jenkins, Anthony Smith, and John Bish- 
op, and their delivery to the jailer of Woodford 
or Mercer county, within one year from tbe date 
hereof. 

IN TESTIMONY WHEREO.', I 
have hereunto set my band and caused 
tbe seal of tbe Commonwealth to be 
affixeu. Doneat Frankfort, this 5th 
day of Sept., A. D. 1865, and in tbe 
74th yearof the Commonwealth. 

THOS. E. BRAMLETTE. 

By ibe Governor. 

E. L. Van Winkle, Secretary of State. 

By Jas. R. Page, Assistant Secretary. 

DESCRIPTION. 

Tbos Jenkins is about 5 feet 19 inches high, 
light hair, hazel eyes, and little stooped shoulder 
(hardly sufficient to discover at a distance) and 
will weigh about 170 tbs. Lives in Mercer 
ceunty, near Duncansville, Ky. 

Anlbony Smith is about 5 feet 8 inches in 
bight, black hair, dark eyes, and will weigh about 
180 lbs. Lives in Washington county, nearCorn- 
ishviile, Ky. 

John Bishop is about 5 feet 8 inches in beiffbt, 
and has light hair, hazel eyes, weighs about 130 lbs 
and lives in Mercer county, near Duncansville, 

Ky. 

Sept. 8. 1865* .3ui. 

Proclamation by the Governor. 



$300 REWARD. 

CouuoN * wealth op Kentucky, ) 

ExECUTIVS DbFARTMENT, j 

W HEREAS, it has been made known to me 
that one ROBERTO. TURNER, did, in 
November, 1865, in the County of Logan , murder 
R. S. Porter, and is now a fugitive from justice, 
going a large. 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. B. BRAMLETTK, 
Governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do 
hereby offer a reward of THREE HUNDRED 
DOLLARS, for the apprehension oftho said Rob 
ort G. Turner, and his delivery to tbe Jailer of 
Logan County, within one year from the date 
hereof : 

— ^ IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 

I L S ( hereunto set my hand, and caused 
( * J the seal of the Couimonwoaitb to be af- 

— ’ fixed. Done at Frankfort, this 20lh day 
ef November, A. D. 1865, and in tho 74th year of 
the Commonwealth. 

THOS. H. BRAMLETTK. 

By the Governor, 

E. L. Va.n WINKLE, Secretary of State* 

By Jas. R. Page, Assistant Secretary. 



DESCRIPTION. 

Robert G. Turner, is about 35 or 40 yean old, 
5 feet 10 inches high, light hair, had a blue mark 
underoue oye; formerly from the State of Mis- 
souri. 

Nov. 21-3m. 



Proclamation by the Governor. 
?300 UEWAIUJ. 

Coumonwraltm op Krntucki*, 1 
Exhcbtivb Dkpastre.nt, j 
U ^ HEHE.-VS, It has liucn made known to me, 
V V that .1 A M ES LAWSON , h.i.s been indicted 
iu thu Mercer Circuit Court, J4»r murdering one 
Bub Bosley, of Mercer County, tho said Jame.s 
Lawson has fie l from justice end is nnw going at 
large. 

Now, therefore, I, THOS. K. BRA.MLKTTE, 
Governor ot the Commonwealth of Kentucky, do 
hereby offer a reward of THREE HUNDRED 
DOLLARS, fttr the .spprehoiision of the said 
James Lawson, ami his delircry to the Jailor of 
Mercer County, within tweUo months from ihe 
date hereof : 

— — . f.V TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I 

! | have heieunto set my hand anil caused 
I*. 8. j- tho seal of the Cominou wealth to bo 
j affixed. Done at Frankfort, Ihia, the 
— , — ’ 24th day of November. A. D. 1865. 
and in the 74th vear of the Commonwealth. 

THOS. E. BR.AMLETTK. 

By (he Governor. 

B. L V.iiwjKKLK, Sccretiiiy of State. 

By Ja.s. R. Page, .Issistant decretory. 
Nov. 24. 3toos. 



COUNTIN (HI 



FOR 



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19 20 21 22 23 
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SETTLEMENTS!! 

Everybody want, to mako out their bill., .nj 
everybody can gave a vast amount of labor by 
having nicely 

THE 

COMMONVY! ALTII OKKICK 

J O li ROOMS 

Turn out that da,, ol Hrinting io the highest style 
of tho art, and at the 

VERY i.OWEHT DRIUKtS 
LAW BOOKS AND BLANKS, 

FOR SALE 

AT COMMONWEALTH OFFICJs. 

BOOKS. 

MONhOK A HARLAN’S DIGEST OF THE DE 
CISIONS OF TUB COUR OF API’EALS, 

3 vol,. Price i]n i|jj 

REVISED ST A UTES OF KENTUCKY, 

1 vol. Price . (,« 

DEBATES OF THE CONVENTION, 

I vol. Price J 00 

GUIDE TO JUSTICES, CLERKS, SHERIFFS 
Ao., by John C. IlaaNDON, 

I vol. Price 4 99 

THE GENERAL ACTS of Session l855-fi. 

Pamphlet form. Price 1 00 

LOUGHBOROUGH'S DIGEST OF THE STAT- 
UTES, 

1 vol. Prioe 

BOOK AND JOl. PRINTING 

Vft are prepared to execute all kinds ol 

Book, Pamphlet, and Job Work, 

In tbe neatest and best style, on short notice, and 
as low as any office will do similar work. 

LAWYER’S BRIEFS 

Printed in the very be^t and Deataat manner, and 
on moderate terms. 

BL AiTkS. 

Clerks, Sheriffs, and all other kinds of Blanks, 
printed on short notice and moderate terms.. 

Louisville and Frankfort, and Lex- 
ini^ton and Frankfort Railroads 



O N AND AFTER MONDAY, OCTOBER 23, 
1865, Trains will leave as follows: 

No. 1-Leaves Louisville daily (exoept Sundays) 
at 6:00 A. M«, stopping at all stations except 
Fair Grounds, Race Course, Brownsboro and 
Belleview, connecting by stage at Frankfort fur 
Lawrenceburg, Harrodsburg and Danville, at 
Midway for Versailles, at Payne's for Georgetown, 
and at Lexington, by Rail and Stage, for Nich- 
olasville, Danville, Harrodsburg, Lancaster, 
Stanford, Richmond, Mt. Sterling, and all interior 
towns. Leaves Lexington at 2:00, P. M., and ar- 
rives at Louisville at 7:00, P. M. Connecting by 
stage at Payne's for Georgetown, at Midway for 
Versailles, and at Christianshurg for Shelby- 
ville. 

No. 2 — Leaves Louisville at 2:20 P. M. (Sun- 
days excepted), stopping at all stations except 
Fair Grounds, Race Course, Brownsboro, and 
North Benson; connecting at Christiansburg by 
stage for Shelby ville. Leaves Lexington at 6:15 
A. M. and arrives at Louisville at 11:15, A. 5i . 

No. 3 — Accommodation — Leaves Lagrange 
daily (Sundays excepted) at 7:00 A. M. and ar 
rives at Louisville at 8:45, A. M. Leaves Louis- 
ville at 4:20, P. M.; arrives at Lagrange at 6:00 
P. M. 

FREIGHT TRAINS leave Louisville nnd 
Lexington daily, Sundays Excepted. 

S.AM'L. GILL, Sup’t. 

Nov. 24. 

Kentucky Central Railroad! 

WINTER ARRANGEMENT 

1 805-ti. 



T he most direct route from the interior of Ken 
tucky, to all Eastern, Northern, and North- 
western Cities and Towns. Rut one change o/ 
caret 

TWO PASSENGER TRAINS 
Leave Lexington, daily, (Sundays excepted j rti 
5:30 A. u. and 1:15 p. x. 

Leave Covington, daily, (aSuudays exA*epled  nt 
A. X. and 1:50 p. x. 

ONH PASSENGER TRAIN 
Leaves Lexington for Nicholasville, daily, 
(Sundays excepted) nt 1 1 :30 a . x . 

Loaves Nioholsutville for Lexington, daily, 
(Sundays excepted) at 12:30 i*. u. 

Passengers can leave by tbe afternoon Tiain, 
and arrive at Pittsburg. Cleveland, Chicago, or 
St. Liiuis, early the next morning. Also at Cin 
cinnati, make connection with the Eastern Ex 
press Train at 8 and 10 p. x. 
for Supper at Cincinnati. 

Tho Morning Train arrives at Covington at 
11:00, giving time for bu.-iness in Cincinnati, and 
taking the evening trains for (udiauapi lis, Lalu- 
yette, Chicago, Springfield. Blooraiugton,(duinuy , 
Keokuk, St. Joseph, and Leavenworth. Ragynye 
checked through! Sleeping Cars by Night TreinsI 
For through tickets, apply ol the ofiices ol iLp 
Companvnt Nichol^viMe, fecxington, and I’nri*. 

11. V. HANSOM, 

Nov. 5, 1865 l» Urn’l Tick»'f A'/'ui 

SP.l.BC!!’ SCHOOL FOR ROYS 

Rrv. R. .S. IIITCIICOCK will re-uf.eu hii 
soliool Id the bjsemont of the Proshjrlorian Church 
on lha.2d Monday in SBl tcmber, 1805. 



The Frankfort commonwealth, 1865-12-26

4 pages, edition 01

 Persistent Link: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/catalog/xt7zs756fn04
 Local Identifier: frc1865122601
 JSON Metadata: https://kentuckynewspapers.org/papervault/frc/xt7zs756fn04.json
Location
  Published in Frankfort, Ky., Kentucky by Hodges, Todd & Pruett
   Franklin County (The Bluegrass Region)